Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
@m Amerika, América, Amérique, America, America
Diktionär, Diccionario, Dictionnaire, Dizionario, Dictionary

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Aukan-English Online Dictionary (Creole, Suriname)

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Aukan/English/AukanEngDictIndex.html


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Carib-English Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Carib/English/CaribEngDictIndex.html


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Saramaccan-English Dictionary (Creole, Suriname)

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Saramaccan/English/SaramEngDictIndex.html


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Saramaccan-English-Dutch Dictionary (Creole, Suriname)

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Saramaccan/National/SaramNLDictIndex.html


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Sranan-English Online Dictionary (Suriname)

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Sranan/English/SrananEngDictIndex.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/americas/suriname/Sranan/English/SrananEngLLIndex.html


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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
@m Amerika, América, Amérique, America, America
Diktionär, Diccionario, Dictionnaire, Dizionario, Dictionary

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Allsopp, Richard (Herausgeber)
Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage
With a French and Spanish Supplement

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/9766401454/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/9766401454/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/9766401454/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/9766401454/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/9766401454/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 776 Seiten
Verlag: University Press of the West Indies; Auflage: New Ed (Dezember 2003)
Sprache: Englisch


Amazon.com
Caribbean English is an exceptionally rich dialect, evocative and vivid. Take "bagabu", for instance, a fine word American and British English lack, referring to "dried nose mucus". "Day-clean" is a lovely word for "dawn". To be in "goat-heaven" is to "be in a state of bliss", but to have "goat-mouth" is a nasty business, similar to giving the evil eye. A "pissintail" is a "disrespectful young thing", while "piss-a-bed" merely refers to "wild coffee". A solid, scholarly work that fills an important reference niche, Allsopp's dictionary covers more than 20,000 words and phrases from "Guyana" to "the Bahamas" and "Belize". Even if you've no Caribbean ties, are conducting no Caribbean research, and planning no Caribbean vacation, the dictionary is worth the price solely for its grand browsing pleasure.
Stephanie Gold

Synopsis
The Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage is the first attempt for over four hundred years to provide an authentic record of current English from the Caribbean archipelago, "Guyana" and "Belize". Drawing its data from a broad range of enquiry through teacher workshops in 22 territories in 18 states, from speech recordings and over 1,000 written sources of Caribbean literature, reference works, magazines, pamphlets and newspapers, the Dictionary surveys a range of over 20,000 words and phrases and includes hundreds of illustrative citations. With a specially designed system of labeling, the Dictionary offers maximum levels of clarity and accessibility. Providing four levels of identification from Creole to Formal, and with labels to denote social or grammatical register, it also gives particular focus to Indic and French Creole loan-words. Etymological and Usage Notes are included, as well as a short supplement listing Caribbean French and Spanish equivalents to Caribbean English items selected from the main work.

Covering as it does a large number of independent and non-contiguous states, the Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage is not only an instrument of education wherever Caribbean people live in the world but also a unique contribution to international lexicography and the record of World English.


(E?)(L?) http://www.oed.com/newsletters/1997-01/dceu.html

January 1997 newsletter
How the "Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage" ("DCEU") came to be done
By S.R.R. Allsopp, Editor, Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage
As a West Indian student in England just after World War II, I rather prided myself not only on my spoken English - as all West Indians, at least of my generation, do - but also on my French accent, which happened to be often commended. It so happened that, at a French summer school in Nice in 1947, I translated 'il ne pleuvait plus' orally as 'the rain had held up', and was given a clear negative finger signal by my tutor. The next speaker said 'it had stopped raining' and was told to continue. I was stung, but further annoyed (with myself) when my English buddies after class sided with the tutor. My problem was that I had used a standard Guianese (East Caribbean) idiom which was not standard English. The difference lay in Caribbean English Usage. That was the beginning.
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