Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretańa e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Eponym, Epónimo, Éponymie, Eponimo, Eponym

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eleaston.com
Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://www.eleaston.com/ety-name.html#ep

EPONYMS Quizzes


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tripod.com
Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://foxdreamer.tripod.com/

An eponym is a word derived from someone's name. For example, the "sandwich" is named for the "Earl of Sandwich" who, not wishing to be called away from a lively game of cards, bid a servant to bring him a serving of meat between two slices of bread so as, informally, to sate his hunger. Well, this site presents my personal collection of eponyms. To see the words, please visit "The List" below.


(E?)(L?) http://foxdreamer.tripod.com/page2.html

| abelia n. | adamsite n. | Addisonian adj. | albertype n. | Aldine n. | aldrin n. | alexandrite n. | algorithm n. | America n. | ammeter / amp / ampere / amperage | angstrom n. | baud n. | begonia | Benedict Arnold n. | bloomers n. | Bolivia n. | bowdlerize v. | boycott v. | braille n., adj. | brougham | buhlwork n. | cardigan n., adj. | Caesarian / C-section n., adj. | Celsius adj. | chauvinism / -ist / -istic n., adj. | Columbia n. | coulomb n. | curie n. | curium n. | daguerreotype n. | dahlia n. | damoclean / sword of Damocles adj., n. | Darwinian / Darwinism adj., n. | decibel n. | derrick n. | derringer n. | Dickensian adj. | diesel adj., n. | doberman n. | dobro n. | draconian adj. | dunce n. | einsteinium | epicurean | farad / faraday / faradize | farenheit | Fosbury | frangipani | frisbee | fuschia | galvanize / galvanic | gerrymander / gerryrig | grahamite | grangerize | Granny Smith | guillotine | guy | Heimlich | Hobson's choice | Horatio Alger | Jack Rose | jacquard | Jesus Christ | jimson weed | John Hancock | joule | Kafkaesque | Kelvin | lambert | leotard | loganberry | ludditte | lynch | macabre | macadam / macadamia | mach | Machiavellian | mackintosh | Mae West | marialite | masochism / -ist | Matthew Walker | maudlin | maverick | maxwell | mazarine | Mc- | McCarthyism | McCleod | McIntosh | mesmerize | mirandize | Molotov coctail | murcott | napoleon | Nehru | newton | nicotine / nocotinia | ohm | Orwellian | Oscar | pasteurize | peeping Tom | poinsettia | Ponzi | Pullman | Pyrrhic | Queen Anne | Queen Anne's lace | quisling | raglan | rammelsbergite | Reaganomics | rickettsia | roentgen | Roy Rogers | Rube Goldberg | ruy lopez | sadism / -ist | sally lunn | salmonella | sandwich | sarrusaphone | saxaphone | Shirley Temple | shrapnel | sideburns | silhouette n. | simens | sousaphone | spoonerism n. | stishovite n. | stomach Steinway n. | stroganoff n. | talbotype n. | tarmac n. | Tasmania / Tasmanian devil n. | tawdry adj. | Teddy-bear n. | tetrazinni n. | theramin n. | thespian adj., n. | Tom Collins n. | Tommy-gun n. | tontine n. | Tony n. | valentine n. | valentinite n. | Van der Hum | vernier | Victorian adj. | vivianite n. | volt n. | zinnia n.

The etymologies for the following eponyms are not yet accepted by my dictionary, The RHDEL 2d E, so I've refrained from putting them on the list. Perhaps you can find a citation?

| August | Bismark | bogart | camellia | crapper | Dorothy Hammil | dukes | Farrah flip | fudge | gardenia | gibberish | Hitler Youth | Homer | July | magnolia | Peavey | Pulaski | real McCoy | sequoia | stetson | Veronica Lake | Windsor / double Windsor | wisteria


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wikipedia.org
List of eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms

List of eponyms (A-K)

An eponym is a person (real or fictitious) from whom something is said to take its name. The word is back-formed from "eponymous", from the Greek "eponymos" meaning "giving name".

Here is a list of eponyms:

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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms_(L-Z)

List of eponyms (L-Z)

An eponym is a person (real or fictitious) whose name has become identified with a particular object or activity.

Here is a list of eponyms:

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretańa e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Eponym, Epónimo, Éponymie, Eponimo, Eponym

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Beeching, Cyril Leslie (Autor)
A Dictionary of Eponyms

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192821563/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 214 Seiten
Verlag: Oxford Paperbacks; Auflage: 2 Sub (September 1988)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung

The English language contains a large number of eponymic words - words derived from the names of people because of their close association with the product, service, or concept. Eponymic words fall into three categories: those derived from mythological or fictitious names; those which describe the person or his works (as, for example Shakespearian or Shavian); and the "true" eponymic words which come from the names of people who actually exist or once existed.

This lively, compact, and entertaining reference book presents four hundred "true" eponyms that cover virtually every field of human activity, originating from a vast cross-section of foreign, as well as English, names. Cyril Leslie Beecher, the compiler of the dictionary, informs us that the term "ampere" comes from the name of the French scientist, André Marie Ampčre; that the "cardigan" gets its name from James Thomas Brudenell, the seventh Earl of Cardigan; that the "zeppelin" comes from the name of a German soldier and airship designer and manufacturer, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin; and the list goes on. A short account of the originator's history and claim to this unusual form of immortality accompanies the definition for each word. The dictionary also includes a subject index which enables readers to satisfy their curiosity about specific areas. Presenting a wide variety of eponymic words whose human association makes them particularly fascinating, this highly readable and comprehensive dictionary provides the perfect opportunity for browsing and obtaining a vast amount of unusual information.

Synopsis

This reference guide covers the topic of eponyms - those words in the English language which are also the names of people who have become so associated with a product, service or concept that their proper names have been given to them. Each of the 400 eponyms is defined and is accompanied by a short account of its originator, its history and claim to this unusual form of immortality. This book may be of interest to those wanting to browse as well as its reference value.

Über den Autor

Cyril Leslie Beeching is a freelance writer and broadcaster.


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Freeman, Morton S. (Autor)
A New Dictionary of Eponyms

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195093542/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 304 Seiten
Verlag: Oxford University Press USA (1. Januar 1997)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung

Do you approve of censoring the works of great writers? Some might contend that to bowdlerize a great writer's work would be to diminish its overall quality. Others, like Thomas Bowdler, whose eraser danced over every Shakespeare play, would argue that all modest people should be able to read a great work without blushing. For attacking the classics, "Mr. Bowdler" has been immortalized as the world's best-known, self-appointed literary censor. And because of his efforts the term "bowdlerize" has become eponymous with his name. Alternatively, the word "bikini" - defined as a two-piece bathing suit for women - has been a linguistic mystery since 1947 when these suits were first seen on the beaches of the French Riviera, a year after the United States began testing atom bombs on the "Bikini atoll" of the Marshall Islands. Some shocked people said that the impact of the scanty swimsuit on male beach loungers was like the devastating effect of the atomic bomb. Whoosh! A simpler and more credible notion is that the daring swimsuits resembled the attire worn by women on the Bikini atoll.

Created about a century ago, the term "eponym" is itself a coinage from two Greek words, "epi", "on" or "upon," and "onuma", "a name." But its broadened meaning, as dictionaries set it out, refers to a word derived from a proper name. For instance, "Salisbury steak" - a popular diner menu item created from common hamburger and dressed up with brown gravy to make it more appealing - is named after "James H. Salisbury", an English physician who promoted a diet of ground beef. A Dictionary of Eponyms explores the origins of hundreds of these everyday words from Argyle socks to zeppelins. Written in an entertaining and anecdotal style, and with a foreword by Edwin Newman, the book includes a brief biography of the individual whose name became associated with an item or concept as well as information on how and when the name entered the language. If you've ever wondered just where terms like "cardigan sweater", "pamphlet", and "robot" come from, Morton Freeman does more than simply define them - he brings them to life.

Über den Autor

Morton S. Freeman, a retired lawyer and formerly Director of Publications, American Law Institute-American Bar Association, is the author of many books, including The Grammatical Lawyer, which was named book of the year by the American Society of Legal Writers, and The Word Watcher's Guide To GoodWriting and Grammar. His column, "Word Watcher," appears in a number of newspapers, including The Philadelphia Inquirer, Buffalo News, and St. Louis Post Dispatch.


Erstellt: 2013-02

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Graham-Barber, Lynda (Autor)
A Chartreuse Leotard in a Magenta Limousine
And Other Words Named After People and Places

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786820020/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe
Verlag: Hyperion Book CH (16. Mai 1995)
Sprache: Englisch


This is a splendid gift idea for curious kids of all ages. Even kids too young to read comfortably on their own will sit still for these compact, highly readable stories about the origin of eponyms and toponyms. Because each colorful history is just about a paragraph long, they can make fine bathroom reading. The truly wonderful thing about eponyms and toponyms is how they aid recall of historical facts. I'm sure my son won't forget where the word berserk came from: "bear-sarks" or "bear coats", a term used to describe those wild Norse warriors who frazzled so many nerves a thousand years ago.


Erstellt: 2013-02

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Hendrickson, Robert (Autor)
The Dictionary of Eponyms
Names That Became Words

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/088029230X/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe
Verlag: Dorset (1988)
Sprache: Englisch

Erstellt: 2013-02

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