Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Region, Región, Région, Regione, Region

Schottland, l'Écosse, Scotland

A

AHSS (W3)

"AHSS" steht für "Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland".

(E?)(L?) http://www.ahss.org.uk/


B

bbc
Scots Leid

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A839207


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A828164
The "Scots Leid"
A'll tell ye the tale o a leid
"Scots" - the Language
Scotland has more than one distinct language (or "leid"). There is English, the language of newspapers, TV programmes and the Internet; Gaelic, the ancient Celtic language of the Western Highlands and Island; and one other. The language is "Scots", the language of the poet Robert Burns.
...

Contrary to popular belief both in the general populace and the education establishment, Scotland has its own distinct language. And its not Gaelic either. The language I am talking about is "Scots", the language of the poet Robert Burns. The reason for the lack of knowledge of this language is simple enough. It is very close to English. However it is not simply a dialect. "Scots" is to English what Dutch is to German or Portugese is to Spanish.

bogey (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.usga.org/history/faq/
The term "bogey" comes from a song that was popular in the British Isles in the early 1890s, called "The Bogey Man" (later known as "The Colonel Bogey March"). The character of the song was an elusive figure who hid in the shadows: "I'm the Bogey Man, catch me if you can." Golfers in Scotland and England equated the quest for the elusive Bogey Man with the quest for the elusive perfect score. By the mid to late 1890s, the term "bogey score" referred to the ideal score a good player could be expected to make on a hole under perfect conditions. It also came to be used to describe stroke play tournaments - hence, in early Rules books we find a section detailing the regulations for "Bogey Competitions". It was only in the late 1900s/early 1910s that the concept of "Par" started to emerge - this being the designated number of strokes a scratch player could be expected to take on a hole in ideal conditions. In this way "par" was distinguished from "bogey". The term "par" itself is a standard term in sports handicapping, where it simply means "level" or "even".

Braveheart (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.bravehearts.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.kiltmen.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.weltbilder.de/html/schottl.htm
"Braveheart" wurde 1995 durch den Film diesen Titels mit Mel Gibson in Deutschland bekannt. Den Film habe ich nicht gesehen und die geschichtlichen Hintergründe sind mir leider auch nicht bekannt.
Die Bezeichnung "braveheart" bedeutet jedenfalls "mutiges Herz", im übertragenen Sinn also "tapferer Mann".
Dass unser "brav" in früheren Zeiten gar nicht so brav war, findet man in dessen Wortgeschichte.

Ein Besucher ergänzt:
"Bravehearts" ist die landläufige Bezeichnung für alle Schotten.
(A: halo)

breast (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=150412004
Etymology: Old English "brest" or "breost".

britannia
Scots Dictionary

(E?)(L1) http://www.britannia.org/scotland/scotsdictionary/


C

cyndislist
Scotland
Genealogy Sites

(E?)(L1) http://www.cyndislist.com/scotland.htm
Die wirklich grosse Linkliste ist in folgende Kategorien unterteilt.


General Resource Sites | Government & Cities | History & Culture | How To | Language & Names | Libraries, Archives & Museums | Locality Specific | Mailing Lists, Newsgroups & Chat | Maps, Gazetteers & Geographical Information | Military | Newspapers | People & Families | Photographs & Memories | Professional Researchers, Volunteers & Other Research Services | Publications, Software & Supplies | Queries, Message Boards & Surname Lists | Records: Census, Cemeteries, Land, Obituaries, Personal, Taxes and Vital | Religion & Churches | Societies & Groups

Also for Scotland: Scotland - Counties Index

Related Categories: Channel Islands | England | England - Counties Index | General U.K. Sites | Ireland & Northern Ireland | Ireland & Northern Ireland - Counties Index | Isle of Man | Presbyterian | Scotland | Scotland - Counties Index | U.K. & Ireland - Census | U.K. - Military | Wales / Cymru | Wales / Cymru - Counties Index


Die Kategorie "Language & Names" enthielt folgende Einträge:




D

demon
Scottish Slang

(E?)(L?) http://www.paidmyre.demon.co.uk/
Hier findet man ein paar .wav-Beispiele mit schottischen Sätzen.

dias
Celtic Studies

(E?)(L?) http://www.celt.dias.ie/english/


(E?)(L?) http://www.celt.dias.ie/publications/cat/
School of Celtic Studies - Scoil an Léinn Cheiltigh Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies - Institiúid Ard-Léinn Bhaile Átha Cliath

Books and Publications in Celtic Studies

dsl
DSL
Dictionary of the Scots Language
Scottish Dictionary
Dictionary Older Scottish Tongue (DOST)
Scottish National Dictionary (SND)

(E?)(L1) http://www.dsl.ac.uk/


(E?)(L1) http://www.dsl.ac.uk/dsl/

What is the Dictionary of the Scots Language? (Scottish Etymological Dictionary)

The "Dictionary of the Scots Language (DSL)" comprises electronic editions of the two major historical dictionaries of the Scots language: These are the most comprehensive dictionaries available for, respectively, Older Scots and modern Scots, and are therefore essential research tools for anyone interested in the history of either Scots or English language, and for historical or literary scholars whose sources are written in Scots or may contain Scots usages.

In the DSL, these two dictionaries are being published together in their full form for the first time. Thus, information on the earliest uses of Scots words can be presented alongside examples of the later development and, in some cases, current usage of the same words. In this way, we hope that the DSL will allow users to appreciate the continuity and historical development of the Scots language. By making the DSL freely available on the Internet, we also aim to widen access to the source dictionaries and to open up these rich lexicographic resources to anyone with an interest in Scots language and culture.

Scots is a living language and, although the examples of modern Scots included in SND only date as far as the publication of the last part of that dictionary, in 1976, work has continued since then on collecting information on Scots usage. Scottish Language Dictionaries Ltd. (formerly the Scottish National Dictionary Association) are currently compiling a new Supplement which incorporates recent research and there are plans to publish this on the DSL website in the near future, so as to bring the lexicographic record of Scots truly up to date.

...

Together, these data files represent twenty-two volumes of printed text and contain more than eighty thousand full-word entries. Each entry traces the chronological and semantic development of a Scots word, and gives details of orthographic variants, grammatical inflections, derivative words and phrases, and etymological history. The words and terms defined in the DSL are illustrated by quotations drawn from over six thousand sources, covering a wide range of subject areas within Scottish culture and history. Many of the modern Scots words are also illustrated by evidence from oral sources, and include information on phonological and dialectal variation.

...


Die Begriffe sind untereinander querverlinkt und können per Doppelklick aufgerufen werden.

Die Suche kann nach folgenden Kriterien vorgenommen werden: Die Logik ist mir nicht so ganz klar.

Dennoch ist es ein hervorragendes schottische Wörterbuch mit vielen etymologischen Anmerkungen.

dunce
John Duns Scotus
Scotists
Scotism and Scotists (W3)

The word "dunce" meaning a "stupid person" = "Dummkopf" refers to "John Duns Scotus" (c.1265-1308), a leading scholar of philosophy and theology. "Scotus" was born in "Duns", Scotland and his writings formed the philosophical core for a Scholastic sect named after him, the "Scotists".
In the 16th century, humanists and reformers began attacking the "Scotists" for engaging in useless philosophical discussions. In return, the "Scotists" attacked the new learning of the Renaissance. As a result, "Duns" became associated with those who refused to learn.

Die Links führen zu Wortgeschichten zu "dunce" und zu Informationen zu Leben und Werk des Philosophen "John Duns Scotus".

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/d6etym.htm


(E?)(L1) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words16.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05194a.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/s.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13610b.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/s.htm


(E3)(L1) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive.php4
dunce (2001-07-18)

(E?)(L?) http://www.philolex.de/philolex.htm
Duns Scotus

(E4)(L1) http://www.rasscass.com/templ/te_bio.php?PID=1477&RID=1
J. Duns Scotus (1266)

(E6)(L1) http://www.weltchronik.de/bio/cethegus/d/dunsscot.html
Duns Scotus, Johannes

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/041400.html#dunce


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/dunce/


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0498
dunce Apr 98

Dunedin (W3)

Die neuseeländische Stadt "Duendin" wurde 1848 von schottischen Immigranten gegründet. Diese nannten sie nach ihrer Heimatstadt "Edingburgh"; allerdings mit dem "Gaelic word" "Dunedin", welsch "Din Eidyn" - "Eidyn's fortress".

(E?)(L?) http://www.atoz-nz.com/Dunedin/


(E?)(L?) http://www.encyclo.co.uk/define/Dunedin


(E?)(L?) http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0912720.html

Dunedin, Scotland: see Edinburgh.


(E?)(L?) http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0816766.html

Edinburgh
...
The city is famous in Scottish legend and literature as "Dunedin" or "Auld Reekie".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05191c.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RD.HTM

HMS Dunedin was a British D Class cruiser of 4850 tons displacement launched in 1918 that saw action during the Second World War before being sunk in 1941.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placename_dunedin.htm

...
"Dunedin" (the Gaelic form of "Edinburgh", derived from the original Old Welsh/Cumbrian name "Din Eidyn" - "Eidyn's fortress") and North and South Dunedin by association.
...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Dunedin


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_Zealand_place_names_and_their_meanings

Dunedin - from the Scottish Gaelic name for "Edinburgh", "Dùn Èideann".


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunedin_(disambiguation)
Abkömmlinge des schottischen "Edinburgh" bzw. "Dùn Èideann" sind:


Dunedin is an anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic name Dùn Éideann for Edinburgh, Scotland.

Dunedin may also refer to:

Places Other See also


Erstellt: 2012-07

E

eleaston
Scotish-English online

(E?)(L?) http://www.eleaston.com/scot-eng.html
Mit Links zu Scots / English:

electricscotland.com
History and Culture of Scotland

(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/

Hello and Welcome to Electric Scotland

The largest and most comprehensive site on the history and culture of Scotland and the Scots at home and abroad. Started in 1997 in Scotland we cover every aspect of Scottish history and the Scots Diaspora. A great educational and research resource with thousands of books on all aspects of Scottish history and culture. As the site is so huge you may wish to avail yourself of our customised Google site search engine to locate specific information. Lots of information on clans and families, places in Scotland, and loads of historical articles on just about every topic imaginable. We also have lots of great stories on our Electric Canadian web site where you can learn all about the history and culture of Canada and also about the Scots that settled there. We have a full 6 volume gazetteer on the site and many volumes of information on Significant and famous Scots. And we don't forget the young ones as they have their own section with many games and some 800 children's stories.




(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/index.html

Scottish and Irish Clans & Families

Most of our material comes from antiquarian books published in the 1800's. There are many references to Scottish clans in our History section as well so do use our search engine to find other mentions of your clan or family in our thousands of historical pages. Should you enjoy Scottish History then why not get our Free weekly email newsletter.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/clanmenu.htm

Official Scottish Clans and Families
...
Abercromb | Adam | Agnew | Anderson | Anstruthe | Arbuthnot | Arthur | Armstrong | Auchinlec | Baillie | Baird | Balfour | Bannatyne | Bannerma | Barcla | Baxter | Bell | Bethune | Beveridge | Bissett | Blair | Borthwick | Boswell | Boyd | Boyle | Brodie | Broun | Bruce | Buchan | Buchanan | Burnett | Calder | Cameron | Campbell | Campbell of Breadalbane | Campbell of Cawdor | Carmichael | Carnegie | Cathcart | Chalmers | Charteris | Chattan | Chisholm | Clelland | Cochrane | Cockburn | Colquhoun | Colville | Craig | Cranstoun | Crawford | Crichton | Cumming | Cunningham | Currie | Dalrymple | Dalzell | Darroch | Davidson | Dennistoun | Dewar | Douglas | Drummond | Dunbar | Dunlop | Durie | Dundas | Elphinstone | Elliot | Erskine | Ewing | Falconer | Farquharson | Ferguson | Fleming | Fletcher | Forbes | Forrester | Forsyth | Fraser | Fraser of Lovat | Fullarton | Galbraith | Garden | Gayre | Gibsone | Gladstaines | Glas | Glen | Gordon | Graham | Grant | Gray | Grierson | Gunn | Guthrie | Haig | Haldane | Hamilton | Hannay | Hay | Henderson | Hepburn | Home | Hope | Hogg | Horsburgh | Houston | Hunter | Inglis | Innes | Irvine | Jardine | Johnstone | Keith | Kennedy | Kerr | Kincaid | Kinnaird | Kinnear | Kinninmont | Kirkpatrick | Lamont | Learmonth | Leask | Lennox | Leslie | Lindsay | Little | Livingstone / MacLea | Logan | Lockhart | Lumsden | Lyle | Lyon | MacAlister | MacAlpine | MacAulay | MacBain | MacBrayne | MacCallum (Malcolm) | MacCorquodale | MacCulloch | MacDonald | MacDonald of Clanranald | MacDonald of Sleat | MacDonald of Keppoch | MacDonell of Glengarry | MacDougall | MacDowall | MacDuff | MacEwen | MacFarlane | MacFie | MacGillivray | MacGregor | MacInnes | MacIntyre | MacIver | MacKay | MacKenzie | MacKie | MacKinnon | MacKintosh | MacLachlan | MacLaine of Lochbuie | MacLaren | MacLean | MacLellan | MacLennan | MacLeod | MacLeod of the Lewes | MacMillan | MacNab | MacNaghten | MacNeacail | MacNeil | MacNicol | MacPherson | MacQuarrie | MacQueen | MacRae | MacTavish | MacThomas | Maitland | Makgill | Mar | Marjoribanks | Matheson | Maxwell | Melville | Menzies | Mercer | Middleton | Moffat | Moncreiffe | Montgomery | Morrison | Mow | Muir | Muirhead | Munro | Murray | Murray of Atholl | Nairn | Napier | Nesbitt | Newlands | Newton | Nicolson | Ogilvy | Oliphant | Paisley | Patterson | Pennycook | Pitcairn | Pollock | Preston | Primrose | Pringle | Purves | Ramsay | Rattray | Riddell | Robertson | (Donnachaidh) | Rollo | Rose | Ross | Rutherford | Ruthven | Sandilands | Scott | Scrymgeour | Seton | Sempill | Shaw | Sinclair | Skene | Somerville | Spens | Stewart | Stewart of Apin | Stirling | Strachan | Strange | Stuart of Bute | Sutherland | Swinton | Tailyour | Thompson | Trotter | Turnbull | Tweedie | Urquhart | Walkinshaw | Wallace | Watson | Wardlaw | Wedderburn | Weir | Wemyss | Whitelaw | Wishart | Wood | Young |


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/other_names.htm

Information on other Scottish Names
...
Aitcheson | Akins | Alexander | Allan | Allison | Ayre | Beaton | Bennet | Birrell | Birse | Black | Blackstock | Blaikie | Bowie | Budge | Buie | Burns | Burness | Butter | Cargill/Cargile | Cheape | Christie | Clark | Colt and Coutts | Comyn/Connal | Cooper | Cloe and Clow | Crozier | Cullen | Cuthbert | Dalgleish | Deas | Denovan | Dinwiddie | Dinsmoor/Dinsmore | Doig | Don | Donnachaidh | Duncan | Ewing | Fenton | Findlater | Frame | French | Galloway | Gemmell | Gillies | Gow, MacGowan | Hall | Gourlay | Grewar | Harden | Harkness | Herd | Hume | Johnson | Kidd, Kyd | Kilgour | Laing | Landrum | Lauder | Leith | Liddle | Lundin / Lundie | MacAdam | MacAllum | MacBean | MacBeth | MacCarley | MacCaskill | MacClachlan | MacColl | McComb | MacCoss | MacCrimmon | MacDiarmid | MacDuffee | MacEachain | MacFadyen | MacGhie | MacGill | MacHardy | MacIain | MacInroy | MacKean | MacKellar | MacKerrell | MacKillop | MacKinlay | McKirdy | MacLintock | McMath | MacMicking | MacPhail | MacPheeter | MacSporran | MacTaggart | MacWilliam | McKinstry | McWhirter | Manuel | Marshall | Martin | Maule | Miller | Milne | Mitchell | Morgan | Mowat | Mowbray | Murdoch | Oliver | Pattillo | Pentland | Porteous | Rankine | Routledge | Russell | Sellars | Shepherd | Simpson | Smith | Snoddy | Snodgrass | Stevenson | Sturrock | Taylor | Tearlach | Telfer | Tennant | Thom(p)son | Traill | Tullis | Tyrie | Vipont | Walker | White | Wilson | Witherspoon | Scottish Families


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/scotsirish/index.htm

Clans & Families of Ireland and Scotland
...
Aherne | Barrett | Barry | Boyle | Brady | Brennan | Browne | Burke | Butler | Byrne | Cahill | Cannon | Carroll | Casey | Clancy | Cleary | Connolly | Costello | Crowley | Cullen | Dalzell | Dempsey | Denny Doherty | Donnelly | Dorrough | Dowd | Doyle | Duffy | Dunne | Egan | Farrell | Fitzpatrick | Flaherty | Flynn | Fox | Gallagher | Hannon | Hawkins | Hennessy | Hickey | Higgins | Kavanagh | Keappock | Keating | Kelly Kennedy | Keogh | Kinsella | May | Magenis | McAteer | MacAuley | MacCabe | MacCarthy | McCluskey | MacDermot | MacGillycuddy | McGrath | McLaughlin & O'Neill | MacDonnell | McHale | McMahone | Maguire | Maloney | Moriarty | Mullins | Murphy Navin | Nolan | O'Brien | O'Callaghan | O'Dennehy | O'Donoghue | O'Donovan | O'Hara | O'Keeffe | O'Neill | O'Reilly | O'Rourke | O'Ryan | O'Shea | O'Sullivan | Quinn | Roche | Scullion | Sheridan | Sweeney | Walsh | Wham |


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/surnamesofscotland.pdf

ETYMOLOGY OF THK PRINCIPAL GAELIC NATIONAL NAMES PERSONAL NAMES AND SURNAMES


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/culture/

Scottish Culture & Language


(E?)(L?) http://www.electricscotland.com/culture/features/scots/index.htm

Scots Language

Enjoy our Scots Language section where you can both read words, poems and stories as well as listen to them.

External Links


Erstellt: 2017-01

epodunk
Scotland

(E?)(L?) http://uk.epodunk.com/profiles/northern-ireland/3000004.html

Scotland is a country of the United Kingdom.
...
The country encompasses the mainland regions of the Highlands, Lowlands and Southern Uplands, and the Hebrides, Orkney and Shetland islands.
Former and merged names include: "Caledonia".
...


epodunk - County Profiles (UK, SC)

Meine Stichproben ergaben, dass es zur überwiegenden Anzahl der Informationen zu schottischen Verwaltungsbezirken auch Hinweise zur Namensgebung gibt, die meist mit der Formel "The county was named ..." eingeleitet werden.
Dies rechtfertigt die Aufnahme im Etymologie-Portal.

(E?)(L?) http://uk.epodunk.com/historic-counties-scotland.html




epodunk - Community-Profiles (UK, SC)

Meine Stichproben ergaben, dass es zur überwiegenden Anzahl der Informationen zu schottischen Städten auch Hinweise zur Namensgebung gibt, die meist mit der Formel "The county was named ..." eingeleitet werden.
Dies rechtfertigt die Aufnahme im Etymologie-Portal.

(E2)(L1) http://uk.epodunk.com/communities-scotland.html

COMMUNITIES LIST - Scotland
(2008-02-24) Our listings for Scotland include the following communities:


ethnologue
Gaelic, Scots - Scots - Traveller Scottish

(E?)(L?) http://www.ethnologue.org/show_language.asp?code=GLS


(E?)(L?) http://www.ethnologue.org/show_language.asp?code=SCO


(E?)(L?) http://www.ethnologue.org/show_language.asp?code=TRL


europe
Gälisch für Einsteiger

(E?)(L1) http://www.hp.europe.de/kd-europtravel/gaelic/gaelic0.htm

Gälisch ist eine keltische Sprache, verwandt mit dem Irischen, und wird von ca. 70.000 der 5 Millionen Einwohner Schottlands gesprochen, oder von etwas mehr als 1 % der Bevölkerung. Die meisten gälischsprechenden Menschen leben auf den Äußeren Hebriden, aber auch im Westen der Highlands und der Region Strathclyde sowie in den Städten Glasgow, Edinburgh und Inverness wird gälisch gesprochen.
Vom 9. bis 11. Jahrhundert wurde gälisch in den meisten Teilen Schottlands gesprochen. Sein Einfluß läßt sich heute noch überall in Schottland bei Ortsnamen und Personennamen nachweisen.
Im 18. und 19. Jahrhundert waren viele Schotten von ihren "Landlords" gezwungen, ihr Land in den Highlands und auf den Inseln aufzugeben und zu emigrieren, und so wurden gälische Gemeinschaften in Teilen von Nord Amerika gegründet (z.B. North Carolina und Nova Scotia).
Ein Gälisch-Kurs

europe
Gälische Verben

(E?)(L?) http://www.hp.europe.de/kd-europtravel/gaelic/gaelic8c.htm
Hier findet man einige etymologische Hinweise zu den gälischen Verben:
abair | beir | chaidh | chì | chuala | chunnaic | cluinn | cluinntinn | dèan | dèanamh | dol | faic | faicsinn | faigh | fhuair | gheibh | nì | rach | ràdh | rànig | rinn | rug | ruig | ruigsinn | thàinig | theid | their | thig | thoir | thuirt | thug

explorersgarden.com
Explorers Garden

(E?)(L?) http://www.explorersgarden.com/

Hunters History

The Plant Hunters were not just botanists, they were adventurers and explorers. They had to be tough to survive the conditions they faced in far-flung corners of the world. They survived shipwrecks, sieges and slavery and battled with pirates, escaped convicts and hostile natives.


(E?)(L?) http://www.explorersgarden.com/explorers-garden/plant-hunters/discover-the-plant-hunters.html




Erstellt: 2014-03

F

firstfoot
Scottish Vernacular

(E?)(L1) http://www.firstfoot.com/php/glossary/phpglossar_0.8/index.php
(Es kann etwas dauern, bis die lange Wortliste geladen ist.

Fore (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.usga.org/history/faq/


(E?)(L?) http://www.americandialect.org/
Why do golfers shout "Fore!" when they hit an errant shot?

The word "fore" is Scottish in origin, and is a shortened version of the word "before" or "afore". The old Scottish warning, essentially meaning "look out ahead", most probably originated in military circles, where it was used by artillery men as a warning to troops in foreword positions. Golfers as early as the 18th century simply adopted this military warning cry for use on the links.

freeze (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=322492004
Etymology: Middle English "fresen", from Old English "frosan". From Indo-European roots.

G

Gaelic (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/g1etym.htm

Gaelic - 1774, earlier Gathelik (1596), from Gael (Scottish Gaidheal), from O.Ir. Goidhel, the original form of the word. The native name in both Ireland and Scotland, Gael was first used in Eng. exclusively of Scottish Highlanders (1596).


Glamis Castle - Rose

"Glamis Castle" ist eines der bedeutendsten Schlösser Großbritaniens (Besitz der königlichen Familie seit 1372). In William Shakespeares "Macbeth" wird es zum sagenumwobenen Schauplatz.

(E?)(L?) http://www.classicroses.co.uk/products/roses/


(E?)(L?) http://www.davidaustinroses.com/german/Search.asp?Theme=


(E?)(L?) http://www.dickemauern.de/glamis/glamis.htm

Forfar - "Glamis Castle" - von Kai Brune


(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/browse.lasso

Glamis Castle w White & White blend, English Rose (Shrub) 1992


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php


(E?)(L?) http://www.hortico.com/roses/roseindex.asp?va=y

Glamis Castle - English Garden Roses


(E?)(L1) http://www.justourpictures.com/roses/textindex.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.ludwigsroses.co.za/rose-search/?roseName=Glamis+Castle&frag=&height=&use1=&use2=&use3=&col1=&col2=&col3=&find=do

David Austin's English Roses: "Glamis Castle" ("AUSlevel")


(E?)(L?) http://www.pflanzen-im-web.de/pflanzen/pflanzen-suche/Rosen/index.php

Englische Rose "Glamis Castle (Auslevel) ~ Rosa Hybr.


(E?)(L?) http://www.photomazza.com/?Rosa-Glamis-Castle


(E?)(L1) http://www.rogersroses.com/gallery/chooserResult.asp

Glamis Castle (Auslevel)


(E6)(L1) http://www.rosenfoto.de/LiRosenfotoFSY.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.schmid-gartenpflanzen.de/rosen/sorten/rose.php/Englische%20Rosen/Glamis%20Castle/


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/duftrosen.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/namen_der_rosen/was_namen_der_rosen.htm


Erstellt: 2013-04

Golf
golf
birdie
eagle
dormie
skins
mulligan (W3)

Vorläufer des Golfspiel findet man in vielen Ländern, wie etwa bei den Römern, in China, im alten Persien, in England, Frankreich und den Niederlanden. Die Entstehung des heutigen Golf-Spiel wird jedoch Schottland zugesprochen. Der erste nachweisbare Beleg ist eine Verfügung von King James II, der das Spiel im Jahr 1457 verbot, da es vom Erlernen des Bogenschießens ablenkte.

Die sprachliche Herkunft von engl. "Golf" führt über "gouf" (vermutlich) zurück auf schott. "goulf" = dt. "aufschlagen", oder auf ndl. "kolf", "kolve" = dt. "Keule", "Knüppel". Im Schottischen des 14./15. Jh. wurde daraus "goff", "gouff", und etwa im 16.Jh. engl. "golf".

Die sprachliche Verbindung zwischen den Niederlanden und Schottland ergab sich durch intensive Handelsbeziehungen der beiden europäischen Regionen vom 14. bis zum 17. Jh.

Das in den Niederlanden mit Stock und Ball auf zugefrorenen Kanälen gespielte "kolf" soll demnach von niederländischen Seeleuten an die schottischen Küsten gelangt sein.

Ein weiterer - scherzhafter - Versuch erklärt engl. "golf" als Abkürzung für "Gentlemen Only, Ladies Forbidden".

"Golf" dient auch zur Widergabe des Buchstabens "G" im internationalen Buchstabieralphabet.

(E?)(L?) http://www.lecondegolf.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.lecondegolf.com/glossaire_golf.htm

Le Glossaire
ADRESSE | ALBATROS | ALIGNEMENT | ALL SQUARE | APPROCHE | APPROCHE PUTT | BACKSPIN | BACKSWING | BIRDIE | BRUT | BUNKER | CADDIE | CARRY | CHANDELLE | CHIP | COUP ROULE | DEPART | DIVOT | DOWNSWING | DRAPEAU | DRAW | DRIVE | DRIVER | DROPPER | EAGLE | EAU FORTUITE | ECLECTIQUE | ETIQUETTE | FACE DU CLUB | FADE | FAIRWAY | FER | FLAT | FERS COURTS | FERS MOYENS | FERS MOYENS | FERS LONGS | FINISH | FOURSOME | FREE DROP | GRAIN | GREEN | GREEN-FEE | GREEN KEEPER | GREENSOME | GRIP | GRIP BASE BALL | GRIP ENTRECROISE ou Interlock | GRIP VARDON ou Overlap | HANDICAP | HOOK | HORS LIMITES | IMPACT | INJOUABLE | INSERT | JEU LONG OU GRAND JEU | LIE | LINKS | LOB | LOFT | MANCHE OU Shaft | MATCH PLAY | MEDAL PLAY | MULLIGAN | NET | OBSTACLE | OUVERT | OVERSWING | PAR | PENALITE | PETIT JEU | PITCH | PLAY-OFF | POSTURE | PRACTICE ou Driving Range | PUTT | QUATRE BALLES-MEILLEURE BALLE | RECOVERY | ROUGH | RYTHME | SAND-WEDGE | SCORE | SCRATCH | SLICE | SOCKET | SORTIE DE BUNKER | SQUARE | STABLEFORD | STANCE | SWAY | TALON | TEE | TIMING | TOP | TORQUE | TRAJECTOIRE | DRAW | FADE | PULL | PULL-HOOK | PULL-SLICE | PUSH | PUSH-HOOK | PUSH-SLICE | UPRIGHT | VIRGULE | VOL | WAGGLE | WEDGE | ZONE DE FRAPPE


(E?)(L?) http://golfeur.qc.ca/


(E?)(L?) http://golfeur.qc.ca/faq/08_term/gdfaq08q03.htm

Quel est l'origine étymologique du mot "Golf"?

La majorité des livres de golf que j'ai consulté indique plus ou moins qu'ils ne savent pas d'où provient ni le jeu, ni le nom. Tous le revendique, tant les chinois, les hollandais, les français que les écossais. Toutefois, les écossais semblent s'être gagné la faveur populaire puisque selon le Petit Robert, "Golf" serait un mot d'Écosse. Néanmoins, selon plusieurs auteurs dont le Manuel du Golf, édition Solar, entre autre, le mot "Golf" serait dérivé d'un jeu hollandais nommé "Kolf" ou "Kolven".

Mais, de grâce, ne croyez pas les gens qui vous expliqueront que le mot provient de l'acronyme "Gentlemen Only Ladies Forbidden" puisqu'il s'agit d'un gag visant à éloigner la gent féminine des parcours. J'ai bien hâte de voir un tournoi professionnel mixte. Je crois que plusieurs machos seront surpris des résultats.


(E?)(L?) http://www.usga.org/
United States Golf Association

(E?)(L?) http://usgamuseum.com/researchers/faq/

Golf History FAQ


google
language_tools
Schottisch-Gälisch

(E?)(L1) http://www.google.de/language_tools?hl=de


(E?)(L1) http://www.google.com/intl/gd/


Great Scott!
Fuss and Feathers, Old (Great Scott!) (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-gre4.htm
Neben einigen anderen Vermutungen (z.B. der Bezug auf "grosser Gott") gibt es die Version, dass sich der Ausdruck auf "Winfield S. Scott" bezieht. Allerdings dürfte der anklingende Bezug auf "god" durchaus zur Etablierung dieses Ausrufs beigetragen haben.
...
There’s nothing new in this attribution, however. "Winfield Scott" has previously been fingered as the origin by several writers, among them Eric Partridge. And we still can’t be absolutely sure that he was the Scott being alluded to. But the combination of dates and the references written so soon after the event point to him quite strongly.

Gretna Green (W3)

Zum Ortsnamen selbst konnte ich leider keine Hinweise finde (warum der Ort so heißt, bzw. was "Gretna Green" bedeutet). Aber der Ortsname "Gretna Green" wurde seinerseits zum Symbol für "wildromantische Eheschließungen".

Der kleine Ort "Gretna Green" liegt in Schottland nahe der Grenze zu England. Im 18.Jh. wurde er zum Wallfahrtsort junger Verliebter, die den Bund der Ehe eingehen wollten. Anlaß war, 1753, der "Marriage Act" in England, der Heiraten von und mit unter 21-jährigen verbot. In Schottland dagegen durfte man ab 16 Jahren heiraten. Und so schlug die Stunde des Schmiedes von "Gretna Green", der Trauungen vornehmen durfte. Einen kleinen Rückschlag gab es im Jahr 1856, nach einem Gesetz, das den Heiratswilligen vor der Trauung einen 21-tägigen Aufenthalt in Schottland auferlegte. In den Jahren 1940, 1969 und 1995 wurden die entsprechenden Gesetze in Schottland und England zunehmend vereinheitlicht.

"Gretna Green" ist Gegenstand einiger englischer/schottischer Balladen.

Auswanderer aus Schottland gründeten in den USA einige Orte denen sie den Namen "Gretna" verpassten.

(E?)(L?) http://www.gretnagreen.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames2.htm

...
A tradition of being married by the local blacksmith stemmed from a Joseph Paisley who carried out such ceremonies from 1791-1814.
There is a "Gretna" in Louisiana (so named because an early justice of the peace carried out marriages 24 hours a day without the need for a legal certificate) and Nebraska, USA (off Interstate 80, southwest of Omaha).
The "Gretna" in Manitoba, Canada was so named by the Canadian Pacific Railroad because it was just over the border from USA.
There is also a "Gretna" in Tasmania.


(E?)(L?) http://www.ratgeberrecht.de/980517_04.html


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.visitbritain.com/VB3-de-DE/presse/gretna_green.aspx


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gretna_Green


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gretna_Green


(E6)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Colors_G.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Cent.html#136
"Gretna Green" als Farbe: - #657f4b - Moderate Yellowish Green
(E?)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Cent.html#145
"Gretna Green" als Farbe: - #386646 - Moderate Green


gubernatorial, governor (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=1124542003
Etymology: from the Latin "gubernator", meaning "governor" or "steersman", from "gubernare" = "to govern".

H

Harris Tweed, Tweed, Harris Tweed Act 1993 (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.folklife.si.edu/CFCH/festival2003/scot_tweed.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.harristweed.org/what_is.htm
Eine der Hebriden-Inseln heisst "Harris". (Sie bildet mit der Nachbarinsel "Lewis" fast eine Einheit.) Und den für diese Insel charakteristischen Tweed nennt man "Harris Tweed".
Das melierte Woll- bzw. Mischgewebe "Tweed" geht zurück auf den schottischen Fluss "Tweed", an dessen Ufern diese Stoffart ursprünglich hergestellt wurde.

Auf der "www.harristweed.org"-Site kann man sich sogar "Harris Tweed Act 1993" als PDF-Dokument downloaden.

Darin ist festgelegt:
"the Outer Hebrides" means the Islands of Harris, Lewis, North Uist, Benbecula, South Uist and Barra and their several purtenances.

Und hier findet man auch die "Definition of Harris Tweed".

in this act "harris tweed" means a tweed which —


heinrich-tischner
Die keltischen Sprachen
Wochentage keltisch
Buchstabennamen keltisch
Keltisch

(E1)(L1) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/anlag/verz/22spra.htm#Keltische Sprachen

Keltische Sprachen


(E1)(L3) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/22-sp/2wo/sprachen/0/japhet.htm

Keltisch - Inhaltsverzeichnis


(E1)(L1) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/22-sp/1sprach/kelt/kelt-kal.htm
Ausserdem kann man eine kleine Tabelle der Namen der Wochentage in den keltischen Sprachen finden. Die Kelten orientieren sich im wesentlichen an den römischen Namen. Die Schotten und Iren haben für Mittwoch bis Freitag eine merkwürdige Zählung.
(lateinisch - gälisch - irisch - cymrisch - bretonisch)

(E1)(L1) http://www.heinrich-tischner.de/22-sp/1sprach/kelt/kelt-spr.htm
Die keltischen Sprachen

Hogmanay (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2000/12/31.html
the name, in Scotland, for the last day of the year.
Word of the Day Archive/December 2000

hopscotch (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/h5etym.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/032602.html#hopscotch

...
The "scotch" in "hopscotch" comes from the Old French word "escocher," meaning "to cut." In the case of "hopscotch," it refers to the lines cut or scratched into the dirt (or, more likely these days, drawn on a sidewalk) where the game is played. The same "cut or scratch" sense of "scotch" is used in the idiom "to scotch a rumor," meaning to deny or refute it, as well as in "butterscotch" candy, which was originally made in large sheets and then "scotched," or cut, into small pieces.
...


I

ic
Gaelic-English Dictionary

(E1)(L1) http://www.sst.ph.ic.ac.uk/angus/Faclair/
Faclair Gàidhlig - Beurla

J

K

Kilt (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=406162004
...
Etymology: From "kilt" = "to tuck up" = "reinhauen, zulangen", from Middle English "kilten", of Scandinavian origin.
...

L

letter (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=379482004
...
Etymology: Middle English, from Old French "lettre", from Latin "littera", "a letter", perhaps from Etruscan, from Greek diphther meaning "hide", "leather", "writing surface".)
...

lexilogos
Dictionnaire gaélique d'Ecosse

(E1)(L1) http://www.lexilogos.com/celtique_langue_dictionnaires.htm


links course (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.usga.org/history/faq/
"Links" is a term that refers to a very specific geographic land form found in Scotland. Such tracts of low-lying, seaside land are characteristically sandy, treeless, and undulating, often with lines of dunes or dune ridges, and covered by bent grass and gorse. To be a true "links", the tract of land must lie near the mouth of a river - that is, in an estuarine environment. From the Middle Ages onward, "linksland" (generally speaking, poor land for farming) were common grounds used for sports, including archery, bowls and golf.
Because many of the early courses of Scotland were built on these common "linksland", "golf courses" and "links" have forever been associated. The term "links" is commonly misapplied to refer to any golf course. But remember that a true "links" depends only on geography.

M

Martyr (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=262352004
...
Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin, from Late Greek "martur", from Greek "martus", "martur-", "witness".
...

Melrose - Rose

Engl. "Melrose" hat nichts mit einer "Rose" zu tun, sondern geht zurück auf kelt. "mail-rhos" = dt. "bestellte, bewirtschaftete Wiese".

Nach welchem der vielen Orte namens "Melrose" die Rose benannt wurde konnte ich nicht klären. Naheliegend wäre der viele Jahrhunderte so genannte Ort in Schottland.

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.19960

Melrose (Hybrid Tea, Dickson, 1963)


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.35002

Melrose (Floribunda, RVS 1985)


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/rosen_me.htm

Melrose RVS (BE) 1963 Floribunda rosa starker Duft 1. Preis Floriade Zoetermeer (NL) 1992, Belfast-Preis 1993, Gold Orléans 1994, Silber Den Haag 1995, Gold Den Haag 96 .


Erstellt: 2013-03

Melrose

Engl. "Melrose" hat nichts mit einer "Rose" zu tun, sondern geht zurück auf kelt. "mail-rhos" = dt. "bestellte, bewirtschaftete Wiese".

Vor dem Ort "Melrose" gab es eine Abtei namens "Melrose". Die Stadt wurde nach der Abtei benannt.

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Melrose, Scotland

Melrose, Scotland

MELROSE, a police burgh of Roxburghshire, Scotland. Pop. (1901), 2195. It lies on the right bank of the Tweed, 374 m. S.E. of Edinburgh, and 19 m. N.W. of Jedburgh, via St Boswells and Roxburgh, by the North British railway. The name - which Bede (730) wrote Mailros and Simeon of Durham (1130) Melros - is derived from the Celtic maol ros, " bare moor," and the town figures in Sir Walter Scott's Abbot and Monastery as "Kennaquhair." In consequence of the beauty of its situation between the Eildons and the Tweed, the literary and historical associations of the district, and the famous ruin of "Melrose Abbey", the town has become residential and a holiday resort. There is a hydropathic establishment on Skirmish Hill, the name commemorating the faction fight on the 25th of July 1526, in which the Scotts defeated the Douglases and Kers. Trade is almost wholly agricultural. The main streets run from the angles of the triangular market-place, in which stands the market cross, dated 1642, but probably much older. Across the river are Gattonside, with numerous orchards, and Allerly, the home of Sir David Brewster from 1827 till his death in 1868.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/M2.html

Melrose Abbey (Register of)


(E?)(L?) http://www.bridgemeister.com/inventory.php

1826 Gattonside (Melrose) Melrose, Scotland, United Kingdom River Tweed


(E2)(L1) http://uk.epodunk.com/profiles/scotland/melrose/3001337.html

Melrose (town), Scottish Borders
...
The town was named for Melrose Abbey.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.h2g2.com/approved_entry/A49097587

Dere Street - From York to Melrose in Seven Days

The Roman road which we know today as Dere Street runs from the English city of York to the Forth estuary in Scotland. At its northernmost point it meets the eastern end of the Roman Antonine Wall, once the northernmost boundary of the Roman Empire. Dere Street was a major supply route to the Roman forts along the eastern section of both Hadrian's Wall and the Antonine Wall. This Entry describes the Roman camps and fortifications which you can visit on a northbound journey along this ancient road.
...
Melrose
Roman name: "Trimontium" – 'the fort at the foot of the three Eildon Hills’
Condition: 2
Journey total: 146 miles

The fort at Melrose was built in 80 AD and garrisoned for around 100 years. At its largest, the fort was 60,700 square metres and the garrison comprised 1,000 infantry and 500 cavalry. In all, the fort extended to 80,937 square metres of fortified areas and enclosures, grouped around a parade ground. A large settlement developed to support the garrison, and this featured shrines as well as a military amphitheatre. The water supply for the fort and town came from over 200 wells dug around the site.


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/

Ungefähr 27 Ergebnisse (0,19 Sekunden)


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10170a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Abbey of Melrose
Located in Roxburghshire, founded in 1136 by King David I, was the earliest Cistercian monastery established in Scotland.


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10171a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Chronicle of Melrose
It opens with the year 735, ends abruptly in 1270, and is founded solely upon the Cottonian Manuscript, Faustina B. ix, in the British Museum, the only ancient ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08418a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Jocelin
Cistercian monk and Bishop of Glasgow; d. at Melrose Abbey in 1199. On 22 April, 1170, being then prior of Melrose, he was chosen abbot, on the resignation of ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02625a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Boisil
Superior of Melrose Abbey, d. 664. Almost all that is known of St. Boisil is learnt from Bede (Eccles. Hist., IV, xxvii, and Vita Cuthberti). He derived his information ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06324a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Furness Abbey
... Second abbot of Melrose"; "Life of St. Kentigern or Mungo". The names of thirty- two abbots of Furness are known, the last being Roger Pyle. In October, 1535 ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04578a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Cuthbert
He was probably born in the neighbourhood of Mailros (Melrose) of lowly parentage, for as a boy he used to tend sheep on the mountain-sides near that ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13054b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Abbey of Rievaulx
... most celebrated monastery in England; many others sprang from it, the most important of them being Melrose, the first Cistecian monastery built in Scotland.


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03329c.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Juan Caramuel y Lobkowitz
He was in turn Abbot of Melrose (Scotland), Abbot-Superior of the Benedictines of Vienna, and grand-vicar to the Archbishop of Prague. In 1648, when the ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05240c.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Eata
As early as 651 he was elected Abbot of Melrose, which was then within the metropolitan jurisdiction of York. With the increase of the Christian population in ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05167a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dryburgh Abbey
A monastery belonging to the canons of the Premonstratensian Order (Norbertine or White Canons), situated four miles south-east of Melrose, Scotland.


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08659a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Kinloss
The monastery was colonized from Melrose and the greater part of the church and buildings were erected before 1200. Pope Alexander III confirmed the royal ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05555b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Ethelwold
... are (2) St. Ethelwold, monk of Ripon, anchoret at Lindisfarne, d. about 720; feast kept 23 March; and (3) St. Ethelwold, Abbot of Melrose, Bishop of Lindisfarne, ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02288b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: John Barbour
An earlier, incomplete manuscript, written by Fenton, a monk of Melrose, in 1369, is not extant. "The Bruce", extending through 6,000 octosyllabic couplets, ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10781a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Newbattle
Newbattle Abbey was a filiation of Melrose (itself a daughter of Clairvaux) and was situated, according to Cistercian usages, in a beautiful valley along the South ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/16025b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Cistercians in the British Isles
Among the offshoots of Rivaulx were Melrose and Revesby. Still more famous was Fountains near Ripon. The foundation was made in 1132 by a section of the ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05325a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Egbert
St. Egbert's own mission was made known to him by a monk, who, at Melrose, had been a disciple of St. Boisil. Appearing to this monk, St. Boisil sent him to tell ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08328b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Jedburgh
... of the erection of the priory into an abbey, when prior Osbert (styled in the Melrose chronicle "primus abbas de Geddeworth") was raised to the abbatial dignity.


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13631a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Scoto-Hibernian Monasteries
... recorded to have resigned his office and returned to the stately abbey of Melrose, which he preferred to what he called that poor cottage of the monks of Deir".


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13613a.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Scotland
... while in the east of Scotland Lothian honours as its first apostle the great St. Cuthbert, who entered the monastery of Melrose in 650, and became bishop, with ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/j-ce.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Index for J
Job - One of the books of the Old Testament, and the chief personage in it. Jocelin - Cistercian monk and Bishop of Glasgow; d. at Melrose Abbey in 1199 ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/d-ce.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Index for D
Dryburgh Abbey - A monastery belonging to the canons of the Premonstratensian Order (Norbertine or White Canons), situated four miles south-east of Melrose, ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/b-ce.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Index for B
Boisil, Saint - Abbot of Melrose, renowned for prophetic gifts, taught St. Cuthbert. St. Boisil died in 664. Bois-le-Duc - Diocese lies within the Dutch province of ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/m-ce.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Index for M
Melrose Abbey - Located in Roxburghshire, founded in 1136 by King David I, ...Melrose, Chronicle of - It opens with the year 735, ends abruptly in 1270, and is ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/06665b.htm

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Gothic Architecture
In Scotland French influence was more pronounced than in the South, and the Norman of Jedburgh and Kelso, the Gothic of Dryburgh, Melrose, and Edinburgh ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames2.htm

Melrose

The Border town of Melrose had a monastery in the 7th century, founded by St Aiden but by the 12th century it was derelict. King David I encouraged Cistercian monks to go there and they founded "Melrose Abbey" in 1136. However, being in the Borders, it was destroyed in the 1385 by Richard II from England. It was rebuilt but destroyed again in 1545.

Other places named "Melrose" around the world are at Australia (South and Western), Canada (Nova Scotia), USA (Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Wisconsin) and a "Melrose Park" in Illinois, New York and Pennsylvania. There is a "Melrose Place" in Los Angeles and there is (was?) a "Melrose Place" on American TV! Not a bit like Melrose, New Mexico where the US Air Force has a bombing range! And a suburb of Wellington, New Zealand is also named "Melrose" while "Melrose" forms part of a number of suburban names such as "Melrose Arch", Estate and North, all in Johannesburg, "Melrose Park" (Adelaide and Sydney in Australia and Chicago and Houston in the States) and "Melrose Highlands" (Boston).


(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/search/content/Melrose

The Ride to Melrose - Scott, Sir Walter (1771 - 1832).
... waken'd by the winds alone. 1.151 But when Melrose he reach'd, 'twas silence all: 1.152 He ...

On the Departure of Sir Walter Scott from Abbotsford, for Naples - Wordsworth, William (1770 - 1850).
Hills, a striking feature of the landscape near Melrose and Abbotsford. They were associated with legends ...

Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg - Wordsworth, William (1770 - 1850).
... of Melrose Abbey. Back to Line 19] the frolic and the gentle: adjectives chosen as true of Lamb and ...


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melrose

Melrose ist eine Stadt mit etwa 1.820 Einwohnern (Schätzung 2004) im schottischen Grenzland (Scottish Borders) am Ufer des Flusses Tweed. Der Name "Melrose" stammt vom keltischen "mail-rhos", was so viel wie "bestellte, bewirtschaftete Wiese" bedeutet. Melrose liegt in der County Roxburghshire.
...


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Melrose
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Melrose" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 auf.

Erstellt: 2013-03

mondegreen (W3)

Bezeichnet ein "sich-verhören". Die Schriftstellerin Sylvia Wright verstand als Kind in einer schottischen Ballade statt "Oh, they have slain the Earl of Moray and laid him on the green". "Oh, they have slain the Earl of Moray and Lady Mondegreen".

mutual (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=58002004
...
Etymology: from the French "mutuel", from Old French, from Latin "mtuus", borrowed. Date: circa 1586.
...

N

NLS (W3)

"NLS" steht für "National Library of Scotland".

(E?)(L?) http://www.nls.uk/


(E?)(L?) http://www.nls.uk/digital-gallery

Digital gallery
•Browse the Digital Archive - see books, documents, photographs, and more.
Here you can view digitised material from the National Library of Scotland's outstanding collections. These special web features offer unique glimpses into a variety of chapters of Scotland's story.

Golf in Scotland 1457-1744
Take a swing through golf's early history. Key documents, including the first 'rules' of the game, show how golf developed in Scotland.

12 key Scottish plays 1970-2010
Introducing 12 of the major plays and major playwrights of Scotland. See images from theatre productions and related archive material.

Maps
Further your family, local history or school project using this collection of thousands of zoomable maps of Scotland for the period 1560-1928.

The Word on the Street
Discover early news stories and ballads that informed and entertained Scots between 1650 and 1910 as you browse around 1,800 broadsides.

The Auchinleck Manuscript
Middle English language and literature as Chaucer would have known it, contained in this rare document, with a full transcription.

The Murthly Hours
View each page of this book of prayer dated 1280 - one of the most richly illustrated manuscripts in Scotland during the Middle Ages.

Pencils of Light
Delve into photographic history with 300 images taken in the 1840s by the Edinburgh Calotype Club - the world's first photography society.

A Guid Cause
The history of women's suffrage in Scotland, with photographs, newspaper reports, diary entries and other sources. Activities for secondary schools.

Scottish Science Hall of Fame
A tribute to 10 great Scottish scientists of the past. Read transcripts of letters, papers and published works about or by them.

Bartholomew Archive
Read about the remarkable record of mapmaking and printing by the world-famous Bartholomew firm in Edinburgh from 1820 to 2002.

Slezer's Scotland
Dozens of zoomable engravings show us Scottish towns, castles and palaces from the 17th-century, as seen by military surveyor John Slezer.

The Spread of Scottish Printing
Trace the spread of printing across Scotland from 1508 to 1900. Read an early item produced in each of the first 33 printing towns.

Experiences of War
The nurse, the soldier and the general - three stories from the front and at home during the First World War. Features schools resources.

Scottish History in Print
Together with details of thousands of works published by historical clubs, two major Jacobite sources are online as keyword searchable files.

First Scottish Books
See online, page by page, 'The Chepman and Myllar Prints' - nine of the earliest books printed in Scotland, in or around 1508.

Churchill: The Evidence
The life and times of Winston Churchill, MP for Dundee before he became a wartime Prime Minister. Features schools resources.

Robert Louis Stevenson
See letters, sketches and photographs in our biography of story-teller and poet Robert Louis Stevenson - and view 'Kidnapped' page by page.

Robert Burns
The life, work and legacy of Scotland's Bard, together with fascinating detail about original material in the Library's collections, and short song clips.

Playbills of the Theatre Royal Edinburgh
Find out about this important theatre in the 19th century by searching through our selection of playbills.

Muriel Spark
Using material from her personal archive, we tell the story of the life and career of one of Scotland's greatest novelists, Dame Muriel Spark.

The Write Stuff
Modern Scottish writers - among them J K Rowling, Liz Lochhead and George Mackay Brown - through the lens of photographer Gordon Wright.

Mary Queen of Scots
Read in English and French - the last letter by Scotland's 16th-century queen, written only hours before her execution in Fotheringhay Castle.

Propaganda - A Weapon of War
A selection of images of British Government propaganda which was used at home and in Europe during the Second World War.

Scotland's Pages
Move along the timeline of key events in Scottish history, and discover along the way some of the 'treasures' held by the Library.

Phoebe Anna Traquair
Examine in detail Traquair's exquisite illuminated manuscript of Elizabeth Barrett Browning's 'Sonnets from the Portuguese'.

Scottish Bookbinding
Distinctive examples of bookbinding created in Scotland, from our pre-eminent collection of decorative bindings, which spans 500 years.

The photographs of John Thomson
Find out about the Scottish photographer and traveller who helped pioneer photojournalism on London's Victorian streets.

The Union of the Crowns
A look at the union of the Scottish and English crowns in 1603, and the monarch who wanted to lead a peaceful, united Britain.

Moir Rare Book Collection
Learn about John William Moir's collection of rare books on all aspects of bees and beekeeping, including how bees 'sing'!

The Kirk Papers
Out of Africa - the personal papers of Sir John Kirk, a British Consul in Africa who had explored the Zambesi with David Livingstone.

Medical History of British India
Search nearly 50 volumes of rare official documents recording disease prevention and public health in India in the 19th and 20th centuries.


(E?)(L?) http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/index.html
The Word on the Street - Broadsides

(E?)(L?) http://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/search.html
Broadsides sind in etwa vergleichbar mit Flugblättern. Und die "National Library of Scotland" hat davon 1.800 aus der Zeit zwischen 1650 und 1910 gesammelt und ins Netz gestellt.

How Ordinary Scots in Bygone Days Found out what was Happening
In the centuries before there were newspapers and 24-hour news channels, the general public had to rely on street literature to find out what was going on. The most popular form of this for nearly 300 years was 'broadsides' - the tabloids of their day. Sometimes pinned up on walls in houses and ale-houses, these single sheets carried public notices, news, speeches and songs that could be read (or sung) aloud.
The National Library of Scotland's online collection of nearly 1,800 broadsides lets you see for yourself what 'the word on the street' was in Scotland between 1650 and 1910. Crime, politics, romance, emigration, humour, tragedy, royalty and superstitions - all these and more are here.
Each broadside comes with a detailed commentary and most also have a full transcription of the text, plus a downloadable PDF facsimile. You can search by keyword, browse by title or browse by subject.
Take a look, and discover what fascinated our ancestors!

Browse by Subject

Accidents [41] | Adventure and adventurers [5] | Apparitions [11] | Arson [1] | Ballads [911] | Body-snatching [40] | | Clothing and dress [16] | Courtship [233] | Covenanters [7] | Crime [88] | Dueling [9] | Elegies [59] | Emigration [44] | Executions and executioners [147] | Fairs [8] | Forgery [12] | Freemasonry [4] | Highlanders [14] | Hiring fairs [5] | Humour [177] | Incest [2] | Ireland and the Irish [40] | Jacobites [33] | Last words [88] | Marriage [63] | Marvels [7] | Murder [240] | Pirates [7] | Politics [135] | Prophecies [7] | Prostitution [11] | Rape [8] | Religion [35] | Riots [19] | Robbery [59] | Royalty [27] | Shoemakers [7] | Slavery [6] | Soldiers [53] | Sport [24] | Street life [3] | Suicide [13] | Temperance [17] | Transvestites [4] | Treason [9] | Trials [76] | War [26] | Weavers [2]

Erstellt: 2011-01

O

P

Passion (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=352912004
...
Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin "passi", "passin-" = "sufferings of Jesus" or a martyr; from Late Latin, physical suffering, martyrdom, sinful desire, from Latin, an undergoing, from "passus", past participle of "pat" = "to suffer".
...

Pictish, Piktisch (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.krysstal.com/borrow.html
"Pictish" oder dt. "Piktisch" war die (prä-keltische) Sprache der "Pikten", der "Bemalten", in Schottland. Sie wird zu den Indoeuropäischen Sprachen gezählt. Im heutigen Englisch sind einige Begriffe daraus zu finden, wie etwa "Caledonia", dem römischen Namen für Schottland, der auf den Namen eines Stammes zurück geht; und "fife" = "kleines flötenartiges Instrument ("(Quer)Pfeife").

(E?)(L?) http://mercury.ccil.org/~cowan/essential.html

English is essentially Pictish that was attacked out of nowhere by Angles cohabiting with Teutons who were done in by a drunk bunch of Vikings masquerading as Frenchmen who insisted they spoke Latin and Greek but lacked the Arabic in which to convey that.
Bill Hammel


Pikten (W3)

Die "Pikten" verdanken ihren Namen der Bemalung ("die Bemalten") und wurde von lat. "Picti" als Bezeichnung für die keltischen Stämme in Schottland abgeleitet.

Im engl. "Picture" = "Bild" und im "Piktogramm" = "Begriffssymbol" kann man ebenfalls noch Verwandte von lat. "pingere" = "malen" erkennen.

Q

R

rampantscotland
Scottish-related Links

(E?)(L1) http://www.rampantscotland.com/

12,000+ Scottish-related Links, regularly updated.

3,500 Web page features on Scotland and the Scots.

Links Pages: Accommodation | Archaeology | Architecture | Arts | Art | Festivals | Music/Dance | Theatre | Cinema | TV/Radio | Bagpipes | Businesses | Castles | Castle Collections | Alphabetic List | Celts | Clans | Clan Societies | Tartans | Regiments | Ecology | Animals | Education | Employment | Events | Famous Scots | Food/Drink | Gaelic/Scots | Genealogy | Government | History | Humour | Information | Literature | Online texts | Magazines | Museums | Music/Dance | Newspapers | Poetry | Politics | Religion | Scots/Gaelic | Shopping | Sport | Tartans | Tourism | Across Scotland | Edinburgh | Glasgow | Aberdeen | Highlands | Central | Borders | Castles | Accommodation | Tours/Guides | Info Sources

Feature Pages: All Features Index | Scottish Newsletter | This Week's Edition | Archive | Colour Supplements | Search This Site | Bookstore | Castle Photo Library | Clan/Family Histories | Castles To Stay In | Desktop Graphics | Did You Know? | Edinburgh Photos | Family Tree Research | Famous Scots | Famous Scots Quiz | Feedback/Contact | Flowers of Scotland | Glasgow Photo Library | Great Places to Stay | Great Places to Eat | | History Quiz | History Timeline | History Quiz | Humour/Humor | Monarchs of Scotland | Parliamo Scots | Feature Pages | Scottish Pictorial Calendar 2006 | Places to Visit | Poetry from Scotland | Quotable Scots | Romantic Scotland | Recipes | Scottish Banknotes | Scottish Battles | Scottish Calendar 2006 | Scottish Festivals | Scottish Forenames | Scottish Myths & Legends | Scottish Parliament | Scottish Placenames | Scottish Tattoo | Screensavers | Songs of Scotland | St Andrew Societies | Symbols of Scotland | Tartan Day | Traditional Festivals | Where Am I? Quiz | Webcams in Scotland


(E?)(L1) http://www.rampantscotland.com/features.htm
01.07.2006


The primary purpose of the Rampant Scotland Directory is to provide an index of Scottish-related Web sites. However, over the years the editor has created a number of feature articles and resources on a wide range of subjects - from tourist guides to "famous Scots" and a history timeline. Here are the main ones:

Scotland for Tourists: Culture: Entertainment: People:


rampantscotland
Popular Scottish Forenames

(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/forenames/blnames_index.htm

Introduction
Here are the origins of over a 100 forenames or first names which are found in Scotland today. Nearly all the names in the "Top 100" names registered for babies born and registered during 1999 are here - plus a lot more. They are often used in other parts of the world too, so you may find your own name here, whether or not you have Scottish roots. If you have a name which is not on this list but which has a Scottish connection, drop a note to Scottie and I'll try to find its origins.
A number of reference books have been used to compile this information including "Scottish Forenames" by Donald Whyte, "Traditional Scottish First Names" by Gail Dixon-Smith, "Celtic Names for Children" by Loretto Todd and "Scottish First Names" by George Mackay.

Aaron | Abigail | Adam | Agnes | Aidan | Aileen | Ailsa | Ainslie / Ainsley | Alan | Alana | Alistair / Alasdair / Alister | Alice / Alison | Amy | Andrew | Angus | Anna /Anne / Ann | Archibald | Arthur | Ben / Benjamin | Blair | Bonnie | Brenda | Brendan / Brandon | Bridget | Bruce | Callum / Calum | Cameron | Carol | Catherine / Katherine / Kathryn / Catriona | Charles / Charlie | Chloe | Christopher | Ciara | Colin | Connor / Conor | Courtney | Craig | Daniel | David | Declan | Derek | Douglas | Dugald / Dougal | Duncan | Dylan | Elizabeth / Lisa | Elspeth | Emma | Emily / Emilia | Erin | Euan | Euphemia | Farquhar | Fergus | Fiona / Ffiona/ Ffion | Flora | Fraser | Gail | Gary | Gavin | Geoffrey | George / Georgina | Gordon | Grace | Graham / Graeme | Grant | Gregor | Grizel / Grizelda / Griselda | Hamish | Hannah / Hanna | Heather | Helen | Holly / Hollie | Hugh | Ian / Iain | Iona | Isobel / Isabel | Isla | Lachlan | Jade | James | Jason | Jean | Jennifer / Jenna | Jessica | John | Jordan | Joyce | Kieran / Keiron | Keith | Kenneth | Kirsty / Kirsten | Kylie | Lachlan | Lauren | Leah | Leslie / Lesley | Lewis | Liam | Lisa / Elizabeth | Lorna | Louise / Louisa | Lucy | Lynette / Lynn | Magnus | Malcolm | Margaret | Mark | Mary / Mhàiri | Megan | Michael | Moira | Morag | Munro | Murine / Murron / Muirne / Myrna | Niamh | Nicola / Nicole | Owen | Patrick / Patricia | Peter | Rachel / Rachael | Raymond | Rebecca | Rhiannon / Rhian | Richard | Robert | Robyn | Ross | Rory | Rowena / Rowen / Rowan | Ryan | Samantha | Sarah | Sean / Shaun / Shane | Shannon | Sheila | Shona | Siobhán | Stacey / Stacie / Stacy | Stephen / Steven | Stuart / Stewart | Theresa | Thomas | Una | William


rampantscotland
Scottish Place Names Around the World
Names from Scotland

(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/
Die Schotten trieben sich auch in der weiten Welt herum und gaben vielen Orten weltweit schottische Namen.


As Scots emigrated around the world they often reminded themselves of home by giving Scottish place names to the locations in which they settled. Most of these Scottish names are found in North America and Australia / New Zealand. 50% of the suburban names in Dunedin have a Scottish connection - and "Dunedin" itself is the old name for "Edinburgh", Scotland's capital city. But they also pop up with unfailing regularity in sub-Saharan Africa (there are at least 550 towns, suburbs, villages, mountains, rivers and other topographical features in South Africa alone) and Asia ("Aberdeen" in Hong Kong is perhaps the best known).

Toponymist researcher Ian Kendall has provided another perspective. He is taking cities and towns around the world and finding the origins of the names used in their districts and suburbs. He has supplied the Scottish-related names found in a number of locations around the world. The current cities/towns are:


To find where many other Scottish locations can be found elsewhere than Scotland around the world, go to: (E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames1a.htm
Aberdeen to Elgin


Aberdeen | Ayr | Bannockburn | Caledonia | Campbeltown | Culloden | Dallas | Douglas | Dumbarton | Dunbar | Dundee | Edinburgh | Elgin


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames2.htm
Fife to Oban


Fife | Glasgow | Glencoe | Hamilton | Houston | Inverness | Kelso | Lanark | Leith | Leslie | Montrose | Oban


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames3.htm
Orkney to Stirling


Orkney | Paisley | Perth | Rutherglen | Saint Andrews | Scotland | Stirling


rampantscotland
So That's How It's Pronounced?
A Guide to Scottish Placenames

(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/features/pronounce.htm

Introduction
Visitors to Scotland who have only seen Scottish place names in print sometimes mis-pronounce them. So here is a feature explaining how to pronounce many of the place names which can be found in Scotland. Along the way you will also learn some of the origins of these Scottish names.

But to start with, here is the advice given by Ronald MacDonald Douglas, a writer and nationalist, regarding the finer points of Scottish pronunciation... After reading it, however, do not despair!

"...do try to sound the "r", although not with the exaggerated trill usually given it by so-called 'Scotch' comedians. But, again this to my English readers, don't even attempt to get the guttural sounds of "ach" and "loch". You will only strangle yourselves. To say "ach!" correctly you need generations of Scots blood behind you, and you must have been born with the peat-reek in your nostrils, and the sight of the hills as the first thing you clapped your eyes on."

Aberdour | Auchenshuggle | Auchtermuchty | Balerno | Balluchillish | Beauly | Braemar | Broughty Ferry | Carnoustie | Comrie | Culross | Culter | Doune | Drymen | Eaglesham | Edinburgh | Ecclefechan | Eilean Donan | Elie | Findochty | Forfar | Garioch | Glasgow | Holyrood | Inveraray | Islay | Kilconquhar | Kilmacolm | Kingussie | Kirkcudbright | Kirkcaldy | Lairig Grhu | Lesmahagow | Loch | Milngavie | Oban | Penicuik | Poolewe | Sanquhar | Sauchiehall Street | Wemyss


rampantscotland
Scottish Symbols
Symbols of Scotland

(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/symbols/blsymbols_index.htm

Here are illustrations of many of the symbols of Scotland from bagpipes, tartan and flags to William Wallace, Robert the Bruce, thistles and Scotland at war.
The thumbnail pictures below lead to the illustrations for that symbol.
Kilts | Tartan | Thistles | Flags | Honours of Scotland | Crests | Pipes and Pipers | Lochs | Maps of Scotland | Robert the Bruce | Mary Queen of Scots | William Wallace | Scotland at War


RCAHMS (W3)

"RCAHMS" steht für "Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland".

(E?)(L1) http://www.rcahms.gov.uk/
The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland (RCAHMS) records and interprets the sites, monuments and buildings of Scotland's past, promotes a greater appreciation of their value through the maintenance of the National Monuments Record of Scotland (NMRS) and presents them by means of publications and exhibitions.

Mit vielen Bildern historischer Monument.

S

Schotten
die Schotten dichtmachen (W3)

(E5)(L1) http://www.redensarten-index.de/
(nach "die Schotten dichtmachen" suchen.)
...
"Schotten" sind wasserdichte Quer- und Längswände in Schiffen, die beim Leckschlagen verschlossen werden können, um eine vollständige Überflutung des Schiffes zu verhindern.
...

schottische (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/s2etym.htm


Schottische Schule< (w3)

"Schottische Schule" nennt man eine philosophische Richtung im 18. und 19. Jahrhundert in "Schottland".

Schottland (W3)



schottlandgeschichte
Schottland Geschichte
Schottland-Informationen

(E?)(L1) http://www.schottlandgeschichte.de/

Die Geschichte | Der Clan MacLeod | Der Whisky | Daten & Fakten | Berühmte Schotten | Links | Fotos | TV-Tipps & News | Literarisches Quartett


Diese Seite bietet Kurzinformationen über Schottland, wichtige Personen der schottischen Geschichte (Könige und andere). Sie erklärt das schottische Clansystem, welches auf die keltischen Vorfahren der Schotten zurückzuführen ist. Schließlich wird auf der Seite noch die komplette schottische Geschichte, eingeteilt in Epochen, präsentiert.


Was weiß man in Deutschland über Schottland? Es ist voller Schafe, es regnet andauernd und wenn die Schotten gegen ihren Lieblingsfeind England zu Felde ziehen malen sie sich das Gesicht blau an. Soweit die landläufige Meinung, ich hoffe nach dem Besuch dieser Seite hat sich das Bild schon ein wenig gewandelt. Schottland wird nicht alleine von Tartan ("Karomuster"), Kilt ("Schottenrock"), Bagpipes ("Dudelsack") und Tossing the Caber ("Baumstämme werfen") ausgemacht.


schottland-seite
Schottland-Informationen

(E6)(L?) http://www.schottland-seite.de/

Herzlich willkommen auf meinen Schottland-Seiten. Ihr findet hier viele Hundert Fotos von verschiedenen Regionen Schottlands, Informationen und Fotos von schottischen Leuchttürmen, Songtexte schottischer Traditionals, allerlei Wissenswertes über schottischen Whisky und vieles mehr.

(E?)(L?) http://www.albamusic.net/heartlandsitemapd.html

  • Schottland: Kurzinfos Schottland | Geschichte Schottlands | Zeittafel | Themen | Declaration of Arbroath | Declaration of Breda | Berühmte Persönlichkeiten der Frauenrechtsbewegung | Burgen, Schlösser, Monumente u. Bauwerke | Burgen und Schlösser | Dunnottar Castle | Inverlochy Castle | Slains Castle | Monumente u. Denkmäler | Glenfinnan Monument | Antike Monumente | Brochs | Dun Telve Broch | Dun Troddan Broch | Bauwerke | Glenfinnan Viadukt | Reise | Leuchtturm - Unterkünfte | Whisky | Scotch whisky | Die Whisky- HerstellungvWissenswertes über Whisky
  • Fotos
  • Leuchttürme: interaktive Landkarte | alphabetische Liste
  • Musik: Songtexte | Meine Lieblingsbands - nicht nur aus Schottland | Eure Lieblingsbands
  • Kontakt
  • Verschiedenes: Spiele | Literatur | Service-Portal
  • Links




Schulter
die kalte Schulter zeigen (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.staff.uni-marburg.de/~naeser/ra-mat.htm
Der Ausdruck "jemandem die kalte Schulter zeigen geht vermutlich auf eine Übertragung von Walter Scotts "to show sb the cold shoulder" zurück.
Vermutlich die rechte, dem Herzen fernere und deshalb als kälter angesehene Schulter (lt. OED II (1933)), ab 1816 (Walter Scott, schottischer Schriftsteller); wurde im 19. Jhd. nach Küpper (1984) ins Deutsche. übernommen.

Scone, Stone of Scone (W3)

Woher die Ortsbezeichnung "Scone" kommt konnte ich leider nicht in Erfahrung bringen.

Der "Stone of Scone" spielte in der schottisch-englischen Geschichte eine große Rolle. Sein Name bezieht sich auf einen Ort mitten in Schottland (im NO von Perth). Dort wo sich heute der alte Ortsteil befindet war bis 1651 die Krönungsstätte der schottischen Könige. Der "Stone of Scone" war der Thron, auf dem die Krönungszeremonie statt fand.
Im Jahr 1296 brachte der englische König Edward I den Thron nach England, wo er in einen Platz in der Westminster Abbey fand. Damit sollte die schottische Eigenständigkeit dauerhaft verhindert werden. Erst im November 1996 kam der "Stone of Scone" wieder nach Schottland zurück.

Die Schotten nahmen den Ortsnamen mit nach Australien und gründeten ein "Scone" in New South Wales, Australia, etwa 12km nördlich von Aberdeen.

(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/15001.html

...
It is said to have been brought from Ireland by Fergus, son of Eric, who led the Dalriads to the shores of Argyllshire.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/placenames/placenames3.htm


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=scone


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scone


(E?)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/scone

...
Scotland itself was often called the "Kingdom of Scone", ...
...


Scot, scot (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/s3etym.htm


Scot Free
get off Scot free (W3)

(E3)(L1) http://owad.de/check.php4?wordid=369&choice=1&PHPSESSID=5d97374f0f3fbcdcd0d33152bbcc1e88


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue023.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/122099.html#scotfree


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/scot_free/


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-sco1.htm


Scotch, scotch (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://eurekaweb.free.fr/vh1-scotch.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.eurekaweb.fr/


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/s3etym.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/042601.html#scotch


Scotch tape, rester scotché (W3)

A brand name of 3M Corporation.

Auf die Klebemittel von "Scotch" bezieht sich auch der umgangssprachliche französische Anglizismus "rester scotché(e)" = "rester collé(e)" = "Sitzen bleiben".

Scotious, Stocious (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/back-x.html#scotious


scotland
Scotish Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/dictionary/gedt-00.asp
FACLAIR NA PÀRLAMAID - DICTIONARY OF TERMS
Faclair - Gàidhlig -Beurla - Beurla -Gàidhlig Dictionary - Gaelic-English - English-Gaelic

Scotland Yard (W1)

Die Lage des Headquarters in der kleinen Strasse "Scotland Yard" gab der Institution den Namen.

Die Strasse wiederum hiess "Scotland Yard", also etwa "schottischer Hof", "schottischer Platz", weil zwischen 970 und 1170 dort die schottischen Könige weilten, wenn sie ihren jährlichen Pflichtbesuch beim englischen König absolvierten.

1890 zug das Headquarter der Polizei in diese Strasse und wurde "New Scotland Yard" genannt. Selbst als es 1967 nach Westminster umzog behielt es den Namen bei.

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/s3etym.htm


scotsfamily
Scottish genealogy
Scottish ancestors services

(E?)(L?) http://www.scotsfamily.com/

Scottish genealogy revealed - do you need to find that elusive Scottish ancestor to complete your Scottish family history? Or are you just beginning a Scottish genealogy search to find your roots in Scotland?

Here is how Scots Family can help you.........


(E?)(L?) http://scotsfamily.com/links.htm
Interessant ist auch die umfangreiche Linkliste.

scotsdictionaries
Scottish Language Dictionaries

(E?)(L?) http://www.scotsdictionaries.org.uk/

About SLD
Scottish Language Dictionaries is the quintessential research organisation for the Scots Language. We are responsible for the major dictionaries of the Scots Language and undertake a wide range of educational outreach work with people of all ages and abilities. Please explore our site and contact us if we can be of any assistance. We can help with your language queries, whether they are for the Sunday crossword or for an academic publication, and this website provides a wealth of information on Scots, its history and usage.
...


scotslanguage.com
Scots Language Centre
Centre for the Scots Leid

(E?)(L?) http://www.scotslanguage.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.scotslanguage.com/pages/view/id/10

The Main Dialects of Scots

"Scots" is the collective name for Scottish dialects known also as "Doric", "Lallans" and "Scotch" or by more local names such as "Buchan", "Dundonian", "Glesca" or "Shetland".

There are four main dialect regions sub divided into 10 sub dialects;


Erstellt: 2017-01

scotsman
"Word of the week"

(E?)(L?) http://search.scotsman.com/scripts/rwisapi.dll/@scotsman.env
"Word of the week" scheint es seit dem 2004-01-03 zu geben.

scots-online
Scots Online
Scots to Engish Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.scots-online.org/
Includes an interactive Scots to Engish Dictionary.
An introduction to the spoken and written Scots language.

The Online Scots Dictionary
Mynd an read the guideance afore-haund! - Remember to read the instructions first!

Scottish pronunciation

(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW143/page4.html#pronunciation


scottishcorpus
Scottish Corpus of Texts and Speech

(E?)(L?) http://www.scottishcorpus.ac.uk/

...
The SCOTS project is the first large-scale project of its kind for Scotland. It aims to build a large electronic collection of both written and spoken texts for the languages of Scotland. This is a resource which is urgently needed if we are to address the gap which presently exists in our knowledge of Scotland's languages.
...


Skua Terrace (W3)

Die engl. "Skua Terrace" im Nordwesten von Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Schottland, erhielt ihren namen im Jahr 1980 durch die UK-APC wegen der zahlreichen "Brown skuas", die hier ihre Nester anlegten.

(E1)(L1) http://geonames.usgs.gov/antarctic/index.html


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/UK-APC

Das "UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee", kurz "UK-APC" ist ein Komitee des Vereinigten Königreichs zur Empfehlung von Namen im Britischen Antarktisterritorium und in Südgeorgien und den südlichen Sandwichinseln.


snda
Scottish National Dictionary Association

(E?)(L?) http://www.snda.org.uk/


(E?)(L?) http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=68086
Publishers of the standard dictionary of modern Scots.

Scottish Language Dictionaries (SLD) is a body established to develop dictionaries and to promote the languages of Scotland.
Scottish Language Dictionaries (SLD) aims in particular to develop Scottish lexicography, building on the achievements of the Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue (DOST) and the Scottish National Dictionary Association (SNDA).
SLD aims to advance the recognition of Scots in all its guises:
above all, as the living language spoken daily by millions of Scots. In this guise it is known diversely as 'the dialect', 'the Doric' (in the North-East), and (in the South) as often as not, just 'the wey oo speak'.
The Scots we speak today was, in times past:

st-andrews
Scottish Placename Society
Scotland County Map

(E?)(L1) http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/institutes/sassi/spns/


(E?)(L1) http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/institutes/sassi/spns/scot_cnt.htm
The Society, launched in February 1996, exists for the support of all aspects of toponymic studies in Scotland, and in particular the work of the Scottish Place-Name Database at the University of St. Andrews and the University of Edinburgh.

SCOTLAND COUNTY-BY-COUNTY - Place-name notes and queries grouped by Counties.
WJ Watson 'Surveys' of Lothian,Dumfries and Galloway,Ayrshire and Strathclyde and Scotland North of Forth now on-line


stooryduster.co.uk
Scottish Words Illustrated

(E?)(L?) http://www.stooryduster.co.uk/

Scottish Words translated and Illustrated are added here weekly. Why Scottish words? They are full of attitude, great on the ear, emotive, and most are not too far from English which makes it globally accessible. Plus I hear and speak it every day. Perfect for the job. The latest Word here.
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(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2017

1 Scottish Words in the 2017 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2016

13 Scottish Words in the 2016 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2015

3 Scottish Words in the 2015 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2014

1 Scottish Words in the 2014 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2012

27 Scottish Words in the 2012 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2011

50 Scottish Words in the 2011 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2010

49 Scottish Words in the 2010 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2009

49 Scottish Words in the 2009 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2008

47 Scottish Words in the 2008 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2007

50 Scottish Words in the 2007 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2006

49 Scottish Words in the 2006 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2005

48 Scottish Words in the 2005 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2004

47 Scottish Words in the 2004 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2003

52 Scottish Words in the 2003 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2002

48 Scottish Words in the 2002 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2001

50 Scottish Words in the 2001 archive


(E?)(L?) http://stooryduster.co.uk/archives/?archive_year=2000

47 Scottish Words in the 2000 archive


Erstellt: 2017-01

Stoved Chicken Howtowdie (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/features.cfm?id=320612004
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This delicious recipe is based on one from Meg Dods Manual, 1829 and is in the French style - the word "stoved" from the French "étuver" = "to stew" or "heat in a stove". The word "howtowdie" is interesting. Although some references explain its etymology as being from old French "hutaudeau", meaning a "pullet" ("a young hen"), the derivation was in fact "hétoudeau" or "hétourdeau" which was "a capon" ("a fattened cock fowl").
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Tell it to the Marines (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=1314472003
Repartee to an improbable story or tale.
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Etymology: From a conversation between Charles II and Samuel Pepys when stories were told of strange things seen abroad which the Court could not credit. The truth of one was vouched for by an officer of the Maritime Regiment. Charles said that in future before casting doubt on a story he would first tell it to the Marines.
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uark
Latin Names of the Bishoprics in Scotland

(E?)(L?) http://comp.uark.edu/~mreynold/recint4.htm


uebersetzung
Tongue Twisters
Zungenbrecher
schottisch

(E?)(L1) http://www.uebersetzung.at/twister


(E?)(L1) http://www.uebersetzung.at/twister/scots.htm
Zungenbrecher in allen Sprachen der Welt: auch: Scots or Scottisch

uhi
Gaelic Online Dictionaries and Glossaries Index - Faclairean Gàidhlig
Gaelic-English Dictionary (Word document)
Dearbhadh litreachaidh sa Ghàidhlig (Gaelic spell-check)
A Dictionary of Gaelic Words and Phrases from Wester Ross (670 pp. Word document)

(E?)(L1) http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/foclora/


(E?)(L1) http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/faclair/


(E?)(L1) http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaidhlig/wentworth/faclair/dualchainnt/clar-gaidhlig.doc
Wörterbuch (182 Seiten)

Mit Links zu:

ukgenealogy
Scotland Genealogy-Researching

(E?)(L?) http://www.ukgenealogy.co.uk/scotland.htm
This page covers resources for the whole of Scotland, if you are looking for information on a specific county use the county links.

unc
Gaelic and Gaelic Culture

(E?)(L?) http://sunsite.unc.edu/gaelic/


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Écosse
Langues dans Écosse

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/Europe/ecosse.htm

(anglais) = R.-U.


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wainscot
wainscoting and potboiler (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/w1etym.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/042601.html#wainscot


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/wordlist.html
wainscot Apr 94

Watt (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.encyclopedia.com/html/w/watt-j1am.asp
Watt, James, 1736-1819, Scottish inventor
The watt, a unit of electrical power, was named for him.

Die elektrische Einheit "W" für die Leistung geht zurück auf den englischen Ingenieur "James Watt".

Whisky, Whiskey, aquavit, Wodka, vodka
Usquebae (W2)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/


(E?)(L?) http://eurekaweb.free.fr/vh2-wisky.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.eurekaweb.fr/
Vie quotidienne: (1494) Whisky

(E1)(L1) http://www.grandwhisky.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.grandwhisky.de/destillen/bushmills/bushmills.htm
Bushmills liegt an der äußersten Spitze der irischen Küste - in Nordirland. Der beschauliche Ort Bushmills verdankt seinen Weltruhm der ortsansässigen Old Bushmills Distillery. Seit 1608 wird hier mit der weltweit ersten Lizenz "Uisce Beatha" - das "Wasser des Lebens" - gebrannt.

(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.net/etext04/dcvgr10.txt
WHISKY: A malt spirit much drank in Ireland and Scotland; also a one-horse chaise

(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whisky

whisky


(E1)(L1) http://www.prismenfernglas.de/etymologie.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.thewhiskystore.de/


(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/


(E?)(L?) http://www.whisky.de/
siehe im Whisky-Buch S.7)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whiskey


(E?)(L?) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/w/w0123200.html
Whiskey or whisky - 06/15/2001

Der schottische Branntwein hat seinen Namen von engl. "whiskey", "whisky", Kurzform von "whiskybae", Nebenform von "usquebaugh" aus gäl. "uisge beatha" bzw. irisch. "uaque baugh" = "Wasser des Lebens", "Lebenswasser" (altir. "uisce" = "water" und "bethad" = "of life").
Der heutige Name entstammt einer Abwandlung des "uisge" über "fuisge" und "uiske" zu "Whisky".

In den USA und in Irland heißt er "Whiskey", "Whisky" heißt er in Schottland.

Das "Lebenswasser" wurde übrigens 1494 in der "Exchequer Roll", der "Steuertabelle", zum ersten Mal erwähnt. Darin wurde dem Mönchsbruder John Cor erlaubt, 8 bushel Gerste zur Herstellung von "aqua vitae" für den König herzustellen.
Ab 1644 wurden dann Steuern auf "uisge beatha" erhoben.

Eine wissenschaftliche Definition gibt einen Hinweis, um was es sich dabei handelt:
Whisk(e)y ist ein, aus vergorener Getreidemaische hergestelltes, Destillat, welches ca. 40-50Vol% Ethylalkohol enthält.

Im "Whisky-Buch" auf "www.whisky.de" fand ich auch den Hinweis, dass das englische Wort "wort" = "Würze" bedeutet (was man leicht im Wörterbuch überprüfen kann.

"Whiskey" wird übrigens auch im internationalen Buchstabieralphabet benutzt.

Das ide. "*wed" = "Wasser", "nass" (germ. "*watar") steckt übrigens noch in vielen anderen "(Lebens-)Wässerchen". So etwa im "aquavit" (lat. "aqua vitae" = "Wasser des Lebens") und im russ. "Wodka", engl. "vodka" = "kleines Voda" = "kleines Wasser".

(E?)(L1) http://www.dsl.ac.uk/dsl/
Die Suche nach "whisky" ergab folgendes Ergebnis:
Found 9 DSL Entries containing "whisky" in the Field Unter dem Stichwort "USQUEBAE" kann man dann nachlesen:

"USQUEBAE", n. Also "usquabae", "usquebea", "usquebey", "usquibae"; "usqueba, "usquba" (Sc. 1732 Chrons. Atholl and Tullibardine Families II. 385), "usk(e)yba" (Per. 1746 T. L. K. Oliphant Lairds of Gask (1870) 140, 157), "usqueba(g)h", "usquebaugh", and, after the modern spelling, "whiskybae" (Abd. 1824 G. Smith Douglas 98), "whisquybeath" (Sth. 1795 Stat. Acc.1 III. 525), and reduced forms "usqu(a)e", "usky", "¶husque" (Sc. 1737 R. Chambers Dom. Annals (1861) III. 528). Earlier forms of "Whisky", q.v., now only arch. or liter. ['usk?be] Hebr. 1703 M. Martin Descr. W. Islands 3: Their plenty of corn was such, as disposed the natives to brew several sorts of liquor, as common "Usquebaugh". Ein Doppelklick auf ein markiertes "whisky" in einem der Texte ergab dann seltsamerweise viele weitere Fundstellen:
Found 355 DSL Entries containing "whisky" in the Full Entry Field

Whistle-blower (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://news.scotsman.com/opinion.cfm?id=232852004
The etymological origins of "whistle-blowing" are gloriously obscure. Some references suggest it is of very recent coinage, circa the 1970s. However, in Raymond Chandler’s 1953 noir detective story, The Long Goodbye, a character says: "Come on, Marlowe, I’m blowing the whistle on you." The allusion might be to the police use of "whistles" as warning signals. Others have suggested the term comes from locomotive trains sounding a warning of their impending arrival. Whatever the source, there’s suddenly a lot of it about. I blame democracy, the media and political and corporate excess.

wikipedia
List of English words of Scots origin

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Scots_origin
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
This is a list of English language words of Scots language origin.
blackmail | caddie | collie | cosy | croon | eerie | forebear | glamour | golf | gumption | lilt | links (golf) | pony | raid | rampage | uncanny | weird | wizened | wraith

wikipedia
List of English words of Scots Gaelic origin

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Gaelic_origin
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
bard | banshee | bog | brat | brisk | clan | cross | gab | galore | glen | keen | leprechaun | pet | slew | slob | slogan | smidgen | smithereens | whisky

All of the original Gaelic forms of these words are also found in Irish and likely have been simultaneously borrowed from both languages.

wiktionary
Scottish Gaelic index

(E?)(L1) http://wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Scottish_Gaelic_index
is a collaborative project to produce a free multilingual dictionary and thesaurus in every language, complete with meanings, etymologies and pronunciations. Wiktionary is the lexical companion to the open content encyclopaedia Wikipedia.

word2word.com
Gaelic

(E?)(L?) http://www.word2word.com/dicd.html#gaelic


worldlanguage
Gaelic Language Books and Other Resources

(E?)(L?) http://www.worldlanguage.com/Languages/Gaelic.htm?CalledFrom=210325

Gaelic is spoken both in Ireland and in Scotland, in two distinct varieties that are generally referred to as Irish Gaelic and Scottish Gaelic. Like Welsh, it is one of the Celtic languages and thus part of the Indo-European family. Gaelic is also sometimes referred to as Erse.
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wwu
Scots English

(E?)(L?) http://pandora.cii.wwu.edu/vajda/ling201/test3materials/AmericanDialects.htm
The Dialects of American English
The various Germanic tribes (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) who invaded Britain after 437 AD brought with them their own dialects of West Germanic. These formed the basis for the emergence of later dialect areas. The submergence of the various British Celtic languages (of which Welsh is the only modern survivor) also lead to innovations in British English. The Viking invasions resulted in more Norse influence in the north than in the south, thereby contributing another layer to the existing dialects. Likewise, the Norman French invaders influenced the south more than the north, which came to be more conservative linguistically.
The Great Vowel Shift of the 1500's didn't affect northern English dialects, which came to be called "Scots English". Because of the long history of dialect creation in the English speaking areas of Great Britain, there are more dialects of English in Britain than in America, Canada, and Australia combined. (Unfortunately, we don't have time to cover modern British English dialects in any detail.)
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yourdictionary
Gaelic language resources
Gaelic grammars, news, and fonts

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/languages.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/languages/celtic.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/grammars2.html#gaelic
Scottish • Profile

Gaelic Grammars

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Schottland, l'Écosse, Scotland

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Blacks, George F.
The Surnames of Scotland
Their Origins, Meaning and History

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874744831/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874744831/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874744831/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874744831/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1874744831/etymologpor09-20
Sprache: Englisch
Gebundene Ausgabe - 914 Seiten - Birlinn Ltd
Erscheinungsdatum: 31. Oktober 1996
ISBN: 1874744831


Synopsis
A book on the origin, meaning and history of Scottish surnames. The core of this work is a listing of over 8000 names, each with a concise history and cross-references. It should serve as a tool for genealogists, historians, or anyone with a general interest in Scotland.


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Maurer, Michael (Autor)
Geschichte Schottlands

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150188628/etymologpor09-20
Broschiert: 382 Seiten
Verlag: Reclam, Ditzingen; Auflage: 2. Auflage. (1. April 2011)
Sprache: Deutsch


Kurzbeschreibung
"Solange hundert von uns am Leben sind, werden wir uns nie, unter welchen Bedingungen auch immer, der englischen Herrschaft unterwerfen." Die Schotten haben immer schon gern, wie 1320 in der Deklaration von Arbroath, einen Mythos um ihre Nation entworfen, von König Arthur über William Wallace, Robert the Bruce oder Bonnie Prince Charlie direkt bis zum Parlament in Edinburgh. Woher das kommt und ob es statt in destruktiven Separatismus auch in ein multinationales Großbritannien münden kann, das die schottische Kulturgeschichte in ein vielfältiges Europa trägt, das beleuchtet Michael Maurer in seinem historischen Überblick. Über den Autor Michael Maurer ist Professor für Kulturgeschichte an der Universität Jena.


(E?)(L?) http://www.reclam.de/detail/978-3-15-018862-0

Inhaltsverzeichnis


Erstellt: 2011-04

McClure, J. Derrick
Doric: The Dialect of North-east Scotland
(Varieties of English Around the World)

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/902724717X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/902724717X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/902724717X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/902724717X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/902724717X/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 219 Seiten
Verlag: John Benjamins Publishing Company (Januar 2002)
Sprache: Englisch


Synopsis
The dialect of North-East Scotland, one of the most distinctive and best preserved in the country, survives as both a proudly maintained mark of local identity and the vehicle for a remarkable regional literature. The present study, after placing the dialect in its historical, geographical and social context, discusses in some detail a selection of previous accounts of its distinctive characteristics of phonology and grammar, showing that its shibboleths have been well recognised, and have remained consistent, over a long period. Passages of recorded speech are then examined, with extensive use of phonetic transcription. Finally, a representative selection of written texts, dating from the 18th century to the present and illustrating a wide variety of styles and genres, are presented with detailed annotations. A full glossary is also included. This study clearly demonstrates both the individuality of the dialect and the richness of the local culture of which it is an integral part.


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Smith, Gavin D.
Das große Whiskybuch

(E?)(L?) http://www.wissenschaft-shop.de/Genuss-Lebensart/Ideen-fuer-Geniesser/Gavin-D-Smith-Das-grosse-Whiskybuch-Neu.html

2. Auflage 2014. 300 Seiten mit 750 Abb., 28 x 24 cm, gebunden

Was macht einen großartigen Whisky aus? Wie genießt man Whisky am besten? Warum sind Eichenfässer so entscheidend? Antworten auf alle Fragen rund um das Kultgetränk gibt diese inspirierende und topaktuelle Whiskey-Enzyklopädie. „Das große Whiskybuch“ stellt Ihnen 175 bedeutende, neue, traditionsreiche und innovative Destillerien in ausführlichen Porträts vor. Erzählt wird nicht nur die Geschichte der Brennereien, es wird auch vieles über deren Philosophie und Strategie verraten.

Über 500 Verkostungsnotizen beschreiben Whiskys, die man als Genießer unbedingt probieren sollte. Neben den traditionsreichen Whisky-Ländern werden auch neuere wie Japan, Australien oder Frankreich vorgestellt. Alle Standorte sind auf Karten zu den einzelnen Regionen verzeichnet und werden durch Hinweise zu regionalen Besonderheiten und Whisky-Festivals und -Events ergänzt. Dieses reich bebilderte Nachschlagewerk ist eine inspirierende und unentbehrliche Lektüre für jeden Whiskyliebhaber!


Erstellt: 2014-04

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Winn, Christopher (Autor)
I Never Knew That About Scotland

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0091910242/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0091910242/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0091910242/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0091910242/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0091910242/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 288 Seiten
Verlag: Ebury Press (23. Oktober 2007)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung
This irresistible miscelllany unearths the enthralling stories, firsts, birthplaces, legends and inventions that shape the country’s rich and majestic history. To uncover the spellbinding tales that lie hidden within Scotland’s wild and romantic shores and to tread in the footsteps of her villians and victors, is to capture the spirit of this fascinating country and bring every place you visit to life. Synopsis

Bestselling author, Christopher Winn takes us on the ultimate journey around Scotland. Travelling county by county, this irresistible miscellany unearths the enthralling stories, firsts, birthplaces, legends and inventions that shape the country's rich and majestic history. To uncover the spellbinding tales that lie hidden within Scotland's wild and romantic shores, to experience what inspired the country's powerful literature and towering castles, and to tread in the footsteps of her villians and victors, is to capture the spirit of this fascinating country and bring every place you visit to life. You will discover the story of the original 'sweetheart', John Balliol, whose embalmed heart is buried beside his devoted wife, Devorgilla at Sweetheart Abbey in Kirkcudbrightshire. In Aberdeen, you will find the only granite cathedral in the world. And, you will hear the haunting echo of the Bear Gates of Traquair House in Peeblesshire were slammed shut when Bonnie Prince Charlie left Scotland in 1746 - legend has it that they will never be re-opened until a Stuart King once more sits on the throne.

This beautifully illustrated treasure trove of a book is the perfect gift, and will act as an eye-opening guide to thrilling, alluring and ever-bewitching Scotland.


Erstellt: 2010-09

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