Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
IE Irland, Irlanda, Irlande, Irlanda, Ireland
Zitat, Cita, Citation, Citazione, Quotation

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fionasplace
Irish sayings
Toasts and Blessings

(E?)(L?) http://www.fionasplace.net/AnIrishPatchwork/Irishsayingsandblessings.html


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irishmillinn
Irish Toasts

(E?)(L?) http://www.irishmillinn.com/toasts1.htm

These toasts have been gathered from many sources over a long period of time. We hope you use them and enjoy them. They are in no particular order. At some point down the road we will organize this a little better and set up search capabilities.


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najapan
Irish Toasts

(E?)(L?) http://www.najapan.com/brown/IrishToasts.html

In the time of the Irish chieftains, from the first through the twelfth centuries, poets were revered as highly as the kings themselves. Each king had his own poet. With the arrival of Saint Patrick and his monks in the fifth century, the written word began to complement the oral traditions. Thanks to Patrick's lasting influence, the Irish were one of the few literate people in Europe throughout the dark Ages. Their reverence for the spoken and written word has remained unswerving.

Most of the Irish get their first practice at storytelling, blarney, and other verbal arts in the pubs. These are not just places to raise a glass, but a place to gather with other people, friends , family, even strangers. The verse is as rich and flowing as the Guinness.

As the glasses fill and empty, patrons tell and retell their tales, polishing and refining their noble art. Is it any wonder the Irish have become masters of the gab?

Here are just a few examples of Irish wit and wordplay. Many of which have been submitted by people visiting this site. So raise a glass and pass on the tradition. St. Patrick would be pleased.


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