Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
CN China, China, Chine, Cina, China
Region, Región, Région, Regione, Region

Regierungsunmittelbare Städte
Shanghai, Chang-hai, Shanghai
(Shanghai)

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Big Lychee (W3)

(E3)(L1) http://www.barrypopik.com/article/993/summary
"Hong Kong" and "Shanghai" are sometimes called the "Big Lychee". It was recently voted down as an official Hong Kong nickname, but it still might be used.
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ids-mannheim
Schanghai

(E6)(L3) http://www.ids-mannheim.de/kt/30000wordforms.dat
Schanghai gehört(e) zu den 30.000 häufigst benutzten deutschen Wörtern.

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Schanghai (W3)

(E6)(L3) http://www.stofflexikon.com/schanghai/894/schanghai.html
Leider erklärt das "Stoff-Lexikon" nicht, warum "Schanghai" als "warenkundliche Bezeichnung für ein leinwandbindiges DOB-Gewebe aus Tussahseide" benutzt wird.

Shanghai (W3)

Der Name der Stadt "Shanghai" setzt sich zusammen aus chin. "Shang" = dt. "auf", "über" und "hai" = dt. "Meer" und heißt also wörtlich dt. "Auf dem Meer".

Die in "Shanghai" gehäuft praktizierte Anheuerung betrunkener Matrosen führte zur Entstehung des Verbs engl. "to shanghai" = dt. "gewaltsam anheuern".

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://www.citypopulation.de/China-Shanghai.html

Table of Urban Areas: Chongming | Fengxian | Jiading | Jinshan | Nanhui | Qingpu | Shanghai City | Songjiang


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://geography.howstuffworks.com/asia/geography-of-shanghai.htm
Geography of Shanghai

(E?)(L?) http://www.lexi-tv.de/themen/staedte/shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://www.moviemaze.de/filme/3033/shanghai.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=188


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://www.signe-chinois.com/shanghai.php

Découverte de Shanghai : ville du futur

Shanghai, métropole internationale dynamique et bouillonnante, accueille des voyageurs venant du monde entier apprécier son atmosphère spéciale. Cette métropole moderne avec son riche héritage de culture chinoise antique donne beaucoup à voir et à faire.

La Perle d'Orient (tour TV)

La Perle d'Orient est le symbole moderne de la ville de Shanghai. Se tenant près du fleuve de Huangpu avec une taille de 468 mètres, c'est la tour antenne la plus grande en Asie et la troisième plus haute au monde. Cette structure peu commune qui domine l'horizon est une grande attraction pour les touristes.
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(E2)(L1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai

The two characters in the name "Shanghai" literally mean "up" / "above" and "sea". The earliest occurrence of this name dates from the Song Dynasty, at which time there was already a river confluence and a town called "Shanghai" in the area. It is unclear how the name originated or how its meaning should be interpreted, though a literal reading suggests the sense "onto the sea".

In Chinese, Shanghai's abbreviations are "Hù" and "Shen".

The city has had various nicknames in English, including "Paris of the East", "Queen of the Orient" (or "Pearl of the Orient"), and even "The Whore of Asia" (a reference to corruption in the 1920s and 1930s, including vice, drugs and prostitution.)


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2005-11-Nov.htm


Erstellt: 2010-02

shanghai, shanghaied (W2)

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=188


(E3)(L1) http://owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=1122


(E?)(L?) http://spotlightongames.com/quote/chinesewords.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW129/page2.html#shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW131/page4.html#shanghai


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0996


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/wotd.pl?word=shanghai

... the verb "shanghai" originated in San Francisco. ... During the gold rush years that started in 1849, sailing ships poured into San Francisco from all over the world, bearing fortune-seekers as well as supplies for the mines and the teeming boomtown. With the gold fields so tantalizingly close, thousands of sailors jumped ship to join the stampede, leaving hundreds of vessels abandoned at the docks and in the harbor. Desperate captains were willing to pay a bounty for able-bodied men who could help get their abandoned ships back on the profitable trade routes. Barbary Coast saloonkeepers, innkeepers, and proprietors of Chinese opium dens were quick to cash in on this demand, rowing out to waiting ships with their drugged victims who would be hoisted aboard - only to wake up once the ship was clear of the Golden Gate and on its way to ... Shanghai.
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In the 1800s, when long sea voyages were very difficult and dangerous, people were understandably hesitant to become sailors. But sea captains and shipping companies still needed crews to sail their ships, so they gathered sailors any way they could - even if that meant kidnapping.

The word "shanghai" comes from the name of the Chinese city of "Shanghai". People started to use the city's name for the unfair way of obtaining sailors because the East was often a destination of ships that had kidnapped men for their crew.



... place name to become a verb; however, "Shanghaied" has been known since about 1870, at first in the sense of drugging and kidnapping a person to make up the crew numbers on a ship, but now more generally to be forced into doing something against one's will.


Shanghai clique (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_Clique
The "Shanghai clique" is an informal name for officials in the central government of the People's Republic of China who rose to prominence in the "Shanghai" city administration under Jiang Zemin and was used somewhat pejoratively to describe Jiang's efforts to promote people associated with Shanghai.
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Shanghai Princess - Rose

(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/browse.lasso

Shanghai Princess lp Light Pink, Hyb. China (OGR) 1993


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=5709


Shanghai Sign Language - Language of CN

(E3)(L1) http://www.ethnologue.com/show_language.asp?code=csl


Shanghai woman (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_woman

"Shanghai woman" is an English expression for a "prostitute", but it has a far more complex and interesting history than most such expressions. It was, when used in this way, a colonial and racist term that deliberately did not recognize the extremely long courtesan tradition of performers, artists, acrobats, and even diplomats, who wielded real power in mainland China, in all previous dynasties. See "Shanghai courtesan".

During British Empire colonial occupation of "Shanghai" and Hong Kong in China, many Royal Navy sailors were stationed there. It was an "open city" that by the 1930s included Tsarist Russians, European Jews, and traders of all kinds. People from all over China came there fleeing situations elsewhere. Due in part to the Chinese Exclusion Act, many destitute women were forced into "prostitution", and worse.
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schanghaien (W3)

Wenn die Handelsschifffahrt nicht genügend Matrosen hatten, haben die Kapitäne mit Kneipen und auch mit Bordellen gegen Vergütung vereinbart, dass junge Männer betrunken gemacht und dann als Matrosen für die Schiffe verpflichtet wurden. Besonders hervorgetan hat sich mit dieser Methode die Hafenstadt Schanghai in China.

(E?)(L?) http://www.grosse-seefahrt.de/modules.php?name=Encyclopedia&op=list_content&eid=1

schanghaien


(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/pls/db/p4_suche_elex.Stichw_alpha?v_Buchst=S

schanghaien


(E3)(L1) http://www.redensarten-index.de/register/s.php


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=schanghaien
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "schanghaien" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2015-11

SHANGHAIINGS (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words2.html
"INTESTINES" has each of its letters occurring twice. Some other such words:

ANTIPERSPIRANTES, APPEASES, ARRAIGNING, BERIBERI, CAUCASUS, CHOWCHOW, CICADELLIDAE, CONCISIONS, COUSCOUS, ESOPHAGOGRAPHERS, FROUFROU, GENSENGS, GREEGREE, GUITGUIT, HAPPENCHANCE, HORSESHOER, HOTSHOTS, INACCIDENTATED, JIPIJAPA, MAHIMAHI, MESOSOME, MILLIEME, MIMETITE, RAPPAREE, REAPPEAR, SCINTILLESCENT, SHAMMASH, , SIGNINGS, TAENIODONTIDAE,

Shanghainese (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.omniglot.com/links/courses.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.omniglot.com/links/dictionaries.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.omniglot.com/writing/shanghainese.htm

Shanghainese is a dialect of Wu spoken by about 15 million people in Shanghai. There are also many Shanghainese speakers in Hong Kong. There is no standard written form of Shanghainese and it rarely appears in writing. Though the language is the everyday spoken language of Shanghai, it isn't used in education and is only occasionally heard on local radio stations.
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Shanghais (W3)

(E3)(L2) http://bdb.co.za/shackle/archives/archive_0304.htm#shanghais


(E3)(L2) http://bdb.co.za/shackle/articles/shanghais.htm

When I was a schoolboy in New Zealand in the 1930s, my mates and I made "shanghais" (small catapults) from Y-shaped tree branches and pieces of car inner tubes, and fired them with devastating effect (until our parents discovered these lethal weapons, and confiscated them). A good marksman could kill a rabbit by day or hit a street light or a neighbour's milk bottle at night from a range of 100 yards or more. Shanghais have been popular with teenagers and a menace to their elders for generations.


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