Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Architektur, Arquitectura, Architecture, Architettura, Architecture

A

architect (W3)

Der engl. "architect" geht zurück auf lat. "architectus", griech. "arkhitektn" und setzt sich zusammen aus "arkhi-", "archi-" = "erst", "oberst", "Haupt-", "Erz-", aber auch "schlimmst", "Riesen-" und "tékton" = "Erbauer", "Baumeister".

Gemeinsam mit vielen anderen Wörtern geht engl. "architect" auf eine ide. Wurzel "*teks-" = "weben", "wirken" zurück.

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


architecture (W3)

Engl. "Architect" ist der Oberzimmermann. Er ist zusammengezimmert aus griech. "arch(i)" = "Ober", "Haupt" (vgl. "Erzbischof") und griech. "tekton" = "Zimmermann", "Handwerker".

Und engl. "architecture" ist die "hohe Kunst des Bauens".

(E?)(L?) http://reference.howstuffworks.com/architecture-encyclopedia.htm


B

C

colossal, colossic, Colossus (W3)

Die Herkunft von engl. "colossal", "colossic", "Colossus" läßt über zurückverfolgen über frz. "colossal", "colosse" und lat. "colossus" zu griech. "kolossos". Danach verlieren sich seine Spuren. Vielleicht wurde es von den Ägyptern in Zusammenhang mit deren Statuen übernommen.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=colossal

1712 ("colossic" in the same sense is recorded from 1607), from Fr. "colossal", from "colosse", from L. "colossus", from Gk. "kolossos", of unknown origin, used by Herodotus of giant Egyptian statues, and used by Romans of the bronze Apollo at the entrance to the harbor of Rhodes.

"Colossus" is from 1398; generalized sense of "anything awesomely vast" is from 1794.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=colossal


D

E

F

G

Gargoyle
gargouille
gargouiller
gurgeln
gargle
Gurgel
gurgulio (W3)

Das engl. "Gargoyle" bezeichnet "Wasserspeier", wie man sie im Mittelalter gerne an Kirchen anbrachte um Wasser und böse Geister abzuwehren.

Im übertragenen Sinn wird "Gargoyle" auch als "Scheusal" übersetzt.

Sprachlich taucht "Gargoyle" im 13. Jh. auf. Und vermutlich ist es ein Wort mit lautmalerischem Ursprung. Es geht jedenfalls direkt zurück auf frz. "gargouille" = "Wasserspeier", "Hals" und frz. "gargouiller", das wie dt. "gurgeln" und engl. "gargle" wohl das Geräusch des Wassers nachahmte.

Verwandt damit sind natürlich auch dt. "Gurgel", die auf lat. "gurgulio" zurück geht.

(E?)(L2) http://www.aardvarkelectric.com/gargoyle/
A Love of Monsters: Gargoyles & Architectural Details in NYC

(E6)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Colors_G.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Cent.html#266
"Gargoyle" als Farbe: - #49423d - Dark Gray


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/G1.html
Gargouille, or Gargoil (g hard)

(E2)(L1) http://www.beyars.com/kunstlexikon/lexikon_g_1.html
Gargouille

(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/gargouille


(E?)(L?) http://cidc.library.cornell.edu/adw/gravely.html
This site is a companion to an exhibit about the admiration by Victorians of the Gothic style of architectural decoration of cathedrals, which featured gargoyles ("decorative waterspouts that preserve stonework") and grotesques (that "serve a variety of other practical and ornamental functions, as corbels or capitals, for instance"). Includes a gallery of images and a glossary. From the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

(E?)(L?) http://www.corsinet.com/trivia/j-triv.html
The word "gargoyle" comes down from the Old French: "gargouille", meaning "throat" or "gullet". This is also the origin of the word "gargle". The word describes the sound produced as water passes the throat and mixes with air. In early architecture, "gargoyles" were decorative creatures on the drains of cathedrals.

(E1)(L1) http://www.crystalinks.com/gargoyles.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=gargoyle


(E?)(L?) http://avalon.gargoyles-fans.org/


(E?)(L?) http://avalon.gargoyles-fans.org/castle/charguide/

Goliath | Elisa Maza | Hudson | Brooklyn | Broadway | Lexington | Angela | Demona | Bronx | David Xanatos | Fox | Matt Bluestone | Owen Burnett | Macbeth | Princess Katharine | Tom, Guardian of the Eggs | The Magus | John Castaway | Alexander Fox Xanatos | Anastasia Renard | The Archmage | Arthur Morwood-Smyth | Arthur Pendragon | Banquo | Banshee | Beth Maza | Billy's Mom | Boudicca | Brendan | Brentwood | Bruno, the Commando Leader | Burbank | Cagney | Captain of the Guard | Claw | Coldstone | Coyote, the Xanatos Robot | Delilah | Derek Maza | Desdemona | Diane Maza | Dingo | Dominique Destine | Duncan | Fang | Findlaech | Fleance | Gabriel | Gillecomgain | Gillie | Glasses | Griff | Gruoch | Hakon | Halcyon Renard | Hyena | Iago | Jack Danforth | Jackal | Mr. Jaffe | Jason Canmore | Jeffrey Robbins | The Jogger | Jon Canmore | Lady of the Lake | Luoch | Lydia Duane | Mace Malone | Maggie Reed | Maria Chavez | Margot Yale | Martin Hacker | Mary | Officer Morgan | Oberon | Odin | Pal Joey | Peter Maza | Petros Xanatos | Preston Vogel | Proteus | Puck | Robyn Canmore | Dr. Sevarius | Talon | Taurus | Thailog | Titania | Tony Dracon | Travis Marshall | Vinnie | The Weird Sisters | Wolf | Al | Amy Schummer | Anansi | Anubis | Dr. Arnada | Art | Judge Bates | Billy | Bobbi Porter | Bodhe | Boreas | Canmore | Carrie Benjamin | Chair One | Chaz | Clive | Cornelia Stallman | Lord Constantine | Coyote, the Trickster | Cu Chuliann | Dave | David Porter | Dominic Dracon | Douglas Bader | Mr. Dugan | Duval | Egon Pax | Princess Elena | Ekidna | The Emir | Erik Sturlisson | Fara Maku | Finella | Flo Dane | Gang Leader | Garry Lee Packer | Grandmother | Gunther Sturlisson | Constable Hiroshi | Helios | Hugo | Jackson | Jade | Janus | Kai | King Kenneth | Kenny | Kim | Kiron | Lamont | Leo | Lois | Lou | MacDuff | Malcolm Canmore | Maol Chalvim | The Matrix | Matthew | Max Loew | Molly | Natsilane | Dr. Nexus | Nokkar | Norman Ambassador | Obsidiana | Pat Doyle | Rabbi Loew | Radar | Raven | Renaissance Hunter | Robert | Judge Roebling | Rory Dugan | Dr. Sato | Shauna Coyle | Sora | The Stone of Destiny | Susan | Taro | Talos | Tea | Tomas Brod | Turquesa | Una | Yama | Zafiro


(E?)(L?) http://avalon.gargoyles-fans.org/castle/charguide/weird_sisters.html
The Avalon Archives Gargoyles Character Guide

(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Dictionary/part3.htm
Gargoyle figures on churches served waterspouts to discharge rainwater.
The word "gargoyle" traces from the same French root as "gargle" and "gurgle".

(E?)(L1) http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/default.asp?Document=2.30&gst=Gargoyle


(E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/explore/devil%27s_dictionary.htm

GARGOYLE, n. A rain-spout projecting from the eaves of mediaeval buildings, commonly fashioned into a grotesque caricature of some personal enemy of the architect or owner of the building. This was especially the case in churches and ecclesiastical structures generally, in which the gargoyles presented a perfect rogues' gallery of local heretics and controversialists. Sometimes when a new dean and chapter were installed the old gargoyles were removed and others substituted having a closer relation to the private animosities of the new incumbents.


(E?)(L?) http://www.oeuvre-notre-dame.org/index2.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.oeuvre-notre-dame.org/fr/vente/images/statuettehr/ane.jpg


(E1)(L1) http://www.pantheon.org/areas/all/articles.html
Gargouille

(E?)(L1) http://www.pantheon.org/articles/g/gargoyle.html


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://gargoyle.strange.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.stratis.demon.co.uk/gargoyles/gargoyle.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.stratis.demon.co.uk/gargoyles/gg-ety-hist-myth.htm#gargoyle_etymology




(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW130/page5.html
gargoyle (n.), an olive-flavored mouthwash.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ulrikehoinkis.de/gargoyles/mainpage.html
Introduction | The Middle Ages in England | The Medieval Mind | Features of the Romanesque (Norman) and Gothic Styles in English Architecture | Gargoyles | The Term "Gargoyle" | Functions of Gargoyles | Motives | The Green Man | Other Motives of Pagan Origin | Types of Gargoyles | Bestiaries | Symbolism | Human Shaped Gargoyles | Chimeras | Materials | Gargoyles Today | Grotesques and Other Monsters | Religious Opposition to Grotesque Statuary | Literature Used

(E1)(L1) http://www.ulrikehoinkis.de/gargoyles/gargoyles.html

The term "gargoyle" was derived from French gargouille meaning "throat" and Latin "gurgulio" meaning "gullet". (Encyclopedia Britannica, p. 307/"gargoyle") An explanation for the use with the protruding architectural means could be, although more charming than credible, the following legend: A dragon called La Gargouille lived in a cave close to the River Seine in France. It swallowed ships, caused destruction with its fiery breath, and spouted so much water that it caused flooding. The residents of nearby Rouen attempted to placate La Gargouille with an annual offering of a live victim; although the dragon preferred maidens, it was usually given a criminal to consume. Around the year 600, the priest Romanus (or Romain) arrived in Rouen and promised to deal with the dragon if the townspeople agreed to be baptized and to build a church. Equipped with everything needed for an exorcism, Romanus subdued the dragon by making the sign of the cross. La Gargouille was burned at the stake, but the head and neck, well tempered by the heat of the dragon's fiery breath, would not burn. These remnants were mounted on the town wall and became the model for gargoyles for centuries to come. (Online Source 6)


(E?)(L?) http://freespace.virgin.net/janison.edge/janisonedge/GargoyleRecords.htm
Gargoyle Records

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/040503.html#gargoyle


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/gargoyle/


(E2)(L1) http://www.wordspy.com/diversions/fave-words.asp#gargoyle


(E?)(L1) http://www.zeichentrickserien.de/gargoyle.htm
Gargoyles - Auf den Schwingen der Gerechtigkeit

H

I

J

K

L

lookingatbuildings
Building-Glossary

(E?)(L1) http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/
Understanding and enjoyment of buildings is often made more complicated and difficult because of the complex vocabulary needed to interpret the language of architecture.

The glossary is a searchable database of architectural terms and styles designed to assist understanding both of terms used in the pages of the site and for recognising the individual elements of a building. Many of the terms are supported by drawings (specially commissioned for the Pevsner Architectural Guides) or photographs to explain the term and its place within the composition of a complex structure. As the site expands we hope to add photographs to illustrate each and every term in the glossary. You may consult the glossary at any time during your visit by using the Glossary search facility on every page of the site. Alternatively you can make a general search of the Glossary by using the terms in the drop-down menu. The Glossary also includes definitions for most of the principal styles and phases of British architecture. These terms are also featured on the interactive timeline.

(E?)(L?) http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/glossary/glossary.html
Am 25.04.2004 enthielt das Glossar folgende Begriffe:

Abacus | Abutment | Acanthus | Accumulator tower | Achievement | Acroterion (plural: acroteria) | Adam | Addorsed | Aedicule | Aesthetic Movement | Affronted | Aggregate | Aisle | Almonry | Altarpiece | Ambo | Ambulatory | Angle buttress | Angle roll | Angle round | Angle volute | Anglo-Saxon | Annulet | Anse de panier | Antae (singular: anta) | Antefixae | Anthemion | Apse | Arcade | Arch | Archaeological | Arched braces | Architrave | Archivolt | Arcuated | Ark | Arris | Arrow loop | Art Deco | Art Nouveau | Artisan Mannerism | Arts and Crafts | Ashlar | Ashlar piece | Astragal | Astylar | Atlantes | Atrium (plural: atria) | Attached column | Attic | Attic base | Aumbry | Bag-rubbed pointing | Bailey | Balance beam | Balconette | Baldacchino | Ballflower | Baluster, balustrade | Banded rustication | Baptistery | Bar tracery | Barbican | Bargeboards | Barley-sugar columns | Barmkin | Barrel vault | Barrow | Bartizan | Bascule | Base | Base cruck | Basement | Basilica | Basket arch | Bastion | Batter | Battlement | Bawn | Bay | Bay leaf | Bay window | Bead-and-reel | Beakhead | Beaux-Arts | Bee-boll | Belfast roof truss Belfry | Bell capital | Bellcast roof | Bellcote | Berm | Billet | Bivallate | Blade | Blind arcade | Blind balustrade | Blind portico | Blind tracery | Block capital | Blocked | Blocking course | Board-marked | Boiseries | Bolection moulding | Bond | Boss | Bow window | Bowed girder | Bowstring bridge | Bowtell | Box frame | Box girder | Box pew | Brace | Bracket | Brattishing | Breastshot water wheel | Bressumer | Bretasche | Brise-soleil | Broach spire | Broch | Broken pediment | Bronze Age | Brutalism | Bucranium (plural: bucrania) | Bull-nosed sill | Bullseye window | Bush-hammered | But-and-ben | Butt purlins | Buttery | Butt-joint | Buttress | Byzantine | Cable moulding | Cadaver | Camber | Cames | Campanile | Candle-snuffer roof | Canted | Cantilever | Caphouse | Capital | Carrel | Cartouche | Caryatids | Casemate | Casement | Cast iron | Castellated | Catslide | Cavetto | Cell | Cella | Cellurach | Celure or ceilure | Cement | Cenotaph | Centring | Chambered tomb | Chamfer | Chamferstop | Chancel | Chancel arch | Channelled rustication | Chantry chapel | Chapter house | Check | Chequer-set | Chequerwork | Cherry-caulking or cherry-cocking | Chevet | Chevron | Chinoiserie | Chip-carving | Choir | Churchwarden's pew | Ciborium | Cinquecento | Cinquefoil | Cist | Clachan | Cladding | Clapboarding | Clapper bridge | CLASP | Clasped purlins | Clasping buttress | Classical | Clerestory or clearstorey | Cloister | Close | Close studding | Closed string | Closed truss | Closer | Coade stone | Cob | Coffering | Cogging | Collar or collar-beam | Collar purlin | Collegiate | Collegiate church | Colonnade | Colonnette | Colossal order | Columbarium | Column | Column figure | Columna rostrata | Commissioners' church | Commissioners' Gothic | Common rafters | Communion rails | Communion table | Composite | Compound pier | Concrete | Conductor | Conduit | Console | Coomb or comb ceiling | Coping | Corbel | Corbiesteps | Corinthian | Cornice | Corps-de-logis | Cosmati work Cottage orné | Counterchanging | Counterscarp bank | Coupled rafters | Cour d'honneur | Course | Cove | Cradle roof | Credence | Crenellation | Crinkle-crankle wall | Crockets | Crossing | Cross-wall construction | Cross-window | Crown | Crown-plate | Crown-post | Crowsteps | Crucks | Crypt | Cupola | Cursus | Curtain wall | Curvilinear tracery | Cusps | Cutwater | Cyclopean masonry | Cyma recta and cyma reversa | Dado | Dagger | Dais | Dalle-de-verre | Decorated | Demi-or half-column | Dentil | Depressed arch | Diagonal buttress | Diagonal rib | Diamond-faced rustication | Diaper | Die | Diocletian window | Discharging arch | Distyle | Dog-leg stair | Dogtooth | Doocot | Doric | Dormer | Dormer head | Dorter | Dosseret | Double chamfer | Double pile | Double-framed | Dragon beam | Dressings | Dripstone | Drum | Dry-stone | Dun | Dutch gable | E. E. | Eared | Early Christian | Early English | Easter sepulchre | Eaves | Echinus | Edge rail | Edge roll | Egg-and-dart | Elevation | Elided | Elizabethan | Embattled | Embrasure | En délit | Encaustic tiles | Enfilade | Engaged column | Engineering bricks | English altar | English bond | English garden wall bond | Enrichments | Entablature | Entasis | Entresol | | Escutcheon | Exedra | Expressionism | Extrados | Eyecatcher | Faience | Fanlight | Fan-vault | Fascia | Fenestration | Feretory | Ferramenta | Festoon | Fibreglass | Field | Fillet | Finial | Flamboyant | Flared header | Flash lock | Flatted | Flèche | Flemish bond | Flemish gable | Fleuron | Flowing tracery | Flushwork | Fluting | Flying buttress | Flying stair | Foil | Foliate | Font | Fore-building | Forestair | Formwork | Fosse | Four-centred arch | Framed building | François I | Frater | Free Style | Freestone | Fresco | Fret | Frieze | Frontal | Frontispiece | Frost-work | Full cruck | Gable | Gablet | Gadrooning | Galilee | Gallery | Galleting | Gambrel roof | Garderobe | Gauged brickwork | Gazebo | Geodesic dome | Georgian | Giant order | Gib door | Gibbs surround | Girder | Gisant | Glaciated | Glacis | Glazing bars | Gnomon | Gothic | Gothic | Revival | Gothick | Grange | GRC | Greek cross | Greek Doric | Greek fret | Greek Revival | Grisaille | Groin | Groin-vault | Grotesque | Grotto | GRP | Guilloche | Gunloop | Gushet | Guttae | Hagioscope | Ha-ha | Half-column | Half-tester | Half-timbering | Hall-church | Hall-keep | Hammerbeams | Hammer-dressed | Hammerposts | Hamper | Harling | Hatchment | Header | Header bond | Headstop | Helm roof | Henge | Herm | Herringbone work | Hexastyle | High Tech | Hill-fort | Hipped roof | Hollow chamfer | Hoodmould | Horsemill | Hungry joints | Husk garland | Hydraulic power | Hypocaust | Iconostasis | Imperial stair | Impost | Impost block | In antis | In situ | Indent | Industrialized building | Infill | Inglenook | Ingo | Intercolumniation | Interlace | Intersecting tracery | Intrados | Ionic | Iron Age | Italianate | Jack arch | Jacobean | Jacobethan | Jamb | Jetty | Jib door | Joggle | Jointed cruck | Joists | Keel moulding | Keep | Kentish cusp | Key pattern | Keystone | Killeen | Kingpost | King-strut | Knapped | Kneeler | Label | Label stop | Laced brickwork | Lacing course | Lade | Lady chapel | Lair | Laird's loft | Lancet | Lantern | Lantern cross | Lattice girder | Lavatorium | Lean-to | Ledger slab | Lesene | Liernes | Light | Limewashing | Linenfold | Lintel | Loft | Loggia | Long-and-short work | Longhouse | Loophole | Louis XIV, Louis XV | Lowside window | Lucam | Lucarne | Luckenbooth | Lugged | Lunette | Lychgate | Lynchet | Machicolations | Mains | Mannerism | Manometer tower | Mansard | Manse | Margins | Marriage lintel | Mathematical tiles | Matrix | Mausoleum | Megalithic | Megalithic tomb | Mercat | Merlons | Metopes | Mezzanine | Middle cruck | Minimalism | Misericord | Mitre | Mixer-courts | Modernism | Modillions | Module | Mort-safe | Motte-and-bailey | Mouchette | Moulding | Mullion | Multifoil | Multi-storey | Multivallate | Muntin | Murder hole | Mutules | Nailhead | Naos | Narthex | Nave | Needle spire | Neo-Byzantine | Neo-Classicism | Neo-Georgian | Neolithic | Neo-Renaissance | Neo-Vernacular | Neo-Wren | Newel | Night stair | Nodding ogee | Nogging | Nook-shaft | Norman | Nosing | Nutmeg | Obelisk | Octostyle | Oculus | Oeil de boeuf | Ogee | Old English | Open pediment | Open string | Opus sectile | Opus signinum | Oratory | Order | Orders | Organ loft | Oriel | Overarch | Overdoor | Overmantel | Overshot water wheel | Overthrow | Ovolo | Palazzo | Palladian | Palladian window | Palmette | Panel frame | Panel tracery | Panelling | Pantile | Pantry | Parabolic arch | Parapet | Parchemin panel | Parclose screen | Pargeting | Parlour | Parterre | Passing braces | Patent glazing | Patera | Patte d'oie | Pavilion | Pebbledashing | Pedestal | Pediment | Pedimental gable | Peel tower, pele tower | Pend | Pendant | Pendentive | Penthouse | Pepperpot turret | Peripteral | Peristyle | Perpendicular | Perron | Pew | Piano nobile | Piazza | Picturesque | Piended roof | Pier | Pietra dura | Pilaster | Pilastrade | Pile | Pillar | Pillar piscina | Pilotis | Pinnacle | Pins or pinning | Piscina | Pisé | Pit prison | Pitchback water wheel | Pitched masonry | Place bricks | Platband | Plate | Plate girder | Plate rail | Plate tracery | Plateway | Platt | Pleasance | Plinth | Pocked tooling | Podium | Point block | Pointing | Poppyhead | Portal frame | Portcullis | Porte cochère | Portico | Porticus (plural: porticus) | Portland stone | Post | Postern | | Potence | Pound lock | Pre-cast | Predella | Prefabrication | Presbytery | Pre-stressed | Principals | Pronaos | Prostyle | Pulpit | Pulpitum | Pulvinated | Purbeck | Purlin | Putlog holes | Putto (plural: putti) | Quadripartite rib-vault | Quarries | Quatrefoil | Quattrocento | Queen Anne | Queenposts | Queen-struts | Quirk | Quoins | Radburn system | Radiating chapels | Rafters | Raggle | Raguly | Rail | Rainwater-head | Raised and fielded | Raked | Rampart | Ramped | Random rubble | Ratcourse | Rath | Rebate | Rebus | Reeding | Refectory | Regency | Reinforced | Relieving arch | Renaissance | Rendering | Repoussé | Rere-arch | Reredorter | Reredos | Respond | Reticulated tracery | Retrochoir | Return | Reveal | Rhone | Ribbon pointing | Ribbonwork | Rib-vault | Ridge or ridge-piece | Rinceau | Ring crypt | Ring fort | Ringing chamber | Riser | Roach | Rocaille | Rock-faced | Rockwork | Rococo | Roll moulding | Roman | Roman Doric | Romanesque | Rood | Rope moulding | Rose window | Rosette | Rotunda | Roughcast | Round | Roving bridge | Rubbed brickwork | Rubble | Rundbogenstil | Rustication | Rybats | Sacrament house | Sacristy | Saddleback roof | Sail dome | Sail vault | Salomonic columns | Saltire cross | Sanctuary | Sangha | Sarcophagus | Sarking | Sash window | Saucer dome | Saxo-Norman | Scagliola | Scale-and-platt stair | Scalloped capital | Scarcement | Scarp | Scissor truss | Scissor-braces | Scotia | Scottish or Scotch Baronial | Screen | Screens passage | Scribe | Scuntion | Section | Sedilia (singular: sedile) | Segmental pediment | Septum | Serlian window | Session house | Set-back buttress | Set-off | Setts | Sexfoil | Sexpartite rib-vault | Shaft | Shaft-ring | Shaped gable | Sheila-na-gig | Shell | Sheugh | Shingles | Shouldered arch | Shouldered architrave | Shuttering | Side purlins | Sill | Single-framed | Skew | Skew arch | Slab block | Slate-hanging | Slop stone | Slype | Snecked | Soffit | Solar | Solomonic columns | Sopraporta | Sounding-board | Souterrain | Space frame | Spandrels | Spere | Spike | Spiral stair | Spire | Spirelet | Splat | Splayed | Splayed-foot spire | Split cusp | Spring or springing | Sprocket | Spur | Square panel | Squinch | Squint | Stack | Stack bond | Stall | Stanchion | Standpipe tower | Star-vault | Stay-suspension bridge | Steading | Steam engines | Steeple | Stellar vault | Stiff-leaf | Stilted arch | Stock bricks | Stop | Stoup | Strainer arch | Strapwork | Stretcher | Stretcher bond | String | String course | Strut | Stucco | Studs | Stugged | Stupa | Stylobate | Sub-cusping | Sunk chamfer | Superimposed orders | Suspension bridge | Swag | Swan-neck pediment | System building | Tabernacle | Table tomb | Tas-de-charge | Tempietto | Temple front | Tenement | Tenoned purlins | Term | Terquetra | Terracotta | Terreplein | Tessellated pavement | Tester | Tester tomb | Tetrastyle | Thermal window | Tholsel | Three-centred arch | Three-decker pulpit | Through purlins | Tidal gates | Tie-beam | Tierceron | Tifting | Tile-hanging | Tiltyard | Timber framing | Tolbooth | Tolsey | Tomb-chest | Tondo | Torus (plural: tori) | Touch | Tourelle | Tower arch | Tower block | Tower house | Trabeated | Tracery | Trades loft | Transe | Transept | Transeptal chapel | Transitional | Transom | Transverse arch | Transverse rib | Tread | Trefoil | Trenched purlins | Triforium | Triglyphs | Triquetra | Triumphal arch | Trivallate | Trompe l'oeil | Trophy | Trumeau | Trumpet capital | Truss | Tuck pointing | Tudor | Tudor arch | Tumbling or tumbling-in | Tunnel vault | Tuscan | Tusking stones | Two-centred arch | Two-decker pulpit | Tympanum | Undercroft | Undershot water wheel | Univallate | Upper cruck | Vault | Vaulting shaft | Venetian window | Vermiculation | Vernacular | Vesica | Vice | Villa | Vitrified | Vitruvian scroll | Volutes | Voussoirs | Wagon roof | Wainscot | Wall arcade | Wall monument | Wallhead | Wall-plate | Wall-post | Wall-rib | Wall-walk | Warming room | Water wheels | Waterholding base | Waterleaf | Wealden house | Weatherboarding | Weathering | Weepers | Well stair | Wheel house | Wheel window | Wind-braces | Winder | Winder stair | Wrenaissance | Wrought iron | Wyatt window | Wynd | Yett | Y-tracery | Zigzag

M

Monastery
-terion- (W3)

Engl. "Monastery" (15. Jh.) geht über altfrz. "monastere" zurück auf lat. "monasterium" und griech. "monasterion". Zu Grunde liegt griech. "monazein" = dt. "allein leben", griech. "monos" = dt. "allein". Der Suffix "-terion-" steht für "Platz an dem (etwas getan wird)".

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Eberbach%2C_Germany_%28Monastery%29
Eberbach, Germany (Monastery)

(E?)(L?) http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/Mol.html#anchor1336951


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/10873.html
Malmesbury Monastery

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/11010.html
Margan Monastery (Register of)

(E?)(L?) http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/S/scary-devil-monastery.html

"scary devil monastery": n.

Anagram frequently used to refer to the newsgroup "alt.sysadmin.recovery", which is populated with characters that rather justify the reference.


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=monastery


(E?)(L?) http://odysseus.culture.gr/h/3/eh351.jsp?obj_id=8081
Monastery of Osios Loukas

(E?)(L1) http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0408D&L=ads-l&P=R509
040176 04/08/22 08:43 52 monastery (1st. century)


The OED etymology for "monastery" includes "...Byzantine Greek, "monasthrion" [h=eta] "monastery" (4th cent.)...." But the Greek "monasterion" appears much earlier than that, in Philo of Alexandria, De Vita Contemplativa, 25 and 30. Philo lived from about 20 BC to about 50 AD.


(E?)(L?) http://looklex.com/e.o/zz1.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/16003a.htm
Andechs - Benedictine monastery in Bavaria

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03442b.htm
Monastery of St. Catherine

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04355d.htm
Monastery of Corbie

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09269a.htm
Ancient Diocese and Monastery of Lindisfarne

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/10458a.htm
Canonical Erection of a Monastery

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11181a.htm
Monastery of Obazine

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13365a.htm
Monastery of Saint Lucius

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14394b.htm
Syon Monastery

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/16077b.htm
Monastery of Tallagaht

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15577d.htm
Monastery of Weissenau

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15648a.htm
Wimborne Minster - Monastery in Dorsetshire, England

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15651a.htm
Windesheim - Augustinian monastery in Holland

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/utility/search.htm?safe=active&cx=000299817191393086628%3Aifmbhlr-8x0&q=monastery&sa=Search&cof=FORID%3A9#690
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA:

(E?)(L?) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tibet/
Lost Treasures of Tibet

This site is a companion to a Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) NOVA program about restoration efforts for ancient Buddhist murals located in the of Thubchen in the remote Himalayan kingdom of Mustang. Features an interactive tour of Mustang, information about restoration methods and results, and clues about deciphering Buddha imagery. Also includes a teacher's guide and a program transcript.

(E?)(L?) http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tibet/restoration.html


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/monastery


(E?)(L?) http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/




(E?)(L?) http://vizerra.com/en/locations

Tatev monastery was one of the main cultural and spiritual centers of medieval Armenia for many centuries. Located at the edge of a steep incline, it was also a fortress and a shelter where local people used to hide from the enemies. Today it is an open air museum with a breathtaking view at the surrounding rocks and gorges. Enjoy the magnificence of Tatev Monastery and its breathtaking surroundings through a virtual visit!

The Kiev Pechersk Lavra is also known as the Kiev Cave Monastery. Its underground catacombs and corridors are among the Lavra’s main attractions. It’s also famous as a site where the relics of many Orthodox saints are buried, and some of them are believed to have performed miracles. Stay tuned for a 3D model of the magical Kiev Pechersk Lavra!

The New Jerusalem Resurrection (Voskresenskiy) Monastery, or New Jerusalem, was intended to become a reflection of Jerusalem in Palestine and a center of the Orthodox world. This was impossible due to the Soviet Government and the Second World War. However, in 1995 the monastery was reborn.

Frigolet Abbey France 286 5
A real fortress, the last outpost of France during the Hundred Years' War. Abbey is visited by more than 3 million people a year; only Paris has more tourists. During the Revolution the monastery was converted to prison, but monks live there again from 1966.

Kykkos Monastery Cyprus 159 2.27
The largest monastery of Cyprus. There is the miracle-working icon of Virgin Mary. According to legend it had been painted by the Aposttle Luke.

Taung Kalat Monastery Burma 155 2.13
A Buddhist monastery built on volcano. Thousands of pilgrims visit the Burmese sanctuary every year.


(E?)(L?) http://www.wdl.org/en/search/gallery?ql=eng&s=monastery




(E?)(L?) http://www.wdl.org/en/item/156/?ql=eng&tc=2&view_type=gallery
9. Monastery, Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior (1558-1566), Northwest View with Gallery (1602), and Church of St. Nicholas (1832-1834) Solovetskii Island, Russia

(E?)(L?) http://www.wdl.org/en/item/161/?ql=eng&tc=2&view_type=gallery
Nativity-St. Ferapont Monastery, Southwest View, Ferapontovo, Russia

(E?)(L?) http://www.wdl.org/en/item/161/?ql=eng&tc=7&view_type=gallery
Nativity-St. Ferapont Monastery, Southwest View, Ferapontovo, Russia

(E?)(L?) http://www.wdl.org/en/item/155/?ql=eng&tc=9&view_type=gallery
Monastery, Canal (19th Century), Solovetskii Island, Russia

(E?)(L?) http://www.wmf.org/dig-deeper/wmf-publications
World Monuments Fund in China (pdf)
Date: 2005
>Related Projects: DA QIN CHRISTIAN PAGODA AND MONASTERY, DULAN COUNTY TIBETAN ROYAL TOMB GROUP, LIAO DYNASTY SITE, OHEL RACHEL SYNAGOGUE, PALPUNG MONASTERY, QIKOU TOWN, SAN XING DUI ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE, SHAXI MARKET AREA, TIANSHUI TRADITIONAL HOUSES, XIANNONGTAN (TEMPLE OF AGRICULTURE)
Country: China

(E?)(L?) http://www.wmf.org/dig-deeper/wmf-articles
Chronicle in Stone (pdf)
Date: Winter 2002/2003
Keywords: ICON Magazine, Portugal
Related Projects: JERONIMOS MONASTERY
Country: Portugal

(E?)(L?) http://www.wmf.org/dig-deeper/wmf-articles
  • Reversal of Fortune (pdf)
  • Date: Winter 2003/2004
  • Keywords: ICON Magazine, United Kingdom
  • Related Projects: SAINT FRANCIS CHURCH AND GORTON MONASTERY
  • Country: United Kingdom


  • (E6)(L?) http://www.worldheritagesite.org/visited.html
    Rila Monastery | Poblet Monastery | Monastery of Horezu | Monastery of Alcobaça | Monastery of Geghard | Maulbronn Monastery

    (E1)(L1) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/m/M.htm


    (E?)(L?) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/m/M2.htm


    (E?)(L?) http://www.xs4all.nl/~adcs/woordenweb/m/monos.htm


    Erstellt: 2010-09

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    nationaltrust
    National Trust properties (UK)

    (E?)(L1) http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/


    (E?)(L?) http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-trust/w-thecharity/w-thecharity_our-past.htm

    The National Trust was founded in 1895 by three Victorian philanthropists - Miss Octavia Hill, Sir Robert Hunter and Canon Hardwicke Rawnsley. Concerned about the impact of uncontrolled development and industrialisation, they set up the Trust to act as a guardian for the nation in the acquisition and protection of threatened coastline, countryside and buildings.

    Wherever you are in England, Wales or Northern Ireland you are never far from several National Trust properties. We care for over 248,000 hectares (612,000 acres) of beautiful countryside and welcome visitors to over 300 historic buildings and gardens.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-global/w-terms_conditions/w-sitemap.htm


    Empfehlungen aus dem Rover-garden guide:

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    parachute dome (W3)

    Ich dachte eigentlich alle Kuppeln haben Ähnlichkeit mit einem Fallschirm. Aber die Architekten machen da anscheinend feine Unterschiede, wie etwa sichtbare Rippen, wie sie durch die Haltebänder bei Fallschirmen entstehen.

    (E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/parachute dome


    (E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/melon-dome

    "melon dome", a hemispherical dome having a circular plan and a ribbed vault. Also called "parachute dome", "umbrella dome".


    (E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=parachute dome
    Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

    Engl. "parachute dome" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

    Erstellt: 2012-07

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    The Royal Crescent (W3)

    Hinter allen Bezeichnungen mit "Crescent" steckt der "aufgehende Halbmond".

    (E?)(L1) http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/The_Royal_Crescent.html

    Der "Royal Crescent" in Bath, England ist in einem leichten Bogen erbaut, also mondsichelförmig.


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    window (W1)

    "Window", das "Windauge".

    (E?)(L?) http://www.exploratorium.edu/exploring/language/word_histories.html

    ...
    Look up the word "window". You'll find that it comes from the Middle English (ME) "windowe", which came from the Old Norse (ON) "vindauga", which itself was formed from the two Old Norse words "vindr", which meant "wind," and "auga", which meant "eye." So "window" once meant "wind-eye", a poetic description appropriately suggesting a window's function of letting in both air and light.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.art-service.de/Artservice-Newsletter/Windauge-Achtundachtzig-Augenblicke-Fotografien-1966-1999.html

    Windauge. Achtundachtzig Augenblicke. Fotografien 1966-1999.
    Von Michael Ruetz. Göttingen 2001.

    (R) 25,5 x 29,5 cm, 120 S., 88 Bildtafeln, davon 40 in Farbe, Halbleinen.

    Über diesen Artikel

    Achtundachtzigmal ein "Fenster" (oder "Windauge") - überraschende Blicke, Denkanlässe, Konstellationen des Augenblicks. Fenster von Wohnhäusern, Schaufenster, Windschutzscheiben, Fernsehgeräte als »Fenster zur Welt«, Augen, die ja in gewisser Weise Fenstern ähnlich sind, - Michael Ruetz legt den Begriff großzügig aus. Er fotografiert hinein und hinaus, zeigt Ausschnitte der Welt, wie man sie wahrnehmen kann, wie sie sich spiegeln. Die Fotografien sind nur datiert, mehr Kommentars bedarf es nicht, denn alle Aufnahmen sind voller dichter Information. »Das Auge spricht«, sagt Michael Ruetz dazu. Mit einem Essay von Klaus Honnef. Längst vergriffen, bei uns jetzt kurzzeitig erhältlich!


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