Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Fremdwort, Extranjerismo, Mot étranger, Esotismo, Foreign word

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dailytimes - WORD For word: Words come back at us!

(E?)(L?) http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=story_27-7-2003_pg3_7
Khaled Ahmed
Some words we treat as foreign words could be actually our own which the foreigners took with them. Such words get transformed and at times return to us. Monsoon, the rain wind, or "mausim" in Arabic, is our word that came back through Portuguese and English.
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Where did dengue come from?

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eleaston
Influence of other Languages on English
Eva L. Easton
Foreign Words in English
Loan Words in English
Cognates

(E1)(L1) http://www.eleaston.com/ety-lgs.html
Hier findet man viele etymologische Links zu den Kategorien: Morpheme Flash Cards & Quiz
Words: Where do they come from?


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Fremdworte im Englischen

Einige Beispiele für Fremdworte im Englischen (laut OED) sind:

Erstellt: 2013-12

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infoplease
Foreign Words and Phrases

(E?)(L1) http://www.infoplease.com/dictionary.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0001619.html
Am 03.09.2004 waren folgende Begriffe mit kurzen Hinweisen aufgeführt:

ad absurdum | ad infinitum | ad nauseam | aficionado | angst | annus mirabilis | a priori | au courant | beau geste | beau monde | bête noire | bon mot | bon vivant | carpe diem | carte blanche | casus belli | cause célèbre | caveat emptor | comme ci comme ça | comme il faut | coup de grâce | cri de coeur | de rigueur | dolce vita | doppelgänger | ecce homo | enfant terrible | entre nous | ex cathedra | ex post facto | fait accompli | faux pas | Feinschmecker | flagrante delicto | hoi polloi | in loco parentis | in medias res | in situ | ipso facto | je ne sais quoi | mano a mano | mea culpa | memento mori | mise en scene | mot juste | ne plus ultra | nom de guerre | nom de plume | nota bene | persona non grata | pro bono | quid pro quo | sans souci | savoir-faire | schadenfreude | sine qua non | sotto voce | sui generis | terra incognita | tout le monde | veni, vidi, vici | vox populi | Wanderjahr | Weltanschauung | Weltschmerz | Zeitgeist

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kokogiak - Luciferous Logolepsy - Dragging obscure words into the light of day

(E3)(L1) http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/
Zu den 9.000 Wörtern findet man immer nur kurze Erklärungen. Durch die wortwörtliche Übersetzung erhält man allerdings auch einige Hinweise auf ihre Herkunft.

A collection of over 9,000 obscure english words. Though the definition of an "english" word might seem to be straightforward, it is not. There exist so many adopted, derivative, archaic or abandoned words in what we loosely define as the "English Language", that a clear-cut definition seems impossible. For the purposes of this project though, words are included that may stretch any basic definitions. Particular attention has been paid to archaic words, as they tend to be more evocative - as if their very age lends additional meaning or overtones. Current personal favorites include "skirr", "epicaricacy" and "schizothemia".

The name of this project is also its description: "Luciferous" [adj. - "illuminating", literally and figuratively] "Logolepsy" [n. - "an obsession with words"], in other words: "an illuminating obsession with words". For those with a thirst for even more interesting words, be sure to visit some of the sites on the list below.

krysstal
The English Language
Words Borrowed from Other Languages

(E?)(L1) http://www.krysstal.com/borrow.html
Am 02.09.2004 waren folgende Einflüsse aus anderen Sprachen auf die englische Sprache zu finden (jeweils mit einer eigenen Seite mit Beispielen):

A | Akkadian (iq-ismen-) | Albanian (al-ismen_) | Algonquin (ca-ismen_) | Amharic (et-ismen_) | | Anglo-Saxon (uk-sprach) | Arabic (sa-ismen_) | Aramaic (sy-ismen_) | Araucanian (cl-ismen_) | Australian English (au-ismen_) | Avestan (ir-ismen_) | Aymara (bo-ismen_) | B | Balti (pk-ismen_) | Bambara (ng-ismen_) | Basque (es-ismen_) | Beja (cm-ismen_) | Bengali (bd-ismen_) | Breton (fr-ismen_) | Byzantine Greek (gr-ismen_) | C | Cornish (uk-_cornw) | Croatian (hr-ismen_) | Czech (cz-ismen_) | D | Danish (dk-ismen_) | Dharuk (au-ismen_) | Dutch (nl-ismen_) | E | Egyptian (eg-ismen_) | Etruscan (it-ismen_) | Evenki (ru-ismen_) | Ewe (gh-ismen_) | F | Faroese (fo-ismen_) | Farsi (ir-ismen_) | Finnish (fi-ismen_) | Flemish (nl-ismen_) | Frankish (de-ismen_) | French (fr-ismen_) | G | Gaelic (ie-ismen_) | Gaulish (fr-ismen_) | German (de-ismen_) | Greek (gr-ismen_) | Guarani (py-ismen_) | Gujerati (in-ismen_) | Guugu-Yimidhirr (au-ismen_) | H | Haitian Creole (ht-ismen_) | Hausa (ng-ismen_) | Hawaiian (us-__hawai) | Hebrew (il-ismen_) | Hindi (in-ismen_) | Hungarian (hu-ismen_) | I | Ibibio (ng-ismen_) | Ibo (ng-ismen_) | Icelandic (is-ismen_) | Inuit (ca-ismen_) | Italian (it-ismen_) | J | Japanese (jp-ismen_) | K | Kimbundu (cd-ismen_) | Kongo (cd-ismen_) | Korean (kp-ismen_) | L | Latin (va-ismen_) | Latvian (lv-ismen_) | M | Malagasy (mg-ismen_) | Malay (my-ismen_) | Malayalam (in-ismen_) | Maori (nz-ismen_) | Marathi (in-ismen_) | Marshallese | Maya (mx-ismen_) | Minoan (gr-ismen_) | N | Nenets (ru-ismen_) | Nepali (np-ismen_) | Norman French (fr-ismen_) | Norse (no-ismen_) | Norwegian (no-ismen_) | O | P | Phonoecian (ps-ismen_) | Polish (pl-ismen_) | Portuguese (pt-ismen_) | Provençal (fr-ismen_) | Punic (@f-ismen_) | R | Romanian (ro-ismen_) | Romansh (ch-ismen_) | Romany (eu-ismen_) | Russian (ru-ismen_) | S | Sabine (eu-ismen_) | Sámi (fi-ismen_) | Sanskrit (in-ismen_) | Serbian (yu-ismen_) | Shona (mz-ismen_) | Sinhalese (lk-ismen_) | Sotho (bw-ismen_) | Spanish (es-ismen_) | Swedish (se-ismen_) | Swiss French (ch-ismen_) | Swiss German (ch-ismen_) | Syriac (sy-ismen_) | T | Tagalog (ph-ismen_) | Tahitian (au-ismen_) | Taino (cu-ismen_) | Tamil (in-ismen_) | Tartar (ru-ismen_) ??? | Telugu (in-ismen_) | Temne (sl-ismen_) | Thai (th-ismen_) | Tongan (to-ismen_) | Trinidadian English (tt-ismen_) | Tswana (bw-ismen_) | Turkish (tr-ismen_) | U | Ukrainian (ua-ismen_) | Urdu (pk-ismen_) | W | Walloon French (fr-ismen_) | Welsh (uk-__wa__) | Wiradhuri (au-ismen_) | Wolof (sn-ismen_) | Y | Yiddish (il-ismen_) | Yoruba (ng-ismen_) | Z | Zuni (us-ismen_)

(E?)(L?) http://www.languagehat.com/archives/000369.php

The English language has an enormous amount of words that have been borrowed (or loaned) from other languages. This is a collection of tables listing words from the many languages that have contributed words to English. For some languages the word list is complete; for others (French, Greek, Latin, Arabic, Spanish) only a selection of borrowed words is given as there are so many.


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nwlink - Borrowed English

(E?)(L?) http://www.nwlink.com/~dtilque/WWarticles/BorrowedEnglish.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.languagehat.com/archives/000369.php

Dan Tilque
English is known as a great borrowing language. Among words in the dictionary, roughly 25 percent are native English words, the rest derived from other languages. But how many languages has English borrowed from? The way to find out is to compile a list of words derived from as many different languages as possible.
Before counting, there were a number of issues to resolve. Different references have different etymologies for the same word. Should equal consideration be given to all of them? What exactly constitutes a language? How should language families, creoles, dialects, etc. be handled?
After much consideration, I settled on the following ground rules:
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... only one word per language, but at least you can be pretty sure that word is correctly listed.


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pauls-notes.blogspot.de
100 German Words You'll Find In English

(E?)(L?) http://pauls-notes.blogspot.de/2009/09/100-german-words-youll-find-in-english.html

abseil | Alzheimer | Angst | Auf Wiedersehen | Anschluss | Apfelstrudel | Aspirin | Autobahn | Blitz | Blitzkrieg | Bratwurst | Creutzfeldt-Jakob-Krankheit | Christkindl | Dachshund | Delikatessen | Dieselmotor | Dirndl | Dirndlkleid | Dobermann | Pinscher | Doppelgänger | Doppler | Dummkopf | Edelweiß | Ersatz | Fahrenheit | Fahrvergnügen | Fest | Flak | Frau | Fräulein | Frankfurter | Wurst | Führer | Gasthaus | Gauß | Geigerzähler | gemütlich | Gemütlichkeit | Gestalt | Gesundheit | Gewürztraminer | Glockenspiel | Götterdämmerung | Hamburger | Hamster | Hertz | Hinterland | Kaffeeklatsch | Kaiser | kaputt | Kindergarten | Kitsch | kitschig | Knackwurst | Kobalt | Konzertmeister | Lebensraum | Leberwurst | Lederhose | Leitmotiv | Lied | Leberwurst | Masochismus | Neanderthal | Nickel | Ostpolitik | Panzer | Pinscher | Poltergeist | Putsch | Quarz | Realpolitik | Reich | Reichstag | Rottweiler | Rucksack | Sauerbraten | Sauerkraut | Schadenfreude | Schnapps | Schnauzer | Schnitzel | Schweinehund | Strudel | Übermensch | Umlaut | verboten | Volkswagen | Walzer | Waldsterben | Wanderlust | Wehrmacht | Weltanschauung | Weltschmerz | Wienerschnitzel | wunderbar | Wunderkind | Zeitgeist | Zeppelin | Zink | "Vorsprung durch Technik"


Erstellt: 2014-07

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rice.edu
ruf.rice.edu
Loanwords

(E?)(L?) http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~kemmer/Words/loanwords.html

Major Periods of Borrowing in the History of English

Loanwords are words adopted by the speakers of one language from a different language (the source language). A loanword can also be called a borrowing. The abstract noun borrowing refers to the process of speakers adopting words from a source language into their native language. "Loan" and "borrowing" are of course metaphors, because there is no literal lending process. There is no transfer from one language to another, and no "returning" words to the source language. They simply come to be used by a speech community that speaks a different language from the one they originated in.
...


Erstellt: 2017-01

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tufts
Foreign Words and Phrases

(E?)(L?) http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.03.0068&query=head%3D%2328


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Uni Chicago - Hobson
Hobson-Jobson
A glossary of colloquial Anglo-Indian words and phrases

(E?)(L?) http://dsal.uchicago.edu/dictionaries/hobsonjobson/
Henry Yule, A. C. Burnell
Hobson-Jobson: A glossary of colloquial Anglo-Indian words and phrases, and of kindred terms, etymological, historical, geographical and discursive. New ed. edited by William Crooke, B.A. London: J. Murray, 1903.
The Hobson-Jobson Anglo-Indian dictionary includes many uncommon diacritics. In order to display the full range of diacritics a Unicode font must be installed. Information and instructions are available on the Font Display page.
The data for The Hobson-Jobson Anglo-Indian dictionary was reloaded on 15 January 2002.
This dictionary is funded in part by the U. S. Department of Education.

It is a historical dictionary of words current in "Anglo-Indian" and on the Eastern trade routes, from the sixteenth to the end of the nineteenth century. Illustrative quotations, in date order, are drawn from travel narratives and other literature in numerous languages: those in Arabic and other Asian languages are given in translation. In the 2nd edition Crooke added a few entries and some further quotations, and corrected some etymologies.
Entries are under Anglicised (sometimes laughably Anglicised) Victorian spellings. Where words remain current at all, a different spelling has usually come into use by now, but the index, pp. 967–1021, offers many alternatives.
Difficult to classify in the terms of this Guide, Hobson-Jobson might as well have been placed under ‘Foreign words’ (see 407–411), since most of the words it deals with are of Asian origin - or among the multilingual dictionaries (see 13–15), since its word histories and its quotations are relevant to Portuguese, French, medieval Latin, Persian, Arabic and Urdu studies as well as to English. It is unique in English lexicography.

The catch-title is only partly explained by the relevant entry:
HOBSON-JOBSON, s. A native festal excitement ... This phrase may be taken as a typical one of the most highly assimilated class of Anglo-Indian argot ... peculiar to the British soldier and his surroundings ... an Anglo-Saxon version of the wailings of the Mahommedans as they beat their breasts in the procession of the Moharram - “Yâ Hasan! Yâ Hosain!”
For further help see Yule’s preface, p. ix, which concludes: ‘At any rate, there it is.’ From A Guide to World Language Dictionaries by Andrew Dalby.
London: Library Association Publishing, 1998.

mit umfangreichen Suchmöglichkeiten:

Search for entry words or parts of entry words
Search for words or parts of words in the entire dictionary Search for multiple words in the entire dictionary

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verbs - weak verbs, strong verbs

In der Rubrik "McCabe's Week" der Wirtschaftswoche 2003/13 ist zu lesen:
Two hundred years ago Jacob Grimm introduced the terms 'stark' and 'schwach' tp describe different kind of verbs. These words were translated into English, giving us 'strong' (irregular) and 'weak' (regular) verbs. (There are roughly the same amount of irregular verbs in English and German (150-200))
Zur Erinnerung: starke Verben brauchen keine Hilfe durch Suffixe, um unterschiedliche Zeiten auszudrücken: (sing - sang), dagegen schwache Verben: (talk, talked)

Die Begriffe 'weak verbs' und 'strong verbs' sind die ersten (mir bekannten Beispiele) Beispiele von Lehnübersetzungen vom Deutschen ins Englische.

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wikipedia - Lists of English words of international origin

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lists_of_English_words_of_international_origin
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Am 02.09.2004 waren hier folgende Fremdwortlisten zu finden:

These are lists of words in the English language which are known as "loan words" or "borrowings," which are derived from other languages:

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zompist
English Words from Arabic

(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/arabic.html
Eibige der Arabismen findet man auch im Deutschen (in etwas anderer Schreibweise).

admiral | albacore | alchemy | alcohol | alcove | alembic | alfalfa | algebra | Algol | alkali | Allah | Almagest | almanac | amber | antimony | apricot | Arab | arsenal | artichoke | assagai | assassin | attar | ayatollah | azimuth | azure | barbican | berdache | Betelgeuse | bint | bled | borax | burka | burnouse | caliber | calico | caliph | camise | camphor | candy | carat | caraway | carafe | carmine | carob | cassock | check | | chemistry | chess | cipher | civet | coffee | Copt | cork | couscous | crimson | Deneb | dhow | dinar | dirham | dragoman | drub | dura mater | efreet | El Cid | elixir | emir | fakir | fardel | Farsi | fatwa | fedayeen | felafel | fellah | felucca | Fomalhaut | garble | gazelle | genie | gerbil | ghoul | giraffe | hadith | haj | halal | halvah | hashish | hazard | hegira | henna | Hezbollah | hookah | houri | imam | Islam | jar | jasmine | jinn | julep | Kaaba | kabob | kaffir | keffiyeh | khamsin | kismet | kohl | lilac | lemon | lime | loofah | lute | macramé | magazine | Mahdi | majlis | mancala | marzipan | mask | mattress | minaret | monsoon | Mozarabic | muezzin | mufti | mujahedeen | mullah | mummy | Muslim | muslin | nadir | natron | nizam | orange | ottoman | pia mater | popinjay | Primum Mobile | racket | realgar | ream | rebec | Rigel | roc | rook | Rubaiyyat | safari | saffron | Sahara | sahib | salaam | saluki | Saracen | sash | satin | scarlet | sequin | Sharia | sheikh | sherbet | Shiite | shrub [drink] | sine | sirocco | souk | spinach | Sufi | sugar | sultan | sumac | Sunni | sura | syrup | tabbouleh | tabby | tahini | Taliban | talisman | tamarind | tambourine | tandoori | tarboosh | tare [weight] | tariff | tarragon | tell [mound] | ujamaa | ulema | Vega | vizier | wadi | Waqf | zenith | zero

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Fremdwort, Extranjerismo, Mot étranger, Esotismo, Foreign word

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Robertson, John G.
Robertson's Words for a Modern Age
A Cross Reference of Latin and Greek Combining Elements

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0963091913/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0963091913/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0963091913/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0963091913/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0963091913/etymologpor09-20
Paperback: 272 pages
Publisher: Senior Scribe Publications (November 1991)
Language: English


Product Description
A compilation of English words that are derived from Latin and Greek elements with cross references from the Latin and/or Greek elements or from English to Latin and/or Greek elements.


Erstellt: 2010-02

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