Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Anagramm, Anagrama, Anagramme, Anagramma, Anagram

A

Anagram (W3)

Dt. "Anagramm", span. "Anagrama", frz. "Anagramme", ital. "Anagramma", engl. "Anagram", esp. "anagramo", geht über mittelfrz. "anagramme", neulat. "anagramma", zurück auf griech. "anágramma" und griech. "anagraphein" = "umschreiben" und setzt sich zusammen aus griech. "-ana-" = "zurück" und griech. "gramma" = "Buchstabe".

Ableitungen von engl. "Anagram" sind engl. "anagrammatic", "anagrammatize", "anagrammed".

Das ide. "*gerbh-" = dt. "kratzen" führt auf einem langen Weg über griech. "grámma" und griech. "gráphein" = dt. "einritzen", "schreiben" zum Suffix "-gramm" = dt. "-schrift", "-bild". Man findet es aber auch als Präfix, etwa in dt. "Grammatik" zu lat. "(ars) grammatica" = dt. "Sprachlehre", griech. "grammatike (téchne)", das wörtlich also etwa "Ritzkunde", "Kratztechnik" bedeutet.

Passend zum Thema "Anagramm" kann man sich die Entwicklung von ide "*gerbh-" zu griech. "gráph-" auch als anagrammatische Umstellung vorstellen. Eine solche Lautumstellung wird in der Linguistik auch als "Metathese" bezeichnet (zu lat. "metathesis", griech. "metáthesis" = dt. "Umsetzen", "Umstellen). Eine solche Lautumstellung in einem Wort kann man durchau öfters finden, so etwa bei "Wepse" / "Wespe" oder "Born" / "Bronn".

(E?)(L?) http://www.20000-names.com/anagram_names.htm

Anagram Names
Here is a list of first names that are spelled with the exact same letters as other names or words.


(E?)(L?) http://www.anagrammy.com/

The Anagrammy Awards is a monthly competition for the best anagrams posted to the Anagrammy Awards Forum. Anagrams from the Forum are nominated to compete in ten categories, and the winners are determined by popular vote.
...


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080726143746/http://www.bartleby.com/61/IEroots.html

ENTRY: "*gerbh-"


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080708235435/http://bartleby.com/61/69/A0276900.html

anagram

NOUN: ETYMOLOGY:

New Latin "anagramma", from Greek "anagrammatismos", from "anagrammatizein", to rearrange letters in a word : "ana-", from bottom to top; see "ana–" + "gramma", "grammat-", "letter"; see "gerbh-" in Appendix I.

OTHER FORMS:


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/684.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/C528


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/alabaster/A35669442

An Anagram Entry: 'A Mean, Angry Rant'


(E?)(L?) http://bdb.co.za/shackle/articles/two_geniuses.htm

Two anagram geniuses
(wearisome suntan gag)
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.behindthename.com/anagram/

Anagram Names: OVER 5,500 ANAGRAM NAMES FROM AROUND THE WORLD
Created by Paul Pan (with Nanaea) for behindthename.com


(E?)(L?) http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/S/scary-devil-monastery.html

scary devil monastery: n.

Anagram frequently used to refer to the newsgroup alt.sysadmin.recovery, which is populated with characters that rather justify the reference.


(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/scrabble/

What was Scrabble’s Original Name?
?March 26, 2011
scrabble
Great things can come out of hard times — take "Scrabble". During the Great Depression, architect Alfred Mosher Butts couldn’t find work. So he decided to create a board game that required the vocabulary skills of "anagrams" and crossword puzzles but also had an element of chance. Butts hand-drew the original board with architectural drafting equipment. He also hand-lettered the tiles. He studied the front page of the New York Times, the New York Herald Tribune, and The Saturday Evening Post to calculate the frequency of each letter in the alphabet and then came up with a point value system.

At first, the game was named "Lexiko".

Then he called it "Criss-Cross Words".

Butts’ story was not one of success from the start. He tried and failed to sell Criss-Cross Words to game manufacturers. Milton Bradley rejected the game in 1933. James Brunot came on board as a business partner, and renamed the game "Scrabble", which means "to scratch" or "scrape" and "to scrawl".
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=anagram


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/12513/12513-h/12513-h.htm

Dewey Decimal Classification

Ana, anagrams - 543


(E?)(L?) http://people.howstuffworks.com/13-anagrams.htm

13 Anagrams


(E?)(L?) http://mypage.iu.edu/~shetter/miniatures/april1.htm

13. Politically Incorrect English
A neutral language for the Internet (1 Apr 99)
This was the first "April Fool" Miniature, announcing that an imaginary language called "Rolo-Pifla" (an anagram!) was about to be declared the official politically neutral language of the Internet.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/lower2/zz-cryptic.html

zz: Hidden X Term for Puzzlement (7, 9)


(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/upper2/AAnagrams.html

AA: We Do 'Grams, Word Games


(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/lower3/eeespy.html

eee: "He Had No Peer, and Very Few Equals"


(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/lower3/ppperfect.html

ppp: The Sum of Its Parts


(E?)(L?) http://anagrams.logos.it/

Anagrams Search Box - DE-ES-FR-IT-UK
Anagrams - DE-ES-FR-IT-UK
Anagramme: englisch, italienisch, deutsch, französisch, spanisch


(E?)(L1) http://www.logos.it/instructions/help/en/anagram.html

What is an anagram?


(E?)(L?) http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath414.htm

The Fundamental Anagram of Calculus


(E?)(L?) http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath151.htm

Galileo's Anagrams and the Moons of Mars


(E?)(L?) http://www.mbhs.edu/~bconnell/cgi-bin/anagram.cgi

Brendan's Amazing Anagram Generator
This amazing program will take an English name, phrase, and so on, and rearrange the letters to form other English words. Submitting "word play" yielded 48 anagrams, including "yap world," "pal rowdy," and "wary plod."


(E?)(L1) http://mmm.mbhs.edu/~bconnell/phoneagrams.html

Brendan's Phone Anagram Generator

This program finds the letter equivalents of a phone number. For example, "439-2665" is equivalent to dialing "HEY-COOL." Most of the results you generate will probably be meaningless, but there might be a couple or so that are real or semi-real phrases.


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

anagram | anagrammatism | anagram pair


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagram

Limericks on "anagram"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatic

Limericks on "anagrammatic"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatical

Limericks on "anagrammatical"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatically

Limericks on "anagrammatically"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatisation

Limericks on "anagrammatisation"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatise

Limericks on "anagrammatise"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatization

Limericks on "anagrammatization"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=anagrammatize

Limericks on "anagrammatize"


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Bananagrams

Limericks on "Bananagrams"


(E?)(L1) http://www.orchy.com/dictionary/anagrams.htm
Hier findet man eine lange Liste mit englischen Anagrammen.


The Anagram Dictionary

A long time ago I decided to make use of an electronic scrabble dictionary by using it to build an anagram dictionary. Many years later, I happened to mention that in the course of a discussion in the newsgroup, alt.anagrams and put it online. Checking the logs, next to no one looked at it. A few weeks later I found a fair amount of people all round the world, especially domains ending in .edu, looking at the anagrams file - about 10 a day. Curious, I put a msg at the beginning of the document asking where they found it, assuming some anagram page had put in a link. It took ages for a reply but finally I was told a search engine had picked up on it. Whether they search through Usenet looking for URL's or someone submitted it I do not know.
...



(E?)(L1) http://www.phoneSpell.org/phoneSpell.html

Phone-Number-Anagrams

What does your phone number spell?

The PhoneSpell® search engine provides three 4 services in one! You may have heard that now you can take your phone number with you when you move. Enter a 6 to 10 digit phone number and we'll show you what words and phrases your phone number spells to help you decide if you want to keep it. Opening a business and need a new phone number? Pick a new 7 or 8 digit phone number by typing in an available exchange (first 3 to 5 digits) and see what one-word numbers you can choose from. Searching for just the right toll free number to advertise? Type in letters and we will show you the corresponding phone number. We can even dial the number for you! Questions? Get the FAQs.

Enter a 6 to 10 digit phone number and find out what words and phrases your phone number spells.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/anagram

1580-90; probably Middle French "anagramme", New Latin "anagramma". See "ana-", "-gram"

Word Origin

C16: from New Latin "anagramma", shortened from Greek "anagrammatismos", from "anagrammatizein" "to transpose letters", from "ana-" + "gramma" "a letter"

Word Origin and History for an-a-gram Expand

n., transposition of letters in a word so as to form another, 1580s, from French "anagramme" or Modern Latin "anagramma" (16c.), both from Greek "anagrammatizein" "transpose letters", from "ana-" "up", "back" (see "ana-" ) + "gramma" (genitive "grammatos") "letter" (see "grammar"). Related: "Anagrammatical"; "anagrammatically".


(E?)(L?) http://dictynna.revues.org/220

Wordplay in Vergil and Claudian
Damien Nelis

Résumé

This paper looks at two examples of anagrammatic wordplay in Vergil and Claudian, and argues that in each case the poet carefully signals the presence of the anagram to the reader.
...


(E?)(L?) http://dictynna.revues.org/912

The Pedant’s Curse: Obscurity and Identity in Ovid’s Ibis
Darcy Krasne

Résumé

This paper investigates the extended catalogue of curses in Ovid’s Ibis, in particular the catalogue's literary significance and the reasons and methods behind Ovid's organizing principles and choice of themes. I demonstrate how the Ibis plays with presenting itself in the manner of mythographic texts while exploiting the polyvalency of the mythic tradition’s inherent mutability and syncretism. I also discuss how major themes of the poem, such as a prevalent emphasis on names and their suppression, and an identification of the poetic corpus with the poet’s own body, echo the thematic concerns of Ovid’s other exile poetry. Finally, I argue for identifying Ovid’s pseudonymous enemy “Ibis” with the Muses, whose “love/hate” relationship with Ovid is clearly expressed in the exile poetry.
...
149 This is a normal feature of ancient linguistic play and etymologizing. Ahl (1985) 44–54 shows a number of clear anagrams in Vergil, such as the half-line pulsa palus (Aen. 7.702), as well as pointing out that as serious a philosopher as Plato includes theories of anagrams in the Cratylus. At Cratylus 395D–E, for instance, Socrates proposes that "talantaton" is behind Tantalus’s name. (See Sedley [1998] on the etymologies of the Cratylus, whether anagrammatic or otherwise.) Tzetzes (Schol. Lyc. p. 5.6–8 Scheer) records, perhaps spuriously (Cameron [1995b] 481–2, but cf. West [1984] 129n11), that Lycophron invented anagrams, including two on the names of Ptolemy Philadelphus and Arsinoe ("apd melitos" and "???", respectively). Cameron (1995b) disputes the existence of non-etymological anagrams in antiquity, but the example he chooses from Ahl (1985) to prove that “almost all the cases that carry any conviction at all are etymological associations of one sort or another” (479) first of all ignores the presence of a secondary and non-etymological anagram in the same line and, secondly, does not take into account the existence of such half-line anagrams as "pulsa palus": “Verg. Aen. 8.322–3, LATIUmque vocari / maluit, his quoniam LATUIsset [tutus] in oris. The reader is clearly encouraged to look for the meaning of the name here, scarcely an anagram as we understand the term, since it is the very similarity of the words that is held to justify connecting them” (479). The presence of maluit at the beginning of 8.323 defies Cameron’s dismissal of non-etymological anagrammatic play in these lines; contra Harrison (1986), who believes that intentional anagrammatic play in such cases “seems fundamentally unlikely. The error here is not to find anagrams but to ascribe them to the poet” (237).
...


(E?)(L?) http://bulletinhispanique.revues.org/1099

Pour une autre lecture de El peregrino en su patria de Lope de Vega
Philippe Meunier

p. 75-88

Résumés

Français
English
Español

Cette lecture du Peregrino en su patria se propose d’aller au-delà de l’étiquette de roman d’aventures qui lui est couramment apposée. En partant du double constat du titre paradoxal et de l’absence d’auto sacramental à la fin du cinquième livre, il s’agira de montrer à la lumière de trois épisodes particuliers – le pèlerinage à Montserrat, le séjour dans l’hôpital des fous de Valence et la nuit fantasmatique dans un autre hôpital, refuge de pèlerins – comment le destin romanesque de Pánfilo épouse une autre trajectoire – allégorique – sous l’espèce d’une « révélation personnelle ».
...
Quant à Nise, son nom qui a déjà été l’objet d’un sonnet « equívoco »31, peut être lu de manière anagrammatique comme Inés, la désignant par étymologie comme l’incarnation de la chasteté.
...


(E?)(L?) http://ir.uiowa.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=ejab

...
100. Pirie, G.H. “Letters, Words, Worlds: The Naming of SOWETO.” African Studies Journal 43, no. 1 (1984): 43-51.

It is amazing how a contrived name such as "Soweto", an anagram for "South West Township" has evolved beyond the paucity of its original meaning to represent a multitude of political, social and historical meanings for the entire world. In this dense article, Pirie provides us with some elements of understanding about the naming of "Soweto". The first section describes the naming process from the 1930’s to the 1960’s. Using information from local archives, the author brings to light a long series of power struggles between the different boards around the issue of what the linguistic and ethnic origin of the name should be. In a second section, Pirie reflects on the meaning of the large number of proposed names and some of the insights these names provide into the minds of South Africans of that era. The author states that even the names that did not make it to the top of the list are “rich depositories of information about the perception of places.” Pirie concludes with an epistemological reflection on the genesis of toponyms. He rejects the concept of toponyms as “historical signposts” which he attributes to Taylor and foregrounds the social conditions surrounding the emergence of certain toponyms which are exemplified by the genesis and the meaning of the name Soweto.
...


(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#anagram


(E?)(L1) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=anagram


(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=anagrammatique


(E?)(L1) http://www.verbivore.com/rllink.htm




(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A




(E?)(L?) http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A30099-2004May15.html

The Style Invitational
Week 558: Set Us Right
Sunday, May 16, 2004; Page D02
What is the difference between JFK (1960) and JFK (2004)?
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/jitney-supper/

Get Your Nickels Together for a Jitney Supper
Posted by Grant Barrett on June 4, 2011
Anagrams, rebuses, cryptograms — Martha and Grant swap stories about the games that first made them realize that playing with words and letters can be fun. Also this week, what’s a jitney supper and where do you eat graveyard stew? The hosts explain the origin of the term hang fire and why Alaskans sound like they’re from the Midwest, and take on a debate about whether an egregious falsehood is a bald-faced lie or a bold-faced lie.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/will-shortz/

NPR Puzzlemaster Will Shortz
Posted by Grant Barrett on November 22, 2010
This week, a special treat: NPR Puzzlemaster Will Shortz stops by with a quiz about slang and anagrams.
Released November 22, 2010.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/number-word-game/

Number Word Game
Posted by Grant Barrett on December 18, 2012
Our Puzzle Man John Chaneski’s been working at the Museum of Math in New York City and it’s got him thinking about number words. For this game, each clue leads to a certain number spelled out. For example, can you guess which number between one and ten can be anagrammed to something that means to pull something with a rope? This is part of a complete episode.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/anagram-word-quiz/

Anagram Word Quiz
Posted by grantbarrett on November 20, 2010
Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a puzzle about anagrams. This is part of a complete episode.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/f-u-n-e-x-s-v-f-x/

F U N E X? S, V F X.
Posted by Grant Barrett on June 7, 2010
Hi from Martha and Grant!
In our latest show, we talk about games that first made us realize that goofing with words and letters is fun. Martha recalls discovering the "F U N E X" word puzzle and Grant describes doing anagrams and cryptograms in the newspaper.
http://waywordradio.org/jitney-supper/

Also this week, we discuss the terms "jitney supper," "graveyard stew," "hang fire," and try to settle a couple's dispute over whether an egregious falsehood is a "bald-faced lie" or a "bold-faced" one.
Speaking of the "F U N E X" puzzle, the trick is to sound out the letters to make words, so that "F U N E X" becomes "Have you any eggs?"
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/we-pinkie-swear/

We Pinkie-Swear
Posted by Grant Barrett on November 26, 2007
Fellow wordivas and wordudes,
This week on A Way with Words we start a brand-new season! To celebrate, we noodled with anagrams, including the one in the title of this episode.
Listen here.
Also on the show:
•A New York City schoolteacher asks, “Why do we call our little finger a pinkie?” and relates his invented etymology.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0699


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0902


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/

Did you know that "parliament" is an anagram of "partial men"? Or, "Clint Eastwood" an anagram of "Old West Action"? Someone once said, "All the life's wisdom can be found in anagrams. Anagrams never lie." Here is your chance to discover the wisdom of anagrams. Enter the word or phrase in the form and press button.

  • Mit Links zu weiteren "Internet Anagram Servern" bei:



  • für 'horst' wurden 2 (englische) Variationen angezeigt
    für 'horst conrad' mehrere hundert
    interessant: Anagrammbildung mit Vorgaben

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/anagram.html

    A.Word.A.Day--anagram

    A rearrangement of letters in a word, phrase, or name to form another word, phrase, or name.
    verb tr.
    To rearrange the letters of a term to form another.

    [From Middle French "anagramme", from New Latin "anagramma", from "ana-" ("back", "up") + "-gram" ("something written").]

    Can you create one word out of the letters in "new door"? The answer is (ha ha) "one word". The letters in "new door" are the same as those in "one word", except in a different order. When is enough not enough? When you rearrange the letters in "enough", you get "one hug". Everybody knows that one hug is never enough!
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/anagram.wav

    A rearrangement of letters in a word, phrase, or name to form another word, phrase, or name.
    When is enough not enough?
    When you rearrange the letters in 'enough', you get 'one hug'. Everybody knows that 'one hug' is never 'enough'!

    "Aptagrams" are words or statements that uncannily anagram into their own synonyms or into uncannily related ideas: Next up in this phase of anagramazing program are words and phrases that we can shape into heaps of other meaningful phrases: No wonder that an acronym of anagram is A New, Appropriate, Grandly Rearranged, Alphabetic Message. No wonder that those who believe in the magical potency of words have hailed the anagram as AH, AN ART GEM! and anagrams as ARS MAGNA, "the great art".


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/hof.html

    Anagram Hall of Fame
    Here you'll find a list of the best and the brightest anagrams of all time, such as "The Morse Code = Here Come Dots," "Slot Machines = Cash Lost in'em" and "Dormitory = Dirty Room."


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/anagram/article-sydneymorningherald.html

    The Sydney Morning Herald
    April 17, 1999
    Raiders of the Lost Anagram
    ...


    (E1)(L1) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/a/A.htm


    (E1)(L1) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/a/ana.htm


    (E?)(L?) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/g/gramma.htm


    (E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/anagram


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=anagram
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "anagram" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1610 auf.

    Erstellt: 2015-07

    B

    C

    D

    E

    F

    G

    Gimmick (W3)

    Das engl. "gimmick" = "verborgene Vorrichtung" sorgt heute für kleinere überraschende Effekte (z.B. in der Computerei oder auf Internetseiten.

    Eine mögliche Herleitung ist ein Anagramm von engl. "magic".

    Englische Synonyme sind "gaff", "gaffus" and "feke", and "fake".

    My guess would be that the word started in "common" use in the early 1920's, although perhaps without distinction. Henry Hay, in the Amateur Magician's Handbook credits the "authority of John Mulholland" to distinctly define gimmick as "a secret device never seen by the audience" and a fake as "seen... but not understood"....
    One theory of the word's origin ascribes it to the German word "gamach", used for this purpose according to one source to mean "easy", and to another "a convenience". A more plausible explanation assigns it to an altered form of "gimcrack", a useless object or one that is showy but of little worth. From the carnival the term passed into the vocabulary of the magician (some say it's an anagram of "magic") and about 1930 the word became part of our general language coming to mean any clever device or gadget. By the 1940s "gimmick" achieved its modern sense of "a stratagem for gaining attention"; a feature in a product, plan, presentation, etc., believed to increase appeal, although it is not necessarily useful or important ("grabber", "hook").

    (E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=g&p=5


    (E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S2=ads-l&q=gimmick&s=&f=&a=&b=
    ADS-L Digest - 14 Feb 2004 to 15 Feb 2004 (#2004-47) - There are 20 messages totalling 673 lines in this issue.
    Topics of the day:

    (E1)(L1) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Gimmick


    (E?)(L?) http://www.musanim.com/mam/unknown.html
    gimmick (1926)

    (E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/042601.html#gimmick


    (E?)(L?) http://www.www-kurs.de/gloss_g.htm#Gimmick


    (E?)(L?) http://www.yps.de/
    Die tollsten Gimmicks gibt's in Yps

    H

    I

    J

    joergzuther.de
    Anagrams

    (E?)(L?) http://www.joergzuther.de/words/index.html#ANAGRAMS

    Definition Anagram: An anagram of a piece of text is an arbitrary rearrangement of its letters (without consideration of whitespace and punctuation characters and without regard to the semantic content).

    If you do this rearrangement randomly, you'll get just a muddle of letters. Probably, this won't be very interesting to you. But it can be very funny to find anagrams that make sense by itself, especially if this new meaning interferes somehow with the original meaning. Here are some good links concerning anagrams:
    ...


    Erstellt: 2015-08

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    M

    maproom.co.uk
    The London tube map anagrammed

    (E?)(L?) http://www.maproom.co.uk/maps/anagrammap.gif


    Erstellt: 2015-07

    Myra (W3)

    Der weibliche Vorname "Myra" soll von dem englischen Dichter Fulke Greville (1554-1628) im 16./17. Jh. (möglicherweise) als Anagramm von "Mary" geprägt worden Sein "Mary" ist seinerseits eine vereinfachte Form von "Myrrha", eine Name, der auf lat. "mirari" = dt. "bewundern" zurück geht.

    Als weitere findet man "Mira", "Mairead", "Mairéad", friech., lat. "myron" = dt. "lieblich riechendes Öl", schwed. "myra" = dt. "Ameise".

    "Myra" war auch der Name der heutigen Stadt "Demre" in Antalya in der Türkei. Die Stadt wird mit "Nikolaus von Myra" in Verbindung gebracht, unserem heutigen "Nikolaus".

    (E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/girl/myra

    Myra

    Coined by the poet Fulke Greville (1554 - 1628) for use in his love poems. Some believe it to be a variant of the Irish "Moyra"; an anagram of "Mary"; a borrowing of the name of a seaport in ancient Lycia; or from the Latin "myrrha" ("myrrh").
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2

    Peonies: Myra | Myra MacRae | Myra McCrae


    (E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/prenom.php?search=Myra

    "Myra": Origine et sens : celle qui élève (hébreu).


    (E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/prenom.php?search=Myranie

    "Myranie": Origine et sens : celle qui élève (hébreu).


    (E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm

    The Etymology of First Names

    "MURIEL" form of "MYRA" or "sea bright" (Celtic) or "merry" (Middle English)


    (E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm

    MYRA "myrrh" or "fragrant" (Greek). Myrrh is a fragrant resin obtained from a tree.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Myra

    Myra | Mýra


    (E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Myra

    Myra, noun ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.sacklunch.net/personalnames/M/Myra.html

    "Myra": A feminine name. The termination of some other Christian name; or from the Greek, "Myron", "myrrh".


    (E?)(L?) http://www.sacklunch.net/BibleNames/M/Myra.html

    Meaning of Bible Name: "Myra": "I flow"; "pour out"; "weep"


    (E?)(L?) http://www.zoope.com/

    "Myra" : MIGH-ruh : french "quiet song"


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=7&content=Myra
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "Myra" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1790 auf.

    Erstellt: 2015-07

    Myra - Rose

    Es gibt mehrere Rosen, die "Myra" im Namen tragen:


    Auszeichnungen / Awards
    Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage
    Blüheigenschaften / Flowering Habit
    Blütenblätter-Anzahl
    Blütenfarbe / Flower Colour
    Blütenform / Bloom Shape
    Blütengröße / Bloom Size
    Blütentyp / Bloom Type
    Blütezeit / Flowering Period, Blooming Season / Floraison
    Bodenansprüche / Cultivation
    Dornen / Stacheln / Thorns
    Duft / Fragrance / Scent
    Elternrosen / Herkunft
    Erkrankungen
    Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth)
    Exhibition Name
    Genealogie / Parentage
    Hagebutten / Hips
    Knospen / Buds
    Ordnungskriterien / Klasse / Genre / Famille de rosiers
    Registration Name
    Schädlinge
    Schwächen / Weaknesses
    Standort
    Stärken / Strengths
    Stiele / Stems
    Synonyme
    Verwendung / Use Type de rosier
    Winterhärte / Hardiness
    Wuchsabstand / Dist. de plantation
    Wuchsform
    Wuchshöhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur
    Wuchsweite / Width
    Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer



    (E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php




    (E?)(L2) http://www.ludwigsroses.co.za/

    Myra Stegman


    Erstellt: 2015-08

    N

    O

    P

    pyramus.demon.co.uk
    Anagram Page

    (E?)(L?) http://www.pyramus.demon.co.uk/anag.htm




    Erstellt: 2015-08

    Q

    R

    Reva (W3)

    Der Name "Reva" soll als Anagramm aus dem Namen "Vera" gebildet worden sein.

    Die dt. "Rebe", mhdt. "rebe", ahdt. "reba", "rebo", heißt schwed. "reva". Der Name "Reva" könnte also auch einen Bezug zu Skandinavien haben. Die Herkunft von dt. "Rebe" bzw. schwed. "reva" ist noch ungeklärt. Möglich wäre eine Verwandtschaftm mit lat. "repere" = dt. "kriechen", "schleichen", das man auch in dt. "Reptil" findet. Auch gibt es einen Bezug zu lit. "replióti" = dt. "kriechen".

    Im Deutschen ist es verwirrend, was mit "Rebe" genau bezeichnet wir. Ursprünglich bezeichnete "Rebe" die Ranke oder den (kriechenden) Wurzelausläufer einer Pflanze. Davon ausgehend übertrug man die Bezeichnung "Rebe" auf die komplette "rankende Pflanze". Im Weinanbau bezeichnet dt. "Rebe" den (kompletten) "Weinstock", während der Plural "Reben" einen "Weingarten", "Weinberg" bezeichnet.

    (E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm

    "REVA" an anagram of "VERA"


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Reva
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "Reva" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 / 1750 auf.

    Erstellt: 2015-08

    Rosalind (W3)

    Der weibliche Vorname engl. "Rosalind" soll von dem englischen Dichter Edmund Spenser im 16. Jh. als Anagramm des Namens seiner Geliebten "Rosa Daniel" gebildet worden sein. Zunächst blieb der Name in der Literatur. Thomas Lodge übernahm den Namen für die Hauptgestalt eines Romans. Diesen Roman nahm Shakespeare in seiner Komödie "Wie es euch gefällt" (um 1599) zur Vorlage und bearbeitete ihn als Drama. Allgemeine Verbreitung erlangte der Name "Rosalind" in England erst in den 1860er-Jahren.

    Als Varianten findet man auch "Rosalin", "Rosalyn", "Rosalynn", "Roseline".

    Der Name "Rosalind", "Rosalinda", "Rosalinde" kann aber auch auf einen germanischen Ursprung zurück geführt werden. Demnach handelt es sich um eine Zusammensetzung aus german. "*hros" = dt. "Ross" und german. "*linta" = dt. "Linde" und erweitert zu "Schild aus Lindenholz".

    Auch findet man die Möglichkeit einer Zusammensetzung aus "Rose" und ital. "lindo", "linda" = dt. "rein", "sauber" und damit "Rosalind" = dt. "reine Rose" bzw. mit span. "lindo", "linda" = dt. "schön" als dt. "schöne Rose".

    Und dann gibt es noch die Deutung als "ruhmreiche Milde", mit althdt. "hruod" = dt. "Ruhm" und althdt. "lind" = dt. "sanft", "weich", "mild".

    (E?)(L1) http://www.astronomia.de/index.htm?http://www.astronomia.de/mondeura.htm#Rosalind

    Rosalind


    (E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/namipedia/girl/r

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.backyardgardener.com/plantname/Rcommon.html




    (E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/R2.html


    (E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/14500.html

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.britannica.com/search?query=Rosalind

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=R

    Rosa und Rosalind (A 1987)


    (E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/34512/34512-h/34512-h.htm

    Title: Rosalind at Red Gate

    Author: Meredith Nicholson

    Illustrator: Arthur I. Keller

    Release Date: November 30, 2010 [EBook #34512]

    Language: English

    Produced by Al Haines
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2

    Peonies:


    (E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm




    (E?)(L?) http://www.netzwerkpflanzensammlungen.de/suche_extern/index.php

    Sorte "Rosalind"


    (E?)(L?) http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Category:Names

    Rosali | Rosalia | Rosalida | Rosalie | Rosaliina | Rosalin | Rosalina | Rosalind | Rósalind | Rosaline | Rosalinn | Rosalinne | Rosalint | Rosalyn | Rosalynn


    (E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Elias, Rosalind

    Limericks on "Elias, Rosalind"


    (E?)(L?) http://www.onomastik.com/Vornamen-Lexikon/name_2164_Rosalind.html

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=rosalind

    rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

    rosalind (62)


    (E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/shakespeare/as_you_like_it/

    Shakespeare: As You Like It

    With one Duke exiled, his younger brother takes his place in the court; a pair of girls, "Rosalind" and "Celia", the daughters of each Duke, are forced by the new Duke’s anger and their ties of friendship to travel into the Forest of Arden, followed by a courtier, Touchstone. In the forest where the elder Duke resides, the girls’ paths cross with Orlando, himself fleeing his elder brother’s tyranny. Through song and dance, with poetry and cross-dressing, four couples take shape and eventually marry before the goddess Hymen. The play concludes as it began, with the old Duke leaves Arden and his brother entering the forest: one Duke absent, one Duke in the court.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://openshakespeare.org/work

    As you Like it - With one Duke exiled, his younger brother takes his place in the court; a pair of girls, Rosalind and Celia, the daughters of each Duke, are forced by the new Duke’s anger and their ties of friendship to travel into ... read more»


    (E?)(L?) http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/node/21

    Gerbille de Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/46

    Rosalind's Gerbil


    (E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Rosalind

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.sacklunch.net/personalnames/

    "Rosalin", "Rosalind": A feminine diminutive formed from the name Rose.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.solarviews.com/eng/toc.htm

    Satellites of Uranus

    Cordelia, Bianca, Cressida, Desdemona, Juliet, Portia, Rosalind, Belinda, Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon Caliban, Sycorax


    (E?)(L?) http://solarviews.com/eng/rosalind.htm

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SR

    Rosa und Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/clear-highest-sphere

    Like to the Clear in Highest Sphere
    (From "Rosalind")
    Lodge, Thomas (1558 - 1625)
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/rosalinds-madrigal

    Rosalind's Madrigal
    From "Rosalind"
    Lodge, Thomas (1558 - 1625)
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.vvork.com/?page_id=8343

    rosalind


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Rosalind
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "Rosalind" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1590 / 1790 auf.

    Erstellt: 2015-07

    Rosalind - Rose

    Es gibt mehrere Rosen die "Rosalind" getauft wurden.


    Auszeichnungen / Awards
    Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage
    Blüheigenschaften / Flowering Habit
    Blütenblätter-Anzahl
    Blütenfarbe / Flower Colour
    Blütenform / Bloom Shape
    Blütengröße / Bloom Size
    Blütentyp / Bloom Type
    Blütezeit / Flowering Period, Blooming Season / Floraison
    Bodenansprüche / Cultivation
    Dornen / Stacheln / Thorns
    Duft / Fragrance / Scent
    Elternrosen / Herkunft
    Erkrankungen
    Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth)
    Exhibition Name
    Genealogie / Parentage
    Hagebutten / Hips
    Knospen / Buds
    Ordnungskriterien / Klasse / Genre / Famille de rosiers
    Registration Name
    Schädlinge
    Schwächen / Weaknesses
    Standort
    Stärken / Strengths
    Stiele / Stems
    Synonyme
    Verwendung / Use Type de rosier
    Winterhärte / Hardiness
    Wuchsabstand / Dist. de plantation
    Wuchsform
    Wuchshöhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur
    Wuchsweite / Width
    Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer



    (E?)(L?) http://www.belle-epoque.nl/online-catalogus/zoeken/trefnaam/rosalind/RROSALIN

    Rosalind


    (E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

    Rosalind (hybrid tea, Bell, 1993)
    Hybrid Tea / Large-Flowered. Pink blend. Fading pale pink. Mild to strong fragrance. Large, borne mostly solitary bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Height of 47" to 4¼' (120 to 130 cm). Width of 39" to 43" (100 to 110 cm). Ronald J. Bell (1993).

    Rosalind (shrub, Scarman, 2007)
    Shrub. Apricot and pink. Small, full (26-40 petals), button-eye bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Height of up to 20" (up to 50 cm). Width of up to 20" (up to 50 cm). John Scarman (2007).

    Rosalind (florists rose, Austin, 2009)[AUStew]
    Florists Rose. English Rose Collection. Light pink. Blush or soft pink. Strong, fruity fragrance. Medium, very double, button-eye bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. David C. H. Austin (2012).

    Rosalind (Hybrid Tea, Pierson, 1918)
    Hybrid Tea. Orange-pink to seashell-pink. Coral bud, apricot-pink when half open, shell pink when open. Strong fragrance. Large, full (26-40 petals), borne mostly solitary, open bloom form.

    Rosalind Orr English
    Hybrid Tea. Salmon-pink, ages to deep pink . Fades to cherry-pink. Large, full (26-40 petals), borne mostly solitary, in small clusters bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). E. Gurney Hill Co. (1907).

    Rosalinda
    Hybrid Tea / Large-Flowered. Carmine-red. Mild to strong fragrance. Large, very double bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Cebrià Camprubí Nadal (1945).

    Rosalinde (polyantha, Paul, 1908)
    Polyantha. Pink. Small, double (17-25 petals), in small clusters bloom form. Continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). William Paul and Son (1908).

    Rosalinde (floribunda, Krause, 1944)
    Floribunda. Pink. Mild to strong, apple fragrance. Double (17-25 petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters, cupped, old-fashioned bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Max Krause (1938).

    Rosalinde (polyantha, Grunewald, 1930)
    Polyantha. Carmine-pink. Mild fragrance. Medium, double (17-25 petals) bloom form. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Grunewald (1930).

    Rosalinde (polyantha, Schmidt, 1903)
    Polyantha. Salmon-pink. Medium, full (26-40 petals), in large clusters bloom form. Continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Johann Christoph Schmidt (1903).


    (E?)(L?) http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47d9-b92e-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

    Rose Coughlan as Rosalind


    Erstellt: 2015-07

    S

    sensagent.com
    anagrams search

    (E?)(L?) http://www.sensagent.com/en/anagrams-dictionary/

    languages


    Erstellt: 2015-07

    ssynth.co.uk
    Andy's anagram solver

    (E?)(L?) http://www.ssynth.co.uk/~gay/anagram.html

    Word or phrase to be solved: "abcd"
    Limit each solution to "1 ... no limit" words
    English (20000 common words)
    English with proper nouns
    English (132000 words)
    Huge english dictionary (209000 words). Experimental.
    Huge english dictionary with names and proper nouns
    Dutch
    French
    Include single-character words (a and I)


    Erstellt: 2015-07

    T

    U

    V

    Vanessa (W3)

    Für die Herkunft des weiblichen Vornamens "Vanessa" findet man den Hinweis auf Jonathan Swift. Dieser soll den "Kunstnamen" in seinem autobiografischen Gedicht "Cadenus und Vanessa" aus dem Jahr 1726 anagrammartig aus dem Namen seiner Geliebten "Esther Vanhomrigh" (genannt "Essa") gebildet haben. Um 1960 kam der solcherart gebildete Name auch nach Deutschland und gehörte um das Jahr 1990 sogar zu den beliebtesten Mädchennamen in Deutschland.

    Es gibt jedoch auch einen Hinweis, wonach der Name "Vanessa" von "Venisse", einer normannischen Variante von "Véronique" abgeleitet sein soll. Danach gelangte der Name in Folge der normannischen Invasion von "Guillaume le Conquérant", "Wilhelm dem Eroberer" im 11. Jh. nach England, wurde dort als "Venisse" adaptiert, umgeformt zu "Venissa" und schließlich zu "Vanessa". Jonathan Swift (der Autor von Gullivers Reisen) gab dem Namen im 18. Jh. lediglich neue Popularität. In Frankreich gelangte der reimportierte Name "Vanessa" dann ab 1970 zu Popularität.

    Auch die Schauspielerin "Vanessa Redgrave" (30.01.1937 (London) - ) soll in den 1970er Jahren zur Verbreitung des Namens beigetragen haben.

    Dann gibt es noch einen Hinweis, wonach "Vanessa" auf eine griechische Bedeutung "Schmetterling" zurück gehen soll. Immerhin gibt es auch eine Falter-Art mit dieser Bezeichnung.

    Die in der Botanik zu findende Bezeichnung bot. "vanessae" soll auf die Botanikerin "Vanessa Beth Beauchamp" (1976- ), Tochter von R. Mitchel Beauchamp, zurück gehen, die Autorin eines Werkes "A Flora of San Diego County" (ref. Baccharis vanessae).

    Als (direkte oder indirekte) Ableitungen findet man in Europa auch die Varianten "Janessa", "Nessa", "Vanesa", "Vanessa", "Vanesse", "Vannessa", "Vannie", "Vanny", "Venessa", "Vania", "Wanesa", "Wanessa", "Wenessa".

    Auch eine Rose aus dem jahr 1946 wurde auf den Namen "Vanessa" getauft.

    (E?)(L?) http://www.1000vornamen.de/vorname_1859_Vanessa.html

    Dieser Mädchenname geht ursprünglich zurück auf den englischen Schriftsteller Jonathan Swift, dessen Geliebte Geliebte Esther (genannt "Essa") Vanhomrigh hieß.
    ...


    (E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/girl/vanessa

    Vanessa


    (E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/17070.html

    E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

    "Vanessa" is Miss "Esther Vanhomrigh", and Cade’nus is Dean Swift. While he was still married to Stella [Miss Hester Johnson, whose tutor he had been] Miss Vanhomrigh fell in love with him, and requested him to marry her, but the dean refused. The proposal became known to his wife (?), and both the ladies died soon afterwards. Hester Johnson was called Stella by a pun upon the Greek aster, which resembles Hester in sound, and means a “star.” Miss Vanhomrigh was called "Van-essa" by compounding "Van", the first syllable of her name, with "Essa", the pet form of "Esther". "Cadenus" is simply "decanus" ("dean") slightly transposed.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/219/0411.html

    The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
    Volume IX. From Steele and Addison to Pope and Swift.
    IV. Swift.
    § 11. Stella and Vanessa.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/219/0421.html

    The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
    Volume IX. From Steele and Addison to Pope and Swift.
    IV. Swift.
    § 21. Baucis and Philemon; The Grand Question Debated; Cadenus and Vanessa; Later savage Satirical Verse: The Legion Club.
    ...


    (E2)(L1) http://www.calflora.net/botanicalnames/pageV.html

    vanessae


    (E?)(L?) http://www.encyclopaedizer.net/tmp/buch1.pdf

    "Vanessa", [Name, undef]: Der Namenstag von VANESSA ist der 17.04.

    Der Name "Vanessa" ist eine Erfindung des Autors Jonathan Swift. "Loyola" ist aber ein Wallfahrtsort in Spanien und es gibt den Heiligen Ignatius von Loyola. Ein Pfarrer erklärte, dass "Vanessa" vom Heiligen "Wando" abgeleitet wird, dessen Namenstag ist am 17.

    Brussel, Belgium, 18-09-2004, 18:42


    (E?)(L?) http://prenoms.famili.fr/,vanessa,2277,16112.asp

    ...
    C'est le dérivé de "Venisse", forme normande de "Véronique".
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.gens.info/italia/it/nomi?nom_action=b&nom_nome=VANESSA

    ...
    Recentemente è stato ripreso per la popolare attrice degli anni '70 Vanessa Redgrave.


    (E?)(L1) http://www.heiligenlexikon.de/Vornamen/V.htm


    (E2)(L2) http://www.kunigunde.ch/HWV.htm#gnVanessa

    Vanessa
    ...
    ... auch Bezeichnung einer Schmetterlingsgattung.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000603/?ref_=fn_al_nm_2

    Vanessa Redgrave

    On January 30th, 1937, renowned theatre actor Michael Redgrave was performing in a production of Hamlet in London where the show's lead Laurence Olivier announced to the audience during the curtain call that "tonight a great actress was born", this was in reference to his co-star's new baby daughter, "Vanessa Redgrave". Vanessa was born in Greenwich,...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000603/bio?ref_=nm_ov_bio_sm

    Vanessa Redgrave (Biography)

    Date of Birth 30 January 1937, Greenwich, London, England, UK

    On January 30th, 1937, renowned theatre actor "Michael Redgrave" was performing in a production of Hamlet in London where the show's lead Laurence Olivier announced to the audience during the curtain call that "tonight a great actress was born", this was in reference to his co-star's new baby daughter, "Vanessa Redgrave".

    "Vanessa" was born in Greenwich, to "Michael Redgrave" and "Rachel Kempson", both thespians. Three quarters of a century after her birth (despite numerous ups and down) this rather forward expectation has definitely been lived up to with an acclaimed actress that has won (among many others) an Academy Award, two Emmys, two Golden Globes, two Cannes Best Actress awards, a Tony, a Screen Actors Guild award, a Laurence Olivier theatre award and a BAFTA fellowship.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.meilleursprenoms.com/prenom.php/Vanessa

    ...
    Autres prénoms associés: , Vanesa, Vania, Vannessa, Vannie, Vanny
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_first_names.htm

    "VANESSA" The name was invented by Jonathan Swift.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Vanessa

    Vanessa


    (E?)(L?) http://www.onomastik.com/Vornamen-Lexikon/name_1859_Vanessa.html

    Dieser weibliche Vorname geht ursprünglich zurück auf den englischen Schriftsteller Jonathan Swift, dessen Geliebte Geliebte Esther (genannt Essa) Vanhomrigh hieß.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.zoope.com/

    Vanessa : greek "butterfly"


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Vanessa
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "Vanessa" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1710 auf.

    Erstellt: 2015-07

    Vanessa - Rose

    Anscheinend wurden mehrere Rosen auf den Namen "Vanessa" getauft. Am bekanntesten scheint die Rose aus dem Jahre 1946 von Mathias Leenders zu sein.

    Auszeichnungen / Awards
    Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage
    Blüheigenschaften / Flowering Habit Blooms in flushes throughout the season
    Blütenblätter-Anzahl 17-25 petals, bloom form
    Blütenfarbe / Flower Colour Corolle rosa, con sfumature malva, Pink blend, Coral-pink, salmon-yellow reverse
    Blütenform / Bloom Shape Large, double
    Blütengröße / Bloom Size 4.5"
    Blütentyp / Bloom Type
    Blütezeit / Flowering Period, Blooming Season / Floraison
    Bodenansprüche / Cultivation
    Dornen / Stacheln / Thorns
    Duft / Fragrance / Scent molto profumate, Strong fragrance
    Elternrosen / Herkunft Parentela: "Arch. Reventós" × "Lord Baden-Powell"
    Erkrankungen
    Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth) 1946
    Exhibition Name
    Genealogie / Parentage
    Hagebutten / Hips Ovoid buds
    Knospen / Buds
    Ordnungskriterien / Klasse / Genre / Famille de rosiers Ibrida di Tea, Hybrid Tea
    Registration Name Vanessa
    Schädlinge
    Schwächen / Weaknesses
    Standort
    Stärken / Strengths
    Stiele / Stems
    Synonyme Vanessa
    Verwendung / Use Type de rosier
    Winterhärte / Hardiness USDA zone 6b through 9b
    Wuchsabstand / Dist. de plantation
    Wuchsform
    Wuchshöhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur
    Wuchsweite / Width
    Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer Creata in Olanda, nel 1946, da Mathias Leenders (Netherlands, 1946).



    (E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

    "Vanessa" (hybrid tea, Leenders, 1946)
    Hybrid Tea / Large-Flowered. Coral-pink, salmon-yellow reverse. Strong fragrance. Large, double (17-25 petals) bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). Mathias Leenders (1946).

    "Vanessa" (hybrid tea, Paul, 1914)
    Hybrid Tea / Large-Flowered. Light pink, dark brown center. Semi-double (9-16 petals) bloom form. William Paul and Son (1914).

    Vanessa (species cross, Cazzaniga, pre 1947)
    Hybrid Moyesii, Species Cross. Pink, white undertones, yellow stamens. Single (4-8 petals), cluster-flowered bloom form. Febo Giuseppe Cazzaniga (1953).

    Vanessa (hybrid tea, Mansuino, 1973)
    Hybrid Tea.

    Vanessa Belinda [BRAndyglow]
    Unknown. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default).

    Vanessa Campello
    Florists Rose, Hybrid Tea. Light pink. Medium to large, very double bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 6b and warmer.

    Vanessa's Gift
    Floribunda. Purple blend or mauve. Strong fragrance. Medium, full (26-40 petals), cluster-flowered, in small clusters bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. Height of 4' 11" (150 cm). Richard Bruce Walsh (2011).


    (E?)(L2) http://www.ludwigsroses.co.za/flower/vanessa/

    Vanessa LUDredest(N)
    Hybrid Tea
    Yet another sport of "Esther Geldenhuys". This sport, like its sisters, boasts the same excellent qualities of producing a profusion of perfect star shaped blooms on long stems, in an attractive cherry-red colour. Vigorous & prolific.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.photomazza.com/?Rose-Vanessa&lang=it


    Erstellt: 2015-07

    vimeo
    Etymology videos

    (E?)(L?) http://vimeo.com/search?q=Etymologie




    (E?)(L?) http://vimeo.com/search?q=Etymology




    (E?)(L?) http://www.golem.de/specials/vimeo/

    Vimeo
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vimeo

    ...
    Namensherkunft

    Der Name "Vimeo" stammt von Mitgründer Jakob Lodwick und ist ein Anagramm des englischen Wortes "movie" (deutsch: "Film"). Der Name spielt außerdem mit den Worten "Video", und "me" (deutsch: "ich") und betont somit noch einmal den Bezug zwischen den Filmen und ihren Eigentümern.
    ...


    Erstellt: 2011-09

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    Bücher zur Kategorie:

    Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
    UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    Anagramm, Anagrama, Anagramme, Anagramma, Anagram

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    Lederer, Richard (Autor)
    Morice, Dave (Illustrator)
    The Circus of Words
    Acrobatic Anagrams, Parading Palindromes, Wonderful Words on a Wire, and More Lively Letter Play

    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556523807/etymologporta-20


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556523807/etymologety0f-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556523807/etymologetymo-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556523807/etymologety0d-21


    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1556523807/etymologpor09-20
    Taschenbuch: 144 Seiten
    Verlag: Chicago Review Pr; Auflage: illustrated edition (Mai 2001)
    Sprache: Englisch


    Language skills will fly through the air with the greatest of ease as kids join in "The Circus of Words". Children of all ages are delighted by anagrams, palindromes, acrostics, alliteration, riddles, and puns, yet few books on wordplay are addressed to middle-schoolers. This creative and challenging activity book shows kids how to juggle letters to become ringmasters of wordplay. The Shrinking Spotlight shows how larger words become smaller words when certain letters are removed. Clown Cars introduces the idea of words hiding within words, and The Acro Bat and Silver Spoonerisms show off letter clusters that change from one word to another. The whole bandwagon is here, enabling kids, who are natural language enthusiasts, to cavort through that endless entertainment, the English language.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Richard_Lederer

    Richard Lederer (born May 26, 1938) is an American author, speaker, and teacher best known for his books on word play

    Word play is a literary technique in which the words that are used become the main subject of the work. Puns, phonetic mix-ups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, and telling character names are common examples of word play....
    ...


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