Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
IQ Irak, Iraq, Irak, Iraq, Iraq
untergegangene Wörter, Archaismen, Arcaísmo, Archaïsme, Arcaismo, Archaism

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ETCSL (W3)

"ETCSL" steht für "Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature".

(E?)(L?) http://www-etcsl.orient.ox.ac.uk/

Introduction

Sumerian is the first language for which we have written evidence and its literature the earliest known. The "Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature" ("ETCSL"), a project of the University of Oxford, comprises a selection of nearly 400 literary compositions recorded on sources which come from ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and date to the late third and early second millennia BCE.

The corpus contains Sumerian texts in transliteration, English prose translations and bibliographical information for each composition. The transliterations and the translations can be searched, browsed and read online using the tools of the website.

Funding for the ETCSL project came to an end in the summer of 2006 and no work is currently being done to this site or its contents.

For more information, see the About ETCSL menu or the site map


(E?)(L?) http://www-etcsl.orient.ox.ac.uk/edition2/etcslsitemap.html

Tools and resources About ETCSL Using ETCSL Sumerian Miscellaneous


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Sumer (W3)

"Sumer" ist der Name für den südlichen Teil Mesopotamiens, heute Mittel- und Südbabylonien. Die Bezeichnung wird aus dem Akkadischen abgeleitet.

Sumerian (W3)

Engl. "Sumerian" = dt. "Sumerer" ist die Bezeichnung der Bewohner Sumers, heute Mittel- und Südbabylonien. Die Bezeichnung wird aus dem Akkadischen abgeleitet.

(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=Sumerian

howstuffworks search results for: Sumerian - Your search for "Sumerian" returned 26 articles


sumerian
Sumerian Lexicon
Version 3.0
by John A. Halloran

(E?)(L?) http://www.sumerian.org/sumerlex.htm

The following lexicon contains 1,255 Sumerian logogram words and 2,511 Sumerian compound words. A logogram is a reading of a cuneiform sign which represents a word in the spoken language. Sumerian scribes invented the practice of writing in cuneiform on clay tablets sometime around 3400 B.C. in the "Uruk" / "Warka" region in the south of ancient Iraq. [The etymology of "Iraq" may come from this region, biblical "Erech". Medieval Arabic sources used the name "Iraq" as a geographical term for the area in the south and center of the modern republic.] The Sumerian language spoken by the inventors of writing is known to us through a large body of texts and through bilingual cuneiform dictionaries of Sumerian and Akkadian, the language of their Semitic successors, to which Sumerian is not related. These bilingual dictionaries date from the Old Babylonian period (1800-1600 B.C.), by which time Sumerian had ceased to be spoken, except by the scribes. The earliest and most important words in Sumerian had their own cuneiform signs, whose origins were pictographic, making an initial repertoire of about a thousand signs or logograms. Beyond these words, two-thirds of this lexicon now consists of words that are transparent compounds of separate logogram words. I have greatly expanded the section containing compounds in this version, but I know that many more compound words could be added.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.sumerian.org/sumerian.pdf

Sumerian Lexicon
Version 3.0
by
John A. Halloran
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Sumerian Language (W3)

Engl. "Sumerian" = dt. "Sumerer" ist die Bezeichnung der Bewohner Sumers, heute Mittel- und Südbabylonien. Die Bezeichnung wird aus dem Akkadischen abgeleitet.

(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/display_borrowlang.php?lang=Sumerian

Borrowed Words From Sumerian


(E?)(L?) http://www.language-museum.com/encyclopedia/s/sumerian-cuneiform.php
Sumerian (Cuneiform)

(E?)(L?) http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/php/English_list.php
Sumerian - Sumerian - sumérien - sux

(E?)(L?) http://www-etcsl.orient.ox.ac.uk/edition2/language.php

Sumerian language


(E?)(L?) http://www.sumerian.org/prot-sum.htm
The Proto-Sumerian Language Invention Process
by John A. Halloran

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sumerian
An Introduction to the Sumerian Language

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Sumerian/Grammar

Sumerian Grammar

In the lessons below, you'll be introduced to aspects of Sumerian grammar in (hopefully) bite sized chunks. If any of the lessons are confusing, don't hesitate to edit them for style, or use the discussion boards for suggestions! That's the spirit of the wiki, after all.

The Lessons


(E?)(L1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sumerian_language

Sumerian language

Sumerian ("native tongue") was the language of ancient Sumer, spoken in Southern Mesopotamia since at least the 4th millennium BCE (BC). It was gradually replaced by Akkadian as a spoken language somewhere around the turn of the 3rd and the 2nd millennium BCE (the exact dating being a matter of debate), but continued to be used as a sacred, ceremonial, literary and scientific language in Mesopotamia until the first century CE (AD). Then, it was forgotten until the 19th century, when Assyriologists began deciphering the cuneiform inscriptions and excavated tablets left by these speakers. Sumerian is a language isolate.
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(E?)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/languages.html


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