Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
IE Irland, Irlanda, Irlande, Irlanda, Ireland
Ismus, Ismo, Isme, Ismo, Ism

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Hiberno-English (W3)

"Hiberno-English" setzt sich zusammen aus "Hiberno" (lat. "Hibernia") = "Irish" und "English", bezeichnet also das in Irland gesprochene Englisch.

(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Hiberno-English


(E?)(L1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the_English_language

Republic of Ireland: Hiberno-English


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiberno-English

"Hiberno-English", or "Irish English", is the dialect of English written and spoken in Ireland (Latin: Hibernia).

English was first brought to Ireland as a result of the Norman invasion of the late 12th century, although during that time the Normans did not speak English, but rather Norman-French. Initially, it was mainly spoken in an area known as the Pale around Dublin, with Irish spoken throughout the rest of the country. By the Tudor period, the Irish culture and language had regained most of the territory initially lost to the colonists: even in the Pale, "all the common folk … for the most part are of Irish birth, Irish habit, and of Irish language". However, the resumption of English expansion following the Tudor conquest of Ireland saw a revival in use of their language, especially during the plantations. By the mid-19th century, English was the majority language spoken in the country. It has retained this status to the present day, with even the minority whose first language is Irish usually being fluent in English as well.

Modern English as spoken in Ireland today retains some features showing the influence of the Irish language, such as vocabulary, grammatical structure, and pronunciation.

Contents ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yaelf.com/history.shtml

What is "Hiberno-English"? Is it a dialect of English?

(Pondial differences)

Bob Cunningham: Recalling Padraig's recent remarks about whether or not Hiberno-English should be considered to be a dialect of English, I've done a Google search and have come up with some remarks that seem to be pertinent.

University College Dublin has a Web site at www.ucd.ie. On a page of that site, at Staff Publications, there appear the following remarks:

===== Begin remarks =====

Hiberno-English is the name given to the Irish dialect of English. It differs from Standard English on two principal counts. First, it is a hybrid dialect, full of borrowings from the Irish language, with words or phrases imported directly or in anglicised form ('meas', 'rawmaish', 'galore', and so on). Thus 'galore' is an anglicisation of the Irish 'go leor', meaning 'in abundance'. Galore has now passed into Standard English usage, but Hiberno-English is full of such formations which remain unique to Ireland. Irish also influences the grammar, as in 'I'm after writing a letter'.

The second strand in Hiberno-English comprises words obsolete in Standard English but still commonly used in Ireland. Thus a word like 'oxter', meaning an armpit, is still in general use in Ireland but passed out of Standard English around 1800. Similarly, words such as 'cog', to cheat in an exam, 'crack', 'bowsey' and 'delph' have retained their currency in Ireland.

In this pioneering work, Professor Dolan has prepared an accessible one volume dictionary of Hiberno-English.

===== End remarks =====

So far as I've seen, the page doesn't give an explicit reference to Professor Dolan's book. However, I happen to have a book called _A Dictionary of Hiberno-English_, subtitled "The Irish Use of English"; compiled and edited by Terence Patrick Dolan, published by Gill & Macmillan Ltd, Goldenbridge, Dublin 8; copyright Terence Patrick Dolan 1998. It seems reasonable to assume it's the book the UCD Web page is referring to.

(extract from the aue archives, article by Bob Cunningham, follow the link below for the complete thread)


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Hiberno-English
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Hiberno-English" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2013-03

(E?)(L?) http://www.hiberno-english.com/
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(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20090603211347/http://hiberno-english.com/

This site is dedicated to the study and promotion of Hiberno-English: Hiberno (= "Irish", and English), indicating that we are dealing with English that has been profoundly influenced by features of the Irish language.
...
This site provides an introduction to the history and grammar of Hiberno-English. It also provides a small number of Hiberno-English related links, and relevant details of Hiberno-English related events, such as public lectures, radio broadcasts and so forth.

The main purpose of this site, however, is to build and maintain an archive of Hiberno-English words, phrases, sayings, and idioms, collected and collated by Professor Terence Patrick Dolan of University College Dublin - a world authority on Hiberno-English lexicography and author of A Dictionary of Hiberno-English: The Irish Use of English published by Gill and Macmillan, Dublin 1998.
...


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The History of Hiberno-English

The history as it is outlined here is not meant to be comprehensive. It is a very brief overview. Also it deals only with external events that influenced languages spoken in Ireland.

Two languages dominate any discussion of Language of Ireland - Irish and English. Although Hiberno-English is now the national Standard Language of Ireland, the Irish language was the principal language of most of the population until well into the nineteenth century. In many ways the history of the interplay between the two languages reflects the external history of the country. English has won the battle of dominance but only to a certain extent and from a certain point of view. The title of Hiberno-English with its two components clearly describes the relationship between the two tongues.

English has been used in Ireland since the twelfth century. The Anglo-Normans began arriving in Ireland from about 1167 onwards, bringing with them the Norman-French and English languages. This meant that there were three languages current in Ireland at that time - Irish, Norman-French, and English. In addition Latin was used by senior clerics. Norman-French was spoken by commanders of the invading forces, who had been sent to Ireland by Henry II to conduct (allegedly) a moral mission to reform the Irish. The King had been authorized to do so by the only English Pope, Nicholas Breakspear, who had taken the name Hadrian IV.

In England, Norman-French was used for diplomatic correspondence up to the reign of Henry IV (1399-1413). In Ireland, use of this language declined much earlier, from the beginning of the fourteenth century, but not before it had contributed a number of words to the lexicon of Irish (for example, dinnéar from Norman-French diner, buidéal from botel, and so forth).

English continued in use, but such was the power of the Irish language that the authorities in England began to worry about the resurgence of Irish culture and linguistic influence. The authorities were especially concerned about this resurgence in that part of the country, to the north and south of Dublin, which came to be known as The Pale (I think more clarity in how the Pale is defined). To counteract this trend, a son of Edward III, Lionel, Duke of Clarence was sent over to preside at an assembly in Kilkenny. This parliament issued the famous "Statute of Kilkenny", written in Norman-French (more as a gesture, than as an indication that Norman-French was still generally understood). This document prohibited the ruling class and their retainers from becoming more Irish than the Irish themselves. It was directed at the settlers. Hurling was banned, as was entertainment of Irish minstrels, and other notably Irish pastimes. For us, the main interest is the ban it placed on the use of the Irish language and on the adoption of Irish names by the English. People breaking this rule would have their lands and property seized. This would not be returned until the "culprits" had relearned English.

This statute was ineffectual, and the Irish language continued to make inroads into the Pale. Change only came about with the adoption of a new scheme for governing and administering Ireland - the Plantations which took effect from 1549 onwards. This resulted in speakers of English being "planted" at various places far beyond the Pale. The immediate effect was that for the first time Irish people away from the main population-centres, especially Dublin, had to face and mix with users of the English Language. Those who employed them spoke English, and they had consequently to learn English, just to receive instructions. Where the rules of the Statute of Kilkenny failed, sheer practicality ensured the eventual success of the English Language in Ireland.

The English language benefited from the symbolical prestige attached to its being used by the people who had the power. In addition, Irish people began to emigrate to England in greater and greater numbers from the end of the sixteenth century. They had to learn English as quickly as possible. Understandably, they had to learn it through the lexicon, grammar, and syntax, pronunciation, and idiom of their vernacular language, Irish, which is substantially different from English - for example, in its verbal forms, which have no equivalent of "have" in English, and in its prepositional range. Thus an Irish person then, and now, may say "He’s been dead with years", corresponding to British English "He has been dead for years", with the Irish preposition "le" (=with) being translated and incorporated into the English sentence, making it typically Hiberno-English.

Use of the English language became further established from the late seventeenth century in Ireland. The Penal Laws from (1695) ensured that Irish people were denied formal education, and the informal education provided by the Hedge Schools played its part in the formation of modern Hiberno-English. English continued to flourish here throughout the eighteenth century. The great Seminary at Maynooth was established in 1795. Priests graduating from this college addressed their congregations in English whenever they could. From the 1780’s the Penal Laws had been eased, thus helping to eradicate the polarization, on political and religious lines, of those who spoke English and those who spoke Irish.

From the beginning of the nineteenth century the rise of English was unstoppable. The Act for the Legislative Union of Ireland with Great Britain (1800) strengthened the need for aspiring politicians to learn and use English efficiently for putting the Irish case in Westminister. When they came back to Ireland to address their own people they spoke in English and further enhanced its prestige. Many other events helped this process. A system of Primary Education was introduced in 1831, and the medium for instruction was English. Children were punished for using the Irish Language.

A decade later, the Famine had a catastrophic effect on the poorest, Irish-speaking members of the population. Since then, in spite of efforts of The Gaelic League and many Government enactments in education - in spite, too, of the brilliant work of many writers in Irish - the position of the Irish language has become weaker and weaker. However, it also has another life, so to speak, in Hiberno-English, as instanced already with the example of "He’s been dead with years".

Much of the literary effect of Anglo-Irish literature depends on the author's use of Hiberno-English vocabulary, idiom and sentence-structure. From the earliest usages in the fourteenth-century "Kildare Poems" to the great nineteenth and twentieth century writers, George Bernard Shaw, Sean O'Casey, John Millington Synge, and of course James Joyce and Samuel Beckett, and on to the most recent, Edna O'Brien, Roddy Dolye, Seamus Heaney, Jamie O'Neill, Maeve Binchey, Tom Paulin and Gerard Stembridge, to name just a few. Hiberno-English provides the linguistic resources which identify their culture as Irish.

Hiberno-English is a singularly rich member of the family of Englishes and owes much of its vivacity and inventiveness to the underlying influence of the Irish Language and also to the turbulent history of the Irish and the English.


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d'anam 'an Diabhal, thanum-on-dioul | daff | dagging | Dáil | dailc | dalk | dalkey | dall | dallachán | dallamullóg | dallapookeen | daller mallog | dallóg | dalta | daltheen | damhán alla | dander | daol | dardaol | dark, dorchas | DART | Dart Accent | dathúil | daw | dea-chroí | dead-house | deadly | dealing | deannach | Dear, deer | dearg | death | death notice | Debs | decade | Decies, The | deck | deifir | deisigh! | dekko | delay | delph, delf | demesne | deoch an dorais, duck and your duty | deoir | deoirín | deoraí | destroy | devil a haet | Devil's Buttermilk | devil's needle | devil, divil | devotions | dhera | dhoodeen, doodeen, dúidín | Dia | Dia linn | diabhal | dícheall | differ | dílis | dillisk, duileasc, duilisc, sea-grass | Dimond | dinge | dioc | dip pen | dirab | dirt-bird | dispensary | disremember | ditch | diúcán | divide | dlaoi | do | dobhrán | dobrón | dock(-leaf) | dog | dóib buí | doicheall | doirnín | dóiteán | dol | dollacalling | domhnach | domlas | donán | donas | done | donny, dawny, dawnie, donsy | donnybrook | doodeen | dooley | doras | dorn | dórnán | dornóg | dorr | dosser | dote, doaty, dotey | dottle | Double X | down | doxy | drabhsóg | dráchaí | dradaire | draid | dramhaíl | drantán | drass | draw | drawk | dreep | dreigh, dreegh, dreech | dreoilín | dreolán | dress | dríodar | driseog | drisheen | driuch | driving turkeys | drochmheas | droll | dromach | dromán, dromon | dronn | dropeen | drouth, dhrouth | drúcht, drught | druchtín | Drum | dubh | Dublin Three and a Half | Dubs, The | dúchán, dubhachán | dúchán, dubhachán | dúchas | dúdaire | dudeen, dudheen, dhudeen, dúidín | dúdóg | duileasc | dúiric | dul amú, dullamoo | dull | dulse | dunduckity, dunducketty | dúr | dúramán | duskiss | dúthracht | dúthrachtach


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e | e'er | ea | éadan | eagla | éan | earc luachra | earnest | earrach | eascaine | eascú | easnamh | easóg | Easter Duty | eccer, ekker | eejit, ejit, eedgit, eegut, eedjiiot | een | egg-bag | eggler | eidhneán | éillín faobhair | éinín | eireaball | Éireannach | éirí in airde | Éirinn | éist! | elder | elected | elegant | elevenmonth | end | entirely | equal | er | Erin go bragh, Éire go bragh | errish | esker | evening, tráthnóna | ever | exposition


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face | fada | fadálach | fadbhán | fadge | fadharcán | fadó | faggot | faibrí | faic | fáideog | fail | failed | faill | fainic | fáinne | fáinnín | Fair City, The | fairchín | faircsin | faire | fairy fort | faith | faix, faikins | fál | falcaire | falla | fallaing | fámaire | Famine, Great Famine | famished | famous | fánach | fánadóir | fann | fanntais | faobhar | faoileán | faoiseamh | faopach | faraor | fardel, fardele | fardoras | farl | Farney Men, The | fásach | fash | fast | fathach | FCA | feac | fead | feadaíl | feadair | feadán | feadhain | feadóg | feaking | feall | feallaire | féar | féar gortach, forgortha, hungry grass | fear siúil | fear, man of the house | fearann | fearg | feargach | féasóg | feast day | feck | fecker | feileastram | féin | feirc | féirín, féireann, fairin' | feis | Fenian | feochadán | fiacail, fiacal | fial | fialtrach | Fianna Fáil | fierce | figary, figairy, fegary | Fighting Cocks, The | file | filloon | Findlater\'s Church | fine | Fine Gael | fiolún | fionnán | fiorin | fir, Fir Bolg | fire | firín | fírinne | First Firdays | fit | fit-up | fiú | flaff | flah | flaitheas | flaithiúil | flaithiúlach, flahoolagh | fleá | flesher | fligat | flipe | flitter | fliuch | flooster | flúirse | flummery | flush | flute around | fluthered | flying | fód | fóidín mearaí | folachán | folly | folt | fooder | fooster, foosther, fústar | foosty, fusty | foot | football | footing | for to | forbye | form | formad | fornent, forenent, fornenst, forenenst | Forty Hours | fostúch | fothain | fothrach | fothram | founder | fox | francach | fraoch | fraughan, fraochán | Free State | fret | friend | frigging | frock | from | fruit | fuachtán | fuadar | fuairneach | fuairnéalach | fuar | fuarán | fuath | fuílleach, fuíollach | fuinneóg | fuist | furze | futa fata


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GAA | gab, geab | gabha | gabháil, gawl, gwall | gabhairín reo | gabhal-luachair | gabhar | gabhlán | gabhlóg, gowlogue, gollog | gad | gadaí | gadaidhe | gadrach | Gaelic | Gaeltacht | gaff | gaffer | gág | gáilleog | gairbhin | gairdín | gáirleog | gaisce | gaiscí | gait (of going) | gal | galamaisíocht | gale-day | gallagh-gunley | gallán | gallery | gallivanting | galloglass, galloglas, gallinglass | gallon | gallus, gallous | galluses | galoot, gilloot | galore, go leor, galorybit | galún, galúinín | gam, gom | gámaí | gámaidhe | gamal | gamalóg | game-ball | gammock | gammon | gandal | gansey | gant | garda | Garda Síochána | garden | Garden County, The | gargle | garlach | Garland Sunday | garron | garsoon, gorsoon, garsún, gassoon, gossoon | gart | gas | gasúr, gassir, gossure, gosawer | gat | gauger | gaum | gausterer | gawk | gawp | gazebo, gizaybo | gé | geabach | geabaire | gead | geáitse | gealach | gealán | gealgháiriteach, gealgháireach | gealtaire | geámaí | geamaireacht | geanc | geancach | geancánach | geansaí | geantraí | gearán | gearrán | gearrcach | gearrchaile | gearróg | geasa | geck | gee | geek | geidimín | géillín | geit | gentle | gentle folk, gentle people | gentrice | gentry | geocach | geocán | geois | geonaíl | geosadán | gern, girn | get, git | ghlún | ghrá thú | gibiris | giblets | gick, gicknaw | giddhom | gig | gildi | gillery | giob | giob geab | giobach | giobal | giobalach | giobstaire | giodam | giodam | giodamán | gíog | gíogs ná míogs | giolcach | gioscaire | giota | girg | girseach | gistra | giúirléidí, guirléidí | give | give out | gladar box | glafaire | glaic | glaise | glám, glaum | glamaire | glár, glaur | glare | glass | glaur | gleanntán | gléigeal | Glens Men, The | gleo | gleoisín | glib | glic | gligín, gligeen | glimmer-man | glincín | gliog | gliogaire | gliogar, glugger, gliug-ar | gliomach | gliondar | gliondrach | gliúcach | glór | glúin | glúiníneach | gneeve | go | go bhfóire Dia orainn! | go brónach | go-be-the-wall | go-boy | go-car | gob | gob-music | gobadán | gobaire | Gobán saor | gobán, guban, gub | gobdaw | goblach | gobshite | God | gog | gogaide | gogail | gogaille | gogaireacht | góilín | goirtín, gurteen | goisleach | goldar | gom, gaum | gombeen(-man), gambanman | gomerel, gomeral, gomeril, gommeril | gonc, gunk | goo | goodie | goody | googeen | googie | goose-seam | goosheen | gorb | Gorey | Gorseejack, Gorseyjack | Gorta | gortach | gortóg | gossip | goster, gasther, gauster | gouger | gowk | gowldie | grá Dé | grá geal | grá mo chroí | grá, grádh | grabach | grabaire | grabhar móna | gradam | grafán | grágach | grágaíl | gráinneog | gráinseachán | graip | graith, greth, grath | gramaisc | grámhar | grán tonnóige | grand | grass-nail | grástúil | grawls, grilses | grawn | greadadh chugat | greas | great | greet | grig, greg | gríosach, greesach, greesh, greeshy | gripe | griskin, greeskeen, gríscín | grisset | grog, grug | groodles | groop | growler | gruagach | gruamachán | grush | guaigín | guaire | gual | Guards | gudget | guggering | guilpín | guipure | guldar | gullion | gur, gur-cake | gurrie, gurrie, gurrie | gurrier | gurtóg | guth | gutters | guttery | gutty | guzzle


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habit | haet | haggard, haggart | haghas | haí | haitch | hake | half | hallion | hames | hanam an Diabhal | handsel, hansel | handy | hap | harm | harrish, harish | hash | hat | hata | hata cogaidh | hatch | hate | | have | haverel | hay cearc | hay muck | haymanger | hazard | head-the-ball | headstall | heap, up in a heap | hear | Heather County, the | heave-off | heavy on the loafers [casual shoes] | hedge-school | heel of the hunt | henting, hinting, henteen | Herring-chokers, the | herself | hesp | Hiberno-English | Hill Sunday, Bilberry Sunday, Garland Sunday, Garlic Sunday | himself | hind | hob | hob ná hae | hoigh | hoise | hokey | holy day of obligation | Holy Hour | holy show | holy water | home | hoofling | hooker | hooley | hooligan, hoolivan | hoor, huer, whoor, whore | hoosh | hop-o'-my-thumb | horrid | hot | hot in your leather | hough | house | house, rounds of the house | how are you! | howanever, howandever | howeya howerya | howke, hoke | | hula hul | hunkers | hunt | hurl | hurley | hurling | hurrish, hurris, hurais, huirs, hois, huis


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iarlais | idin | idir | ignorant | ill | ín | in it, ann | inagh | inch, inse | indulgence | Industrial School | inis | innocent | insense | inside | Intermediate Certificate | íochtar | iomrall | Íosa | Irish | Irish Mile | Irish Sweepstakes, Sweep, the | is | is ea, 's ea | it is, it was | itself, atself


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jackeen | Jacobs! | jag | Janey Mac | janglers | jant | japs, joups | jar | jarler | jarvey | jaunting-car | Jayzus, Jaysus | Jew-man | jig | John Charles | jorum, deorum | jouk | jowlster | just


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kacks, kaks | keeler, cíléir, ciléar | keen | kern | kesh, cesh | kib | kibe | kiddier, kidger | kill | kilt (kill) | kind | Kingdom, The | kink | kip-house | kippeen, kippen | kish | kitchen | knacker | Knackeragua | knackered | Knock | knug | Kopjeses | Kossicks |


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lá, tiocfaidh ár lá | lab | lábán | lace | lách | lachtar, lachter, lafter, lauchater, lartar (Tyrone), lochter (Scots) | lack lee | lackery | lad | ladar | ladaranach | ladhar, lyre | ladhróg | lady of the house | lághach | laí | laidhricín, ladhraicín | laincis | laingeal | laithreán | láithreán | Lake County, The | lambaste | lámhacán | lamp | lamps | lán | lang | langable, languable, land-gavel | langer | langered, langers | lao | lapa, laipín, lapeen, lop | lapadáil | lár | larrup | lash | lasher | lashings | lasóg, lassogue | lasóg, lossogue | latchiko | latter | lauchy, laughy | lauchy, laughy | laughing potatoes | launa-vaula, launawaula, lán an mhála | lazy-beds | leaba | leac | leaca | leadaí | leadaí na luaithe | leadar | leadhb | leadóg | leadránach, ladránach | leamh | leanbh | leanbh mo chroi | lear | learn | léas | leath | leathar | leathbhuachaill | leathóinseach | leave | leck | lee-a-roady | leg, get the leg over | Legion of Mary | leibide | leicneach | leisce | leite | leithscéal | leochaileach | leor | lep | leprechaun, leipreachán | let | let on | líbín | lick-the-statues | lief, liefer | lig do scíth | like | Lillibullero (bullen-a-la), Lilliburlero | lilt | Lilywhites, The | líob | liobar, Lubbernabohore | liobarnach | lioscán | lisín | liú, liúigh | liúdaí | liúdar | liúdramán, looderamawn, loodheramawn, lúdramán, luderman | liúigh | loaning | lob | lobin' | loch | lochán | lochtán | lock | locked | log | logán | loigín | lóipín | lon dubh | lone | long | long acre | lookit | lopeens | lorgán, lorgadán | losset, losad | Lourdes | louser | low shoes | loy, láí, lay | luachair gabhair | luachra | luaithreamhán | LUAS | luascadh | luascán | lúb | lúb ar lár | lúbaire | lúbán | luck-penny | lude | lúdramán | lug | lugbinder | lúibín | lúidaí | lúidín | luigín | luíochán | lumper | lúrapóg larapóg | lurch | lus na fola | lushery | luthargán | lynching


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m'anam 'on Diabhal | m'anam do Dhia is do Mhuire | mac, mack, mackavicks | macalla | macha | máchail | machree | macushla | mad | mada, madra | made up | magabraw | Magdalen Laundry | maggot | maide | maide briste | maide ceangail | maidin geal | maidrín lathaí | maig | maighdean | máilín | máilín sáithte | máinléad, máilléad | maintainer | mairtíneach | maiste, ambaiste | maistín | maith go leor, mongalore; mau-galore, magalore | make strange | mála | mala | malavogue | mallafoosther, mollafoosdar | malt, ball of malt | mam, mammy | mám, maum | mamailíneach | man | Man Above | man-eater, man-keeper | mangaire | manly | mannerly | manners | mant | mantach | mantachán | mantóg | maoilín | maoineach | maol, meel | maolaí, meely, meeleen | marbhán | marbhan | marbhánach | marbhfháisc | marbhna | marcach | mare | margadh mór | mark | markins | markins | márla, mála | maryah, moryah, mauryah, maryeah, moya | más é do thoil é | masher | masla | masmas | masmasach | Mass | Mass rock | massive | master | matalóg | match-maker | mavourneen, muirnín | mavrone | mé féiner | meadar, maddor, medher | méagram, méigrim, meadhran | mealbhóg | meallaire | méar | méaracán | mearing | méaróg | mearúl, mearbhall | meas, mass, Is mise le meas | meat | meathán | meathlóir | medal, Miraculous Medal | medical hall | meidhreach, mogolyeen-mire | meigeall | meigeallach | méirín | méirscre | meisce | meisceoir | meitheal, mihul, mechil | melodeon | melt | merciful hour | mess | messages | messer | metherin' | mhic ó | mhuise | mí-ádh, meeaw, miaw | mí-rath | mian | mianach | mias | mickey | mickey dazzler | mickey dodger | midden | middling | Midlanders, The | midlín, middhilin, miodailín | mighty | míle murder, meela murder, meila murder, míle murdal | mill | milleán | milseán, misleán | min | mín | mind | mingin' | mingy | minute | míog | míogarnach | míol | míolach | mionnán, meannán | mionnán-aerach, minaun aerach | miotóg | miscaun, mesgan, mescaun, miscin, maskin | mise | misfortunate | mismín | misneach | mission | mitch, mich | mo | mo chac ort | mo léir | Model County, The | mogall | mogóir | moidered | moiley(cow), mail, maileen, moileen, moulleen, mooley | móinéar | moing | móinteán | Moleskins | momento | monabhar | moneen, móinín | mónóg | monstrance | month's mind | Monto | mooch | moose | mópán | mopsy | mór | mór uaisleacht | mórálach | mórdháil | morode | mortaller | mórtas | mórtasach | mot | mothall | mothar | mouldy | mountainy | Mourne Men, The | mouth | mouth music, dowdelling | moxy, moxie | muc, on the pig's back | múchadh | mugadán | muic-iris | muileann | muin | muinéal | mullach | mullán | mullock | mulvather | múnlach | munya, munia | Murcha | Murchadh, Morrogh | murder | muríneach | murlach | musha, muise, mhuise, maise | musicianer | mustar | mustrach | mútálaí | mútóg


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ná boc lies, nabocklesh, nawbocklish | naavo | nádúr | nádúrach | naggin, noggin | naggy | naimhdeach | naíonán | náire | namplush | naomh | naomhóg | naosc | naprún | nasc | National School | National University of Ireland | neamhní | neamhspleách | neantóg | near | neb | nebby | Nelly | neomp | newance | níl focal bréige agam | nimh | no | nocht | nóiméad, fan nóiméad | nóimitín | nóiníní | Nollaig | noodenaddy | nor | not alone | nough | novena | nuaíocht


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ó | o | O'Donnell County, The | O'Farrell County, The | O'Moore County, The | O'Neill County, The | Oakleaf County, The | ócáid | och | ochón, ochone | odd time | odious, ojus | of | offerings | office men | óg | ógaí | ógánach | ogham, macoghamade | oíche | óige | oigheann | oighear | oighreach | óinseach, oanshagh, ownshook, oonshugh | óinseachán | óinsín | Oireachtas | ól, olta | olagón, ullagone | Old Time | old-fashioned | on | one and one, wan and wan | only | ór | orange | Orchard County, The | Order | orlach | ould | ould wan | ouns | out | outnarawka | oven | over-right | owe | owze | oxo | oxter, oxther, ockster


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pad | Paddhereen Partaugh | Paddhereen, Padhren, Padareen, Paddhereen | Paddy's Day | padhsán | páideog | Páidín | paidrín | páinteach | páirc | pairceen | páiste | páistín | pait | páit | Pale | paltóg, pollthogue, polthogue | pampootie | pan | panada | panaí | pandy, peaindí | pannacar | pannikin | pardóg | Parliament | parliamentary side of your ass, sit down on the | parlour | parochial house | paróiste | pasáil | pass | passremarkable | patachán | pataire | patalóg | pattern, patron | pawky | pawreens | paws | pay | peaca | péacach | peallóg, pealltóg | peann | péas | peasewisp, peasewusp, pays-wisp | peata, pata, patta | peatachán | pechenante | ped | pee, pee, pee | peeler, paler | peenge | peg | Peggy's leg | pegh | peil, caid | péisteog | peloothered | penance | penitent | pervert | pet day | phoney | piachán, píochán | piarda | piast, péist | piatees, piaties | pickey | piece, cut | pieceen | pigeon | piggin | pike | pilip, pilibín | piliúr | pillibeen | pillibeen, pilibín, plibín, philip-a-week | pillín, pilliún | pin | pincín, pinkeen | pingin | pint of plain | píobán | piollárdaí | Pioneer | píopa | píosa croise | pis mhionnáin | piscín | piseogaí | pishogue, piseog, pishrogue | pishoguery | pislín, prislín | pismire | piss | piss-a-bed, pishabed | piteog | plab | placa | plaic | plait | plaiting | plámás, plaumause | plámásaí | plámásaidhe | plantation, planter | planxty | plásaí, plausey, plausy | plásaidhe | pléaráca | pleibiste | pléicín | pleidhce | plispín | plobaire | plodán | plodar, pludar | ploid, pluda | pluc, ploc, ploic, pluic | plucamas | plúch | plúchadh | plúchadh | pludach | plúirín | plúr | poc | pocáil | pocán, pochán | póg, poage | poicín | point | póirín | póirseáil | poitín, poteen, potheen, potkeen | poke | pokerarse | pole in the hole | poll | pollán | pollóg | polthogue | ponc | poncán, poncánach | ponger, ponny | pooch | pooch-bed | pookaun, púcán | pookey-bonnet | pooley, pooly | poor mouth, mouth | poor-house | pooren / púirín | poppies | pór | porringer | port | porter | porterhouse | pósadh | poss | post | pótaire | potheens | pottle | pounder | power | PP | prácás | práibín | praiseach bhuí | praiseach, prashagh | práta, pitatie, piatee, pratie, phatie | prawshkeen, prauskeen, praushkeen, práiscín | preab | préachán, pechaun | Premier County, The | prepositions | Presbyterian | press | priest | priesteen | prioc | priocaire | prislín | Pro | prochóg | profession | prog, Progaí | progaidh | proimpín | protestant | púca na sméara | púca pile | púca pile | púca, pooka | pucán, puckawn | puce | puck | pucker | púcóg | púdar | puderance | púic | púicín | puililiú | puisín, puseen, pusheen | puiteach | puithín | púka, pooka, phoca, phoucawn, pookha | punch | punt | purchase-house | purtee | pus, puss | pusach | pusachán | pusaidheacht | pusáiling | pusaíocht | pusaire | put | puth | putóg


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quaids quades | Quarant' Ore | quare hawk | quare one | queer, quare | quench, quinch | quenched | quicken | quilt | quit


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rábaire | rabhan | rabhcán, rócán | rabhchán | ráca | racaid | rachmas | rack | ragaire | ragairne | ragairneálaí | ráib | raic | raideog | raidhse | raidhse | ráig | ráiméis, rawmaish, raumaish | raispín | ráithe | ráithín | raithneach, Mary's Fern | rake | raker, racker | rambling | rámhaille | rámhainn | ránaí, ránaidhe | rann | rapid | rapparee | rasher | rasp | rath | ráth, ráith | RDS | read | Reading Made Easy, Raidin'-Made-Aisy | reamhar | reathaí | Rebels, the | red bog | red neck | redd | reddener | reek | reel | reel-footed | reics, rex | réidh | reilg | réiteoir | réleaba | relic | relict | removal | renegue | rere | resetter | residenter, residenther | retreat | rí | RIA | riabhach | riabhóg | riasc | ribe | ricil | Ridge County, the | rife, riff | rigger | righneálaí | rightify | rince | rince fada | ring-paper woman | riobal | riosc | rip | rírá | rise | RM | rógaire | roilleach | room | rosary | Rosary beads, beads | Rosary rose | rossey, rossie | rothail | rothán | roughness | rounds | Royal County, the | RTE | rua | rua piast | ruadog | ruaig | ruaille, roolyeh | ruaille-buaille | ruathaire (práta) | ruathar | rub | rúcach | ruction | rúisc | rúitín | rún | runner | runners | runt | rúóg | rut | rútáil | ruth ruth, rith rith


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sagart, saggarth, soggart | saileog | saim | sáimhín só | sáiteán | sáith | salach | salachar | sally | sally-come-down-the-river | sambo | sámh | samhadh | Samhain | samhaircín | sámhán, sauvaun | samlach | sanatorium | saoi | saoiste | Saorstát Éireann, soretost | saothar | saothrach | sásamh | Sassenagh, Sassanagh, Sassenagh, sass her nach | sásta | savage | says, sez | SC | sca, ska | scadán | scafaire | scailp, scalp, scolp, scalpeen | scailtín, scawlteen, scaultheen | scaird | scairt | scald, scaldy | scalded | scalder | scaldered | scalladh croí | scallion | Scallion Eaters, the | scalltán | scanger, skanger | scanradh | scaothaire | scapular | scaresome | scarting | scáth | scáthán | scáthlán, scallan | scauls | sceabha | sceabhach | sceach gheal | sceach, skeoch | sceachóir, skhehoshies | sceadóg | scéal | sceala | scealbóg | sceall | sceallán, sciollán, skillaun | scealp | sceartán, sciortán, sceortán, schirtaun | Sceilg's List | sceilmis | sceilp | sceon | scheme | scholard, scollard | scholars | scian, skean, skene | sciathán | sciathán leathair | sciathóg | scib | scibber | sciggl | scileach | scilléad | sciob, skib | sciodar | sciollóg | sciotaire | scíth | sciúrd | scléip | scobe | scobs | scodalach | scoil | scoilt | scoilteán | scóipéalach | scoláire | scollop, scolb, scalab, scallop, scallop, scalp, scailp, spar | scológ | sconsa | scoot, scout | scoraíocht | scorán | scornach | scourer | scráib, scráb, scrawb, scraub | scráideog | scráidín, scrawdeen | scraiste | scraith | scraith bhogáin | scraitheog | scran | scrat | scratcher | scrathóg | scraw | screab | scréach | scread | screadal | screamh | screan | screatall | screed, scríd | scringe | scríob | scrios | scroblach | scrogall | scrooch | scroodge, scrouge | scruta, scrut | scuaibín, skoobeen | scud | scundered | scunner, scunder | scut | scutter | scuttered | scutty | sea | seach, shough, shaugh | seachain | seachrán, shaughraun, shockrawn, seacharán | seachtain | Seachtain na Cásca | seadhgosa, segosha, segasha | seafóid | seal | seam | seamaide | seamair | seamhnán | sean | Seán Buí | sean-cheirteach | sean-nós | Seanad Éireann | séanas | seanbhean | Seanbhean Bhocht, Shan Van Vock, Shan Van Vok | seanchaí, shanachee | seanchas, seanchus | seandraoi | seanduine | seangán | seanpholl | searbh | searbhán | searbhas | searbhasach | searbhóg | searc | seas | seasc | seascair | secondary top | segocia, skeowsha, segotia | seibineach | seileog | seilide búrc, shellika pooka, shillig-a-booka | seilmide | seisc | seisreach | self | senator | seo-hin-seo-heo | seoch | seoithín seothó | seordán | serve | server | set | settle(-bed) | sevendable, savendible, sevendible | shaffoige | shag, shagging | shall | sham | shamrock | shanagh | shandrydan | Shannonsiders, The | shanty | shape | shaping | sharn | shaver | shawlie | shebeen, shibin, síbín | Sheepstealers, The | Shelta | shenanigans, shinannickin' | sheugh, seoch, shugh | shibby | shift | shillelagh | shindig | shite | shoggie, shugge, shuggy, shoogie | shoggle, shuggle | shoneen, seoinín | shook | shore | Short Grass County, The | show | shraft | sí gaoithe, shee-geeha | siamsa | síán, sheean, sheeaun | sickner | sidecar | sidelong | sight | Síle | síle an phortaigh | síle-na-gig | silenced priest | silteach | sin | sin | sin é | sin é an saol | sin scéal eile | sin sin | single | Single X | Sinn Féin, shinners | Sinn-féiner | sioc | siocán | síofra | síofrach | síóg | síóg, sheogue | síógach | siogairlín | siogan | síol | síomáinaín | síománach | síománaíocht | sionnach | siopa | siota | siúlóir | skeet, skeat | skeideen | skelly, skilly | skelp | sketch | skew-ways, skow-ways | skewbald | skillet | skinnymalink | skite | skitter | skiver | slabrachán | slacht | slachtmhar, slachtar | slag | slaidín, sloidín, slúidín | sláimín, slaimín | sláinte | slám | slamaire | slámóg | slán | slane, sleán | slang, sling | slapaire | slat, slaitín tomhais | sleá | sléacht | sleamhain | sleamhnán | sleamhnánach | sleveen, sleeveen, slíbhín | slew | slewsthering | sliabh | slibire | slinge | sliodarnach | slíomadóir | sliotar, slitther | slip | slipe | slippy as a bottle | sliseog | slither | slob | Slob | slogaire | slogan | slogtha | slua | sluasaid | slug, slog | slugabed | sluther, sloother | smacht | smachtín | smahan | smailc | small | smaois | smashing | smathers | smeach | smeachán | smeadar | sméara dubha | smeg | smidgeon | smidirín | smig | smior | smitheán | smithereens, smidiríní | smithering | smólach | smoor | smug | smuga | smugachán | smugarlach | smuilceachán | smuish | smúr | smúrabhán | smush | smut | smután | snab | snabóg | snag | snag-man | snaidhm | snaidhm na péiste | snáithín | snaois | snap-apple | snas, snoss | snasta | snáth | sneachta | sned, snead | snig | sniggle | sniog | sniogadh | sniving | snotting | snug | so | so long | sobal | socair | soccer | Society of St Vincent de Paul | socks, give socks | sodality | sodar | soft | solas | something like | sonas | sonasach | sonse | sonsy | sonuachar, sunoohar, sonohur | sooleens, súiliní | soother | sootherer | sop | sor | sorra, sorrow, sorrel | sot | souper, blackmouth, esoupcans | sowens, sowans, sowins | sowkans, sowkins | spadach | spades | spág, spawg | spairt | spalpeen, spailpín, spawlpeen | spancel | spang | spang | sparán | spatters | speach, spagh | speailín | spideog, spideogue | spin | spíon | spíonán | Spire, The | spit | splanc | spock | spodar | spoiled priest | spoke | sponc, spunk | spondulicks, spondulix, spondulics | spré | spreasán, sprizaun | spuds | spunk | spútrach | Spy-Wednesday | squireen | squoze | sram | sramach | srán | sraoill | srathair, strar | srathair-fhada | srón | St Stephen's Day | stag | stagger | staic | stail | stailc | stailín | stalctha | standard | standing | stare | staróg | starrfhiacail | starving | station | Stations | status | steall, streall | steeler, steely | steps-of-stairs | steveen | steven | stickie | stim | stirabout | stíuicín | stiver | stives | stocious | stock | stóilín | Stone-Throwers, The | stook | stooleen | stoor | Stop! | stór | strácáil (ing) | strácálaí | straddle | straddy | strand | straoill | straois | strap | stravague, stravaig, stravage | straw boys | streancán | streel | streelish | streelish | street, strate | stretch, | striapach, streepach | strip | stripper | strippings, strig | stroke | strollop | stronesha | Strong Farmer | stuacán, stookaun | stuaic, stook | stuggin' | stuicín | stump, stompa | stupe (verb) | sturk, stirk | suachmán | suáilceach | suaimhneasach | suan | suantraí | suarach | suarachán | subh | suck suck | súdaire | súgach | súgán, soogawn, sougawn, suggan | súil | súilíní | suim, seem | súiste | súlach | sult | sultmhar | sumahan (some-a-hawn) | súmaire | sup | sure | Swaddler | swally hole | swarra | swee-gee | swithers


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t'anam an diabhal | tá | tá sé | tabhairt amach | taca | tacar | tack | tack | tackies | tackle | tad | Tadhg | Tadhg an dá thaobh | tadhlach | táilleog | táithín | taitneamh | táláid | tally-iron | tally-stick | tallyman | támáilte | tamall | Tánaiste | Tans, Black and Tans | taobhán | taobhfhód | taoibhín, theeveen | Taoiseach | taom | taoscán | tap | tarbh | tarbh bán | tare alive | tare and 'ouns, tear and 'ouns | tare and ages, tearing ages | targe | targer, targe | tart | tasty | táthaire | táthfhéithlean | tatie-howker | tatoo | tawse | tay, tea | TD | tea-drawer, tay-drawer | teach, zooteac | Teague, Taig, Teigue | teanam | teaspach, taspey, taspy | tedder | teem, taom | teetotaller | terrible | terror | th sound | thall | that | the | the day | them | there | they | thick | Third Order | thivish | thole | thran | through-other | throw shapes | thrun | tiachóg | tiarcas | tiarna, a thiarna | tick, tocht | tig | tigín | till | tilly, tuilleadh | timpeall | tinker, tinckler | tint, tent | tinteán | tionól | tipper | tippin' away | Tír na nóg | tirim | to | tobar | tober | tóchar | tocht | toice | tóin | tóin creiche | tóinín | tóir | toirtín | tóiteán | tollaire | tomhaisín, tosheen | tónóg | took wake | topney | topper | toppin, topping, tapping | toradh | tormas | tortóg, turtóg | tosac | toss school | tosser | tóstalach | townland | tradesman | traik | tráithnín | tráithnín, thrawneen, thraneen, traneen | trálach, tálach, thaulach | tram | tramp | tranglam | trasnán | tráthúil | traveller | treheens | trick | triduum | trig | trína chéile, threena-chela, threenahayla | Trinity | trinket | triopall | triopallach | triuch | trom crithe | tromluí | troth, throth | trough | trousers | true | truff | trup | truslóg | tuaiplis, túplais | tuar | tuathalach | tuathalán | tubaiste | tufaire | tuig | tuigeann tú? | tuirne | tuirse | tuisle | tuitimeas | tulach | tulcais | tumbling-jack | tundish | turas | turdán, tordán | turn | tuth | Twenty-Six Counties | twig


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uachtar | uafásach | uaibhreach | uaigh | uaigneach | uaigneas | uaill | ualach | uallóg | uamhan Dé | uan | uililiú | uillean pipes | úirín | uisce faoi thalamh | ulchabhán | ullamh | umar | unbeknownst | under-board, untherboord | unionist | up in Lizzie's room | útamáil | útamálaí


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VDP | veins | venters | vessels | vex | vocation | voteen, votcheen; vokeen


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wain, wean | wake | wake games | wall-falling | wall-wagger | wan | wanst | want | watch | wax | waxy | way | wear, wearing | weather | wee | Wee County, the | weeny | weeshy, weeshie | well | wersh, wairsh, warsh | west | West Briton, West Brit, welshtbreton | wet (the tea) | wettin' rain | What about you? | wheen | whelm | when | whether | which? | whileen | whin | whinge | Whippins and Lashins | whipster | whiskey | whist, whisht | White Scourge | Whiteboys | whitteret, whitrack, whutrick | who | who-began-it | whole | | widdy | wide | widow-woman | Wild | Wild Rose County, the | will | wing | wingall, windgall | winkers | wirra, wurra | wirrasthru, wirrasthroo, wurrasthroo, wierasthru | wish | wisha | with | with that | without | woeful | wolf | wolfworm | woodquest | worrit | would | wracker, racker | wren, wran | wurrum


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Yeats, Yeat's, or Yeats's County, The | yeer | Yellow Bellies, The | yeos | yerra, erra | yes | yoke | Yola, Yole, Yolaw | you | you sir | young one | your man | yous, ye, yees, yeez, youses, yis, yiz


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Hooligan (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooligan#Etymologie_des_Begriffes

...
Etymologie des Begriffes

Der Begriff "Hooligan" geht angeblich auf eine irische Familie namens "O‘Hoolihan" zurück, die sich im 19. Jahrhundert vor allem wegen heftiger Prügeleien einen derart üblen Ruf erworben hatte, dass sie später sogar in einem Trinklied besungen wurde.

Nach einer anderen Theorie geht die Bezeichnung auf den Iren "Patrick Hooligan" zurück, der 1898 in London in einem Polizei-Bericht als Randalierer und Anführer einer Jugendbande auftaucht. Das Wort entstammt sonach dem Londoner Polizeijargon und ist zurückzuführen auf den Bandenführer mit dem Spitznamen "Hooley", der die Bevölkerung des Londoner Stadtteiles Islington geraume Zeit terrorisierte.

Das Wort "hooley" stammt aus dem Irischen und bedeutet "wild".

In der deutschen Sprache soll das Wort "Hooligan" erstmalig 1906 von Arthur Pfungst verwendet worden sein.
...


Erstellt: 2010-01

I

Irland

Ab 6. Jahrhundert v. Chr.
Ein keltisches Volk, das sich selbst "Gaelen" und die Insel Irland "Eriu" nennt, wandert in Irland ein und unterwirft die bereits seit Jahrtausenden ansässigen Bewohner. Aus zahlreichen Stammesverbänden entwickeln sich allmählich die fünf Königtümer Ulster, Connacht, Leinster des Nordens (Meath), Leinster des Südens und Munster, wobei die Könige aufgrund der ständigen Stammesfehden aus ihrer Mitte einen Hochkönig wählen, der die Aufgabe hat, mit Hilfe der „Fianna“, seiner schlagkräftigen Streitmacht, den Frieden im Land zu sichern. Irland wird als einziges westeuropäisches Land nie von den Römern beherrscht.

J

K

klammeraffe - Irischkurs

(E?)(L?) http://www.klammeraffe.org/~brandy/gaelic/Kurs
The European languages, except for the Basque and a few others derive from a very ancient language which is called Indo-European. It is called so, because the idioms of the Indian subcontinent have the same root as the European languages.
This is due to tribal migrations which started about 4000 B.C. These migrations are now called Indo-Europeans according to the geographical locations where they settled down eventually. Sometimes, the physical apperance of the Indo- Europeans changed through intermarriage. The best example are the brown people in India. The originally fair migrants mixed with the dark-skinned aborigines of India, and forced their language on them.
That Europian, Persian and Indian languages are related to each other has been found out by making comparisions between them. The base of these comparisons were the archaic forms of our modern languages because the further one goes back the closer are these languages to each other. Thus, in Sanskrit, the root of the modern vernaculars of India, the third person of to be is asti; its Latin counterpart is est.
A formular was developed which is nearly always valid. The vocal a undergoes a change and becomes e in Latin. After this an infinite number of similarities between Sanskrit, Latin, Greek, Celtic etc. was discovered. This led the linguists to believe that these anchient languages and therefore, also their modern versions must have a common root. By using Latin, Greek, Sanskrit and a few other archaic idioms as a base linguists started to re-construct the prime language of the European and Indian tribes.
This re-constructed language was called Indo-European. As the Celts were Indo-Europeans the present-day versions (i.e. Irish-Gaelic, Scottish-Gaelic, Manx, Cornish, Welsh, Breton) must have links with the rest of the modern European languages. In fact, many basic expressions that exist in the modern European languages have a Celtic root.
For instance, carrus (Celtic for chariot, car) was adopted by Latin carra. From there the originally Celtic word continued its journey which ended in the following present-day forms: The same is true for lancia (Celtic) which appeared as lancea in Latin. Thus lancia is the root of lance (English), lance (Czechoslovacian), lanza (Spanish), Lanze (German).
That Irish-Gaelic has close links with other modern languages can be demonstrated easily by looking at The list of similarities between Irish-Gaeilge and other languages is endless. Bearing the informations of the introduction in mind the learner will find it easy to get to grips with Irish-Gaeilge.
The learner should also note that, a few years ago, Irish was a dying language. This has changed recently. I personally teach irish in three different towns in the south of Germany. Since I have started to teach I have created at least 100 Irish speakers. Many of them are fluent at irish now. A colleaque of mine covers the northern area of Germany with Irish-Gaeilge. Apart from our private activities there are many univerisities in France, Germany, Spain, England etc. that offer Irish-Gaeilge. Irish has conquered its place in the world. It has started to coexist with the world languages where as formerly it led a marginal existence.

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

slogan (W3)

is Gaelic, meaning "war cry".

Eine hilfreiche Besucherin schickte folgenden Hinweis:
Es bedeutet soviel wie "Werbespruch", "Schlagwort" und wurde erst m 20. Jh. Aus dem Englischen übernommen, wie (leider!) viele der (Werbe-)Anglizismen.
Das englische "slogan" wiederum geht auf das gälische "sluaghghairm" zurück, das soviel wie "Kriegsgeschrei" bedeutet. Wenn man genau „hinhört“, kann man es beinahe hören, das "Kriegsgeschrei der Gallier". Und man „hört“ auch aus dem "sluagh" - die "Schlacht" oder den "Schlag" bzw. aus dem "ghairm" den "Lärm" heraus. Diese „Hör-Assoziationen“ sind aber rein subjektiv empfundene von mir, keine belegbaren. Aber ich glaube, daß ich nicht soweit danebenliege damit.
(A: gaed)

(E1)(L1) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/


T

U

Uni Toronto - mots français d'origine non-latine
§ 4. -- Celtique moderne

(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm
Das zweite Kapitel des "Dictionnaire général (1890-1900)" enthält eine 93 Seiten lange Liste von nicht-lateinischen französischen Fremdwörtern.
Darin werden Begriffe gelistet, die aus anderen Sprachen in die französische Sprache eingegangen sind. Viele dieser Begriffe sind auch ins Deutsche oder Englische aufgenommen worden. (Dabei kann die Schreibweise in den Empfängersprachen durchaus variieren.)
Ich habe die entsprechenden Abschnitte und die zugehörigen Kommentare des Anhangs als "Ismen" den jeweiligen Herkunftsländern / -kontinenten zugeordnet.

§ 4. -- Celtique moderne.

Des idiomes celtiques, descendants directs ou collatéraux de l'ancien gaulois, se sont conservés jusqu'à nos jours dans la basse Bretagne, en Irlande, dans le pays de Galles et en Écosse (29). Ce n'est que par la basse Bretagne que le français a eu un contact direct avec ces idiomes (30). Il a fourni un grand nombre de mots au bas breton, mais il en a reçu très peu en échange. Les mots d'origine bretonne se rapportent en majorité, comme il est naturel, aux choses de la mer : aderne, baderne, baille (31), bernicle (32), bouette, darne, goéland, goémon, minot (boute-hors), raz.

Ce sont aussi des objets particuliers à la Bretagne que désignent les mots biniou, cagou, cromlech, dolmen, menhir, etc. Il est à peine besoin de faire remarquer qu'aucun de ces mots n'a réellement pénétré dans l'usage général : l'emploi de tel ou tel d'entre eux dans notre langue ne relève que de la fantaisie des archéologues (33). En revanche, baragouin, bijou, dia, sont incontestablement français : mais qu'ils soient réellement empruntés au bas breton, voilà qui est loin d'être assuré.

Notes

V

W

wikipedia
List of English words of Irish origin

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Irish_origin
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
This is a list of English language words of Irish origin, including from the Celtic Irish language and the Germanic Hiberno-English and Ulster Scots languages. This list is incomplete. You can help Wikipedia by adding to it.

Am 02.09.2004 waren folgende (verlinkte) Begriffe aufgeführt:
banshee | boreen | clan | colleen | crack | eejit | galore | gob | gobshite | keen | leprechaun | poteen | phoney | quiz | shite | smashing | slob | slogan | slew | smithereens | whiskey |

X

Y

Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
IE Irland, Irlanda, Irlande, Irlanda, Ireland
Ismus, Ismo, Isme, Ismo, Ism

A

B

C

D

Dolan, Terence Patrick
A Dictionary of Hiberno-English
The Irish Use of English

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/071712942X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/071712942X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/071712942X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/071712942X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/071712942X/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 311 Seiten
Verlag: Gill & Macmillan; Auflage: New Ed (1999)
Gill and Macmillan, Dublin 1998
Sprache: Englisch


Synopsis
When T. P. Dolan's "A Dictionary of Hiberno-English" first appeared in hardback, the poet and critic Tom Paulin hailed it as his book of the year, describing it as a tremendous feat of scholarship. It is the only dictionary which provides an authoritative lexicon of the English language as spoken in Ireland. Hiberno-English differs from standard English in a number of ways, most notably through the retention of archaic forms redundant in standard English and through borrowings from the Irish language.


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