Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
GS Südgeorgien und die Südlichen Sandwichinseln, Islas Georgias del Sur y Sandwich del Sur, Géorgie du Sud-et-les Îles Sandwich du Sud, Georgia del Sud e isole Sandwich meridionali, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
Süd-Sandwich-Inseln, Sandwich del Sur, Îles Sandwich du Sud, Isole Sandwich meridionali, South Sandwich Islands

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B

Beltbuster sandwich (W3)

Aus der Bezeichnung "Beltbuster" = dt. "Gürtelkracher" kann man Rückschlüsse auf die Größe des Sandwiches ziehen.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0609B&L=ADS-L&P=R10951&1=ADS-L&9=A&I=-3&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

Beltbuster sandwich
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Texas Dairy Queens have offered a "beltbuster sandwich" since 1971.
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Erstellt: 2014-07

C

Candwich (W3)

"Candwich" is a "sandwich in a can".

(E?)(L?) http://www.avclub.com/article/candwich-sandwich-in-a-can-57693

Candwich sandwich-in-a-can


(E?)(L?) http://eater.com/archives/2010/07/08/the-candwich-a-sandwich-in-a-can.php

The Candwich: A Sandwich in a Can


(E?)(L?) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/07/08/candwich-canned-sandwich_n_640004.html

Candwich Financier Sued For Fraud (ALSO: Canned Sandwiches Exist)


(E?)(L?) http://markonefoods.com/

"Candwich"TM, the official "Sandwich in a Can", is the perfect food, lunch or snack for people on the go.
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(E?)(L?) http://metro.co.uk/2011/05/31/candwich-sandwich-in-a-can-goes-on-sale-28885/

Finally, a sandwich in a can: Check out the Candwich


(E?)(L?) http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/10/15/162941928/sandwich-monday-the-candwich

Sandwich Monday: The Candwich


(E?)(L?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QbuQS5dNRE

Candwich PBJ


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Candwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Candwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Cannibal Sandwich (W3)

Um 1900 kam die Bezeichnung "cannibal sandwich" auf. "Cannibal Sandwich" bezeichnete anscheinend ein Sandwich mit Hackfleisch, "beefsteak tartar".

Eine Beschreibung lautete:

Put half a pound of raw beef thru a meat chopper; add a teaspoonful of salt, a dash of red pepper and a tablespoonful of onion juice. Spread this over buttered rye bread, cover with another piece of bread and trim away the crusts.

Erste Nennungen findet man in der Baltimore (MD) "Sun" vom 03 Januar 1889, supplement, pg. 2:

"The horrid thing," they both faintly gasped, and the German chorister took his departure and his friend along, shaking out the delightful aroma of cannibal sandwiches as he passed down the aisle.

Und am 20 November 1899 im Philadelphia (PA) Inquirer, pg. 8:

"Bring us a couple of cannibal sandwiches," said the friend to the waiter. "And don't put any onions in." It sounded rather guessable and the Saunterer waited in apprehensive silence. Presently the waiter returned with the sandwich. It consisted of two slices of bread about nine inches long and five in width buttered a quarter of an inch thick. One of the slices was covered by a half-inch layer of red meat minced. Both started to eat, but after the Saunterer had gulped down four mouthfuls through a face that was painful in its efforts to smile he demanded emphatically to know what it was.
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"Well, it's made of raw beef, chopped very fine, and it's very good for you. See, they're eating them all around us." and they were, so the Saunterer worked at his a little while longer. The sandwich fully lived up to its reputation. For the Saunterer hasn't really felt hungry since.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0710A&L=ADS-L&P=R7536&1=ADS-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

Subject: Cannibal Sandwich (1889) ("hamburgers in the raw")


OED has no entry for "cannibal sandwich," a somewhat popular item in the early 1900s.
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(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0710A&L=ADS-L&P=R7251&1=ADS-L&9=A&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

Subject: Double Decker, Cannibal Sandwiches (1891); Roast Beef a la Astor House (1893); Bowery Lingo (1899)
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... and cannibal - The latter meaning a raw beef sandwich, being especially adapted to prize-fighters, and so forth.
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Cannibal Sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Cannibal Sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Cemita sandwich (W3)

Das "Cemita sandwich" basiert auf einem mit Sesam bestreuten Brot. Die Bezeichnung span. "cemita" geht zurück auf span. "acemite" = dt. "Kleie", "Kleienmehl". Dieses geht weiter zurück auf eine aramäische Bezeichnung die mit griech. "semídalis" = engl. "semolina" = dt. "Grieß", "Grießmehl" verwandt ist.

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cemita

Alternative names: "Cemita poblana"
Place of origin: Mexico
Region or state: Puebla

The cemita is a sandwich originally from Puebla, Mexico. The name can refer to the bread roll it is served on as well.

The "cemita", also known as "cemita poblana", derives from the city (and region) of "Puebla". The word refers to the sandwich as well as to the roll it is typically served on, a bread roll covered with sesame seeds. The bread is made with egg, and resembles brioche. Additionally, the ingredients usually are restricted to sliced avocado, meat, white cheese, onions, the herb pápalo and red sauce (salsa roja). In modern times it has appeared on the streets of New York, Los Angeles, and other cities with Mexican food vendors.

The most popular meat in a cemita is beef milanesa, a thinly pounded and deep-fried piece of beef. Cueritos (pickled pig skin), queso de puerco (pork head cheese), and carnitas (stewed pork) are also popular. The cheese is often panela, a bland white cheese with the consistency of fresh mozzarella. Quesillo, a Mexican string cheese, is also used.

Although the name is the same, there are diverse types of cemitas depending on the region. The cemita of Sahuayo, Michoacán, is a smooth bread, without sesame seeds and including piloncillo. Its flavor is somewhat sweet and very flavorful; usually it is accompanied by a glass of milk, a corn flour drink (atole), or some sort of hot drink. It is not used like a sandwich.

Name

The Real Academia Española says "cemita" comes from "acemite" (archaic Spanish for "bran") which in turn comes from Aramaic, and is related to Greek "semídalis" ("semolina").
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Cemita sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Cemita sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

chicken sandwich (W3)

Auf dem engl. "chicken sandwich" findet man Hähnchenfleisch.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

chicken sandwiches (fast food).....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#chickensandwich

Chicken sandwiches (fast food)

While recipes for breaded, fried, boneless chicken descend from Old World recipes (think: wiener schnitzel), S. Truett Cathy's Atlanta-based Chick-Fil-A is generally credited for introducing "chicken sandwiches" to the fast food world. They may (or may not) have been the first food restaurant to make a chicken sandwich. They were, however, the first to capitalize on it. In the American land of hamburgers & hot dogs, this was a pretty daring and brilliant move.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=chicken sandwich

chicken sandwich


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=chicken sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "chicken sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1860 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Chihuahua Sandwich (W3)

Chihuahua ein Bundesstaat, mit der Hauptstadt "Chihuahua", in Nordmexiko ist der größte Bundesstaat Mexikos. Nach diesem mexikanischen Staat wurde aber auch ein kleiner Hund mit Fledermausohren benannt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/texas/entry/chihuahua_sandwich/

Entry from June 25, 2007

Chihuahua Sandwich

The Chihuahua Sandwich was created by R. A. “Skeet” Noret and his wife, Sarah, at the Sky-Vue Drive In at Lamesa, Texas. The sandwich — no chihuahuas are included — contains chili, cabbage, onions, and pimento cheese in corn tostada shells.
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(E?)(L?) http://mattiasa.blogspot.de/2010/01/pet-chihuahua.html

the Pet chihuahua


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

"Chihuahua"

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (18 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

Club sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

---1903---U.S. Senate Bean Soup & Club sandwiches


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

club sandwich.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#club

Most food historians agree that the "club sandwich" was probably created in the United States during the late 19th/early 20th century. The where & who behind this classic sandwich remains a matter of culinary debate. The most popular theory contends this sandwich originated in men's social clubs, most notably the Saratoga Club in Saratoga, NY.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Club_sandwich

A "club sandwich", also called a "clubhouse sandwich", is a sandwich with toasted bread.[citation needed] It is often cut into quarters and held together by hors d'œuvre sticks. It frequently has two layers which are separated by an additional slice of bread.
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One popular theory is that the club sandwich was invented in an exclusive Saratoga Springs, New York, gambling club in the late 19th century.
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Club sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Club sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Clubsandwich (W3)

Das "Clubsandwich" soll Ende des 19. Jh. in dem Spielclub Saratoga Springs, New York, kreiert worden sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/clubsandwich


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Clubsandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

"Clubsandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

club-sandwich generation (W3)

Die engl. "club-sandwich generation" muss sich nicht nur um die Kinder und die Eltern, sondern auch noch um die Großeltern kümmern. Die Bezeichnung spielt auf den den dreifachen engl. "club sandwich" (a triple-decker sandwich) an.

(E?)(L?) http://www.abc.net.au/newsradio/txt/s1412581.htm

Club-sandwich generation

You've often heard of "baby boomers", "baby busters" and "generation X" or "generation Y" - but what about the club-sandwich generation.
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A study in the United States suggests that as many as 11% of those Americans over the age of 50 are members of the club-sandwich generation – taking on obligations to the generation above them, and then next two layers following. This is more than just a word or an expression – it’s possibly also a snapshot of one of the ways in which the modern world is changing.


(E2)(L1) http://www.wordspy.com/archives/C.asp

club-sandwich generation

n. People who provide care for their parents, children, and grandchildren.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=club-sandwich generation
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "club-sandwich generation" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

companion (W3)

Engl. "companion" = dt. "Kamerad", "Genosse" setzt sich zusammen aus lat. "com" = dt. "mit", "zusammen", "gemeinsam" und lat. "panis" = dt. "Brot" (mlat. "companio" = dt. "Brotgenosse", "Gefährte"). Die engl. "companions" sind also bereit ihr Brot miteinander zu teilen. Engl. "companion" findet man in schriftlicher Form seit dem 13. Jh.

Das Adjektiv engl. "companionable" = engl. "marked by", "conducive to", "sociable" findet man schriftlich seit dem 14. Jh.

Über altfrz. "compain" = dt. "Genosse" wurde dt. "Kumpan" (mhd. "kompan", "kumpan") = dt. "Kamerad", "Begleiter", "Genosse" vermittelt. Über ein verstümmeltes dt. "kumpe" entstand im 20. Jh. (im rheinisch-westfälischen Bergbau) die Verkleinerungsform dt. "Kumpel" = dt. "Arbeitskamerad", "Bergmann". Der "Kumpel" wurde später in die Soldatensprache übernommen und allgemein verbreitet. Ebenfalls im militärischen Umfeld findet man auch dt. "Kompagnon" und "Kompanie".

Weiter Verwandte von lat. "panis" sind dt. "panieren", frz. "pain" = dt. "Brot", engl. "pantry" = dt. "Vorratskammer", "Speiseschrank", engl. "pannier" = dt. "Korb" ("Essenträger"), engl. "panettone" = dt. "Hefenapfkuchen", engl. "company" = dt. "Gesellschaft", "Firma" (und damit auch die Abkürzung frz., engl. "Co."). Auch engl. "food" = dt. "Essen", "Kost", "Nahrung" ist über gemeinsame Ahnen mit lat. "panis" verwandt.

Entsprechend findet man in dieser Wortfamilie auch dt. "Futter", das mit mhd. "vuoter", ahd. "fuotar", niederl. "voeder", engl. "fodder", schwed. "foder" zurück geht auf ein germanisches Wort aus dem auch mhd. "vuoten", ahd. "fuottan", got. "fodjan", engl. "to feed", schwed. "föda" = dt. "nähren" hervorgingen. Als Wurzel wird ide. "*pa-", "*pa-t-" = dt. "füttern", "nähren", "weiden" postuliert. Hierzu gehören auch griech. "pateisthai" = dt. "essen und trinken" und lat. "pascere" = dt. "weiden lassen", "füttern".



companioncube:



(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080510203827/http://www.bartleby.com/61/20/C0522000.html

companion


(E?)(L?) http://mattiasa.blogspot.de/2011/05/flying-companions.html

Flying companions


(E?)(L?) http://mattiasa.blogspot.de/2008/06/companions.html

Companions


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=companion

companion (n.)

c.1300, from Old French "compagnon" "fellow", "mate", "friend", "partner" (12c.), from Late Latin "companionem" (nominative "companio"), literally "bread fellow", "messmate", from Latin "com-" "with" (see "com-") + "panis" "bread" (see "food").

Found first in 6c. Frankish Lex Salica, and probably a translation of a Germanic word (compare Gothic "gahlaiba" "messmate," from "hlaib" "loaf of bread"). Replaced Old English "gefera" "traveling companion", from "faran" "go", "fare".


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=food

food (n.)

Old English "foda" "food", "nourishment", "fuel", also figurative, from Proto-Germanic "*fodon" (cognates: Gothic "fodeins"), from Germanic root "*fod-", equivalent of PIE "*pa-" "to tend", "keep", "pasture", "to protect", "to guard", "to feed" (cognates: Greek "pateisthai" "to feed"; Latin "pabulum" "food", "fodder", "panis" "bread", "pasci" "to feed", "pascare" "to graze", "pasture", "feed", "pastor" "shepherd", literally "feeder"; Avestan "pitu-" "food"; Old Church Slavonic "pasti" "feed cattle", "pasture"; Russian "pishcha" "food").

"Food chain" is from 1917. "Food poisoning" attested by 1864; "food processor" in the kitchen appliance sense from 1973.


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/06/lord-and-lady-panivorous.html

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"companion" is "someone you eat bread with" in the same way that a "mate" is "somebody who shares your meat".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/word/digital-shopping-companion.php

digital shopping companion


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/C

companion | companionate love | gentleman's companions | woman's home companion


(E?)(L?) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/#companion

Companion; Compañero (Spanish); Copain (French) Companion


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=companion
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "companion" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Coney Island Sandwich (W3)

Das "Coney Island Sandwich" wurde wohl im Jahr 1892 erstmals schriftlich erwähnt.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

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A "Coney Island Sandwich" of chicken, ham, or beef? Would a "beef sandwich" be a "hamburger"?
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15 November 1887, Bismarck (ND) Daily Tribune, pg. 4: For dinner she has probably consumed the second or third quart of beer since morning and a "Frankfurter sausage sandwich".
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The island has been reached; the crowd is pushing and scrambling to get off; it is a case of every man take care of his own girl, or she will have the wind knocked out of her; so the various girls are grabbed by the elbow and pranced along as if they were bicycles, by which the owner was walking. The first thing to do is to get something to eat. The charm of a "Coney Island sandwich" is that it is the same yesterday, today and forever. It has no infinite variety, and all the custom in the world couldn't stale it. It consists of two hunks of bread with a vicious lump of something (called butter) planted in the centre of each; over this grows something the size of a postage stamp, which may be chicken, ham or beef; then comes a flood of mustard. In eating one, you have to make up your mind to go in for a regular scrap, and unless you have been going through a course of training with your dentist the sandwich comes out first and you are left. It has been described as being a set to between the material and the spiritual, and the material gets the better of it. If you can eat a sandwich, which is as much as to say if you are the woman with the iron jaw, then you realize why so much mustard is used - it's to give you a thirst, for from that point right straight around the island, you have a consuming desire to drink anything from milk or lemonade to beer and champagne. After this you buy a strong of popcorn, or a bag of peanuts, and keep them to return to when you can't get anything else to eat.
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LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (9 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

Coon's Posterior Sandwich (W3)

"Coon's Posterior Sandwich"

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/coonass_coon_ass/

Coonass (Coon-ass)

"Coonass" (or "coon-ass") is a term used to describe "Cajuns". The term is used especially in Lousiana and in the parts of Texas with a strong Louisiana influence (such as Port Arthur). Port Arthur’s French Market served a "coonass sandwich" in the 1960s and 1970s.

Some Cajuns used "coon" and "coonass" as terms of endearment, but it can be a strong insult when used by a non-Cajun. Some etymologists derive the term "coonass" from French slang; "coon" has long been in slang use for "black Americans". "Coonass" is first recorded in print in the 1940s.
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(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (4 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

Cuban sandwich (W3)

"Cuban sandwich" wird in Florida nach dem Land "Cuba" benannt.

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_sandwich

History

As with "Cuban bread", the origin of the "Cuban sandwich" (sometimes called a "Cuban mix", a "mixto", a "Cuban pressed sandwich", or a "Cubano") is murky and somewhat intriguing. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, travel between Cuba and Florida was easy, especially from Key West and Tampa, and Cubans frequently sailed back and forth for employment, pleasure, and family visits. Because of this constant and largely undocumented movement of people and culture and ideas, it's impossible to say exactly when or where the Cuban sandwich originated.

It is believed by some that the sandwich was a common lunch food for workers in both the cigar factories and sugar mills of Cuba (especially in big cities such as Havana or Santiago de Cuba) and the cigar factories of Key West by the 1860s. Historian Loy Glenn Westfall states that the sandwich was "born in Cuba and educated in Key West".

The cigar industry in Florida shifted to Tampa in the 1880s and the sandwich quickly appeared in workers' cafés in Ybor City and (later) West Tampa, leading other historians to theorize that the sandwich as now constituted first appeared there Historian Andrew Huse states that "the old 'mixtos' coalesced into something more distinct – the Cuban sandwiches we know and love – an original Tampa creation."

By the 1960s, "Cuban sandwiches" were also common on Miami cafeteria and restaurant menus, as the city had gained a large influx of Cuban residents after Fidel Castro's 1959 rise to power in their native land. The Communist Revolution caused a wave of Cuban expatriates to settle in other locations as well, and they brought their culture and cuisine with them. Cuban sandwiches and variations thereof are now served in various Cuban exile communities in places such as New York, New Jersey, Chicago, and Puerto Rico, among others.
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Erstellt: 2014-07

D

Dagwood sandwich (W3)

Die Bezeichnung "Dagwood" geht auf eine Comicfigur zurück. Der Sandwich wurde mit allem gefüllt, was der Kühlschrank hergab.

Der Cartoonist Murat Bernard Young ("Chic Young", 09. Januar 1901) schuf 1930 den Comic Strip "Blondie". Die Hauptfigur war eine alberne 20-jährige, deren Liebhaber, "Dagwood", war ein Milliardärssohn, der eine ausschweifendes Leben führte. In der Comicserie ging es um Spaß und Spiel. Während der großen Depression ließ Chic Young seine Comicfiguren Blondie und Dagwood ebenfalls in um ihr tägliches Auskommen kämpfen. Damit wurde die Comicserie zu einer Serie über das amerikanische Familienleben. Nach dem Tod von Chic Young im Jahr 1973 setzte sein Sohn Dean die Serie fort. Kennzeichen von Dagwood war seine Liebe zu großen Snadwiches. Und die Bezeichnung "dagwood sandwich" für große, vielschichtige Sandwiches fand sogar Mitte des 20. Jh. den Weg in die Lexika - etwa gleichzeitig mit engl. "hoagie" = "reichlich belegtes Sandwich", "Jumbo-Sandwich" und "submarine" = "Jumbosandwich".

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

Dagwood sandwich---1936---


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#dagwood

The "Dagwood Sandwich" was introduced to the American public April 16, 1936. It was invented by Chic Young and featured in his syndicated comic strip Blondie. "Dagwood" was Blondie's affable but somewhat bumbling husband.

What were the original ingredients?

Tongue, onion, mustard, sardine, beans and horseradish. A loaf of bread appears on the table but we are not told what kind of bread he used. It appears unsliced. Dagwood's two year old son, Baby Dumpling, watches his father composes the sandwich. Frame 2: Dagwood asks "Here, want to try a bite?" Baby Dumpling runs in the opposite direction shouting "NOOOoo." Frame 3: Baby Dumpling hides, watching dad eat his sandwich. Frame 4: Baby Dumpling pronounces the sandwich "Poison." Dagwood, still eating while reading his newspaper, replies "Stop saying that." [NOTE: we are transcibing from the New Castle News [PA], April 16, 1936 (p. 17). Some newspapers ran different Blondie comics that day.]

Original 1936 comic strip here. Over the years, the Dagwood sandwich grew bigger and typically included everything "but the kitchen sink!" Here is a Dagwood sandwich circa 1944.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/dagwood.pdf

Dagwood sandwich


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=dagwood sandwich
Limericks on dagwood sandwich

(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Dagwood sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Dagwood sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Denver sandwich (W3)

Das "Denver sandwich" wurde in Denver kreiert.

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/texas/entry/western_sandwich_denver_sandwich_denver_omelet/

...
It is claimed (see below, in 1954) that Denver restaurateur Albert A. McVittie invented the "Denver sandwich" in Denver in 1907, but the "Denver sandwich" appears in print at least as early as 1903. McVittie (who also served as president of the National Restaurant Association) appears in many newspaper articles before the 1950s, but there is no mention of the "Denver sandwich" in those articles. M. D. Looney (see below, in 1950) is another Denver 1907 claimant. It is also claimed (see below, in 1973) that the "Denver sandwich" was invented at "Denver’s Taber Hotel".

The sandwich was called a "Western Sandwich" as early as 1908, cited in a San Antonio newspaper. A "Manhattan Sandwich" (cited from 1909) contained fried egg, minced ham, and onion.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

Denver sandwiches.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#western


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Denver sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Denver sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1920 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

E

Elvis Presley's Fried Peanut Butter & Banana Sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

Peanut butter & banana sandwiches (Elvis!).....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#elvis

"Elvis made it famous. He made it part of American folk cuisine. He referred to it as a peanut butter and 'nanner sandwich, and his love for this treat helped to transform this simple delicacy into his signature dish. He loved these sandwiches and would ask that they be prepared for him at all hours of the day and night. As the basis for a good, hearty lunch, or even as an energy-packed snack, nothing can beat this crunch grilled sandwich. These step-by-step instructions will insure an authentic peanut butter and 'nanner sandwich.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Banana Sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Banana Sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

F

G

grilled cheese sandwich (W3)

"Grilled Cheese Sandwich" (1929, 1930) findet man in einer Zeitschrift im Bundesstaat New York State im Jahr 1928 und in einer Zeitschrift im Bundesstaat Texas aus dem Jahr 1930.

Genau genommen passt die Bezeichnung engl. "grilled" nicht ganz, es sei denn man legt beide Hälften separat unter einen Grill.

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/grilled_cheese_sandwich_toasted_cheese_sandwich/


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

grilled cheese sandwiches.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/category/episodes/

Hair of the Politics that Bit You (full episode)
Posted November 1, 2008
Feel like having a little “hair of the dog”? Grant and Martha explain what dog hair has to do with hangover cures. And what do you call it when random objects form a recognizable image, like a cloud resembling a bunny, or the image of Elvis in a grilled cheese sandwich? read more »


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=grilled cheese sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "grilled cheese sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1930 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

gritty (W3)

Engl. "gritty" gehört in die Wortfamilie in die auch dt. "Grieß" = dt. "grobkörniger Sand", "zu feinen Körnchen gemahlener Weizen", gehört. Über mhd. "griez", ahd. "grioz" = dt. "Sand", "Kies", "Sandplatz", "sandiges Ufer", "Strand", "grob gemahlenes Mehl", engl. "grit" = dt. "grobkörniger Sand", "Kies", "Sandstein", schwed. "gryt" = dt. "Steinhaufen" gelangt man auch zu dt. "groß", engl. "great" und dt. "Grund". Gemeinsam ist allen Familienmitgliedern die ursprüngliche Bedeutung "grobkörnig". Als weitere Familienmitglieder findet man entsprechend dt. "Grütze" = dt. "geschältes und grob gemahlenes Getreide", engl. "grout" = dt. "grobes Mehl", dt. "grob", dt. "Griebe" = dt. "ausgebratenes Fettstückchen", dt. "Griebs" = dt. "Kerngehäuse des Obstes".

Als Wurzel wird ide. "*ghreu-" = dt. "zerreiben", "zermahlen", zerbröckeln", "Zerriebenes", "Zerbröckeltes" postuliert,das man noch in lit. "grusti" = dt. "zerstoßen", "zerstampfen", "pressen" finden kann.

Die heutig Bedeutung von engl. "gritty" = dt. "sandig", "körnig" wurde im übertragenen Sinn auch zu dt. "mutig", "tapfer", "zäh" und zu dt. "unsentimental", "hart", "wirklichkeitsnah", "ungeschminkt".

Das Substantiv engl. "grit" ist seit dem 12. Jh. nachweisbar. Engl. "gritty" findet man erst seit dem 16. Jh. Im amerikanischen Englisch erhielt "gritty" ab dem frühen 19. Jh. die (zusätzliche) Bedeutung "Mut", "Tapferkeit", "Beharrlichkeit", "Hartnäckigkeit", "Ausdauer" und schließlich dt. "mutig", "schneidig" an.

Die Bedeutung "kernig" kommt auch in engl. "nitty-gritty" = dt. "Kern der Sache" zum Ausdruck.

(E?)(L?) https://archive.org/details/Saint_Louis_Bank_Robbery

The Great Saint Louis Bank Robbery - Free – Steve McQueen stars in a gritty, downbeat, and sometimes savage heist movie. (1959)


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/06/lord-and-lady-panivorous.html

...
"gritty" was not first applied either to dramas or to roads but to dear old, mere old bread.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/2014/03/10/

...
"Gritty" comes from "grit" ("small hard granules"), which in turn derives (via Middle English) from the Old English word for "sand" or "gravel."
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.onelook.com/wotd-archive.shtml


(E?)(L?) http://www.onelook.com/?w=gritty&loc=wotd

2011-01-07: gritty


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/gritty

gritty


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=G

"gritty" composed of or covered with particles resembling meal in texture or consistency


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=gritty
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "gritty" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 / 1700 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

H

ham sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=ham%20sandwich&defid=1393065

August 31, 2005: ham sandwich

The "ham sandwich" can be invoked as a defense for someone who feels wrongfully accused. This comes from the saying that a good prosecutor could indict a ham sandwich, thereby pointing out that one should not presume the indicted is guilty.

Tom Delay, a congressional majority leader in the United States, was indicted on ethics violations. His colleagues came to his defense by invoking the "ham sandwich" defense. This defense became well known when Delay defender Senator Mike Rodgers confused the public by misusing the phrase when he said "... any attorney knows you can get an indictment with a ham sandwich." Obviously he meant "against a ham sandwich."


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_sandwich

...
History

The "ham sandwich" is one of the earliest recorded closed-face sandwiches; by 1850, at least 70 London street vendors offered it. In 18th-century Britain the sandwich was still closely associated with Spanish cuisine, which (considering the especially wide consumption of ham in Spain) may suggest that sandwiches with ham were preferred at that time as well.
...


Erstellt: 2014-07

Hamburger (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamburger

A "hamburger" (also called a "beef burger", "hamburger sandwich", "burger" or "hamburg") is a sandwich consisting of one or more cooked patties of ground meat (usually beef) usually placed inside a sliced hamburger bun. Hamburgers are often served with lettuce, bacon, tomato, onion, pickles, cheese and condiments such as mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup and relish.

The term "burger" can also be applied to the meat patty on its own, especially in the UK where the term "patty" is rarely used. The term may be prefixed with the type of meat as in "turkey burger".

Etymology

The term "hamburger" originally derives from "Hamburg", Germany's second largest city, from which many people emigrated to the United States. In High German, "Burg" means "fortified settlement" or "fortified refuge" and is a widespread component of place names. "Hamburger", in the German language, is the demonym of Hamburg. Similar to "frankfurter" and "wiener", names for other meat-based foods, being demonyms of the cities of "Frankfurt" and "Vienna" ("Wien"), respectively.

The term "burger", a back-formation, is associated with many different types of sandwiches similar to a (ground meat) hamburger, using different meats, such as a buffalo burger, venison, kangaroo, turkey, elk, lamb, salmon burger or veggie burger.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Hamburger
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Hamburger" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1710 / 1800 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

hamburger Sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

hamburger Sandwich

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (98 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

he's one sandwich short of a picnic (W3)

Der Ausdruck engl. "a sandwich short of a picnic" = dt. "bescheuert", "nicht ganz dicht", "nicht alle Tassen im Schrank haben" überträgt den Mangel an Sandwiches bei einem Picnic auf den Geisteszustand eines Menschen. In Deutschland fehlen in einem vergleichbaren Fall ein paar Tassen im Schrank.

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=2057

he's one sandwich short of a picnic


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=he's one sandwich short of a picnic
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "he's one sandwich short of a picnic" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Hoagie Sandwich (W3)

Das "hoagie sandwich", (auch "hoagy"), ist ein großes, reichlich belegtes Sandwich, also ein "Jumbo-Sandwich". Es wurde wohl im Jahr 1925 zum ersten mal schriftlich erwähnt.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

Hoagie Sandwich (1925)
...
Unquestionably, the Hoagie Sandwich capital of the universe is good old Chester, Pa., which not only originated the hoagie-hero-submarine, but still turns out some of the finest in the world.
...
JUST FOR THE record, the hoagie or submarine sandwich was invented by the late Mrs. Catherine DiCostanza back in 1925. She and her husband Augustine operated a combination sandwich shop-delicatessen for 43 years at 1212 W. 3rd St. All of the family worked in the shop at one time or another, including daughter Rosie (now Mrs. Rose Wichanski of Westtown), a classmate of mine at Dewey School nine or 10 years ago.
...
Mrs. DiCostanza reportedly made the first "hoagie" at the request of one of the many workmen who visited the delicatessen and wanted to eat a large sandwich right there.
...
Mr. DiCostanza was born in Schippone, Italy, and came to the United States more than 60 years ago. he immediately settled in Chester and in 1925 he and his wife opened their sandwich shop in the front portion of their home.

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (16 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

homme-sandwich (W3)

Die Bezeichnung frz. "homme-sandwich" für einen menschlichen Reklameläufer, der vorn und hinten eine Werbetafel trug soll im Jahr 1881 kreiert worden sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/homme-sandwich

homme-sandwich
...
Étymol. et Hist. 1881 (Le Charivari, 31 janv., 2 b d'apr. M. Höfler ds Z. rom. Philol. t. 86, p. 337). Composé de homme* et de sandwich*. Bbg. Quem. DDL t. 3; 15 (s.v. homme-affiche).


(E?)(L1) http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/ressources/bdl.html


(E?)(L1) http://66.46.185.79/bdl/gabarit_bdl.asp?T1=Homme-sandwich&T3.x=12&T3.y=15

Homme-sandwich [Pluriel]: "homme-sandwich" nm, des "hommes-sandwichs"


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=7&content=homme-sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Frz. "homme-sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Horseshoe sandwich (W3)

Das "Horseshoe sandwich" soll einem Hufeisen gleichen, das mit Pommes frites als Nägel versehen ist.

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

---1928---Springfield's Horseshoe sandwiches


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#horseshoe

The "Horseshoe sandwich" belongs to Springfield, Illinios. Local folks confirm the moniker was bestowed for the "horse shoe shape" of the meat. The french fries represent the nails in the shoe and the oversized platter is the anvil. The "Ponyshoe" sandwich is a smaller version.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/positions-found-in-the-kama-sutra-for-midwesterners

Positions Found in The Kama Sutra for Midwesterners.

BY Pete Reynolds




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Horseshoe sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Horseshoe sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

hot roast beef sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

hot roast beef sandwiches.....


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=hot roast beef sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "hot roast beef sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1910 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

I

ice cream sandwich (W3)

Vorläufer des zwischen zwei Waffeln eingeklemmten Eises gab es anscheinend schon im 18. Jh. Die Bezeichnung "ice cream sandwich" scheint es wohl ab 1900 zu geben.

Im Jahr 2011 gab Google seinem Betriebssystem für Mobilgeräte Android V4.0 den Codenamen "Ice Cream Sandwich".

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodicecream.html#icecreamsandwich

ice cream sandwich---1900---

Ice cream sandwiches

The history of the ice cream sandwich can be traced to Renaissance-era English trifles and 18th century Charlottes, rich compositions of sweet cream and biscuits. Advances in freezer technology made ice cream available to many Europeans and Americans by the 18th century. Old favorites were transformed. Victorian-era cooks / chefs crafted fancy ice cream (molded ice creams with or without cake). They also specialized in cream-filled Victorias sandwich cakes. Freeze a sandwich cake and what do you get?
...


(E?)(L?) http://magazine.good.is/articles/coolhaus-ice-cream-sandwiches

Coolhaus Ice-cream Sandwiches
by Patrick James
...


(E1)(L1) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0211D&L=ADS-L&P=R4574&I=-3&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches

Ice Cream Sandwich (25 July 1900)


(E?)(L?) http://www.sho-pr.com/Dexter_IceCreamSandwiches_ClipPacket.pdf

Free Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwiches In Honor Of The Final 'Dexter' Season


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/I/ice_cream_sandwich.html

"Ice Cream Sandwich" is the dessert-themed Android codename for version 4.0 of the open source Android mobile operating system. Ice Cream made its debut in October 2011 as Google’s “everywhere” operating system for smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=ice cream sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "ice cream sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Îles Sandwich du Sud (W3)

Die "South Sandwich Islands" benannte James Cook nach "John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich", der zu dieser Zeit als erster Lord der Admiralität diente und entscheidend dazu beitrug Cook's Forschungen zu finanzieren.

(E?)(L?) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amsudant/Georgie-Sud-Sandwich.htm


(E?)(L?) http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Îles Sandwich


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=7&content=Sandwich du Sud
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Frz. "Îles Sandwich du Sud" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1880 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Isole Sandwich meridionali (W3)



(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=22&content=Isole Sandwich meridionali
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Ital. "Isole Sandwich meridionali" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Italian beef sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

Italian beef sandwich.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#italianbeef

...
The name merely refers to some vague idea of how Italians would serve their beef - highly, seasoned - but there is no such dish in Italy."
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Italian beef sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Italian beef sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1980 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Italian Sandwich (W3)

Der engl. "Italian Sandwich" wurde um das Jahr 1925 erstmals in schriftlicher Form erwähnt.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

Really - it's a small loaf of Italian bread, slit down the seam, and crammed with the following delicacies: ...
DiCostanzo's first started to make Italian sandwiches in 1925, the year the store opened and the year Mary was born. At first business was slow.
...

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (40 Matches)


Erstellt: 2014-07

J

jelly sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

peanut butter & jelly sandwiches.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#peanut

Peanut butter & jelly

Who invented this popular sandwich, why & when? The when is easy to document, the why is a relatively simple matter of technology, economics & commerce. The who? Is still a mystery.

Let's start with a quick study of the ingredients. Food historians tell us that finely chopped nuts (especially almonds) were regularly used by ancient cooks in a variety of dishes. BUT! It wasn't until the late 19th century that peanut butter...as we know it...came on the market. Did you know that peanut butter was first marketed as a health food? Ancient cooks also knew how to preserve fruit. BUT! It wasn't until the 15th century that modern jellies/jams/preserves were made. Ancient cooks also made bread. BUT! Sliced pre-packaged bread...the stuff we Americans use today to make our peanut butter & jelly sandwiches...didn't happen until the late 1920s. Interesting, yes? More notes on the history of PB&J ingredients: ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/J

"jelly sandwich": A sanitary pad or tampon.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=jelly sandwiches
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "jelly sandwiches" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Jibarito sandwich (W3)

Das "Jibarito sandwich"

Span. "Jibarito" ist die Verkleinerungsform von span. "jíbaro" = dt. "wild", "verwildert", "vom Lande", "bäurisch", "ungesellig", "menschenscheu", "kräftiger Mann", "Mann vom Lande", "Bauer" - bedeutet also etwa "kleiner Bauer".

(E?)(L?) http://www.food.com/recipe/borinquen-jibarito-sandwich-114779

The Puerto Rican style "jibarito sandwich" was created at the Borinquen Restaurant in Chicago by owner Juan "Peter" Figueroa. Here's my take on making his famous jibarito at home. The plantain "bread slices" for this sandwich are most easily made if you have a large deep fryer, but it can also be done in a deep skillet with oil. I originally saw this made on FoodTV's "Roker on the Road" (episode "On a Roll"). According to the Borinquen website, these sandwiches are known as "emparedado de platano" in Puerto Rico.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/12/14/best-jibarito-sandwiches-_n_796787.html#s206305title=Borinquen_Lounge_1720

Best Jibarito Sandwiches In Chicago
...
A "jibarito sandwich" is a unique Puerto Rican dish that originated right here in Chicago. The original sandwich consists of tender skirt steak, lettuce, tomato, grilled onions, cheese and mayonnaise in between two fried pieces of green plantains with garlic sauce spread on top.
...


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0402C&L=ADS-L&P=R2133&1=ADS-L&9=A&I=-3&J=on&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches&z=4

... The signature dish is the Jibarito, a fried plantain sandwich filled with steak, onions, lettuce and tomato with mayo and ketchup. ...
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.nytimes.com/2004/02/15/travel/15tab.html?pagewanted=2&n=Top%2fFeatures%2fTravel%2fDestinations%2fUnited%20States%2fIllinois%2fChicago

...
Just as Chicago's Italians invented deep-dish pizza, Puerto Rican immigrants invented the "jibarito" ("little bumpkin") sandwich. Instead of bread, jibarito sandwiches are made with chewy slabs of fried plantains topped with garlic.
...


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jibarito

...
History

Chicago restaurateur Juan "Peter" Figueroa introduced the "jibarito" at Borinquen Restaurant, a Puerto Rican restaurant in the Humboldt Park neighborhood, in 1996, after reading about a Puerto Rican sandwich substituting plantains for bread. The name is a diminutive of "Jíbaro" and means "little yokel".

The sandwich's popularity soon spread to other Latin-American restaurants around Chicago, including Mexican, Cuban and Argentinian establishments, and jibaritos now can be found in some mainstream eateries as well.
...


Erstellt: 2014-07

K

L

Lady (W3)

Vom altengl. "hlaf" = engl. "bread", dt. "Brot", aus dem auch engl. "loaf" wurde, leiten sich zwei unvermutete Bezeichnungen ab: engl. "Lord" und "Lady". Entsprechend der zentralen Bedeutung von Brot für die Ernährung hieß eine Frau auch altengl. "hlafdige" (etwa "Brotkneterin") und ein Mann "hlafward" (etwa "Brotwart", "Brotschützer"). Und aus Brotkneterin und Brotaufseher wurden mit der Zeit engl. "Lady", die "Brotherrin", "Herrin, deren Brot einer isst", und "Lord".

Das altengl. "hlaf" = dt. "Brot", "Brotlaib" ist eng verwandt mit dt. "Laib". In der Familie findet man mhd. "leip", ahd. "hleib", "leib", got. "hlaifs", aisl. "hleifr", russ. "chleb" - Bezeichnungen, die wohl ursprünglich ein "ungesäuertes Brot" bezeichneten.

"Lady" setzt sich also zusammen aus dem aengl. "hlaf" = "(Brot)Laib" (got. "hlaifs" = "Laib Brot") und "dige" = "Magd" ("*dig" = "knead" (= "Teig")). Ursprünglich war die "Lady" also die "Brotteigkneterin". Aber durch gute Führung schwang sie sich auf zur "Herrin über den Brotteig" und schliesslich zur Herrin über den gesamten Haushalt. Und dann sogar in höchste gesellschaftliche Kreise.

Die Unterscheidung von dt. "Laib" und dt. "Leib" kam im 17. Jh. auf indem man. Eine schlecht erkennbare Variante findet man noch in dt. "Lebkuchen", das also etwa "Brotkuchen" bedeutet.

Im Saarland wird "Teig" wie "Deeg" oder "Daeg" ausgesprochen. Und dieses hängt wie das engl. "dige" = "Magd, der das Teigmachen obliegt" mit dem got. "digan" = "kneten" ("teigen") zusammen.

(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/

first lady | grand old lady | lady | lady-killer | ladylike | ladyshaver | lady's man | lead lady | milady, milord


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/lady


(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/lady-gaga/

Is she a “lady?” Is she “gaga?” Did Lady Gaga choose her name because of what it literally means?
September 11, 2010 83 Her catchy tunes, epic videos, and bizarre outfits have made her the queen of pop - at least for now. Adding to her allure is Stefani Joanne Angelina Germanotta’s strange, yet fitting, stage name. What does “Lady Gaga” mean? And why did Ms. Germanotta choose it?
To start, a lady is technically a “woman whose manners and sensibilities befit her for high rank in society.” The ancestor of lady is the Old English hlæfdige, “wife of a lord,” or ”one who kneads bread.” It seems clear
CONTINUE READING


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=lady

lady


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/06/lord-and-lady-panivorous.html

Thursday, 10 June 2010
Lord and Lady Panivorous
...
"Hlafward" - "Hlaford" - "Lavord" - "Lord"

"Hlafdige" - "Hlafdi" - "Lavedi" - "Lady"
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm

lady (dame)


(E1)(L1) http://www.workpage.de/etym.php


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Lady
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Lady" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Lord (W3)

Vom altengl. "hlaf" = engl. "bread", dt. "Brot", aus dem auch engl. "loaf" wurde, leiten sich zwei unvermutete Bezeichnungen ab: engl. "Lord" und "Lady". Entsprechend der zentralen Bedeutung von Brot für die Ernährung hieß eine Frau auch altengl. "hlafdige" (etwa "Brotkneterin") und ein Mann "hlafward" (etwa "Brotwart", "Brotschützer"). Und aus Brotkneterin und Brotaufseher wurden mit der Zeit engl. "Lady" und "Lord".

Das altengl. "hlaf" = dt. "Brot" ist eng verwandt mit dt. "Laib". In der Familie findet man mhd. "leip", ahd. "hleib", "leib", got. "hlaifs", aisl. "hleifr", russ. "chleb" - Bezeichnungen, die wohl ursprünglich ein "ungesäuertes Brot" bezeichneten.

Die Unterscheidung von dt. "Laib" und dt. "Leib" kam im 17. Jh. auf indem man. Eine schlecht erkennbare Variante findet man noch in dt. "Lebkuchen", das also etwa "Brotkuchen" bedeutet.

(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/lord

lord


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=lord

lord


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/06/lord-and-lady-panivorous.html

Thursday, 10 June 2010
Lord and Lady Panivorous
...
"Hlafward" - "Hlaford" - "Lavord" - "Lord"

"Hlafdige" - "Hlafdi" - "Lavedi" - "Lady"
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/#lord


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/lord/


(E1)(L1) http://www.workpage.de/etym.php


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Lord
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Lord" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1520 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

M

Monte Cristo sandwich (W3)

Zur Herkunft des engl. "Monte Cristo sandwich" gibt es unterschiedliche Theorien.

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

---1941---Rice Krispies treats & Monte Cristo sandwiches


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#montecristo

Monte Cristo sandwich

Recipe-wise, food experts generally consider the Monte Cristo sandwich to be a simple variation of an early 20th century French dish called Croque Monsieur. According to several articles published in newspapers and magazines, Monte Cristo sandwiches were first served in southern California and were very popular in the 1950s-1970s. Therin ends the agreement. The who/what/why/where/when behind the Monte Cristo sandwich is still very much a subject of debate.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Monte Cristo sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Monte Cristo sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1950 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Muffoletta sandwich (W3)

Ital. "muffola" = dt. "Fausthandschuh", "Muff" könnte als Verkleinerungsform in der Bezeichnung ital. "Muffoletta", "Muffuletta" stecken.

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

Muffoletta sandwiches---1906---


(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/muffuletta

Origin of MUFFULETTA

probably from Italian dialect, from Italian "muffoletta" "little muff", diminutive of "muffola" "muff", from French "moufle", from Middle French


(E?)(L?) http://www.muffoletta.com/faq/

Word muffoletta

The word muffoletta (and its many spelling variations) cause countless debates and (false) urban legends. Some (non) authorities claim that the word originated in New Orleans; others claim that the word comes from muffo, meaning a type of mold. This FAQ answers the most frequently asked questions about the muffoletta.

Of all the questions about muffoletta, the most frequently asked is:
... How is muffoletta spelled?


(E?)(L?) http://www.muffoletta.com/history/

The history of muffoletta bread
...
Note: "Sicilians" did not consider themselves wholly "Italians" until after World War II. Thus before 1945, the "muffoletta" was a type of Sicilian rather than Italian bread.
...
One day, the owner of the Central Grocery, Lupo Salvatore – himself a Sicilian immigrant - made an agreement for the Sicilian baker to supply bread to the Central Grocery, which then re-sold the bread to its customers. With that agreement, the Sicilian baker became a wholesaler, and the workers no longer bought their bread from the Sicilian baker but from the Central Grocery, where the workers bought all their lunch ingredients: bread, meats, cheese and salad.

In 1906, Lupo Salvatore decided to combine these ingredients into a sandwich. He decided to use the "muffoletta bread", because of its ability to hold the filling without leaking. To make each sandwich, Lupo filled a muffoletta loaf with olive salad, meats and cheeses; then he wrapped the sandwich in paper; and then he sold it as a "muffoletta sandwich", except that he misspelled the name as "muffuletta". After all, Lupo was a grocer, not a baker and thus not familiar with the spellings of the many Sicilian breads. In any event, even when misspelled, the "muffoletta sandwich" was so much easier to carry that it became an immediate, major success for the Central Grocery.

Note: Muffoletta, muffuletta, muffelata? What’s in the spelling? That which we call a muffoletta by any other spelling would taste as great. (With apologies for Wm. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act ii, Sc. 2.)
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muffuletta


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Muffoletta sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Muffoletta sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

muffuletta sandwich (W3)

Ital. "muffola" = dt. "Fausthandschuh", "Muff" könnte als Verkleinerungsform in der Bezeichnung ital. "Muffoletta", "Muffuletta" stecken.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

muffuletta sandwiches.....


(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/muffuletta

Origin of MUFFULETTA

probably from Italian dialect, from Italian "muffoletta" "little muff", diminutive of "muffola" "muff", from French "moufle", from Middle French


(E?)(L?) http://www.muffoletta.com/history/

The history of muffoletta bread
...
Note: "Sicilians" did not consider themselves wholly "Italians" until after World War II. Thus before 1945, the "muffoletta" was a type of Sicilian rather than Italian bread.
...
One day, the owner of the Central Grocery, Lupo Salvatore – himself a Sicilian immigrant - made an agreement for the Sicilian baker to supply bread to the Central Grocery, which then re-sold the bread to its customers. With that agreement, the Sicilian baker became a wholesaler, and the workers no longer bought their bread from the Sicilian baker but from the Central Grocery, where the workers bought all their lunch ingredients: bread, meats, cheese and salad.

In 1906, Lupo Salvatore decided to combine these ingredients into a sandwich. He decided to use the "muffoletta bread", because of its ability to hold the filling without leaking. To make each sandwich, Lupo filled a muffoletta loaf with olive salad, meats and cheeses; then he wrapped the sandwich in paper; and then he sold it as a "muffoletta sandwich", except that he misspelled the name as "muffuletta". After all, Lupo was a grocer, not a baker and thus not familiar with the spellings of the many Sicilian breads. In any event, even when misspelled, the "muffoletta sandwich" was so much easier to carry that it became an immediate, major success for the Central Grocery.

Note: Muffoletta, muffuletta, muffelata? What’s in the spelling? That which we call a muffoletta by any other spelling would taste as great. (With apologies for Wm. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act ii, Sc. 2.)
...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/muffuletta

muffuletta


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muffuletta


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=muffuletta sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "muffuletta sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1970 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

N

O

open sandwich (W3)

Ein "open sandwich" ist eigentlich gar kein "Sandwich". Es ist einfach ein belegtes Brot.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

open sandwiches (Scandinavian-style).....


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#open

Open sandwiches, Scandinavian style

These exquisite works of edible art descend from practical traditions:
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_sandwich

An open sandwich, also known as an open face/faced sandwich, bread baser, or tartine[1] consists of a single slice of bread with one or more food items on top.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=open sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "open sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

P

Palm Beach cheese sandwich (W3)

Palm Beach cheese sandwich (1942)

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (6 Matches)



29 December 1947, Dallas Morning News, section II, pg. 12: "Palm Beach" for some unexplained reason has come to mean a "cheese sandwich".
...
Day's apprentice, 17-year-old Andy Turk, said he's learned a lot of phrases from customers' requests. They include "Palm Beach" for pimento cheese sandwich, "mince" for ham salad, "Black Cow" for chocolate milk with a dip of ice cream, and "Black on White" for a chocolate soda with vanilla ice cream.
...
"Palm Beach", the name of a county in Florida.
...


Erstellt: 2014-07

panivorous (W3)

Engl. "panivorous" scheint im Gegensatz zu engl. "carnivorous" eine Eintagsfliege zu sein. Engl. "panivorous" setzt sich zusammen aus lat. "panis" = dt. "Brot" und lat. "vorare" = dt. "gierig fressen".

(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/06/lord-and-lady-panivorous.html

...
It means "that eats or lives on bread" (Latin "panus") and should therefore be wildly applicable. Yet it seems only ever to have been used once, in 1845, by Mrs Catherine Gore who wrote of a man that he was: "A boulanger in the panivorous kingdom of France."
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/ow_p.html

"panivorous" adj. - "bread-eating"


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=panivorous
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "panivorous" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Pastrami sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pastrami

Etymology and origin

The word "pastrami" was borrowed from the Turkish "pastirma", though the dishes themselves have diverged. Some sources claim an etymology from Romanian a "pastra", "to preserve".

The Romanian specialty was introduced to the United States in a wave of Romanian Jewish immigration from Bessarabia and Romania in the second half of the 19th century, via the Yiddish: "???" (pronounced pastróme). Early references in English used the spelling "pastrama", closer to the Romanian original. The modified "pastrami" spelling was probably introduced in imitation of the American English salami.

New York’s Sussman Volk is generally credited with producing the first "pastrami sandwich" in 1887. Volk, a kosher butcher and New York immigrant from Lithuania, claimed he got the recipe from a Romanian friend in exchange for storing the friend’s luggage while the friend returned to Romania. According to his descendant, Patricia Volk, Volk prepared pastrami according to the recipe and served it on sandwiches out of his butcher shop. The sandwich was so popular that Volk converted the butcher shop into a restaurant to sell pastrami sandwiches.

Romanian Jews emigrated to New York as early as 1872. Among Jewish Romanians, goose breasts were commonly made into pastrami because they were inexpensive. Beef navels were cheaper than goose meat in America, so the Romanian Jews in America adapted their recipe and began to make the cheaper beef pastrami.

The Oxford English Dictionary’s Etymology of pastrami, n. quotes a 1914 advertisement from the Jewish Criterion (Pittsburgh)

Sardines and pimentos ... Pastrami ... Rye bread [etc.]
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Pastrami
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Pastrami" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1890 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

pinwheel sandwich (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#pinwheels

Pinwheel sandwiches

"Pinwheel (aka "rolled") sandwiches" descend from canapes: fancy 19th century finger sandwiches served with tea or cocktails. Checkerboard sandwiches, ribbon sandwiches, refrigerator cookies and other artfully crafted bit-sized presentations are closely related. The earliest print reference we find for "Pinwheel Sandwich" in American cookbooks is dated 1929. It is interesting to note this item is not quite the menu item we know today. In the food world, this is not an unusual occurance. Careful examination of ingredients and method often reveal similar recipes with different names. This method is generally a more accruate way to trace the evolution of a specific dish. Modern-style "Pinwheel Sandwiches" (made with several layers of bread and fillings) surface in the early 1930s. "Tortilla Pinwheel sandwiches" surfaced in 1987.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=pinwheel sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "pinwheel sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Ploughman's lunch (W3)

Engl. "Ploughman's lunch" = dt. "Pflügers Mittagessen" ist ein Imbiß aus Brot, Käse und Bier. Im Jahr 1837 fand die Bezeichnung Eingang in die Literatur. Die Darreichungsform kann einem Sandwich ähneln.

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ploughman%27s_lunch

...
Origins and etymology

Pierce the Ploughman's Crede (c. 1394) mentions the traditional ploughman's meal of bread, cheese and beer. The Oxford English Dictionary notes the first recorded use of the phrase "ploughman's lunch" as 1837, from the book Memoirs of the life of Sir Walter Scott by John G. Lockhart, but this stray early use may have meant merely the sum of its parts, "a lunch for a ploughman".

The OED's next reference is from the July 1956 Monthly Bulletin of the Brewers' Society, which describes activities of the Cheese Bureau. It describes how the Bureau:

exists for the admirable purpose of popularising cheese and, as a corollary, the public house lunch of bread, beer, cheese and pickle. This traditional combination was broken by rationing; the Cheese Bureau hopes, by demonstrating the natural affinity of the two parties, to effect a remarriage.

This implies that a "traditional combination" of bread, beer, cheese, and pickle was popular before rationing in the United Kingdom (during and after World War II). In 1956, author Adrian Bell reported: "There's a pub quite close to where I live where ... all you need say is, 'Ploughboy's Lunch, Harry, please'. And in a matter of minutes a tray is handed across the counter to you on which is a good square hunk of bread, a lump of butter and a wedge of cheese, and pickled onions, along with your pint of beer". Only one year later, in June 1957, another edition of the Monthly Bulletin of the Brewers' Society, referred to a ploughman's lunch using exactly that name, and said that it consisted of "cottage bread, cheese, lettuce, hard-boiled eggs, cold sausages and, of course, beer". The Glasgow newspaper The Bulletin from 15 April 1958 and The Times from 29 April 1958 refer to a ploughman's lunch consisting of bread, cheese and pickle.

The meal's rise in popularity during the 1970s has been argued to be at least partially based on a British cultural "revulsion from technology and modernity and a renewed love-affair with an idealised national past".

The 1983 film The Ploughman's Lunch, from a screenplay by Ian McEwan, has a subtext that is "the way countries and people re-write their own history to suit the needs of the present". The title is a reference to the way the supposed traditional meal was apparently used as way to get people to eat meals in pubs.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Ploughman's lunch
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Ploughman's lunch" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1980 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Po'Boy sandwich
po-boy sandwich
Poor boy sandwich (W3)

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Po'Boy sandwich", "Poor boy sandwich" soll im Jahr 1875 aufgekommen sein. Zum Hintergrund der Bezeichnung gibt es zwei Theorien. Möglich wäre die Bezeichnung mit Bezug auf streikende Arbeiter (also "arme Jungs") oder aber die Verballhornung von frz. "pourboire" = dt. "Trinkgeld" womit wohl auf den günstigen Preis des Sandwiches referenziert worden wäre.

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

Po'Boy & hot Italian sandwiches--1929---


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#submarine

Po'Boy

The place? New Orleans. The people? Most commonly attributed to Benny and Clovis Martin. The year? Varies, though most agree the name was made popular during the 1929 streetcar strike. Culinary evidence suggests the sandwich predates the name.

"Po'boy". Also "poorboy". A sandwich made from French bread loaves split in half and filled with a variety of ingredients like ham, beef, cheese, oysters, tomatoes, and gravy. Similar to a hero, they are a specialty of New Orleans, where they were originally called "push sandwiches" because the meat was pushed along the length of the bread to save the best parts for last.

The Po'boy was created in the 1920s by Benny and Clovis Martin, owners of Martin Brothers Grocery, who served the sandwich to striking streetcar workers free of charge (other sources say for fifteen cents) until the strike ended. They used up more than a thousand loaves of bread in one day.

Another story says the term is related to the French for a gratuity, "pourboire". Nonetheless, the term "poor boy" for a sandwich goes back to 1875. An oyster loaf is a form of po'boy made with oysters."
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.poboyfest.com/history

...
In order to maintain their promise, the Martins provided large sandwiches to the strikers. Bennie Martin said, "We fed those men free of charge until the strike ended. Whenever we saw one of the striking men coming, one of us would say, 'Here comes another poor boy.'"
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Po'Boy sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Po'Boy sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Pork tenderloin sandwich (W3)

Das "Pork Tenderloin Sandwich" enthielt Lendenstücke vom Schwein. Das Wiener Schnitzel wurde wohl um 1908 von Nicholas Freinstein of Huntington, Indiana, zwischen zwei Brotscheiben geklemmt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/statefoods.html#indianapolis

What is a Pork Tenderloin Sandwich?

Pork Tenderloin (aka Breaded Pork Tenderloin) is one of Indiana's traditional foods. Presumably descending from German weiner schnitzel, this item first surfaces in the early 20th century. Local folks credit Nicholas Frienstein, of Huntington, for the creation.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Pork tenderloin sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Pork tenderloin sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

praise sandwich (W3)

Das "Sandwichlob" ist ein Lob, das zwischen zwei Scheiben Kritik offeriert wird.

(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/?s=praise+sandwich&submit=search

Search results for "praise sandwich"




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=praise sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "praise sandwich" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Q

R

Reuben sandwich (W3)

Die engl. "Reuben sandwiches" (with Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and corn beef) wurden anscheinend in den 1940er Jahren in dem New Yorker "Reuben's Restaurant" (58th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues) serviert.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

Reuben sandwiches.....


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuben_sandwich

The Reuben sandwich is a hot sandwich of corned beef, Swiss cheese with Russian dressing, and sauerkraut. These are grilled between slices of rye bread. Several variants exist.
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reuben%27s_Restaurant

Reuben's Restaurant and Delicatessen was a landmark restaurant and deli in New York City.

Arnold Reuben, a German immigrant, first opened the restaurant in 1908 at 802 Park Avenue. In 1916 it moved to Broadway and 73rd Street, and two years later it moved again, this time to 622 Madison Avenue. Three decades after it first opened its doors, Reuben's Restaurant and Delicatessen had a formal opening at 6 East 58th Street with Mayor Fiorello La Guardia in attendance (March 28, 1935, New York Times). It stayed at this location for three more decades until it was sold in the mid-1960s, afterwards moving to a location at 38th Street and Madison Avenue.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Reuben sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Reuben sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1920 / 1960 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

S

Sandwich 1 (W3)

Weil der 4. Earl of Sandwich (1718-92) so ein leidenschaftlicher Spieler war, daß er nicht gern vom Kartentisch aufstehen wollte, erfand er diese belegten Brote. Anfangs wohl als "à la Sandwich" bezeichnet wurden die Doppeldecker wohl um 1762 bereits einfach als "Sandwich" bezeichnet.

Nach dem Earl of Sandwich hießen die Inseln von Hawaii früher "Sandwich-Inseln". James Cook, der vom Earl of Sandwich unterstützt wurde benannte auch ein paar arktische Inseln nach seinem Gönner. Zur Unterscheidung von den "Hawaii-Inseln" (ehemals "Sandwich-Inseln") heißen diese "South Sandwich Islands".

"John Montagu, der 4. Earl of Sandwich" soll ein richtiger Schurke, skrupellos, korrupt und dazu noch als Marineminister völlig unfähig gewesen sein. Seltsamerweise widerspricht eine andere Quelle dem und stellt den Earl als ganz das Gegenteil hin! Eines aber sagen beide Quellen - er war ein hemmungsloser Spieler, vor allem Pokern hatte es ihm angetan und dabei soll er betrogen haben, was die Karten hergaben. Nachgesagt wird ihm, die englische Flotte ruiniert zu haben, seine Frau betrogen, für Geld, Posten vergeben zu haben und sogar seine eigene Tochter soll er missbraucht haben. Allerdings liegt die Wahrheit wohl irgendwo dazwischen, denk ich mir! Er wurde im zarten Alter von nur 10 Jahren der 4. Earl of Sandwich, nachdem sein Vater früh gestorben und der Großvater das gesamte Familienvermögen durchgebracht hatte! Er war sein ganzes Leben lang eher arm, sein Vorzug war der alte Name und eine vorzügliche Ausbildung in Eton und Cambridge.

Was nun das Sandwich betrifft, sagt die Legende folgendes: Der Earl saß 24 Stunden ununterbrochen am Pokertisch. Um das Spiel wegen des Essens nicht verlassen zu müssen, hatte er sich sein geliebtes gesalzenes Rindfleisch zwischen zwei Röstbrotscheiben geklemmt und aß es während des Spieles! Das Sandwich war geboren, denn die Methode erreichte sofort einen hohen Beliebtheitsgrad in London! Natürlich gibt es auch hier, wie bei allem im Leben des Earl's, eine Gegendarstellung: Er erfand das Sandwich, um seinen Hunger an seinem Arbeitsplatz zu stillen, da er pausenlos von früh bis Mitternacht arbeitete!

In den USA gibt es auch einen Ort namens "Sandwich" (MA).

Ein weiterer Begriff ist "Sandwich-Schiffsbau".

(E?)(L?) http://www.airpano.com/360Degree-VirtualTour.php?3D=hotdog

Being a Sandwich

As you see, we shoot not only canyons, cities and waterfalls. When there are no flights it's time to joke. So, we present reportage about what a sandwich can see inside a Zanussi oven. Outside the oven Andrey Zubetz, the panorama's author, is watching the sandwich.


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/eponyms/eponym_list_s.html

sandwich:

Food on a slice of bread or between two slices, eaten with the hands. John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich (1718-1792), an English aristocrat after whom Captain James Cook also named the Sandwich Islands.


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20070512130707/http://www2.bartleby.com/81/14862.html

Sandwich.

A piece of meat between two slices of bread; so called from the "Earl of Sandwich" (the noted "Jemmy Twitcher"), who passed whole days in gambling, bidding the waiter bring him for refreshment a piece of meat between two pieces of bread, which he ate without stopping from play. This contrivance was not first hit upon by the earl in the reign of George III., as the Romans were very fond of "sandwiches", called by them "offula".


(E?)(L?) http://www.arte.tv/de/alle-rubriken/2488592.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.arte.tv/de/der-gegenstand-das-sandwich/369224,CmC=369228.html

Sendung vom 8. Februar 2004 - 08/02/04
der Gegenstand: das Sandwich
Michael Rutschky lebt in Berlin. Er ist Dokumentarfilmer, Autor und im Laufe der Jahre ein Spezialist für Alltagskultur geworden.
...


(E?)(L?) http://boingboing.net/2008/09/11/how-to-make-a-squirr.html

How to make a squirrel sandwich


(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

Auch der Belag des Tischtennisschlägers heißt "Sandwich", bestehend aus einer Schicht Schaumgummi und einer Schicht Gummi mit Noppen.


(E?)(L?) http://www.chefkoch.de/suche.php?suche=sandwich&wo=0

Suche nach sandwich: 5.648 Treffer


(E?)(L?) http://www.chefkoch.de/rs/s0/sandwich/Rezepte.html

397 sandwich Rezepte


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/sandwich

SANDWICH, subst. masc.

Étymol. et Hist. 1802 (Gazette nationale ou le Moniteur universel, 13 pluviôse an 10, 531-532 ds Höfler Anglic.); 1875 rails en sandwich (H. Wauwermans, Fortification et travaux du génie aux armées, 53, ibid.); 1884 tranche de maison en sandwich entre deux autres (Maupass., Contes et nouv., t. 1, Patronne, p. 694). Empr. à l'angl. "sandwich", att. en ce sens dep. 1762, tiré du nom de "John Montagu, Comte de Sandwich" [1718-1792] qui selon Grosley, Londres, 1770, I, 262 (v. Höfler Anglic.) avait passé 24 heures de suite à jouer en se restaurant de tranches de bœuf insérées entre deux tranches de pain (NED).


(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/regionalenglish/

Home » Language » What do you call a sandwich made on a roll?

Do you call it a "sub"? A "grinder"? A "hoagie"? A "poor boy"? That all depends on where you live.

The Dictionary of American Regional English has been more than 40 years in the making. In the early 60s, lexicographers and linguists led by the University of Wisconsin at Madison sprawled all over the country in search of unique words.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.dw.de/ohnmachtshappen/a-4741715

DW-WORLD: Ohnmachtshappen - Die moderne Zeit bringt es mit sich: Für das Essen bleibt nicht mehr viel Zeit. Schnell noch ein Sandwich, ein Snack, ein "To-Go-Getränk". Hauptsache der Hunger-Ohnmacht entkommen.
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Sandwich-Historie

Das Sandwich ist keineswegs die Erfindung irgendeiner Fast-Food-Kette, sondern entspringt der Fantasie eines englischen Adeligen und zwar des 4. Grafen von Sandwich. Der Herr spielte gern und begab sich zu diesem Zwecke gerne in Londoner Spielsalons. So auch an jenem denkwürdigen Tag im Jahre 1762, als ihn plötzlich der Hunger überkam, er aber vom Spiel nicht lassen wollte.

Der Kammerdiener wurde gerufen und der Graf von Sandwich beauftragte ihn, zwei Scheiben getoasteten Weißbrotes zu buttern und zu salzen, sowie – und das war das Entscheidende – zwischen die solcher Art vorbereiteten Brote eine Scheibe "Roastbeef" zu legen. Die mitspielenden Herren taten es dem Grafen gleich und bestellten ebenfalls das, was der Graf von Sandwich geordert hatte. Fortan nannte man diese Hungerstiller der Einfachheit halber Sandwiches.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.esquire.com/features/food-drink/sandwiches

February 16, 2008, 12:38 PM

The Best Sandwiches in America

Unranked, unimpeachable, and incomplete, Esquire’s coast-to-coast list of the finest meals on sliced bread. No burgers allowed.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.esquire.com/features/food-drink/sandwiches-addenum

April 24, 2008, 5:30 AM

The Best Sandwiches in America: A Reader Addendum

When you order a sandwich, you usually get a pickle. Maybe chips. Put together a catalog of exceptional sandwiches and you get more than three hundred additions and corrections from your readers. Here, some of the best.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sandwich

sandwich (n.)

1762, said to be a reference to "John Montagu (1718-1792), Fourth Earl Sandwich", who was said to be an inveterate gambler who ate slices of cold meat between bread at the gaming table during marathon sessions rather than get up for a proper meal (this account dates to 1770). It was in his honor that Cook named the "Hawaiian islands" (1778) when Montagu was first lord of the Admiralty. The family name is from the place in Kent, Old English "Sandwicæ", literally "sandy harbor" (or "trading center"). For pronunciation, see cabbage. "Sandwich board", one carried before and one behind, is from 1864.

sandwich (v.)

1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of the stuff between the identical pieces of bread. Related: "Sandwiched"; "sandwiching".


(E?)(L?) http://eurekaweb.fr/wp/sandwich-1762/

C’est à "John Montagu, quatrième comte de Sandwich", que revient, en 1762, l’invention du "sandwich". Passionné de jeu, le comte refusa un jour de quitter sa table pour aller déjeuner. Son cuisinier lui prépara donc un petit en-cas constitué d’une tranche de viande entre deux tartines de pain beurré.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html

Food Timeline FAQs: sandwiches .....Have questions? Ask!


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A144299

Sandwich

The sandwich was, allegedly, invented by the Earl of Sandwich, so that he could play cards uninterrupted.
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(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/search?search_type=article_quick_search&searchstring=sandwich&approved_entries_only_chk=1




(E?)(L?) http://www.ironicsans.com/2006/09/interview_with_adam_rex.html

September 5, 2006

Interview with Adam Rex, illustrator and author of “Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich”
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(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/upper2/GGrab-bag.html

Which reminds me of the proof that a ham sandwich is better than eternal happiness:
1.Nothing is better than eternal happiness.
2.A ham sandwich is better than nothing.
3.Therefore, a ham sandwich is better than eternal happiness.


(E?)(L?) http://lonelysandwich.com/


(E?)(L?) http://recordsetter.com/world-record/images-fish-sandwiches-looked/431

Daredevil Todd Lamb sets a new world record by looking at 25 images of fish sandwiches in just one minute. The images were held and dropped by Opus Moreschi in a manner similar to Bob Dylan's Subterranean Homesick Blues.


(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/activities/11/

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Cultural diffusion includes information and ideas as well as objects, a concept that children may have trouble grasping. One way to begin a discussion might be to look up familiar words in a dictionary that provides etymology. Two easy examples are "hamburger" (named for a German city) and "sandwich" (named for an English aristocrat).
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(E?)(L?) http://www.open-sandwich.co.uk/

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Sandwich Origins

The first recorded mention of "Sandwich" was around 664 AD but there was probably some kind of settlement in Roman times as the site is very close to Richborough Roman Fort (Rutupiae).

The name of the town is, most likely, Saxon in origin, approximately meaning "sandy place", or "the place on the sand". The word "sandwich" as an item of food came into being centuries later ...
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(E?)(L?) http://www.open-sandwich.co.uk/town_history/sandwich_origin.htm

The Earl of Sandwich & the Origin of the Sandwich

The origin of the word "sandwich" for an item of food may have originated from a story about "John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich". He didn't really 'invent' the "sandwich" but he may have made it popular.

It is said that in approx. 1762, he asked for meat to be served between slices of bread, to avoid interrupting a gambling game. This story may have been rumour or adverse propoganda, put about by his rivals.

But soon people may have started ordering “the same as Sandwich”, and the name stuck !
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(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/233177


(E?)(L?) http://pizza.sandwich.net/

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Once I moved to "pizza.sandwich.net", this colourful era ended, and I started trying to actually make sense of the "pizza" part of the name - which was just two random words stuck together - by changing it to "the department of pizza", and including a message board, ostensibly about pizza. I also put up pictures of pizza. woohoo.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/B




(E?)(L?) http://thatsmyhome.com/articles/cookbook-review/

Cookbook Review for Crazy For Breakfast Sandwiches
July 8, 2014 · by Mary Ellen · 1 Comment


(E?)(L?) http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2010/apr/07/how-to-make-shooters-sandwich

The best sandwich ever?

What's your favourite sandwich and how precise is the recipe for success?

In pictures: how to make a shooter's sandwich
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(E?)(L1) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words16.html

"SANDWICH": "John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich" (1718-92), English diplomat


(E?)(L?) http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=136:2:31566590363930:pg_R_49974142591090605124:NO

Feature Name | "ID" | "Class" | "County" | "State" | "Latitude" | "Longitude" | "Ele(ft)*" | "Map**" | "BGN Date" | "Entry Date" |


(E?)(L?) http://www.veoh.com/find/?query=Sandwich




(E?)(L?) http://www.w-akten.de/begrifflichkeiten.phtml

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Die Legende ist aber nicht haltbar, der Earl hatte nämlich ein fieses Magenleiden und konnte keine feste Nahrung zu sich nehmen, aber der Name blieb hängen.


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Montagu%2C_4th_Earl_of_Sandwich

The sandwich

The modern "sandwich" is named after "Lord Sandwich", but the exact circumstances of its invention and original use are still the subject of debate. A rumour in a contemporary travel book called Tour to London by Pierre Jean Grosley formed the popular myth that bread and meat sustained Lord Sandwich at the gambling table. A very conversant gambler, Lord Sandwich did not take the time to have a meal during his long hours playing at the card table. Consequently, he would ask his servants to bring him slices of meat between two slices of bread; a habit well known among his gambling friends. Because John Montagu was the Earl of Sandwich others began to order "the same as Sandwich!" - the "sandwich" was born.

The sober alternative is provided by Sandwich's biographer, N. A. M. Rodger, who suggests Sandwich's commitments to the navy, to politics and the arts mean the first "sandwich" was more likely to have been consumed at his work desk. From 14 March 1741 Sandwich had a Grisons Republic born brother-in-law, Jerome de Salis. The Grisons, or Graubunden, are well known for their sliced dried meat, "Bündnerfleisch", while its then adjoining subject territory the Valtelline, where De Salis grew up, is known for Bresaola; so the refinement of Salis' native habits to suit card playing in St. James', Westminster could have been a small step for the inventive peer.

Islands named after Sandwich by Capt James Cook

"Lord Sandwich" was a great supporter of Captain James Cook. As First Lord of the Admiralty, Sandwich approved Admiralty funds for the purchase and fit-out of the Resolution, Adventure and Discovery for Cook’s second and third expeditions of exploration in the Pacific Ocean. In honour of Sandwich, Captain Cook named the "Sandwich Islands" (now "Hawaii") after him, as well as "Montague Island" off the south east coast of Australia, the "South Sandwich Islands" in the Southern Atlantic Ocean and "Montague Island" in the Gulf of Alaska.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_islands_named_after_people

Montagu Island - John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandwich

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In der englischen Literatur werden Sandwiches ab etwa 1760 erwähnt, zunächst als Imbiss für abendliche Männergesellschaften. Als auch für Damen angemessene Zwischenmahlzeit wurde das Sandwich erst Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts angesehen und bei Tanzbällen angeboten.
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(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandwich_(Kent)

"Sandwich" ist eine Stadt in der Grafschaft Kent in England mit etwa 4500 Einwohnern. Sie ist die englische Partnerstadt von Sonsbeck und liegt im Distrikt Dover.
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Der Ort gilt als der Entstehungsort des Fast-Food-Klassikers Sandwich.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandwich


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sandwiches

| Bacon | Bacon, egg and cheese | Baked bean | Bánh mì | Barbecue | Barros Jarpa | Barros Luco | Bauru | Beef on weck | BLT | Bologna sandwich | Bosna | Breakfast roll | Breakfast | British Rail | Broodje kroket | Bun kebab | Butterbrot | Chacarero | Cheese | Cheese and pickle | Cheesesteak | Chicken salad | Chickpea salad | Chili burger | Chip butty | Chipped beef | Chivito | Choripán | Chow mein | Churrasco | Club | Corned beef | Crisp | Croque-monsieur | Cuban | Cucumber | Cudighi | Dagwood | Deli sandwich | Denver | Doner kebab | Donkey burger | Doubles | Dynamite | Dyrlægens natmad | Elvis sandwich | Egg | Fairy bread | Falafel | Fischbrötchen | Fool's Gold Loaf | Fluffernutter | Francesinha | Francesinha poveira | French dip | Fried brain | Ftira | Gatsby | Gerber | Guajolota | Gyro | | Ham | Ham and cheese | Ham and egg bun | Hamburger | Hamdog | Horseshoe | Hot brown | Hot chicken | Hot turkey | Ice cream | Italian beef | Italiano | Jam | Jambon-beurre | Jibarito | Jucy Lucy | Katsu sando | Kokoretsi | Kottenbutter | Leberkäse | Lettuce | Limburger sandwich | Lobster roll | Lox | Luther burger | Marmite | Martino | Meatball | Medianoche | Mitraillette | Melt | Mettbrötchen | | Montadito | Monte Cristo | Montreal-style smoked meat | Mortadella | Mother-in-law | Muffuletta | Beschuit met muisjes | Naan sandwich | Open-faced sandwich | Pambazo | Pan-bagnat | Panini | Patty melt | Peanut butter and jelly | Pebete | Pistolette | Pljeskavica | Ploughman's lunch | Po' boy | Polish boy | Porilainen | Pork chop bun | Pork tenderloin | Prawn roll | Primanti | Prosperity Sandwich | Pudgy Pie | Pulled pork sandwich | Reuben | Roti john | Rou jia mo | Runza | Sandwich loaf | De miga | Salt beef bagel | Sausage | Shawarma | Shuco | Slider | Sloppy joe | Sloppy joe (New Jersey) | S'more | Smörgåstårta | Smørrebrød | Sol over Gudhjem | Souvlaki | Spiedie | St. Paul | Steak bomb | Steak | Submarine/Sub sandwich/Baguette | Tavern | Tea | The Scooch | TLT (Tempeh, Lettuce, and Tomato) | Toast | Toast Hawaii | Toastie | Tofu Sandwich | Tongue toast | Torta | Torta ahogada | Tramezzino | Tripleta | Tuna | Vada pav | Vegemite | Vegetable | Welsh rarebit | Wrap | Wurstbrot (sausage bread) | Yakisoba-pan | Zapiekanka


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"sandwich": John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, died 1792, fond of gambling. The sandwich let him continue to gamble while doing his eating.


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/021402.html#sandwich

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A "sandwich", of course, is, in its simplest form, meat, cheese or other foodstuffs served between two slices of bread. The "sandwich" is said to have been invented in England in 1762 by "John Montagu (1718-1792), the fourth Earl of Sandwich" (a town in Kent, England).
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(E?)(L?) https://www.wyzant.com/resources/lessons/english/etymology/words-mod-sandwich

The "Sandwich" — a Word with Nefarious, Blasphemous, and Corrupt Origins

Where did the word "sandwich" come from?

The "sandwich", which is most popular with world-wide eaters, functions as a noun or a verb and usually prefers to have its name pronounced as "SAND wich". Besides the more obvious occupation of being something edible between two or more slices of bread, metaphorically speaking, it also likes to squeeze in between two other people, places, things, materials, etc. For example, he is willing "to sandwich" in an appointment between two other meetings or her car was sandwiched between two other cars in the parking lot.

The word "sandwich" that we use today was born in London during the very late hours one night in 1762 when an English nobleman, John Montagu (1718-1792), the Fourth Earl of Sandwich, was too busy gambling to stop for a meal even though he was hungry. The legend goes that he ordered a waiter to bring him roast-beef between two slices of bread. The Earl was able to continue his gambling while eating his snack; and from that incident, we have inherited that quick-food product that we now know as the "sandwich". He apparently had the meat put on slices of bread so he wouldn’t get his fingers greasy while he was playing cards. It’s strange that the name of this fiend should have gone down in history connected to such an innocent article of diet.

The Earl of Sandwich, the sandwich, and the town of Sandwich

The title, Earl of "Sandwich", comes from Old English (O.E.) "Sandwic", and literally means "sand village", "sandy place", or "place on the sand". The old English "wic" is a loan word from Latin "vicus", "hamlet", which also gives us the word "vicinity". The first recorded mention of the town was around 640 CE.

According to Sue Fielder in her Open Sandwich site (reproduced here with her permission):
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1880 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich 2 (W1)
-vig
-vik
-wich
-wiek
-wig
-wiig
-wiik
-wik
Weichbild
vicus
Wiekhaus
Sandwig
Wik
Wiek
villa
*vicsla
Weiler
ville
villar
villino
vilain
*uoikos
oikos
Ökumene
Ökonom
Ökonomie
ökonomisch
Vic
Vigo
Viterbo
vizinal

Die Ortsnamensendung dt. "-wig", "-wiek", engl. "-wich", dän. "-vig", "-vik", "-wik", "-wiik", "-wiig", u.a., scheint die Grundbedeutung "weichen" zu haben. Über die Bezeichnung "Wiekhaus" und der Konnotation "Ort zum Weichen", "Ort zum Ausweichen", "Befestigter Ort" (eigentlich gerade das Gegenteil von "weich", aber im Sinne von "Befestigter Ort in den man weichen konnte") ergaben sich Bedeutungen wie "Refugium", "Asylum" und allgemein "Aufenthaltsort", "Ansiedlung", "Ort", "Stadt".

Die Endung findet man etwa auch in dem eßbaren weichen Doppeldecker mit Einlage namens "Sandwich". Die Entwicklung der Bezeichnung "Sandwich" nahm jedoch einen großen Umweg. Der engliche Adlige "John Montagu, IV. Earl of Sandwich, Viscount of Hichinbroke" dessen Familiensitz in der englischen Region "Sandwich" lag, und dessen Namen auch eine zeitlang (1779 bis 1796) zur Benennung der "Sandwich-Inseln", heute "Hawaii" diente, frönte auch gerne ausdauernd dem Kartenspiel. Dabei soll es auch zu 24-stündigen Marathonsitzungen gekommen sein. Um nicht zu hungern und schnell zu essen, ohne sich die Finger zu verschmutzen, ließ er sich kaltes Fleisch zwischen zwei Brotscheiben klemmen und am den Spieltisch servieren. Dies führte zur Bezeichnung "Sandwich" wie wir es heute kennen.

Dieser Herr "von Sandwich" war nun aber ein Nachfahre angelsächsischer Wikinger, die den Ortsnamen "Sandwig" bei Flensburg mit nach England brachten. Und nach dem oben ausgeführten handelt es sich also bei dt. "Sandwig" und engl. "Sandwich" um einen Ortsnamen mit der Bedeutung "Sandort", "Sandsiedlung", im weitesten Sinne "Strandsiedlung".

Ein anderer Ansatz zur Herleitung von dt. "Wik", "Wiek" führt direkt zu lat. "vicus" = dt. "Dorf", "Gehöft", "Straßensiedlung". Diese Bezeichnungen findet man im 7.-9. Jh. vor allem in Nordwesteuropa für eine "umzäunte Siedlung", "Wohnplatz", "Handelsplatz" und "Kaufmannsniederlassung".

Bei der Suche nach der weiteren Herleitung zu lat. "vicus" und der Bedeutung "weichen", und dem Zusammenhang zwischen lat. "vicus" und dt. "weichen", bin ich auf das mir bisher nicht bekannte dt. "Weichbild" = "Rechtsgebiet einer Siedlung", gestoßen. In diesem "Weichbild", mhdt. "wichbilde", mndt. "wikbelde", mniederl. "wijcbelt", steckt mhdt. "wich-", ahdt. "wih", mndt., altsächs. "wik", mniederl. "wik", altengl. "wic" = dt. "Wohnstätte", "Siedlung" und "bill" = dt. "Recht" (vgl. auch mhdt. "unbil", dt. "Unbill" = ursprünglich dt. "Unrecht". In der Bezeichnung dt. "Weichbild" steckt also die Bedeutung "Ortsrecht", "Stadtrecht" und im übertragenen Sinn "Bereich der dem Ortsrecht untersteht", "Stadtgebiet", "Ortsgebiet".

Das lat. "vicus" = dt. "Gehöft", "Häusergruppe", "Dorf", "Flecken" geht mit dem lat. "villa" = dt. "Landgut, "Landhaus", "vornehmes Einfamilienhaus", "Einzelwohnhaus" auf ein postuliertes vorlat. "*vicsla" zurück. Weiterhin reiht sich got. "weihs" = dt. "Dorf", "Flecken" in diese Wortfamilie ein.

Die dt. "Villa" wurde im 17. Jh. aus ital. "villa" übernommen. Zu dieser Familie gehört auch das Adjektiv lat. "villaris" = dt. "zum Landgut gehörig", aus dem sich das Lehnwort dt. "Weiler" entwickelte. Als direkte Nachkommen findet man natürlich auch frz. "ville" = dt. "Stadt", span. "villar" = dt. "kleiner Ort", ital. "villino" = dt. "Einzelhaus".

Eine großere Schleife vollführte frz. "vilain" = dt. "unartig", "böse", "garstig", "ungezogen" und als Substantiv "vilain" = dt. "böses, unartiges Kind". Weiter zurück findet man hier die Bedeutung "Bauer", den "Dorfbewohner". Ähnlich wie aus dem griech. "bánausos" = dt. "Handwerker" unser dt. "Banause" wurde.

Oft endet die Rückverfolgung bei den Lateinern. In diesem Fall postuliert man ein ide. "*uoikos" aus dem sowohl lat. "vicus" als auch griech "oikos" = dt. "Haus", "Wohnung", "Hausstand", "Hauswesen", "Haushaltung", "Wirtschaft" hervorgingen (zu griech. "oikein" = dt. "bewohnen"). Damit eröffnet sich ein weiterer Verwandtschaftskreis mit dt. "Ökumene" = dt. "bewohnte Erde als ständiger menschlicher Lebens- und Siedlungsraum" und in religiöser Interpretation "die Gesamtheit der Christen und christlichen Kirchen" das sich über lat. "oecumene" aus griech. "oikouméne ge" = dt. "die bewohnte Erde" entwickelte. Und dazu gehören auch dt. "Ökonom", "Ökonomie", "ökonomisch".

Je weiter man bereits ausgetretene Ableitungspfade verläßt umso mehr läuft man Gefahr sich zu verirren. Dennoch wage ich eine Vermutung abzugeben, was den Zusammenhang von lat. "vicus" und dt. "weichen" betrifft:

Zunächst einmal die "lexikalisch gesicherte" Herleitung von dt. "Vikar" = dt. "Stellvertreter in einem geistlichen Amt in der katholischen Kirche", "Kandidat der evangelischen Theologie nach der ersten theologischen Prüfung". Diesem "Vikar" liegt lat. "vicarius" = dt. "stellvertretend", "Stellvertreter", "Statthalter" zu Grunde. Hier schließt sich dann lat. "vicis" = dt. "Wechsel", "Wechselseitigkeit", "Platz", "Stelle", "Rolle" an und die Verbindung zu lat. "vice" = dt. "anstelle von". Für dt. "Wechsel" wird über mhdt. "wehsel", ahdt. "wehsal", niederl. "wissel", altengl. "wrixl" (aus "*wixl", altengl. "wrigian" = dt. "sich wenden") eine direkte Verbindung zu dt. "weichen" aufgeführt. Und so trägt auch dt. "Wechsel" die Bedeutung "Weichen", "Platzmachen" in sich und wurde in diesem Sinne zu dt. "Tausch", "Abwechslung", "Reihenfolge".

Nach diesem weit gespannten Bogen scheint mir ein Zusammenhang zwischen lat. "vicus" und dt. "weichen" erkennbar zu sein. Vielleicht verweist die ganze Wortfamilie noch in Zeiten, in denen eine feste Wohnstätte eher die Ausnahme war. Die Menschen nahmen wechselnde Orte in Besitz und gründeten temporäre Niederlassungen, wobei sich "Wechsel" und "Ort" in "Ortswechsel" vereinen.

Viele Worte haben eine durchaus interessante aber recht gerade Entwicklungsgeschichte. Aber manchmal - wie im Falle von "Sandwich" - fängt es ganz harmlos an und plötzlich eröffnet sich eine riesige Wortfamilie mit überaus sonderlichen Familienmitgliedern. Und viele davon wurden bisher noch gar nicht erwähnt. So findet man auch noch lat. "vice versa" = dt. "umgekehrt" ("im Wechsel umgedreht"), dt. "Woche", engl. "week", worin auch die Bedeutung "Weichen", "Wechsel" steckt. Weiterhin finden sich dt. "Weide" die naheliegenden dt. "weich" (über "ausweichend", "nachgebend") und "Weiche" ein. Weiter: "Weib", "vibrieren", "Vibraphon", "Weibel" ("Feldwebel"), "wimpel", "Wipfel", "wippen", "Vizekanzlerin" ("Ausweichkanzlerin"), "Viz" (der "Zweit"-gepresste),

Als heutigen (auf lat. "vicus" verweisenden) Ortsnamen findet man die Stadt "Vic" in der Provinz Barcelona, Nordostspanien. Die iberische Siedlung hieß bei den Römern "Ausa", die Westgoten machten es zu "Ausona", das im Jahr 616 zum Bischofssitz wurde. Von 714 - 797 war es in arabischem Besitz. Nach der Rückeroberung wurde die Stadt als "Vicus" ab 878 wieder aufgebaut.

In Deutschland findet man "Braunschweig", engl. "Brunswick", als ehemaliges "Bruno's wik", engl. "Bruno's marketplace", nach dem legendären Gründer "Bruno, Duke of Saxony" (gestorben 880).

Eine weitere spanische Hafenstadt "Vigo" (in Galicien, Provinz Pontevedra, Spanien) war in der Antike als "Vicus" ein bedeutender Hafen.

Die italienische Stadt "Viterbo", zwischen Bolsenasee und Vicosee, wurde von den Römern als Kolonie "Vicus Elbii" gegründet.

Aus lat. "vicus" = dt. "Gehöft", "Dorf" entwickelte sich über lat. "vicinalis" = dt. "nachbarlich", und lat. "vicinus" = dt. "benachbart", "in der Nähe", zu dt. "vizinal" = dt. "nachbarlich", "angrenzend", engl. "vicinity" = dt. "Nachbarschaft".

Mit dem althd. "wig" = dt. "Kampf", "Krieg" (zu finden etwa in "Hedwig", "Ludwig", "Wigand", "Wiegand", "Wigbert", "Wigmar") erscheint nun allerdings ein Kandidat, der rein äußerlich zur Familie gehören könnte, aber doch nicht recht passen will. Vielleicht ergibt sich ein Zusammenhang über "bekämpfen" im Sinne von "jemanden schwächen", "erweichen".

(E?)(L?) htthttp://books.google.de/books?id=Vxt4oFo5VLIC&pg=PA92&lpg=PA92&dq=wig+wich+vik+vig&source=bl&ots=PwWh1nRIV_&sig=yizHudDEdgKze-CqmaK8cP00nz8&hl=de&sa=X&ei=8djEU4ydBOiC4gSHhYGoDw&ved=0CCkQ6AEwBQ#v=onepage&q=wig%20wich%20vik%20vig&f=falsep:///

...
"Ribe" is referred to as "vicus", the latin word for "habour town" used in connection with many european towns in the form of "wich", "wig" or "vig" in Britain and Germany, for example, and "vik" in the north.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.igenea.com/de/nachnamen-projekte/v/vick-3782

Das Vick Nachnamenprojekt

Beschreibung:

The Vick DNA Project is primarily focused on finding family connections for men with the Vick surname.
...
For "VICKERS" and variants see http://worldfamilies.net/surnames/v/vickers/. For "VICKERY" see http://worldfamilies.net/surnames/v/vickery/. For the possibly related variant of "Fix" see www.familytreedna.com/public/fixdnaproject. For the possibly related variant of "MacVicar" see www.familytreedna.com/public/macvicar.
...
Weitere Namen im Projekt

"de Vic", "Devic", "Drivick", "Fic", "Fick", "Ficke", "Fickes", "Ficq", "Ficqs", "Fics", "Fig", "Figs", "Fiik", "Fiiks", "Fik", "Fiks", "Fiq", "Fiqs", "Fique", "Fiques", "Fix", "Fyck", "Fycke", "Fyckes", "Fycks", "LeVick", "Van Vik", "Van Wyck", "Veack", "Veak", "Veake", "Veck", "Veckes", "Veeck", "Veek", "Veeks", "Veix", "Vesgue", "Vesk", "Vesque", "Vic", "Vick", "Vicke", "Vickes", "Vicks", "Vicq", "Vicqs", "Vics", "Vieck", "Viek", "Vig", "Vigs", "Viik", "Viiks", "Vik", "Viks", "Vikse", "Viq", "Viqs", "Vique", "Viques", "Vix", "Vyck", "Vycke", "Vyckes", "Vycks", "Wic", "Wich", "Wick", "Wicke", "Wickes", "Wicks", "Wicq", "Wicqs", "Wics", "Wig", "Wigs", "Wiig", "Wiik", "Wiiks", "Wik", "Wiks", "Wiq", "Wiqs", "Wique", "Wiques", "Wix", "Wyck", "Wycke", "Wyckes", "Wycks"


(E?)(L?) http://www.namenkundliche-informationen.de/pdf/97/reviews/NI%2097_2010_Hellfritzsch.pdf

...
In diesem Zusammenhang sind die Formen des Landesnamens (Norge, Nori [g], Noreg) bzw. die Auseinandersetzungen um die Änderung von Städtenamen im Rahmen der Wiederherstellung des norwegischen Ortsnamenschatzes (Oslo – Trondheim – Kristiansund – Bergen) sowie „das Schisma zwischen Hofnamen und denselben Namen in Funktion als Familiennamen“ (287), z. B. "Vik" als "Wik", "Wiik", "Wich", "Vig", "Wig", "Wiig" usw., von besonderem Interesse, aber auch gesetzliche Regelungen wie das norwegische Ortsnamengesetz (1990, 2005) oder das Personennamengesetz von 2002 werden von der Öffentlichkeit nicht widerstandslos akzeptiert. Helleland kommt zu dem Schluss: „Namen sind Teil der Sprache und die Sprache ist eng mit der Identität der Menschen verbunden. Gleichzeitig vertreten Namen Referenzen (Grundstücke, Städte, Regionen, Individuen usw.), zu denen die Namenbenutzer besondere Beziehungen haben. Diese grundlegenden Eigenschaften von Namen tragen dazu bei, dass Namenkonflikte auch künftig bestehen werden.“
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/VIG

...
Old Norse "wig" = "fight", "battle"
Old Norse "*weik-" = "to fight", "to battle"
Proto-Norse "*wih" = "fighter"
Old Norse "víg" = "fight", "battle"
Old Norse "vígr" = "in fighting condition", "able to fight"
Old Swedish "vigh" = "fight", "battle"
Old Swedish "Vig-" = "fight", "battle"
Old Swedish "Vigh-" = "fight", "battle"
Old High German "wig" = "fight", "battle"
Old High German "wîg" = "fight", "battle"
Related Names: See "Wega", "Wiebe", "Vígi", "Vígnir", "VígR", "Viiki", "Vika"

Combinations

| "Adalwig" | "Chlodowich" | "Elsvig" | "Haduwig" | "Hartwig" | "Heilwig" | "Hiltiwic" | "Vigbjørg" | "Vigfrid" | "Vighild" | "Vigleiv" | "Vigliv" | "Vigný" | Vigrun" | "Vigtýr" | "Vigunn" | "Vigvald" | "Vígarr" | "Vígbaldur" | "Vígbiorn" | "Vígbjóðr" | "Vígbrandur" | "VígdiarfR" | "Vígdís" | "Vígfastr" | "Vígfúss" | "Víggrímur" | "Víggunnur" | "VíghialmR" | "Víghvatr" | "Víglaugr" | "Víglundr" | "VíglæikR" | "Vígmarr" | "Vígmaðr" | "Vígmundr" | "Vígniútr" | "Vígráðr" | "Vígsteinn" | "Vígsterkr" | "VígulfR" | "Vígþorn" | "Vígþór" | "Wigburg" | "Wighard" | "Wignand"

First Element Forms

"Ve-", "Vei-", "Vi-", "Vig-", "Wig-", "Víg-", "Vigh-", "Wigh-"

Last Element Forms

| "-var" | "-ve" | "-vech" | "-veig" | "-ver" | "-vi" | "-vica" | "-vieg" | "-vig" | "-viiki" | "-viikki" | "-vik" | "-vika" | "-vike" | "-vikka" | "-vir" | "-vér" | "-víg" | "-vígR" | "-vík" | "-wic" | "-wich" | "-wicus" | "-wig" | "-wiga" | "-wigh" | "-wik"
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.open-sandwich.co.uk/

...
Sandwich Origins

The first recorded mention of "Sandwich" was around 664 AD but there was probably some kind of settlement in Roman times as the site is very close to Richborough Roman Fort (Rutupiae).

The name of the town is, most likely, Saxon in origin, approximately meaning "sandy place", or "the place on the sand". The word "sandwich" as an item of food came into being centuries later ...
...


(E?)(L?) http://starling.rinet.ru/cgi-bin/response.cgi?root=config&morpho=0&basename=%5Cdata%5Cie%5Cgermet&first=1681

Proto-Germanic: "*wikan-", "*wikwan-", "*wikian-"; "*wiko"; "*waikian-", "*waikwa-", "*wiki-z"
Meaning: "soft", "pliable"; "to avoid"
Old Norse: "vikja", "vikva", "ukva" st. (w-prs.) "weichen", "wenden"; "bewegen", "gehen"; "vik" f. "Bucht"; "veikja" wk. "beugen"; "veik-r" (ält. "veyk-r") "weich", "schwach"; "vik-r" f. "Bimstein"
Norwegian: "vika" vb.; "veikja" "schwächen"; "vik"
Swedish: "vika" "nachgeben", "weichen"; "vek" adj.; "vik"
Danish: "vige" vb.; "vegne" "umbiegen"; "veg" adj.; "vig"
Old English: "wican" st. v. "weichen", "zusammenfallen"; "wic" f. "bocht"; "wac" "weich", "schwach biegsam", "elend"
Old Frisian: "wiaka"
East Frisian: Fris "wyk" "zijvaart", "zijkanaal"
Old Saxon: "wikan" "weichen"; "wek" "schwach"
Middle Dutch: "wiken"; Kil. "wijck" "sinus maris"; "weec"
Dutch: "wijken"; "wijk" f., dial. "wiek", "wieke", noord-holl. "wijkje" "inham van het water"; "week"
Middle Low German: "wiken" vb.; "wik" m., "wike" f. "Entweichen", "Flucht"; "wek"
Old High German: "wihhan" st. v. "eine Richtung nehmen", "ausweichen", "sich zurückziehen", "aus dem Wege gehen", "Platz machen" (um 800); "weih" "weich", "mild", "schwach", "furchtsam" (8.Jh.)
Middle High German: "wich", "wich" st. m. "das weichen", "wanken", "fliegen"; "wichen" st. "eine richtung nehmen", "seitwärts od. rückwärts gehn", "ausweichen"; "ablassen von"; "weichen", "zurücktreten vor", "aus dem wege gehn", "platz machen"; "entweichen auf, durch"; "weich" "weich"; "biegsam", "schwanken"; "nachgiebig", "zart"
German: "weichen"; "weich"


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue109.html

Sandwich (placename)
...
Of course, "Sandwich" was his earldom, and what an excellent question you pose about that name's origins. "Sandwich" is an Old English name deriving from "sand" "sand" and "wic" (pronounced "witch") meaning "landing place" or "port". "Wic" appears in other place names such as "Greenwich" ("the green (grassy) port") and "Norwich" ("north port"). It is said that the "sand" of "Sandwich", however, was not on the beach but was instead in the soil of the area, making it agriculturally rich. Anyhow, though Sandwich was once on the coast, it is now two miles inland.


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vic

...
Ortsname

In früherer Zeit wurde der Name der Stadt in der damaligen katalanischen Schreibweise "Vich" geschrieben. In der Zeit der Zweiten Republik wurde der Stadtname offiziell in "Vic" geändert. Seit 1982 ist Vic auch die offizielle Schreibweise nach den linguistischen Normen der katalanischen Sprache von Pompeu Fabra i Poch am Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_etymologies_of_country_subdivision_names

"Brunswick" (German: "Braunschweig"): from the town of "Brunswick", itself originating as "Bruno's wik" ("Bruno's marketplace") (with reference to the legendary founder "Bruno, Duke of Saxony", died 880) or as "burnt wik")


(E?)(L?) http://woerterbuchnetz.de/DWB/?sigle=DWB&mode=Gliederung&hitlist=&patternlist=&lemid=GW20193

"wiek", "wick", f., "bucht". verbreitet in den sprachen des Nord- und Ostseegebietes: ags. "wíc", engl. dial. "wick", "wich", isl. "vík", dän. "vig", schwed., norw. dial. "vik", mnd. "wik", nl. "wik" (Hellquist svensk etym. ordb. 31341). wieweit die deutschen belege auf entlehnung aus dem skandinavischen beruhen oder altererbt sind, ist schwer zu bestimmen, s. dazu und zur scheidung von "wiek", m., "vicus" Th. Frings in PBB 65 (1942) 221—226. germ. grundform "*wiko" zu "wiken", also "die zurückweichende" oder "die biegung", vgl. DWB "bucht" zu "biegen" sowie Walde-Pokorny 1, 235; Pokorny 1130. "wiek" ist in der schriftspr. der gegenwart (seemannssprachlich s. Kluge 832 f., Eichler v. bug z. heck [1954] 466) und in nd. maa. (s. u. a. Stürenburg ostfr. 330, Doornkaat Koolman ostfries. 3, 548, brem.-nieders. wb. [Bd. 29, Sp. 1563] 5, 255, Möller Sylt 300b, Mensing schlesw.-holst. 5, 630, Frischbier pr. 2, 469) bezeugt, wird jedoch fast nur noch als flur- und ortsname gebraucht (Putziger, Prorer, Potenitzer Wiek, s. Bach ortsnamen 1, 290 u. bes. 2, 357). nur gelegentlich lexikalisch verzeichnet: sinus ein wyck Chyträus nomencl. (Rostock 1585) 73; sinus maris Balthici Danzker wiek Stieler stammb. (1691) 2529; "die wiek", plur. "die wieken", ein völlig niederdeutsches, im hochdeutschen unbekanntes wort' Adelung 5 (1786) 219; "wick" Voigt hdwb. f. d. geschäftsführung (1807) 2, 565; als veraltet bei Campe 5 (1811) 714a. vereinzelt in der (diminutiv-)form "wiekel": am haffte oder wickel bei Denemarcken Chr. Entzelt cronica d. alten marck (1579) D 2a. zur synonymik vgl. Fr. L. Jahn bereicherung (1806) 81, Sanders wb. dt. syn. (1871) 734. für eine tiefer einschneidende bucht steht vereinzelt auch inwiek s. ebda und teil 4, 2, sp. 2151.

literar. belege aus nd., bzw. dem nd. nahestehenden quellen; "wiek" bezeichnet meist eine kleinere, flachere einbuchtung der Ostseeküste: eyn schip vorghing vnde bleue in der Rybbenitzer wijk, dar se ere gudere ane hadden (1420) Lüb. urkundenb. 6, 320; so gij ock in eneme anderen juwem breue begeren vmme twee juwer borger schepe, wij se dessen winter ouer in der Nigesteden wijck to liggende gunnen (1465) ebda 10, 673; an de ander syde van der wyk nortost dar licht ene rudse (15. jh.) Koppmann seebuch 5, 2; wenn nun diser bergsafft ... hell vnnd glat wird, stoszen jn die stürmwind ... mit dem wasserschwal im Samland in etliche wicken oder hafen Mathesius Sarepta (1571) 56b; das vorland ... machte eine grosse vnd weite wike, zum fischfang gar bekwem vnd f?rtreglich Schütz hist. rer. Pruss. (1592) 1, B 1a; dann in dem ersten theil Africae sind zweene wiecken, zwar ungleicher gr?sse, aber fast einerlei eigenschaft W. v. Kalchus Sallust (1629) 213; dasz ein jeder fischmeister in seinem ampt uf die strom-fischerey und die kleinen garnen, so für den strömen und in den wicken fischen, damit die gebür davon geliefert werden möge, fleiszige ufsicht pflege (1640) corpus constit. Prutenicarum 2, 226 (vgl. dazu: 'in den wikken fischen, d. h. in buchten fischen' Hennig pr. wb. [1785] 300); südost zum osten von Eckholmen ein meil ist eine wyk, die Kasperwyk genannt wird Manson seebuch (1701) 13; die spitzen von Jasmund und von Wittow, welche beide länder durch ihre krümmung die wiek oder bucht bilden, lagen izt in einer beträchtlichen ferne hinter uns in der see Kosegarten rhapsodieen (1794) 2, 65.

"wiek", f. (n.), "ansiedlung", "befestigter ort"; nd. form zu lat. "vicus", s. "weich", m. teil 14, 1, 1, sp. 474, z. t. verkürzt aus "wiekhaus" (s. d.), die gelegentlich in hdt. texten auftritt. wohl zuvörderst als "zufluchtsort" aufgefaszt: "wigk" heiszt ein "schlosz", "refugium", "hort", "asylum" bei Luther tischr. 5, 512 W.; vmb dessen willen ein solcher ort (den wir jetzt "festung" heissen) die alten Teutschen und Sachsen eine "wicke" nenneten Kirchhof milit. discipl. (1602) 10; "wiek" heisset ein "flekk" oder "stätlein", darin sich die bürger und einwohner des ortes für gewalt enthalten Schottel haubtspr. (1663) 276; "wiek" et "wick" das "refugium", "asylum" Stieler stammb. (1691) 2529; "wig" oder "wich" "ein mit mauren verwahrter ort, darein man weichen können, wie zur see in einem sinum oder port" Frisch t.-lat. (1741) 2, 433a.


Erstellt: 2014-07

sándwich (W3)

In Spanien machte man aus dem engl. "sandwich" span. "sándwich".

(E1)(L1) http://etimologias.dechile.net/?sa.ndwich

sándwich


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=10&content=sándwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Span. "sándwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1940 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

sandwich (Verb) (W3)

Das Verb engl. "to sandwich" bezieht sich auf den Aufbau eines Sandwichs, bedeutet also etwa dt. "eingeschliessen", "einklemmen".

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sandwich

sandwich (v.)

1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of the stuff between the identical pieces of bread. Related: "Sandwiched"; "sandwiching".


(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalgeographic.com/traveler/articles/1076romanholiday.html

...
I decide to try my luck on the "Spanish Steps", that curving staircase that cascades down from the Trinità dei Monti church, home to a permanent population of teenage boys inspecting the girls who are inspecting the lingerie at the Dolce & Gabbana store. Sandwiched between the Keats-Shelley Memorial House and Babington's Tea Rooms, named after the nearby "Spanish embassy" to the Vatican, and a favorite photo-op for Japanese shoppers, the Steps are about as cosmopolitan a setting as you can find in Rome.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1880 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

sandwich bread (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/2282491364049026/Wie-bei-Subway-Sandwich-Brote.html

Wie-bei-Subway-Sandwich-Brote

Subway Sandwich Bread
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodbreads.html#pullman

"Pullman loaves" [aka "Pain de mie", "Pain Anglais", "Sandwich bread"]

Our research confirms straight-edged "Pullman" loaves were served in dining cars manufactured by this company. It also reveals this type of bread existed long before both railroads and the company. The original reason for the perfectly symmetrical squared loaves was to minimize crust. This loaf was the bread of choice for decorative canapes, hors d'oeuvres, etc. Early loaves were made in several shapes in addition to rectangles. Mr. James Porterfield, railway dining expert, states Pullman selected this loaf for efficient storage purposes. This may be true. He also states this is the same "sandwich bread" we see today in our grocery stores. We think Julia Child, James Beard and Prosper Montagne would disagree.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=sandwich bread
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "sandwich bread" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1860 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich Day (W3)

Der Geburtstag des "IV. Earl of Sandwich" (Nov 3, 1718 - April 30, 1792 (London)), der 03. November, wurde anscheinend im Jahr 1981 zum "National Sandwich Day" erklärt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#holidays

National Sandwich Day

"National" food observances (months, weeks, days) are popular in the USA. They are hosted by different organizations for specific purposes.

National Sandwich Day

In the library world, the standard reference tool used for identifying & researching national observances is a book titled Chases' Calendar of Annual Events. The earliest print reference we find for "National Sandwich Day" comes from Chase's Calendar of Annual Events, 1981 (p. 110). This source does not credit the origination of this day to another source. The entry is presented as fact. November 3rd, generally regarded by moderns as the birthdate of the Fourth Earl of Sandwich, credited for inventing this food. Coincidentally??! The entry for National Sandwich Month disappeared in 1981. Never to return.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sandwich Day
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sandwich Day" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1910 / 1970 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich del Sur (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=10&content=Sandwich del Sur
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Span. "Sandwich del Sur" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich Estimator (W3)

Auch in der Statistik trifft man auf "Sandwich". Die genaue mathematische Bedeutung möge man an anderer Stelle nachschlagen (Suchtreffer: 322.000 Ergebnisse). Die "Sandwich-Schätzfunktion" verdankt ihre Bezeichnung ganz allgemein der Vorgabe, dass ein Ergebniswert - wie der Belag eines Sandwich - in einem Bereich eingegrenzt bleibt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.stat.berkeley.edu/~census/mlesan.pdf

On The So-Called “Huber Sandwich Estimator” and “Robust Standard Errors”
by
David A. Freedman
...


(E?)(L?) http://isi.cbs.nl/glossary/bloken00.htm




(E?)(L?) http://gosset.wharton.upenn.edu/~foster/teaching/541/sandwich_estimator.html

...
Called sandwich estimator since the variance of Y is sandwiched between the two inverses.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sandwich Estimator
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sandwich Estimator" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

sandwich generation (W3)

Die engl. "sandwich generation" muss sich sowohl um die Kinder als auch um die Eltern kümmern.

(E?)(L?) http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/sandwichgeneration.asp

Sandwich Generation


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/sandwich generation

sandwich generation


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/sandwichgeneration.asp

sandwich generation

n. People who must care for both their children and their parents; people who have finished raising their children and now must take care of their aging parents.

Also: sandwiched generation.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=sandwich generation
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "sandwich generation" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1950 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich-Bauweise (W3)

Die Stabilität eines Objekts wächst quadratisch mit der Dicke seiner Wand. Daher macht man die Wand innen und außen aus möglichst festem Material (z.B. kohlefaserverstärktes Epoxydharz), und verwendet dazwischen als Abstandhalter ein möglichst leichtes Material. So kann man die Schale dick, aber trotzdem leicht bauen.

Sandwichbauweise (W3)

Dt. "Sandwichbauweise" ist eine andere Bezeichnung für dt. "Verbundbauweise".

(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/233178

...
Die Hoffnungen der Belegschaft, daß in Hohenems die Skipressen wieder angeworfen werden, lösen sich durch die Reorganisation aber in Luft auf. Diese stützten sich auf Meldungen, wonach Benetton künftig nicht mehr bei Elan fertigen lasse, und in Hohenems wieder rund 15.000 Paar Ski in der "Sandwichbauweise" (Rennski, Anm.) fertigen lassen werde.
...
Die drei Flügel des 3,20 Meter breiten Propellers sind aus glasfaserverstärktem Kunststoff gefertigt (Sandwichbauweise).
...


(E?)(L1) http://www.vds-ev.de/anglizismenindex/

Sandwichbauweise: Verbundbauweise


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichbauweise
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichbauweise" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1950 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichbelag (W3)

Der dt. "Sandwichbelag" ist das was zwischen den beiden Brotscheiben liegt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.chefkoch.de/suche.php?suche=sandwichbelag&wo=1


(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/233179


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichbelag
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichbelag" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichboard (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

...
Ein "Sandwichboard" ist eine Holzplatte, die außen aus Sperrholz und in der Mitte aus einer Faser- oder Spanplatte besteht, oder innen hohl ist.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sandwichboard
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sandwichboard" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

sandwiched (W3)

Das Verb engl. "sandwich" bezieht sich auf die Situation der Fleischeinlage zwischen den beiden Brotscheiben. Je nach Lage der Dinge kann dies als positiv oder negativ empfunden werden. Im Alltag findet man meist die adjektivierte Form (to be) "sandwiched" = dt. "eingeklemmt sein".

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.com/news/world-south-asia-12011352

Afghanistan profile
...
Its strategic position "sandwiched" between the Middle East, Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent along the ancient "Silk Route" means that Afghanistan has long been fought over - despite its rugged and forbidding terrain.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-17601580

Moldova profile
...
"Sandwiched" between Romania and Ukraine, Moldova emerged as an independent republic following the collapse of the USSR in 1991.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sandwich

sandwich (v.)

1841, from sandwich (n.), on the image of the stuff between the identical pieces of bread. Related: "Sandwiched"; "sandwiching".


(E?)(L?) http://www.nationalgeographic.com/traveler/articles/1076romanholiday.html

...
I decide to try my luck on the "Spanish Steps", that curving staircase that cascades down from the Trinità dei Monti church, home to a permanent population of teenage boys inspecting the girls who are inspecting the lingerie at the Dolce & Gabbana store. Sandwiched between the Keats-Shelley Memorial House and Babington's Tea Rooms, named after the nearby "Spanish embassy" to the Vatican, and a favorite photo-op for Japanese shoppers, the Steps are about as cosmopolitan a setting as you can find in Rome.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=sandwiched
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "sandwiched" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.
Dt. "sandwiched" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1910 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwich-Generation (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.vds-ev.de/anglizismenindex/

Sandwich-generation: Elterngeneration (eingeklemmt zwischen Fürsorge für Kinder und eigene Eltern)


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwich-Generation
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwich-Generation" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichgeneration (W3)

Die "Sandwichgeneration" ist eingeklemmt zwischen zu versorgenden Kindern und Eltern. Wenn es dicke kommt gibt es auch schon Enkel und noch Gro0eltern der "Sandwichgeneration". Das wäre dann etwa eine "Doppel-Whopper-Generation".

(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/service/stichwortlisten/neo_90


(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/308693

Sandwichgeneration kann auch als Lehnwort interpretiert werden (vgl. engl. sandwich generation).


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichgeneration
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichgeneration" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1980 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichman (W3)

Der engl. "Sandwichmann" verkauft keine "Sandwiches". Er dient vielmehr der Verkaufsförderung im allgemeinen; er trägt vorn und hinten eine Werbetafel zwischen denen er engl. "sandwiched" ist.

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20070512130707/http://www2.bartleby.com/81/14863.html

Sandwichman (A).

A perambulating advertisement displayer, with an advertisement board before and behind. 1

“The Earl of Shaftesbury desired to say a word on behalf of a very respectable body of men, ordinarily called "sandwiches",” — The Times, March 16th, 1867.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sandwichman
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sandwichman" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Der dt. "Sandwichmann" erscheint also früher als der engl. "Sandwichman".

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichmann (W3)

Der dt. "Sandwichmann" verkauft keine "Sandwiches". Er dient vielmehr der Verkaufsförderung im allgemeinen; er trägt vorn und hinten eine Werbetafel zwischen denen er engl. "sandwiched" ist.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

Sandwich nennt man außerdem ein auf Brust und Rücken zu tragendes doppeltes Plakat, das für Produkte oder politische Ziele wirbt. Sein Träger ist der "Sandwichman", "Sandwichmann", auch als "Sandwichpicker" bezeichnet.


(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/83717?module=elex&pos=16


(E?)(L?) http://pcast.sr-online.de/feeds/sr1-kaddsche/feed.xml


(E?)(L?) http://pcast.sr-online.de/play/sr1-kaddsche/2010-05-25_kkk-sandwichmann.mp3

Es Kaddsche: Was ist ein Sandwichmann?


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichmann
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichmann" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1860 auf.

Der dt. "Sandwichmann" erscheint also früher als der engl. "Sandwichman".

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichmontage (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

Sandwich ist aber auch die Kurzform von "Sandwichmontage", eine Fotomontage, bei der zwei Negative Schicht an Schicht zusammengelegt und dann vergrößert oder kopiert werden.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichmontage
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichmontage" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichmünze (W3)

"Sandwichmünzen" werden aus verschiedenen Schichtwerkstoffen hergestellt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.münzeninside.de/lexikon/Sandwichmuenzen/


(E?)(L?) http://www.reppa.de/lex.asp?ordner=s&link=SandwichM.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.srh-ltd.com/lexikon.php?Land=at,d_&File=./lex/Sd_d_.txt


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichmünze
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichmünze" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichpicker (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

Sandwich nennt man außerdem ein auf Brust und Rücken zu tragendes doppeltes Plakat, das für Produkte oder politische Ziele wirbt. Sein Träger ist der "Sandwichman", "Sandwichmann", auch als "Sandwichpicker" bezeichnet.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sandwichpicker
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sandwichpicker" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sandwichtechnik (W3)

Überall wo es darum geht Schichten verschiedener Materialien zusammenzufügen stößt man auf die Bezeichnung "Sandwichtechnik". Auch in der Forografie und beim Zahnarzt spricht man von "Sandwichtechnik".

"Sandwichtechnik": Schichttechnik; Vorgehen beim Legen einer größeren Komposit-Füllung: Das Material wird nicht auf einmal in das zu füllende Loch (Kavität) gelegt, sondern in Schichten eingebracht und jedes Mal mit Licht zwischengehärtet (Polymerisation). Ziel ist es dabei, die materialbedingte Schrumpfung des Komposits so gering wie möglich zu halten.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ceryx.de/sprache/wd_sandwich.htm

Unter "Sandwichtechnik" schließlich versteht man ein Herstellungsverfahren, bei dem Platten verschiedener Stärke und Substanz zusammengefügt werden, relevant vor allem bei der Fabrikation von Flugzeugen und Skiern.


(E?)(L?) http://www.owid.de/artikel/232864

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Er erzielte über Verfremdungseffekte die Auflösung von Konturen und Sehgewohnheiten. Haidenthaler bedient sich bei seiner "Sandwichtechnik" nur fotografischer Techniken; er verzichtet auf Farbtopf, Pinsel und Computer.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Sandwichtechnik
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Sandwichtechnik" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1950 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

sandwich-words



(E?)(L1) http://www.vds-ev.de/anglizismenindex/




Sausage Sandwich (W3)

Das "Sausage Sandwich" scheint wohl im Jahr 1851 erstmals schriftlich erwähnt worden zu sein.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

by Charles Dickens - 1851
Ham sandwiches, beef sandwiches, German sausage sandwiches - legions of sandwiches are cut and consumed. The cry is "mustard", and anon the coppers rattle, ...
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LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (30 Matches)




Erstellt: 2014-07

Snow Petrel (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://search.birdpost.com/search?query=Petrel

SPECIES RESULTS (71)

Antarctic Petrel | Cape Petrel | Snow Petrel | Mascarene Petrel | Tahiti Petrel


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow Petrel

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Sub-species

There are two subspecies, They differ in size, and the greater form has a stouter, larger beak.
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Etymology

The word "petrel" is derived from Peter the Apostle and the story of his walking on water. This is in reference to the petrel's habit of appearing to run on the water to take off. Also, "Pagodroma" can be broken down as follows, "pagos" is Greek for "ice" and "dromos" for "a running course". "Nivea" is derived from Latin adjective "niveus", -a, -um meaning "snowy". The snow reference is probably meant for its white color.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Snow Petrel
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Snow Petrel" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

South Sandwich Fracture Zone (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://geonames.usgs.gov/apex/f?p=136:3:0::NO::P3_ANTAR_ID,P3_TITLE:19031,South%20Sandwich%20Fracture%20Zone

Antarctica Feature Detail

Antarctica ID: 19031
Feature Name: "South Sandwich Fracture Zone"
Class: Valley
Latitude: 630000S
Longitude: 0200000W
Description: An undersea fracture zone named in association with the "South Sandwich Islands". Name approved 6/87 (Advisory Committee for Undersea Features (ACUF) 225).
Date Entered: 23-AUG-07


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=South Sandwich Fracture Zone
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "South Sandwich Fracture Zone" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

South Sandwich Islands (W3)

Die "South Sandwich Islands" benannte James Cook nach "John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich", der zu dieser Zeit als erster Lord der Admiralität diente und entscheidend dazu beitrug Cook's Forschungen zu finanzieren.

(E?)(L?) http://www.getty.edu/vow/TGNHierarchy?find=&place=&nation=&english=Y&subjectid=1000000


(E?)(L?) http://www.getty.edu/vow/TGNServlet?english=Y&find=South+Sandwich+Islands&place=&page=1&nation=

1. Hierarchy of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (dependent state) South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands .......... (dependent state)
(World, South America, Falkland Islands) [7005153]

2. Hierarchy of South Sandwich Islands (island group) South Sandwich Islands .......... (island group)
(World, South America, Falkland Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands) [1010312]


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/South Sandwich Islands

South Sandwich Islands


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms

John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich — sandwiches and South Sandwich Islands


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_islands_named_after_people

Saunders Island, South Sandwich Islands - Charles Saunders (Royal Navy officer)


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Sandwich_Islands#South_Sandwich_Islands

South Sandwich Islands

Captain James Cook discovered the southern eight islands of the Sandwich Islands Group in 1775, although he lumped the southernmost three together, and their status as separate islands was not established until 1820 by Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen. The northern three islands were discovered by Bellingshausen in 1819. The islands were tentatively named "Sandwich Land" by Cook, although he also commented that they might be a group of islands rather than a single body of land. The name was chosen in honour of "John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich", First Lord of the Admiralty. The word "South" was later added to distinguish them from the "Sandwich Islands", now known as the "Hawaiian Islands".
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook

...
Before returning to England, Cook made a final sweep across the South Atlantic from Cape Horn and surveyed, mapped and took possession for Britain of "South Georgia", which had been explored by Anthony de la Roché in 1675. Cook also discovered and named "Clerke Rocks" and the "South Sandwich Islands" ("Sandwich Land"). He then turned north to South Africa, and from there continued back to England. His reports upon his return home put to rest the popular myth of Terra Australis.
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Montagu%2C_4th_Earl_of_Sandwich


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Montagu%2C_4th_Earl_of_Sandwich#Islands_named_after_Sandwich_by_Capt_James_Cook

...
Islands named after Sandwich by Capt James Cook

Lord Sandwich was a great supporter of Captain James Cook. As First Lord of the Admiralty, Sandwich approved Admiralty funds for the purchase and fit-out of the Resolution, Adventure and Discovery for Cook’s second and third expeditions of exploration in the Pacific Ocean. In honour of Sandwich, Captain Cook named the "Sandwich Islands" (now "Hawaii") after him, as well as "Montague Island" off the south east coast of Australia, the "South Sandwich Islands" in the Southern Atlantic Ocean and "Montague Island" in the Gulf of Alaska.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=South Sandwich Islands
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "South Sandwich Islands" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1870 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Spanjo sandwich (W3)

"Spanjo sandwich"

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L




(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Spanjo

Spanjo

The best sandwich ever made. It was invented in Ann Arbor, MI at the Halfass (.5ass) it consists of Wheat Bread, Cream Cheese, Swiss Cheese, and Sauteed Apple.
...


Erstellt: 2014-07

Submarine Sandwich (W3)

Über die genaue Herkunft der "Submarine Sandwiches" streiten sich die Geister. Generell zutreffend ist wohl, dass die von italienischen Einwanderern bevorzugten Sandwiches ("Italian Sandwich") in der Form an U-Boote erinnern und im Ersten oder Zweiten Weltkrieg in amerikanischen Hafenstädten in "Submarine Sandwich" umbenannt wurden.

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

---1905---Lady Baltimore cake & submarine sandwiches


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodfaqindex.html

submarine sandwiches (aka heros, hoagies, wedges, grinders &c.).....


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

Submarine Sandwich (1925)

JUST FOR THE record, the hoagie or submarine sandwich was invented by the late Mrs. Catherine DiCostanza back in 1925. She and her husband Augustine operated a combination sandwich shop-delicatessen for 43 years at 1212 W. 3rd St., in Chester. All of the family worked in the shop at one time or another, including daughter Rosie (now Mrs. Rose Wichanski of Westtown), a classmate of mine at Dewey School nine or 10 years ago.
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LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (45 Matches)

L


(E?)(L?) http://thatsmyhome.com/category/lunchbox/submarine-deli-sandwiches/




(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_sandwich

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History and etymology

The sandwich originated in several different Italian American communities in the Northeastern United States from the late 19th to mid-20th centuries. Portland, Maine claims to be the birthplace of the "Italian sandwich" and it is considered Maine's signature sandwich. The popularity of this Italian-American cuisine has grown from its origins in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts to most parts of the United States, Canada, and with the advent of chain restaurants, is now available in many parts of the world. In Europe, it would simply be known as a baguette, or a ciabatta, named after traditional breads long baked in France and Italy.

The use of the term "submarine" or "sub" (after the resemblance of the roll to the shape of a "submarine") is widespread. One theory is that it originated in a restaurant in Scollay Square in Boston, Massachusetts at the beginning of World War II. The sandwich was created to entice the large numbers of navy servicemen stationed at the Charlestown Navy Yard. The bread was a smaller, specially baked baguette that resembled the hull of the submarines it was named after.

Another theory suggests the submarine was brought to the U.S. by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s. He is said to have named it after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called Fenian Ram in the Paterson Museum of New Jersey in 1918. His granddaughter has stated the following: "My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti's Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional "Italian sandwiches". His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn't get soggy)."

Those living in Eastern Connecticut and Rhode Island are usually told that the name is associated with two facilities in Groton: the US Navy's submarine base, and the nearby Electric Boat Company which built them. This quote seems to support that theory: "During World War II, the commissary of the United States Navy's submarine base in Groton, Connecticut, ordered five hundred hero sandwiches a day from Benedetto Capaldo's Italian deli in New London, where the name "sub" was soon applied to the item." - America Eats Out, John Mariani [Morrow : New York] 1991 (p. 114-5)"
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Submarine Sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Submarine Sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1890 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Subway Sandwich (W3)

Die von Subway vertriebenen Sandwiches heißen natürlich "Subway Sandwich" oft jedoch verkürzt einfach "Sub".

(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/museum-the-micro-museum

Somerville, Massachusetts
Museum - The Micro Museum
The self-proclaimed world's smallest museum, located next to a Massachusetts sandwich chain
Museums and Collections
15 Aug 2013
...
The Mµseum (or "Micro Museum) is too small to have a real address. In fact, at only eight inches deep and sixteen inches wide, this New England art installation is dwarfed by the "We Bake Our Own Bread" sign glaring from the "Subway sandwich" shop next door.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/2282491364049026/Wie-bei-Subway-Sandwich-Brote.html

Wie-bei-Subway-Sandwich-Brote

Subway Sandwich Bread
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.subway-sandwiches.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.translationdirectory.com/article983.htm

...
In Sao Paulo, for instance, Italian immigrants have long dominated the local taste for pasta and pizza. Therefore, when Pizza Hut brought its famous thick crust to Brazil, the variation that is so popular in the United States was quick to fail. Similarly, when Subway first arrived, the "sandwich chain" threatened to take over the kingdom that McDonald's had established in 1979. Again, with no formal communication or marketing research to learn what Brazilians wanted from them, Subway also swiftly became a royal failure. McDonald's strategy, on the other hand, was successful because instead of simply importing American burgers and fries, they conducted extensive research to find out variations that the demanding Brazilian population might enjoy. The "Cheddar McMelt sandwich", for example, was actually created in the country specifically for the local population. The guaraná (a traditional Brazilian fruit) soft drink has become a permanent addition to the McDonald's menu and is exclusive to Brazilian restaurants. Had Pizza Hut and Subway listened to their customers more carefully, had they tried to "speak their language," they might have avoided becoming a tropical fiasco.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Subway Sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Subway Sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1910 / 1980 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Südliche Sandwichinseln (W3)

Die "South Sandwich Islands" benannte James Cook nach "John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich", der zu dieser Zeit als erster Lord der Admiralität diente und entscheidend dazu beitrug Cook's Forschungen zu finanzieren.

Die "Südlichen Sandwichinseln" gehören zu "Südgeorgien und die Südlichen Sandwichinseln".

(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%BCdliche_Sandwichinseln


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Südliche Sandwichinseln
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Südliche Sandwichinseln" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Süd-Sandwich-Inseln (W3)

Die "South Sandwich Islands" benannte James Cook nach "John Montagu, the 4th Earl of Sandwich", der zu dieser Zeit als erster Lord der Admiralität diente und entscheidend dazu beitrug Cook's Forschungen zu finanzieren.

(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Süd-Sandwich-Inseln
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Süd-Sandwich-Inseln" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Sushi (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sushi

...
History

The original type of "sushi", known today as "nare-zushi", was first made in Southeast Asia, possibly along what is now known as the Mekong River. The term "sushi" comes from an archaic grammatical form no longer used in other contexts; literally, "sushi" means "sour-tasting", a reflection of its historic fermented origins. The oldest form of "sushi" in Japan, "narezushi", still very closely resembles this process, wherein fish is fermented via being wrapped in soured fermenting rice. The fish proteins break down via fermentation into their constituent amino acids. The fermenting rice and fish results in a sour taste and also one of the five basic tastes, called umami in Japanese.
...


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_sushi#Etymology

...
Etymology

The Japanese name "sushi" is written with kanji (Chinese characters) for ancient Chinese dishes which bear little resemblance to today's sushi.

One of these might have been a salt pickled fish. The first use of "???" appeared in the face and hand, the oldest Chinese dictionary believed to be written around the 3rd century BC. It is explained as literally "Those made with fish (are called) ???, those made with meat (are called) ???". "???" is a fermented meat made from salt and minced pork and "???" is a fermented fish made from salt and minced fish. The Chinese character "???" is believed to have a much earlier origin, but this is the earliest recorded instance of that character being associated with food. "???" was not associated with rice.

In 2nd century AD, another character used to write "sushi", "???", appeared in another Chinese dictionary of Han dynasty: "???", which translates as "??? is a food where fish is pickled by rice and salt, which is eaten when it is ready". This food is believed to be similar to "Narezushi", i.e. that the fish was fermented for long times in conjunction with rice and was then eaten after removing the rice.

A century later, the meaning of the two characters had become confused and by the time these two characters arrived in Japan, the Chinese themselves did not distinguish between them. The Chinese had stopped using rice as a part of the fermentation process, and then stopped eating pickled fish altogether. By the Ming dynasty, "???" and "???" had disappeared from Chinese cuisine.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Sushi
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Sushi" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1740 / 1850 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

T

Taco (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taco

...
Etymology

According to the Real Academia Española, publisher of Diccionario de la Lengua Española, the word "taco" describes a typical Mexican dish of a maize tortilla folded around food ("Tortilla de maíz enrollada con algún alimento dentro, típica de México"). The original sense of the word is of a "plug" or "wad" used to fill a hole ("Pedazo de madera, metal u otra materia, corto y grueso, que se encaja en algún hueco"). The Online Etymological Dictionary defines taco as a "tortilla filled with spiced meat" and describes its etymology as derived from Mexican Spanish, "light lunch", literally, "plug", "wadding". The sense development from "plug" may have taken place among Mexican silver miners, who used explosive charges in plug form consisting of a paper wrapper and gunpowder filling.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Taco
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Taco" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1720 / 1810 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

Tavern sandwich (W3)

"Tavern sandwich"

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A0=ADS-L

LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG (9 Matches)



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The problem is that thousands of establishments in America were called "taverns" in the 1940s and 1950s. Are we talking about Iowa's Ye Olde Tavern, Baltimore's Little Taverns, or the White Tavern restaurant chain?
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Serve the hamburger patties with a flavorful butter mixture, or don't shape the patties and serve the browned hamburger meat in a thick barbecue sauce to be ladled over the toasted buns. These are known as "Tavern Burgers" in some areas of the country and are a special favorite of the teen-age crowd.
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"Taverns" originated (al east in my world) at Ye Olde Tavern, a little restaurant on 14th and Jackson in Sioux City, Iowa, where they were the house special and were devoured by hordes of hungry high school kids from Central.
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TAVERNS Bring the water to a boil in a good-sized pan. Crumble the ground beef and add it to the water, along with the rest of the ingredients. Bring the mixture back to a boil for a minute or two, stirring to mix well and break up any lumps of meat. Reduce heat, cover and simmer 20 minutes.
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In Baltimore they are known affectionately as "deathballs." In Washington they're called "ratburgers" - also affectionately.
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"Oh, yes. And it's been that way ever since Mr. Harry Duncan started Little Taverns back in 1927. Even the square buns are made especially for us by Wonder Bread from our own dough recipe."
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The area where I grew up called a loose-meat sandwich with tomato sauce, ketchup, etc. on a bun, a "tavern". This sandwich is also known as a "Sloppy Joe", a "BBQ" in Sioux Falls, and a "Made Right" in parts of Iowa.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Tavern

Little Tavern Shops was a chain of hamburger restaurants in Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

The first Little Tavern opened March 24, 1927, in Louisville, Kentucky, by Harry F. Duncan. The first Washington location was opened in October 1928 and the first in Baltimore opened its doors in June 1930. By 1937, there were 33 shops open. At the height of the chain, there were almost 50 locations. Duncan sold the chain in 1981. The last restaurant closed on April 29, 2008.
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Erstellt: 2014-07

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Victoria Sandwich Cakes
Victorian Sandwich Cakes (W3)

Die englische "Queen Victoria" muss anscheinend immer auftreten, wenn es um Dinge der guten alten Zeit geht - oder wenn man den Dingen etwas davon vermitteln möchte.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcakes.html#victoriansandwichcakes

Culinary evidence confirms sandwich cakes originated in the 19th century. Essentially composed of sponge cake filled with jams or soft creams, these were popular Victorian tea treats. Like so many popular English desserts, they descended from Renaissance-era trifles. Tipsy cake is a version with alcohol.
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"The Victoria sandwich, or Victoria sponge as it is also known, was named after Queen Victoria of Great Britain, and seems first to have come on the scene after about a quarter of a century of her reign: the first known recipe for it is given in Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management (1861) (although from its placement in the book she seems to regard it more as a dessert dish than a tea-time cake). Essentially it consists of two layers of light sponge cake with between them a filling of jam, or sometimes cream."
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"Victoria sandwich cake named after Queen Victoria, is a plain cake made by the creaming method...closely related to pound cake. Although sometimes referred to as Victoria sponge cake', it is not a true sponge cake in the sense that Savoy or Genoise are. Usually it is cut in half and spread with jam and/or cream to give a sandwich. The top is usually dusted with sugar."
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Victoria Sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Victoria Sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

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Western Sandwich (W3)

Das engl. "Western Sandwich" wurde um 1908 kreiert und - warum auch immer "Western Sandwich" genannt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/texas/entry/western_sandwich_denver_sandwich_denver_omelet/

A "Western sandwich" (also called a "Denver sandwich" or "Denver omelet") usually consists of an omelet with ham, onions, and green pepper, served between two slices of (usually toasted) bread. Earlier versions of "ham toast" and "ham and egg on toast" were served in America (the East as well as the West) in the 19th century.
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3 December 1909, Janesville (WI) Daily Gazette, pg. 2, col. 6 ad: (Razook’s Candy Palace—ed.)
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It is claimed (see below, in 1954) that Denver restaurateur Albert A. McVittie invented the "Denver sandwich" in Denver in 1907, but the "Denver sandwich" appears in print at least as early as 1903. McVittie (who also served as president of the National Restaurant Association) appears in many newspaper articles before the 1950s, but there is no mention of the "Denver sandwich" in those articles. M. D. Looney (see below, in 1950) is another Denver 1907 claimant. It is also claimed (see below, in 1973) that the "Denver sandwich" was invented at "Denver’s Taber Hotel".

The sandwich was called a "Western Sandwich" as early as 1908, cited in a San Antonio newspaper. A "Manhattan Sandwich" (cited from 1909) contained fried egg, minced ham, and onion.
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(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/

---1850s--Western sandwiches


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodsandwiches.html#western

Western sandwiches

The classic "Western Sandwich" (aka "Denver Sandwich") is composed of scrambled eggs or egg omelet cooked with ham, onions, green peppers, salt and pepper. It is served hot on toast or rolls.
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(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/western sandwich

western sandwich


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=western sandwich
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "western sandwich" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1920 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
GS Südgeorgien und die Südlichen Sandwichinseln, Islas Georgias del Sur y Sandwich del Sur, Géorgie du Sud-et-les Îles Sandwich du Sud, Georgia del Sud e isole Sandwich meridionali, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
Süd-Sandwich-Inseln, Sandwich del Sur, Îles Sandwich du Sud, Isole Sandwich meridionali, South Sandwich Islands

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Dodd, Philip (Autor)
Encounters with Heroes of the English Language
From the Earl of Sandwich to Joseph P. Frisbie

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1905211589/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 272 Seiten
Verlag: Arrow Books Ltd (Young) (27. September 2007)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung

How did the Texas cattle rancher Samuel A. Maverick end up contributing his name to the language? What is the connection between a rather unflattering item of clothing and the French trapeze artist Jules Leotard? Which filling did the Earl of Sandwich opt for when he made his great culinary invention? And was there really a Sir Oswald Binge whose week-long feasts were notorious for their excess? "The Reverend Guppy's Aquarium" answers these and many other questions drawn from the remoter corners of the English language, exploring the lives of an extraordinarily diverse range of people who happen to have one thing in common: by chance or deliberately, they have left their names deeply embedded in the language and consciousness of future generations. Each figure has something to tell us about a particular moment of history, or a discovery or invention, whether it's Laszlo Biro and his pioneering writing implement, or Mercedes Jellinek, who lent her name to a certain make of car, or Etienne de Silhouette who, having fallen from grace at the French court, spent much of the later part of his life mournfully cutting out paper shapes. Not to mention the Reverend Robert Lechmere Guppy, fish-discoverer extraordinary. Each life in "The Reverend Guppy's Aquarium" is quirky and often bizarre. Few of them would merit a footnote, let alone an entry, in the history books. But they all reveal that the prospect of immortality is only a fluke away. In an age of instant 15-minute celebrity, that's a reassuring thought.


Erstellt: 2012-07

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Games, Alex
Balderdash and Piffle
One Sandwich Short of a Dog's Dinner

(E?)(L?) http://www.abebooks.de/9781846072352/Balderdash-Piffle-Sandwich-Short-Dogs-1846072352/plp


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/Balderdash-Piffle-Sandwich-Short-Dinner/dp/1846072352/

A look at the English language in a fresh and revealing light. From the brash jargon of celebrity magazines to the delicacies and feints of the euphemism, word-sleuth Alex Games has uncovered the remarkable stories behind some of our best-loved words and expressions.

One Sandwich Short of a Dog's Dinner is a thrilling ride through the provocative, bewildering and often downright bizarre world of language and etymology. From the brash jargon of celebrity magazines to the delicacies and feints of the euphemism, author and word-sleuth Alex Games has uncovered the remarkable stories that lie behind some of our best-loved words and expressions.

Gebundene Ausgabe: 256 Seiten
Verlag: BBC Books (22. Mai 2007)
Sprache: Englisch
ISBN-10: 1846072352
ISBN-13: 978-1846072352


(E?)(L?) http://www.buecher.de/shop/englisch/balderdash-and-piffle-pt-2/games-alex/products_products/detail/prod_id/22845577/


(E?)(L?) https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/books/detail/-/art/Alex-Games-Balderdash-Piffle-One-Sandwich-Short-of-a-Dogs-Dinner/hnum/7331423

A look at the English language in a fresh and revealing light. From the brash jargon of celebrity magazines to the delicacies and feints of the euphemism, word-sleuth Alex Games has uncovered the remarkable stories behind some of our best-loved words and expressions.

Einband: Gebunden
Sprache: Englisch
ISBN-13: 9781846072352
Bestell-Nr.: 7331423
Umfang: 240 Seiten
Gewicht: 290 g
Maße: 185 x 127 mm
Stärke: 28 mm
Erscheinungstermin: 15.5.2007


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balderdash_and_Piffle

Balderdash and Piffle was a British television programme made by Takeaway Media for the BBC. Presented by Victoria Coren, it was a companion to the Oxford English Dictionary's Wordhunt, in which the writers of the dictionary asked the public for help in finding the origins and first known citations of a number of words and phrases.

The OED panel consisted of John Simpson, the Chief Editor of the OED; Peter Gilliver, who was also the captain of the Oxford University Press team in University Challenge: The Professionals; and Tania Styles, who also appeared in "dictionary corner" in Countdown.
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Erstellt: 2014-07

Grauls, Marcel
Lord Sandwich und Nellie Melba
Wie berühmte Persönlichkeiten auf der Speisekarte landeten
Hinter einem leckeren Gericht steckt immer ein interessanter Kopf

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3492233678/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3492233678/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3492233678/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3492233678/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3492233678/etymologpor09-20
PIPER
174 Seiten

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