Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
IE Irland, Irlanda, Irlande, Irlanda, Ireland
Name, Nombre, Nom, Nome, Name

A

B

C

Caitlin - Rose

"Caitlín" ist ein irischer Vorname, der aus altfrz. "Catheline" übernommen wurde und dt. "Katharina", frz. "Catherine", engl. "Kathleen", heißt und auf griech. "katharós" = dt. "rein" zurück geführt wird. - Aber wer war "Caitlin May".

(E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/c


(E?)(L?) http://www.behindthename.com/php/view.php?name=caitlin


(E?)(L?) http://www.broadwayworld.com/gallery.cfm?letter=c

Carter, Caitlin | McCleery, Caitlin | Murney, Caitlin | Van Zandt, Caitlin


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/CaitlinsWay/

Caitlin's Way


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=C
Caitlin (USA 2000-2002)

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/roses.php?tab=2&grp=C


(E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/site/Filles/C.htm

Caitlin | Caitline


(E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm
CAITLIN

(E?)(L?) http://www.rocksbackpages.com/library.html
Caitlin Cary

(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SC


(E?)(L?) http://www.zoope.com/
Caitlin

Caitlin May - Rose

"Caitlín" ist ein irischer Vorname, der aus altfrz. "Catheline" übernommen wurde und dt. "Katharina" heißt und auf griech. "katharós" = dt. "rein" zurück geführt wird. - Aber wer war "Caitlin May".

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/roses.php?tab=2&grp=C


(E?)(L?) http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/AlphaIndex.html

Caitlin V


connorsgenealogy
Surnames

(E?)(L?) http://www.connorsgenealogy.com/connors.html

This website is a free site with tons of data including naturalizations, directories, cemetery transcriptions, surname registries, Ireland land records and census records and it gets updated on a monthly basis. As a website gets larger and has more activity, it gets more expensive to keep it on line. Therefore, you will find advertisements on the website and by shopping through this site and/or making a contribution (no matter how small) through the Amazon Honor System, you help keep it on line. Thanks for your support.

Mailing Lists | Surnames | New York State | Ireland | England/Wales | Canada
...
Booth | Gallagher | (O)Boyle | Maclean/McLean | Campbell | Maron(e)y | Carter | McEntee | O'Connor/Connors | Owen(s) | Phillips | Fahy/Fahey | Smith/Smythe | Flanagan | Sweeney | (O)Flynn/Flinn | Todd


D

Dunhill (W3)

Obwohl "Dunhill" als Ortsname, Familienname und Markenname in Erscheinung tritt, ist über die Herkunft der Bezeichnung "Dunhill" nicht viel und nichts Gesichertes zu finden.

Wie der Ort "Dunhill", County Waterford, Ireland, zu seinem Namen kam ist ungewiss. Ein Hinweis führt ein älteres "Dun-hyll" mit der Bedeutung engl. "The Brown hill" an.

Ich könnte mir auch die Bedeutung "umzäunter Hügel" vorstellen mit Bezug zu gäl., kelt. "dun" = dt. "Hügel", "Berg", "Bergfeste". Man findet "-dun-" in vielen englischen und französischen Ortsnamen. Zur großen Verwandtschaft von gäl. "dun" gehört auch dt. "Zaun" und engl. "town" = dt. "Stadt" (altengl. "tun" = dt. "Zaun", "Garten", "Hof", "Dorf", "Ortschaft"). Man findet es als mhdt., ahdt. "zun" = dt. "Umzäunung", "Hecke", "Gehege", ndl. "tuin" = dt. "Garten", altisl. "tun" = dt. "eingezäuntes Land", "Hof", "Ortschaft", und altir. "dun" = dt. "Burg". Die vollständige gallische Form gall. "dunum" findet man oft als Suffix in Städtenamen, so etwa auch in lat. "Noviodunum" = dt. "Neuenburg" (weitere Beispiele findet man sicherlich auch bei Asterix und Obelix).

Im Deutschen wurde die Ortsnamensendung "-dun" auch oft zu "-ten" wie etwa bei dem Ort "Kempten", der auf lat. "Cambodunim", "Cambodunum", und weiter auf keltische Quellen zurück geht.

Folgende Familiennamen (und Schreibweisen) werden mit "Dunhill" in Verbindung gebracht: "Dunswell", "Dunwell", "Dunnell", "Dunnill", "Dunill", "Dunhill", "Dunhills". Alle diese Familiennamen könnten also als Herkunftsbezeichnung auf diesen (oder einen anderen) Ort namens "Dunhill" zurück gehen.

Eine Firma "Dunhill" wurde jedenfalls im Jahr 1893 von "Alfred Dunhill" in London gegründet.

(E?)(L?) http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/dunhill-sir-thomas-peel-6046

4112. Dunhill, Sir Thomas Peel (1876–1957) surgeon


(E?)(L?) https://www.biografiasyvidas.com/biografia/d/dunhill.htm
>

Dunhill, Thomas Frederick


(E?)(L1) http://www.cigarettespedia.com/index.php/BrandDunhill

Brand Dunhill
...
Dunhill Cigarettes retain the smell of fresh tobacco and have a complex taste to them. Spicy, with a hint of sweetness, Dunhill Cigarettes do taste like real tobacco. Dunhill Cigarettes' aroma is enticing and not spoiled by excessive use of various additives making Dunhill Cigarettes' taste a pure and recognizable one.


(E?)(L?) http://www.livrespourtous.com/e-books/list/onecat/Ebooks-gratuits+Auteurs+D-a-F/0/all_items.html

Dunhill, Matt: Hélène et moi...


(E?)(L?) http://www.osmoz.com/brand-perfume/143/dunhill

Dunhill


(E?)(L?) http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/d/

Dunhill Surname Origin

(Origin English) Of Dun-Grey Complexion [Old English dunngraeg, dusky] Dweller at the Brown Hill [Old English "dun" / "dunn", "brown" + "hyll"].
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Dunhill

Last name: "Dunhill"

Recorded in a range of spellings including "Dunswell", "Dunwell", and the either developed form or separate forms "Dunnell", "Dunnill", "Dunill", "Dunhill", and "Dunhills", this is an English locational surname. It originates either from the hamlet of "Dunswell", meaning "Brown stream", near the town of Beverley in the East Riding of Yorkshire, or from a now 'lost' medieval village called "Dun-hyll" or similar and meaning "The Brown hill". In all its spellings it is a name particularly associated with Yorkshire, where it is found in all the various spellings. Locational surnames are usually "from" names. That is to say names given to people after they left their original homes to move elsewhere. It was in past centuries, and to some extent it remains the case, that the easiest way to identify a stranger was to call him or sometimes her, by the name of the place from whence they came. Spelling being at best indifferent, and local dialects very thick, soon lead as with this name, to the development of variant forms. Early examples of the surname recording taken from surviving church registers include: Elen Dunwell, who was christened at St. Peters church, Leeds, on March 29th 1588, Ann Dunnell, christened at Dewsbury Parish Church, on July 15th 1621, Phillip Dunhill, a christening witness at Skipton on May 3rd 1630, and Jeremy Dunswell, who married Ann Pollard also at Dewsbury, on August 8th 1647.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Dunhill
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Dunhill" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Dunhill

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2017-08

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Guinness (W3)

Die Namen "Guinness", "Magennis", "Maguinness", "McEnnesse", "McEnnis", "McGinnis", "McInnes", beruhen alle auf gälisch "Mag Aonghuis" bzw. "Aonghuis", "Aonghus", mit der Bedeutung "einzige Wahl", der später zu "Angus" angliziert wurde.

Die Präfixe "Ma", "Mag", "Mc", bedeuten "Sohn von", vergleichbar mirt dem deutschen Suffix "-sen" oder "-son".

McGuinness, Martin, Irish leader

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Arthur_Edward_Guinness_Ardilaun
Arthur Edward Guinness Ardilaun

(E6)(L1) http://www.aphorismen-archiv.de/
Guinnes, Sir Alec

(E?)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/66/a0.html
McGuinness, James Kevin

(E?)(L?) http://www.cocktaildreams.de/
"Guinness" als Cocktail.

(E?)(L?) http://www.cocktaildreams.de/cooldrinks/allrecipes.php
"Baby Guinness" als Cocktail.

(E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_last_names.htm
Guinness | McGinnis | McEnnesse | McEnnis | McInnes | Maguinness | Magennis | Mc (prefix) | Mag Aonghuis | Angus | McGuinness

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/
Guinness, Alec

(E?)(L1) http://www.who2.com/
Guinness, Alec

(E?)(L?) http://www.whoswho.de/
S. Guinness (1914)

(E?)(L1) http://www.wochenschau-archiv.de/auswahl.php
McGuinness
Beitragstitel: Boxen
Beitragslänge: 1 Min. 12 Sek.
Zeit der Handlung: 1958-1958

H

I

Tay Caitlin - Rose

Welchem/r "Tay Caitlin" diese Rose gewidmet wurde kann ich nicht nachvollziehen.

"Tay" ist der Name des, mit 193 km, längster Fluss Schottlands, Und "Caitlín" ist ein irischer Vorname, der aus altfrz. "Catheline" übernommen wurde und dt. "Katharina" heißt und auf griech. "katharós" = dt. "rein" zurück geführt wird.

(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/browse.lasso

Tay Caitlin ab Apricot & Apricot blend, Miniature 1997


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/roses.php?tab=2&grp=T


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tay

Der Tay ist mit 193 km der längste Fluss Schottlands. Er entspringt an den Hängen des Ben Lui und mündet erst in den Firth of Tay und anschließlich in die Nordsee.
...


J

K

L

M

Mac
Mc
O
Fritz

(E?)(L?) http://genealogy.about.com/cs/surname/a/irish_surnames.htm
Common Surnames of Ireland - Irish Surname Meanings & Places of Origin

Ireland was one of the first countries to adopt hereditary surnames, many of which were devised during the reign of Brian Boru, the High King of Ireland, who fell defending Ireland from the Vikings at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014AD. Many of these names began as patronyms to define a son from his father or grandson from his grandfather. Thus, the reason for the common prefixes found on Irish surnames.

"Mac", sometimes written "Mc", is the Gaelic word for "son" and was attached to the father's name or trade.
"O" is a word all by itself, signifying "grandson" when attached to a grandfather's name or trade. The apostrophe that usually follows the O actually comes from a misunderstanding by English-speaking clerks in Elizabethan time, who interpreted it as a form of the word "of."
Another common Irish prefix, "Fritz", derives from the French word fils, also meaning "son."

In dem zitierten Artikel wird weiterhin auf folgende Namen eingegangen (allerdings nicht immer mit Hinweisen zur Herkunft):

Brennan | Brown or Browne | Boyle | Burke | Byrne | Callaghan | Campbell | Carroll | Clarke | Collins | Connell | Connolly | Connor | Daly | Doherty | Doyle | Duffy | Dunne | Farrell | Fitzgerald | Flynn | Gallagher | Healy | Hughes | Johnston | Kelly | Kennedy | Lynch | MacCarthy | Maguire | Mahony | Martin | Moore | | Murray | Nolan | O'Brien | O'Donnell | O'Neill | Quinn | Reilly | Ryan | Shea | Smith | Sullivan | Sweeney | Thompson | Walsh | White

(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/scottish_macs.pdf

The Scottish Macs

Their Derivation and Origin by James B. Johnson (1922) (pdf)
...
INTRODUCTION.

This brief booklet makes no pretension of being any fresh contribution to the much bewritten story of the Highland clans, or to the many vexed questions which cluster around the philology of names. But the writer himself has long felt the need of some such easily available and easily consulted List as is here given; and he knows that many as well as himself are deeply interested in our Scottish Macs, their meaning and origin. He trusts and hopes, therefore, that the booklet may help to supply a felt want. Only a few words of introduction seem necessary.

"Mac", of course, is the usual spelling of the Gaelic word for "son". Scots Gaelic is one of the "k" or "q" or "c" group of Celtic languages; in the "p" group (Welsh, Pictish, etc.), "mac", or, in its oldest form "mag", appears as "map". But the "m" soon falls away and we get "ap"; thus we find in Old Welsh "map Rhys", "son of Rhys", then "ap Rhys", which today becomes simply "Price".

Who would ever think that this common English surname is really and aboriginally one of the Macs? Of course, "Mac" is also quite common in Irish surnames, even although in Ireland we have besides so many "O's" — "O'Connell", "O'Donnell", etc., from Irish "ó", "ua", Old Ir. "au", "a descendant".

A great many of our Scottish Macs are first recorded in Ireland, where early records are far more abundant; and, through lack of evidence, it is often difficult to know whether a particular Mac-name is really Scots at all, or only a late importation from Erin's Isle. Communication between Ulster and Argyle or Galloway was both early and continuous. Sometimes the forms have been slightly different, and that helps. E.g., the usual Scots form is "M'Diarmid", whilst, if the name be Irish, it is usually "M'Dermott". Many a name which, to an ordinary ear, would sound pure Irish, turns up fairly early in Galloway or Ayr, which makes one cautious about dogmatizing: see, e.g., "M'llvaney" or "M'Kenna". The form of surname is, in any case, very ancient in Scotland. Already in the eleventh century we have such well-authenticated cases as "Macbeth" or "Macduff". Entries like "Pette (croft of) mac Garnait", in the Book of Deer, will be of about the same age.
...


McKeever
MacIvor
McIver
McEevor
McEever
McHeever
McCure
Iverson
Ivarsson
Iwarsson (W3)

Der irische Familienname "McKeever" setzt sich zusammen aus gael. "Mac" = dt. "Sohn", altnord. "iw" = "Bogen" und altnord. "herr" = "Armee", "Heer".

(E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm

"McKeever": is a variation of "McIver" which is a Scottish version of an Old Norse given name "Ivarr" derived from "iw" = "bow" + "herr" = "army". The name was adopted at an early date by the Scots, Welsh, and Irish, and most cases indicate Celtic ancestry. Other variations include "MacIvor", "McIver", "McEevor", "McEever", "McHeever", and "McCure". "Iverson" is the Danish and Norwegian version, while the Swedes opted for "Ivarsson" and "Iwarsson".


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=McKeever
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "McKeever" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1820 auf.

Erstellt: 2011-06

Murphy (W3)

Der Name engl. "Murphy" (auch als engl. "Murphie" vorkommend) ist irisch-schottischen Ursprungs und ist heute noch der weitest verbreitete Name in Irland. Der ins Englische übernommene Name geht zurück auf gäl. "Murchadh", "Murchadha" = dt. "Meereskrieger".

Der Wortteil gäl. "muir" = dt. "See", "Meer" steckt auch in den Namen "Muriel" (zu gäl. "Muirgheal", aus "muir" und "geal" = dt. "glänzen"), "Murdoch" (zu altir. "Muireadhach" (dt. "Seemann"), altwalis. "Mordoc" (dt. "Seemann"). Der Wortteil gäl. "cath" bedeutet dt. "Kampf".

Als heute gälische Namensform findet man auch "Murchú".

"Murphy" findet man heute auch als Vorname. Die Entwicklung vom Familiennamen zum Vornamen verlief vermutlich über die Beibehaltung von "Murphy" als zweitem Familiennamen und so wurde etwa aus "Thomas Murphy Johnson" kurz "Murphy Johnson".

Der Name "Murphy" findet sich in einigen Bezeichnungen. Die bekanntesten sind wohl engl. "Murphy’s Law" und engl. "Murphy bed".

Samuel Beckett, Schriftsteller, Pädagoge (13.04.1906 (Dublin) - 22.12.1989 (Paris), Nobelpreis für Literatur 1969, Werke:

Der Name "Murphy" kommt sehr häufig vor. Eine Suche förderte mindestens folgende Namensträger (und Begriffe) zu Tage:

(E?)(L?) http://genealogy.about.com/cs/surname/a/irish_surnames.htm

Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://wiki.bildungsserver.de/weltliteratur/index.php/Spezial:Alle_Seiten

"Murphy" ist ein Anfang der Dreißiger Jahre entstandener Roman von Samuel Beckett. Beckett litt zu dieser Zeit unter Depressionen.


(E?)(L?) http://english.360elib.com/datu/P/EM383725.pdf

"Irish apricot". An "Irish potato". Captain Francis Grose noted this one in the first edition of A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1785). Synonyms include "Irish apple", "Irish grape", and "Irish lemon". For reasons that should not seem terribly obscure, the "Irish potato" also have been known as a "hog orange", "Donovan", "MlCK", or "murphy". The last of these probably is the most common and the oldest, too, having been dated to 1811 (Anon., "A member of the Whip Club", Lexicon Balatronicum).


(E?)(L?) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/boy/murphy

Origin of the name Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://personensuche.dastelefonbuch.de/Nachnamen-M.html

Murphy


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Murphy

Murphy


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Murphy, William Parry

Murphy, William Parry


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/FatherMurphy/

Father Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Murphy

"Murphy", Gaelic "Murchadh" "sea-warrior". The Celtic "sea" element is also in names "Muriel" (q.v.), "Murdoch" (Old Irish "Muireadhach", Old Welsh "Mordoc" "mariner"), etc. "Murphy bed" (1925) is named for U.S. inventor "William Lawrence Murphy" (1876-1959). By happy coincidence, "Murphy" was an illiterate 18c.-19c. perversion of Morpheus, god of sleep.


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/25763/25763-h/25763-h.htm

Gambier-Parry, Ernest, 1853-1936: 'Murphy' - A Message to Dog Lovers (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/site/Garcons/M.htm

Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://www.oocities.org/edgarbook/names/m/murphy.html

Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://www.searchforancestors.com/surnames/origin/m/

Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/?s=Murphy

Search results for "Murphy"


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/category/episodes/

A Murphy, a Melvin, and a Wedgie (full episode)
Posted March 26, 2011
When it comes to joining Facebook affinity groups, grammar lovers have lots of choices. Take, for example, the group whose motto is “Punctuation saves lives.” It’s called “Let’s Eat Grandma!’” or “Let’s eat, Grandma!” Martha and Grant talk about their favorite tongue-in-cheek Facebook groups for grammar lovers. Also this week: when to use apostrophes, whether [...]read more »


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/category/e-newsletter/

Lurve a Librarian
Posted September 7, 2010
Greetings, Murphys and Melvins and wedgies, oh my! In this week’s archive episode, we talk about these and other terms for that cruel prank that involves a yank. Also, funny Facebook groups for grammar lovers, the difference between “bring” and “take,” and whether there’s a term for fitting the lyrics of one song over the [...]read more »


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/category/e-newsletter/

Giving Up Atomic Wedgies for Lent
Posted March 15, 2010
On this week's show, the topic was wedgie technique, specifically the difference between a "murphy" and a "melvin." We also talked about the origin of "mad props," the uses of "bring" and "take," and singing the lyrics to "Amazing Grace" to the tune of "Gilligan's Island." We also threw [...]read more »


(E?)(L1) http://www.wochenschau-archiv.de/auswahl.php

Murphy - Suchergebnis: sortiert nach Zeit der Handlung, 5 Treffer


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/murphy

murphy, pl. murphies

Slang:

Origin of "murphy": from Irish surname "Murphy"

Murphy (noun), pl. "Murphies"

Slang Origin of "Murphy" From "Murphy", a common Irish name.


(E?)(L?) http://www.zoope.com/

Murphy


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Murphy
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Murphy" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 / 1710 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Murphy

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-09

  • murphy
  • murphy (W3)

    murphy /'/ n. (coll.) Kartoffel, die; Knolle, die (ugs.)

    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=murphy
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "murphy" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

    (E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#murphy

    This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


    Erstellt: 2016-09

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    Rutledge (W3)
    Ruttledge History Page

    (E?)(L?) http://www.rootsweb.com/~rutledge/origins.htm

    ...
    The name "Rutledge" is a place name. It meant "red lache or pool" from the old Anglican words "redd", meaning "red", and "loec" - later "lache", variant "letch" meaning a "stream", or a "pool" in boggy land. (Surnames of United Kingdom by H. Harrison). A "d" in the middle or end (if a word in the old Germanic Tongues was sounded as "t"; hence the "t" sound in the first syllable. Harrison speaks of "Rutledge" as "a great Border name". Anciently, those of that name were said to dwell "by the waters (of Bale", or "Bailey Water", later called "Routledge Burn", in the township of Bailie, or Bailey, near Bewcastle in the southern part of The Debateable Land on the English-Scottish Border.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.ruttledge.com/

    This page has been published by Sean J. Ruttledge
    Resident of Bromley , Kent. UK

    The steel bonnet you see above was the headgear of my forefathers, These people were border reivers from "The Debatable Land" a lawless enclave of disputed territory on the English Scots border which for several generations witnessed some of the most violent anarchy ever seen in the history of the British Isles.

    The name has been transcribed in several different variants which have evolved over the course of time. The main variants surviving today include "Routledge", "Rutledge", and "Ruttledge". The map below shows a closer view of the border region. You can clearly see the names of the reiving families on the areas they lived. Note Routledges across the shaded area.

    My Father, Anthony Joseph Ruttledge Grew up in Ballina County Mayo Ireland. Like the rest of the family he couldn't tell me why "Ruttledge" was not a "Fitzrutledge" or "O'Ruttledge", all they could tell me was that it was not an Irish name but had been in Ireland a long time, that started me on a quest, the results of which can be seen here

    Near the very foot of this page you will find a little arrow BEWARE! if you click on it you will be taken into an intriguing article on the Ruttledges of County Mayo. This article was written by Thomas Ormsby Ruttledge in the 1980's. I Acknowledge him and the Irish Genealogist 1988 as the Author and copyright holders. The article has been copied into html format literally as it appears in the book ( Warts, Typo's an all) To preserve its integrity.

    There are more than twenty pages and nearly 300 references to source material. Footnotes at the bottom of each page relate to these source reference numbers. To proceed through the entire article simply scroll to the foot of each page and keep clicking on the arrows.

    I wish to Thank Mr. Bill Ruttledge of St Louis Missouri for his kindness in providing me with this article.


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    uark - Latin Names of the Bishoprics in Ireland

    (E?)(L?) http://comp.uark.edu/~mreynold/recint5.htm


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    Bücher zur Kategorie:

    Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
    IE Irland, Irlanda, Irlande, Irlanda, Ireland
    Name, Nombre, Nom, Nome, Name

    A

    B

    C

    D

    E

    F

    G

    H

    I

    J

    K

    Kelly, Patrick
    Irish Family Names with Origins, Meanings, Clans, Arms, Crests and Mottoes

    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0810341468/etymologporta-20


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0810341468/etymologety0f-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0810341468/etymologetymo-21


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    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0810341468/etymologpor09-20
    Hardcover: 136 pages
    Publisher: Gale Group; 1st edition (September 1976)
    Language: English

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    Uhlich, Jürgen
    Die Morphologie der komponierten Personennamen des Altirischen

    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/392526776X/etymologporta-20


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/392526776X/etymologety0f-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/392526776X/etymologetymo-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/392526776X/etymologety0d-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/392526776X/etymologpor09-20
    Witterschlick/Bonn : Wehle, 1993, 1. Aufl
    Taschenbuch: 309 Seiten

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