Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
AU Australien, Australia, Australie, Australia, Australia
Ort, Sitio, Lieu, Luogo, Place

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anps
Australian National Placenames Survey (ANPS)
Australian Placenames

(E1)(L1) http://www.anps.org.au/

The aim of the "Australian National Placenames Survey" ("ANPS") is to prepare a national register of geographical names. The National Register will be a supplement to the National Gazetteer, and will be a database constructed on recognised principles for the research and documentation of history, geography, linguistics, cultural knowledge, surveying and mapping. It will record all known Australian names, documenting their pronunciation, generic class, status (gazetted, obsolete, non-gazetted, sensitive, disputed etc.), origin, meaning, history, cultural significance (of both name and site), and map reference and location. The database will enable the production of a series of place name dictionaries, both local and national, over the next few decades.


(E1)(L1) http://www.anps.org.au/news.html
Wenn man an Ortsnamen und der damit verbundenen Geschichte Australiens interessiert ist, dann sollt man unbedingt diesen Nesletter abonnieren.


Newsletter
Placenames Australia is the newsletter of the "Australian National Placenames Survey". It began its life in March 1996 as the Bulletin of the then National Placenames Project, with Bill Noble as its editor. As the Project grew into the Australian National Placenames Survey more design features were added to the newsletter and the number of subscribers and contributors continues to grow steadily. It is now a free, quarterly publication and contains articles and short pieces about the cultural aspects of placenames and placename research in Australia. Feel free to browse through and print any of the available back issues below, using Adobe Acrobat.

Anyone interested can join the mailing list by completing the subscription form. This form can also be used to unsubscribe and to notify us if you have changed your postal address.


(E?)(L?) http://www.anps.org.au/subscribe.html
Leider findet man hier keine Liste der australischen Ortsnamen. Aber zumindest gibt es seit Dezember 2001 einen alle drei Monate erscheinenden Newsletter in PDF-Format mit interessanten Artikeln über die Forschung zur Benennung australischer Orte und "Plätze".
(Achtung: Die PDF-Dokumente sind gut 1MB groß.)

Placenames Australia (PDFs) June 2005 | March 2005 | December 2004 | September 2004 | June 2004 | March 2004 | December 2003 | September 2003 | June 2003 | March 2003 | December 2002 | September 2002 | June 2002 | March 2002 | December 2001

Ich habe den Newsletter vor einigen Monaten bestellt und habe nun bereits zwei Newsletter in Papierform erhalten. Der Newsletter vom September 2005 hatte z.B. 16 Seiten und viele interessante Artikel mit Hinweisen zu australischen Ortsnamen. Besonders interessant ist, dass sich hier Namensgebungen der Ureinwohner mit Bezeichnungen der europäischen Invasoren mischen und oftmals nicht mehr direkt erkennbar ist, woher sie ursprünglich stammen. Und nebenbei erhält man dann auch kleine Einblicke in die Sprachen des asiatisch-pazifischen Raums.

(E?)(L?) http://www.anps.org.au/about.html

"Placenames Australia" is the newsletter of the "Australian National Placenames Survey". It began its life in March 1996 as the Bulletin of the then National Placenames Project, with Bill Noble as its editor. As the Project grew into the Australian National Placenames Survey more design features were added to the newsletter and the number of subscribers and contributors continues to grow steadily. It is now a free, quarterly publication and contains articles and short pieces about the cultural aspects of placenames and placename research in Australia. Feel free to browse through and print any of the available back issues below, using Adobe Acrobat.
Anyone interested can join the mailing list by completing the subscription form. This form can also be used to unsubscribe and to notify us if you have changed your postal address.



The aim of the Australian National Placenames Survey (ANPS) is to prepare a national register of geographical names. The National Register will be a supplement to the National Gazetteer, and will be a database constructed on recognised principles for the research and documentation of history, geography, linguistics, cultural knowledge, surveying and mapping. It will record all known Australian names, documenting their pronunciation, generic class, status (gazetted, obsolete, non-gazetted, sensitive, disputed etc.), origin, meaning, history, cultural significance (of both name and site), and map reference and location. The database will enable the production of a series of place name dictionaries, both local and national, over the next few decades.

The project will have important beneficial effects not only on the cultural aspect of geographical names but also on the technical aspects of government function (such as efficiency in communications, transport and defence). The project involves support from government agencies, academic institutions and individuals. A national structure is being put into place to implement the project, ensuring effective representation of interested parties at national, state and local levels.


(E?)(L?) http://www.anps.org.au/resources.html
Auf dieser Seite findet man viele Links zu Sites, die sich ebenfalls mit australischen Ortsnamen und lokalen Sprachen in Australien befassen.

Australia and NZ placenames websites

We link you here to the naming authorities in Australia and New Zealand. These organizations have strongly supported the development of the ANPS and we are working in partnership with them to cover the cultural as well as the technical aspects of placenames.

Australian Indigenous languages websites

One of the tasks of the ANPS will be to record the language of Indigenous placenames and, where possible, the language of placenames of Indigenous origin. The following websites are a good starting point for anyone interested in these placenames. However, research about the origin and meaning of these placenames requires linguistic and cultural expertise. It is an area of research in which the ANPS will co-operate with and be advised by Indigenous people and communities. International websites

The links below are to placenames bodies in other English-speaking countries, each of which has been very supportive of the development of the ANPS and has provided the ANPS with advice and encouragement. National Library of Australia - gazetteers of Australia and the world

The link below is to a list of gazetteers maintained by staff in the mapping section of the National Library of Australia. The National Library provides a much longer, more comprehensive list of placenames websites than we have listed on our 'Resources' page. It also lists placenames books and dictionaries, published and unpublished gazetteers, which you can use at the National Library or perhaps find in a public library near where you live. Historical Association websites Research Friends downloads

The items below are available for Research Friends to download:

Ayers Rock
Ayers (W3)

Der "Ayers Rock" trägt den Namen von "Sir Henry Ayers", der 1873 Premierminister von Südaustralien war.
Der Name "Ayers" geht zurück auf altengl. "eir", "eyr" = "heir" = "Erbe", "Nachfolger", im weitestens Sinn also "Sohn", "heir to the throne" = "Thronfolger".

"Ayers" is a patronymic version of the surname "Ayer", an English Nickname for the man who was well known to be the heir to a title or fortune, from the Middle English word "eir", "eyr" = "heir". Variants include "Ayr", "Ayre", "Eyer", "Eyre", "Hayer", "Heyer", among others.

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CGNA (W3)

"CGNA" steht für "Committee for Geographical Names in Australia".

(E?)(L?) http://www.icsm.gov.au/icsm/cgna/index.html

We all use place names everyday to describe our surroundings, where we’re going or where we’ve been.

Rivers, mountains, plains, towns, suburbs, reefs, shoals and undersea features all have names. Whether they are of national or international importance or known only to a handful of people, names connect places to their local communities and often reflect our heritage and culture.

New Zealand and each Australian state and territory - including our Antarctic areas of interest - have a place name registrar, naming board or committee for approving or registering names. However it is the "Committee for Geographical Names of Australasia" ("CGNA") that coordinates place-naming activities across Australia and New Zealand.

CGNA Brochure
CGNA has produced an informative brochure on place naming in Australia and New Zealand. Significantly, it outlines the achievements of CGNA in ensuring the integrity of place names.


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ga
Geoscience Australia
Place Name Search

(E?)(L?) http://www.ga.gov.au/map/names/


gov
Geoscience Australia Place Name Search

(E?)(L?) http://www.ga.gov.au/


(E?)(L?) http://www.ga.gov.au/map/names/


(E?)(L?) http://www.ga.gov.au/about/corporate/ga_authors/publications_free.jsp
Publications for free download
These Publications by Geoscience Australia staff are available under the Australian Government's spatial data policy. Downloading these products is free.
Geoscience Australia Records

gov
ICSM - Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping

(E?)(L?) http://www.icsm.gov.au/icsm/


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ICSM (W3)

"ICSM" steht für "INTERGOVERNMENTAL COMMITTEE ON SURVEYING & MAPPING"

(E?)(L?) http://www.icsm.gov.au/icsm/

ICSM's role is to provide leadership, coordination and standards for surveying, mapping/charting and national framework datasets.

The Intergovernmental Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) was established by the Prime Minister, State Premiers, and the Chief Minister of the Northern Territory in 1988. Since that time the Australian Capital Territory and New Zealand have joined ICSM. The Australian Defence forces are also represented on ICSM.

Membership is comprised of senior representatives of surveying and mapping agencies.

Prior to 1988 a similar body, the "National Mapping Council" ("NMC"), had coordinated cooperative Commonwealth, State and Northern Territory mapping programs since 1945. Although the NMC had been an effective forum, the changing operational environment of the late 1980s led to the cessation of the NMC and the formation of ICSM to cover both surveying and mapping issues, as they related to Government activities, to ensure continued cooperation in these activities on a national basis.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.icsm.gov.au/icsm/publications/ACRONYMS_and_JARGON.pdf
ICSM ACRONYMS and JARGON

(E?)(L?) http://www.icsm.gov.au/icsm/cgna/glossary_pnames.pdf
TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Moent, Dubbelde Ree (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.anps.org.au/documents/GeogRes.pdf

Geographic and Linguistic Reflections on "Moent" and "Dubbelde Ree": Two of Australia’s First Recorded Placenames
JAN TENT
Department of Linguistics, Division of Linguistics and Psychology, Macquarie University, NSW 2109, Australia. Email: jan.tent@mq.edu.au
Received 30 August 2005; Revised 3 May 2006; Accepted 3 August 2006
Abstract
The year 2006 marks the quatercentenary of the first known European charting of any part of the Australian coastline, when the Dutch mariner Willem Janszoon explored 300 kms of the north-west coast of Cape York Peninsula. He bestowed seven placenames, two of which, "Moent" and "Dubbelde Ree" have ambiguous meanings or referents. This paper attempts to resolve the enigmas behind these names by considering geographic, linguistic and historical evidence.

"Moent" is particularly challenging, with several possible linguistic sources, some more plausible than others. The most compelling evidence points to it either referring to the western entrance to Endeavour Strait, or a Dutch rendition of an Indigenous Australian word.

"Dubbelde Ree" is less problematic. The issue surrounding this name is whether its second element is meant to be "Ree", an abbreviation of "Reede" ("Roadstead"), or "Rev", an abbreviation of "Revier" ("River"). The search for the meaning of these placenames has provided credible evidence demonstrating that Janszoon explored the coastline in greater detail than has hitherto been thought, and that, in all likelihood, made contact with the local inhabitants.
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onomastik.com
Die deutschen Ortsnamen in Australien

(E?)(L?) http://www.onomastik.com/magazin/die-deutschen-ortsnamen-australien.php

Die deutschen Ortsnamen in Australien mit besonderer Berücksichtigung Queenslands
Thomas Liebecke

Als vor gut zweihundert Jahren die Europäer begannen, Australien zu besiedeln, kamen auch Tausende Deutsche auf den Kontinent.
Sie beeinflußten die Entwicklung der jungen Kolonien nachhaltig - davon zeugen nicht zuletzt auch Ortsnamen wie Bismark, Dresden, Heidelberg oder Marburg.
Der folgende Text gibt Aufschluss darüber, wie die Deutschen und ihre Namen nach Australien kamen.
Wem der ganze Text zu lang ist, der kann sich zum Einstieg die Liste deutscher Ortsnamen in Südaustralien oder Queensland anschauen.
Der Text basiert auf einer Magisterarbeit im Studiengang Namenkunde, Universität Leipzig, 2003, wurde leicht editiert und um etwa 25 Prozent gekürzt.
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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
AU Australien, Australia, Australie, Australia, Australia
Ort, Sitio, Lieu, Luogo, Place

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Hercus, Luise
The Land Is a Map
Placenames of Indigenous Origin in Australia

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1740760204/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1740760204/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1740760204/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1740760204/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1740760204/etymologpor09-20
Placenames of Indigenous Origin in Australia
by Luise Hercus, Flavia Hodges, Jane Simpson
Paperback: 328 pages
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (January 2002)
Language: English


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The entire Australian continent was once covered with networks of Indigenous placenames. These names often evoke important information about features of the environment and their place in Indigenous systems of knowledge. On the other hand, placenames assigned by European settlers and officials are largely arbitrary, except for occassional descriptive labels such as "river", "lake", "mountain". They typically commemorate people, or unrelated places in the Northern Hemisphere.

In areas where Indigenous societies remain relatively intact, thousands of Indigenous placenames are used but have no official recognition. Little is known about any variation in principles of placename bestowal found in different Indigenous groups. While many Indigenous placenames have been taken into the official placename system, they are often given to different features from those which they originally applied to. In the process, they have been cut off from any understanding of their original meanings. Attempts are now being made to ensure that additions of Indigenous placenames to the system of official placenames more accurately reflect the traditions they come from.

This book ranges across all these issues. The contributors bring a wide range of different experiences, both academic and practical, to their contributions. The book promises to be a standard reference work on Indigenous placenames in Australia for many years to come.

The Land is a Map was launched in Canberra on 5 December 2002 at the Australian Placenames Colloquium. The publisher's description and purchasing details for the book may be found at the relevant page on the Pandanus Books website.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.anps.org.au/publications.html

PANDANUS BOOKS
Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
The Australian National University
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