Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Geschichte, Historia, Histoire, Storia, History

A

Angelsachsen

Im 5. und 6. Jh. wanderten westgermanischen Stämme der "Angeln", "Sachsen" und "Jüten" nach England aus. Die Nachkommen (von denen heute auch Angehörige in Amerika leben) werden als "Angelsachsen" bezeichnet.

B

bbc
British History

(E6)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/




(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/atoz.shtml




bbc.co.uk
History

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/history




Erstellt: 2015-02

british-history
British History Online

(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/

British History Online is the digital library containing some of the core printed primary and secondary sources for the medieval and modern history of the British Isles. Created by the Institute of Historical Research and the History of Parliament Trust, we aim to support academic and personal users around the world in their learning, teaching and research.




(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/browse.aspx




(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/results.asp?query1=etymology&match=1&content=1&source=&title=

Texts 1-10 of 25 matching your criteria (27.02.2006):




(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/place.asp
Browse by place

Publications with a specific geographical focus are listed in this index; some publications, such as the journals of the House of Lords and Commons, are national in structure and are impractical to list here, but may nonetheless contain material of interest. To view all the publications available on this site, you can browse by source or use the full text search function.

1 Bedfordshire (8) | 2 Berkshire (8) | 3 Buckinghamshire (8) | 4 Cambridgeshire (9) | 5 Cheshire (7) | 7 City of Westminster (18) | 8 Cornwall (3) | 9 Cumberland (5) | 10 Derbyshire (5) | 11 Devon (4) | 12 Dorset (7) | 13 Durham (6) | 14 Essex (11) | 16 Hampshire (7) | 17 Herefordshire (4) | 18 Hertfordshire (5) | 19 Huntingdonshire (8) | 20 Kent (8) | 21 Lancashire (6) | 22 Leicestershire (8) | 23 Lincolnshire (6) | 24 Middlesex (30) | 25 Norfolk (6) | 26 Northamptonshire (8) | 27 Northumberland (4) | 28 Nottinghamshire (7) | 29 Oxfordshire (11) | 30 Rutland (6) | 31 Scotland (1) | 32 Shropshire (10) | 33 Somerset (9) | 34 Staffordshire (9) | 35 Suffolk (6) | 36 Surrey (9) | 37 Sussex (12) | 38 Wales (4) | 39 Warwickshire (10) | 40 Westmorland (4) | 41 Wiltshire (11) | 42 Worcestershire (6) | 43 Yorkshire (10)

(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/subject.asp
Browse by subject collection

Publications with a specific subject focus are listed in this index; to view all the publications available on this site, you can browse by source or use the full text search function.

Administrative history | Agriculture | Art and Architecture | Cultural history | Ecclesiastical and religious history | Economic history | Historical geography | Imperial and Colonial | Intellectual history | Legal history | Local history | Medicine and public health | Military/Naval history | Parliamentary history | Population | Social history | Urban and metropolitan history

(E?)(L?) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/source.asp
Browse by source

This section lists all publications grouped into sources; you can browse by types of sources by using the 'Refine by type' option.




C

D

E

F

G

H

hereditarytitles
Hereditary Titles

(E?)(L?) http://www.hereditarytitles.com/

This is a site about British peerage and hereditary titles explaining all titles beginning with the Royal Family and ending with the Gentleman. It provides a database of over 7,100 British hereditary titles which can be searched by title, degree and surname. A section on coats of arms, containing images and annotations, is also provided.


(E?)(L?) http://www.hereditarytitles.com/sitemap.html




History (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/History


historypin
Pin your history to the world

(E?)(L?) http://www.historypin.com/

38,054 photos and stories pinned so far


Erstellt: 2011-04

I

J

K

L

M

Magna Carta (W3)

Zur Verwandtschaft von lat. "magnus" = dt. "groß" gehören neben engl. "magnificent", "magnify", "magnanimous" auch der dt. "Maharadscha", engl. "Maharajah" = dt. "Großer König". (Hindi "rajah" = dt. "König" gehört zu ide. "*reg-" und damit zu lat. "rex", "regis" = dt. "König".) Die "carta" gehört zu lat. "charta" = dt. "Karte" zu der auch dt. "Karton", engl. "cartoon", ital. "cartone" gehören.

Als lat. "Magna Carta" (1560) (auch "Magna Charta", engl. "Great Charter") wird der am 15. Juni 1215 in Runnymede, zwischen König John und den englischen Baronen, vereinbarte Vertrag über die zugesicherten Freiheitsechte (Magna Charta Libertatum) bezeichnet.

15. Juni 1215

Der englische König Johann (ohne Land) erläßt auf Druck der Barone die "Magna Carta liberatum", die dem Adel Rechte und Freiheiten verbrieft und den König an geltendes Recht bindet. Sie stellt die Grundlage des Verfassungsrechts und des parlamentarischen Systems, sowie der Pressefreiheit dar. Das Einlenken Johanns liegt in den derzeitigen außenpolitischen Schwierigkeiten Englands begründet. 1213 erlitt Johann im Konflikt mit Papst Innozenz III. eine Niederlage und mit der Niederlage in der Entscheidungsschlacht von Bouvines am 27. Juni 1214 gegen das Heer von Philipp II. August verlor er alle seine Besitzungen auf dem Festland an Frankreich.

15.06.1215: Magna Carta sealed by King John - a charter of English liberties that occupies a unique place in the popular imagination as a symbol and a battle cry against oppression - was sealed this day, under threat of civil war, by King John in 1215.

John (1167-1216), king of England, and lord of Ireland, duke of Normandy and of Aquitaine, and count of Anjou, was the youngest son of Henry II (1133-1189) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (c.1122-1204), and was born at Oxford on 24 December 1167.

Seven hundred ninety years ago — on June 15th, 1215 — a group of barons met with King John in the riverside meadows of Runnymede. The unhappy noblemen forced the equally unhappy king to sign the Magna Carta (literally, “great charter” in Latin) granting them certain rights and liberties. The significance of that document lives on in the name Magna Carta: over the centuries, Magna Carta has developed an additional, general sense, naming any document constituting a fundamental guarantee of rights and privileges.

What sorts of promises were made in that great charter? They ranged from small ones — such as agreeing to remove royal fishweirs, enclosures for capturing fish that also impeded the progress of boats — to commitments whose impact was enormous, such as the one forbidding compelled testimony. But our reading of the Magna Carta paused at the repeated mentions of amercement, whose imposition was regulated in a number of articles.

To amerce is to penalize or punish someone; an amercement names the infliction of a penalty at the discretion of a court, or the penalty thus imposed. Before the Magna Carta such penalties could be quite arbitrary; appropriately enough, amerce has an ancestor in a French verb meaning at one’s mercy. Hundreds of years before William Shakespeare’s Portia proclaimed the “quality of mercy is not strain’d,” the Magna Carta prescribed justice, if not necessarily mercy, in amercements.

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Magna Carta


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/S6KGkVE5S72VHrSDw3jRDg

Hereford Magna Carta
The Great Charter of Liberties or Magna Carta agreed between King John and his barons at Runnymede in 1215 is one of the ... Contributed by Individual


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/OiBPq_-oTBydsT4NnccgSg

The Magna Carta
Magna Carta, sealed by King John in 1215, was to form the basis for English law and legal systems all over the world. Contributed by Museum


(E?)(L?) http://www.bl.uk/learning/online-resources

Magna Carta Explore the origins and 800-year legacy of Magna Carta, and discover its relevance to justice, liberty and the law today. This unique collection of historical sources is contextualised through articles and videos from leading experts.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bl.uk/magna-carta

Magna Carta is one of the most famous documents in the world. Explore its 800-year legacy with unique collection items, newly-commissioned articles by leading experts, videos and animations and a range of teaching resources. School groups can also contribute a clause towards a new Magna Carta for the digital age.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.culture24.org.uk/search%20results?q=Magna+Carta

Search results

Article: Interview
Parliament Week Curator's Choice: The Magna Carta at the British Library
In her own Words...Dr Claire Breay Lead Curator of Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts at the British Library tells us why the Magna Carta is such a powerful piece of British history.
15 October 2011

Article: Interview
Parliament Week: Dr Hugh Doherty on the Magna Carta at the Bodleian Library
The Medieval manuscripts expert at the University of Oxford tells us about trawling the country in pursuit of Magna Carta, the ruthless exploits of King John and the abiding influence of the famous 800-year-old charter.
14 October 2011

Article: News
Salisbury Cathedral reinterprets 800-year-old Magna Carta in new Chapter House exhibition
A new exhibition at the cathedral, which holds one of four copies of the UNESCO-listed Magna Carta, aims to reinterpret it as it approaches its 800th anniversary.
18 August 2011

Article: News
Team of experts aim to "transform academic and public understanding of Magna Carta"
Some of the country's foremost experts unite for a three-year project to coincide with the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, led by the University of East Anglia.
26 March 2012

Venue: Gallery, Archive, Library
County: Greater London
British Library London
Tags: BBC The Story of Wales | BBC Stargazing LIVE | BBC Springwatch | BBC Planet Dinosaur | BBC Live 'n' Deadly - DSI | BBC Hands on History | BBC Handmade in Britain | BBC Countryfile | BBC London 2012: Festival | BBC London 2012: Torch Relay

Article: Interview
Curator's Choice: Claire Breay on the oldest intact book in Europe found in a Saint's coffin
Find out about the 1,300-year-old Latin holy tome which is at the centre of a £9 million campaign by the British Library to save it for the nation.
04 October 2011

Article: Preview
Flower power spirit floats through holy walls for return of Salisbury Cathedral Flower Festival
The trio of Chelsea gold medallists who masterminded the cathedral's last festival, in 2008, return for a floral celebration.
07 June 2011

Venue: Sacred space
County: Lincolnshire
Lincoln Cathedral
Lincoln

Article: Trail
Monks, knights, peasants, merchants - a Medieval trail
This trail is a guide to some of the places in Britain where you can find out about all things medieval, from the monks' plainsong to King Richard III's reputation and the Peasants' Revolt.
11 June 2008

Article: News
News In Brief - Week Ending July 22 2007
Museums, galleries and heritage news in brief from the 24 Hour Museum for the week ending July 22 2007.

Article: Interview
Parliament Week Curator's Choice: A porcelain figure of radical MP John Wilkes at the Buckinghamshire Museum
Will Phillips, the Collections Officer of Social History at Buckinghamshire County Museum Resource Centre, introduces a porcelain figure of John Wilkes, a radical 18th century MP who had a colourful and controversial parliamentary career.
03 November 2011

Article: News
Rocking Around St Pancras
British Library receives donation of classic rock recordings from the 1990's.
23 March 2000

Venue: Garden, parklands or rural site, Heritage site
County: Berkshire
Runnymede (National Trust) Old Windsor

Venue: Sacred space, Heritage site
County: Wiltshire
Salisbury Cathedral
Salisbury

Article: Feature
The Culture24 review of 2011: History and Heritage
From skulls and puddings to funding victories and top new venues, we take a look back at some of the biggest history stories we covered this year.
21 December 2011

Venue: Archive
County: Surrey
The National Archives Kew

Article: Preview
Treasures of the Bodleian inspires public to choose treasures for £78 million Weston Library
From the Magna Carta to Shakespeare folios and Handel's Messiah, the new show at Oxford's Bodleian puts key artefacts on display with an eye on its transformation into the Weston in 2015.
29 September 2011


(E?)(L?) http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/kalenderblatt.870.de.html?cal:month=6&cal:year=2015&drbm:date=2015-06-15

Sendung vom 15.06.2015

Magna Carta

Ein international gültiges Symbol für Freiheit

Die Magna Carta wurde vor 800 Jahren in Runnymede an der Themse vom englischen King John höchst widerwillig besiegelt. Ursprünglich hätten jedoch nur die englischen Adeligen von den Zugeständnissen profitiert sowie freie Bürger, von denen es damals nicht all zu viele gab. Ein Beitrag von Ruth Rach


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Magna Carta

"Magna Carta" also "Magna Charta", 1560s, Medieval Latin, literally "great charter" (of English personal and political liberty), attested in Anglo-Latin from 1279; obtained from King John, June 15, 1215. See magnate, card (n.).


(E?)(L?) http://eawc.evansville.edu/anthology/magnacarta.htm

The Magna Carta
1215
This text originally appeared in Albert Beebe White and Wallace Notestein, eds., Source Problems in English History (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1915). It was put on the internet by Seth Seyfried for The Internet Medieval Sourcebook, which is administrated by Paul Halsall.
...


(E?)(L?) http://gergely-wootsch.com/British-Library-Magna-Carta/

British Library: Magna Carta


(E?)(L?) http://www.google.com/doodles/800th-anniversary-of-the-magna-carta

800 Jahre Magna Carta - 15.06.2015


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a

The Magna Carta (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/u

The Magna Carta (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.h2g2.com/approved_entry/A14066444

King John and the Magna Carta


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/search?searchstring=Magna+Carta&search=GO&approved_entries_only_chk=1&search_type=article_quick_search




(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/magna-carta.htm

Magna Charta, or Magna Carta, one of the most important documents in world history. The Magna Charta, issued in 1215, is the foundation of constitutional liberty in English-speaking lands. By compelling King John to obey laws that limited his power precisely, it became the earliest guarantee against tyranny in England.
...


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/a_alpha.html

Magna Carta (1215)


(E?)(L?) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chronologia/Lspost13/MagnaCarta/mag_intr.html

Magna Carta (1215)

saeculum tertium decimum
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/Chronologia/Lspost13/MagnaCarta/mag_cart.html

Johannes Dei gracia rex Anglie, Dominus Hibernie, dux Normannie, Aquitannie et comes Andegravie, archiepiscopis, episcopis, abbatibus, comitibus, baronibus, justiciariis, forestariis, vicecomitibus, prepositis, ministris et omnibus ballivis et fidelibus suis salutem.

...


(E?)(L?) http://www.kuriositas.com/2015/04/what-is-magna-carta.html

What is Magna Carta?

If you are researching Magna Carta for a history essay then you cannot go wrong with this for sheer clarity. In just under four minutes you will understand how the Magna Carta came in to being and how it echoes down the eight centuries since it was written from the US Declaration of Independence to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.


(E?)(L?) http://www.michas-spielmitmir.de/allespiele.php

Caylus - Magna Carta


(E?)(L1) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/09531a.htm

The charter of liberties granted by King John of England in 1215 and confirmed with modifications by Henry III in 1216, 1217, and 1225.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/198/000092919/

King John Lackland (24-Dec-1166 - 18-Oct-1216), Signed the Magna Carta, then reneged


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Magna Carta


(E?)(L?) http://www.sacklunch.net/placenames/M/MagnaChartaorMagnaCarta.html

Magna Charta or Magna Carta


(E?)(L?) http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/indices.html

Magna Carta


(E?)(L1) http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/magnacarta.html

MAGNA CARTA

Johannis sine Terra regis Angliae 15° Junii anno Domini 1215.
[Scriptum originale continuus sine numeris est.]

Concordia inter Regem Johannem et Barones pro concessione libertatum ecclesie et regni Anglie.
[Sicut scriptum versus originalem Lincolniensis.]
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=L

"law of the land": a phrase used in the Magna Carta to refer to the then established law of the kingdom (as distinct from Roman or civil law); today it refers to fundamental principles of justice commensurate with due process


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=M




(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/magna_carta.html

magna carta
...
ETYMOLOGY:

From Latin "magna carta" ("great charter"). After "Magna Carta", a charter of political and civil liberties that King John of England was forced to sign on June 15, 1215. It was revised several times over the years, and it became an important symbol, establishing for future generations that there were limits to royal power.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/magna-carta

Magna Carta


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/magna-charta

magna-charta


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Magna Carta
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Magna Carta" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 / 1750 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Magna Carta

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-04

Magna Carta - Rose

Die 1215 verabschiedete "Magna Charta" gilt als die große Freiheitsurkunde des englischen Adels.




Auszeichnungen / Awards
Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage
Blüheigenschaften / Flowering Habit
Blütenblätter-Anzahl
Blütenfarbe / Bloemkleur / Flower Colour
Blütenform / Forme de la fleur / Bloemvorm / Bloom Shape
Blütengröße / Bloem / Bloom Size
Blütentyp / Bloom Type
Blütezeit / Floraison / Bloeitijd / Flowering Period
Bodenansprüche / Cultivation
Dornen / Stacheln / Thornyness
Duft / Fragrance / Geurend / Scent Strength
Elternrosen / Herkunft / Parentage
Erkrankungen / Disease resistance
Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth)
Exhibition Name
Genealogie / Parentage
Hagebutten / Hips / Hip Colour / Hip Shape
Knospen / Buds
Ordnungskriterien / Klasse / Genre / Famille de rosiers / Type de rosier / Groep / Class / Family / Group
Registration Name
Schädlinge
Schwächen / Weaknesses
Sports / Mutationen
Standort / Shade Tolerance
Stärken / Strengths
Stiele / Stems
Synonyme Magna Carta
Verwendung / Utilisation / Gebruik / Use
Winterhärte / Hardiness
Wuchsabstand / Dist. de plantation
Wuchsform / Vorm / Growth Habit
Wuchshöhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur
Wuchsweite / Width
Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer



Erstellt: 2016-04

N

ngm
How England began

In der Ausgabe Nocember 2011 von "National Geographic" ist ein Artikel "Magical Mysterie Treasure" zu finden. Ein guter Teil und eine informative Graphik behandeln das Thema "How England began". Die Quintessenz lautet etwa:

Vor den Römern besiedelten keltische Stämme die britischen Inseln, die engl. "Scotti" in Irland, die engl. "Picts" in Schottland, und die engl. "Britons" in England und Wales. Die Römer errichteten noch den Hadrianswall um England gegen die Pikten abzugrenzen, verließen dann aber die Insel um 410. Das entstehende Machtvakuum erweckte Begehrlichkeiten bei den umliegenden Stämmen. Und so kamen die Pikten über den Hadrianswall nach Süden. Die "Scotti" setzten von Irland nach Wales über, aber auch in großem Umfang in das ehemalige Gebiet der Pikten. Deshalb trägt Schottland den irischen Namen "Scotti". Aber auch marodierende Wikinger sahen ihre Chance und landeten an der Ostküste Englands.

Einigen der "Britons" wurde die Lage zu ungemütlich und sie verließen ihrerseits die Insel um sich in der Bretagne anzusiedeln, der sie ihren Namen gaben und wo bis heute keltische Sprachanteile zu finden sind. Die in England verbleibenden "Britons" wußten sich nicht mehr anders zu helfen, als Söldner vom Festland zu engagieren. Die in Dänemark lebenden engl. "Jutes", die in Schleswig-Holstein lebenden engl. "Angles" und die an der Nordseeküste lebenden engl. "Saxons" nahmen ab 450 die Einladung gerne an und schlugen sich für die "Britons" mit den anderen Eindringlingen. Aber die Britons dürften ihre Entscheidung bald bereut haben. Im Zuge der Familienzusammenführung begann die Fremdarbeiterwerbung eine nicht mehr zu regulierende Eigendynamik zu entwickeln. Die Angeln und Sachsen überrollten förmlich den "englischen" Teil der Insel. Einer der letzten römisch-britischen Könige der sagenhafte "König Arthur" soll noch Anfang des 6. Jh. regiert haben. Nach und nach errichteten die Angeln, Sachsen und Jütländer kleine Königreiche (die sich durchaus auch gegenseitig bekriegten). Zwischen 600 und 850 bildeten sich dann drei große Königreiche im heutigen England: Northumbria, Mercia (Angeln) (altengl. "mierce" = dt. "Grenzbewohner" zu Wales) und Wessex ("Westsachsen").

Nach dem Tod von "Alfred the Great" im Jahr 899 kam es wohl zu einem einzigen Königreich im heutigen England. Während ab 793 die Wikinger ihre Siedlungsversuche in Ostengland verstärkten, formte sich in Nordfrankreich ein eigener Wikingerstaat. Der französische König wusste sich auch nicht anders zu wehren und schlug den "Nordmännern" vor, sich in der "Normandie" anzusiedeln und im Gegenzug weitere Eindringlinge aus dem Norden abzuwehren. Und so lebten sich die Nordmänner etwas auseinander. Die einen wurden in der Normandie seßhaft während die anderen noch plündernd die Nordsee unsicher machten.

Schließlich kam es zu einem Erbschaftsstreit und Wilhelm der Eroberer wollte es noch einmal wissen. Also setzte er im Jahr 1066 von der Normandie über nach England und beendete in der Schlacht von Hastings die Herrschaft der Angelsachsen. Obwohl die Angelsachsen nun in die zweite Reihe treten mußten sind sie bis heute die tragende Säule der angelsächsischen Welt.

Natürlich haben sich diese Ereignisse auch sprachlich nieder geschlagen. Und so findet man im heutigen Englisch keltische, irische und bretonische Worte. Die Römer waren immerhin 350 Jahre in England und haben einige lateinische Worte hinterlassen. Die Wikinger konnten immerhin kleinere Ansiedlungen gründen und bereicherten die englische Sprache mit einigen altnordischen Worten. Den größten Beitrag zur englischen Sprache lieferten jedoch die Angelsachsen mit Worten germanischen Ursprungs und die bereits romanisierten Nordmänner aus der Normandie mit altfranzösisch und damit (erneut) Wörtern mit lateinischem Ursprung. Und da die ehemaligen Neufranzosen ab 1066 die Oberschicht bildeten, findet man für viele Dinge zwei Begriffe wobei die romanischen Varianten als die vornehmeren gelten. Und da die Engländer also schon früh (mindestens) zwei Idiome in ihre Sprache integriert hatten fiel es ihnen später, als sie sich zum weltweiten Kolonialreich entwickelten auch leicht weitere Sprachhäppchen aus aller Welt aufzunehmen und damit den größten Wortbestand in einer Sprache anzusammeln.

Interessant wäre eine statistische Auswertung des heutigen Wortbestands nach der Herkunft der Wörter.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ngm.com/


Erstellt: 2011-11

O

oldbaileyonline
The Proceedings of the Old Bailey London 1674 to 1834

(E?)(L1) http://www.oldbaileyonline.org.uk/
A fully searchable online edition of the largest body of texts detailing the lives of non-elite people ever published, containing accounts of over 100,000 criminal trials held at London's central criminal court.
Now available: 22,000 trials, from December 1714 to December 1759. Project Timetable. Project Conference: Call for Papers.

Der Beschreibung nach geht es hier um eine riesige Sammlung von Prozessakten aus dem England des 18. Jh. Aber ich habe den Schatz der Site noch nicht gehoben. Jedenfalls findet man hier auch viele Informationen zum geschichtlichen Hintergrund dieser Zeit.
Aufgefallen ist mir zum Beispiel auch der Germanismus "Hinterland" in der Rubrik:

London and its Hinterland - London life from the late seventeenth to the early nineteenth centuries; Rural Middlesex; Currency, Coinage, and the Cost of Living; Material London.


P

Q

R

Rosa Damascena Variegata (Redouté) - Rose

Die synonyme Bezeichnung der Rose "Rosa Damascena Variegata", "York and Lancaster" (Damask Rose) verweist auf den Rosenkrieg der englischen Geschichte. Das Haus Lancaster hatte sich nach römischem Vorbild eine "rote Rose" (Gallica-Rose) auf das Wappen gemalt, das Haus York dagegen eine weiße Rose (Alba Rose).

(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/cms/home/nameindex-lesroses.htm

057 York and Lancaster | R. damascena variety | Rosier d’Yorck et de Lancastre | Rosa Damascena Variegata

PICTURE SOURCE Les Roses, Volume I (1817)
ORIGINAL BOTANICAL NAME "Rosa Damascena Variegata"
ORIGINAL FRENCH NAME "Rosier d’Yorck et de Lancastre"
CURRENT BOTANTICAL NAME "R. damascena variety"
COMMON NAME "York and Lancaster"
OTHER NAMES "R. damascena bicolor", "Striped Four Seasons Rose", "Striped Damask", "Tudor Rose"
...
ORIGIN Known since the 1500s; thought to be R. gallica x phoenica hybrid
...
At left; picture of the Damask Rose, York and Lancaster, R. damascena variety, painted by Pierre-Joseph Redouté, portrait 057 out of 170, Volume I of Les Roses


Rose of Lancaster - Rose

(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/cms/home/nameindex-lesroses.htm

"Apothecary’s Rose" = "R. gallica var. officinalis" = "Rosier de Provins ordinaire" = "Rosa Gallica officinalis"


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=2.311.10

Red Rose of Lancaster


(E?)(L?) http://www.lancaster.gov.uk/


(E?)(L?) http://www.onelook.com/?w=rose+of+lancaster&ls=a




(E6)(L?) http://www.r3.org/life/medmisc/rose1.html

The Red Rose of Lancaster

Also known as the "Apothecary Rose", "rosa gallica officinalis" originally came from "the Land of the Saracens" to Provins in France when Thibault Le Chansonnier returned from the Crusades. Rose breeder David Austin in Old Roses and English Roses placed it "among the very finest of garden shrubs of any kind." Its light crimson petals surround prominent golden stamens.


(E?)(L?) http://www.schmid-gartenpflanzen.de/rosen/sorten/rose.php/Rosa%20Gallica/Officinalis%20(%60Apothekerrose%60)/

Officinalis ("Apothekerrose")


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essig-Rose

...
Sorten

Die magentarote Sorte "Officinalis" ("Apothekerrose") war im 15. Jahrhundert als "Red Rose of Lancaster" das Symbol des Hauses Lancaster. Ihr gegenüber stand die Rosa alba, die "Weiße Rose" der Adelsfamilie des Hauses York.
...


Erstellt: 2012-06

Rosenkrieg (W2)

Der Rosenkrieg ist der Name eines mit Unterbrechungen von 1455 bis 1487 gefochtenen Bürgerkrieges um die englische Thronherrschaft.

Die sich gegenüberstehenden Parteien waren das House of York und das House of Lancaster, zwei verschiedene Zweige der Plantagenet, die ihren Stammbaum auf König Edward III. zurückführen konnten. Die Wappen dieser Familien beinhalten "Rosen" (eine "rote Rose" für Lancaster, eine "weiße Rose" für York), so dass sich für diesen Konflikt später der Name "Rosenkrieg" etablierte.

Umgangssprachlich bezeichnet man heute auch die bei einer Ehescheidung auftretenden Streitigkeiten zwischen Ex-Partnern als "Rosenkrieg". Das Thema wurde im gleichnamigen Film "Der Rosenkrieg" von und mit Danny DeVito thematisiert.

Beginn des Rosenkrieges: 22.05.1455

1485 Battle of Bosworth Field between Henry VII (winner) and Richard III (loser). (War of Roses)

(E?)(L?) http://www.pkgodzik.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Sammlungen/Wissenswertes_ueber_die_Rosen.pdf

Englands Rosenkrieg ............................................79


(E6)(L?) http://www.presseportal.de/story.htx?nr=728798

Spätestens seit dem spektakulären Film mit Kathleen Turner und Michael Douglas ist das Wort RosenKrieg hierzulande ein Synonym für Trennung und Scheidung - und zwar Trennung und Scheidung auf die schmutzige Art.
...


(E3)(L1) http://www.redensarten-index.de/register/r.php


(E6)(L?) http://www.rosenkrieg-magazin.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.schockwellenreiter.de/gartengeschichten/rosen.html

Heute versteht man unter einem "Rosenkrieg" das Hauen und Stechen zwischen Eheleuten, eigentlich sind damit aber die englischen Erbfolgemetzeleien gemeint, die zwischen 1455 und 1485 zwischen den Häusern York und Lancaster tobten und Shakespeare zu seinen großen Historiendramen inspirierten.

Der "Krieg der Rosen" begann 1455 in England, als die beiden Herrscherhäuser York und Lancaster um den Thron kämpften.

Eigentlich regierte Lancaster (Symbol: "Weiße Rose", "rosa alba"), doch der König Heinrich VI. war geistesgestört und unfähig, das Land zu regieren. Daher zettelte sein Cousin, Herzog Richard von York (Symbol: "Rote Rose", "rosa gallica"), einen Aufstand an, um selber König zu werden. Erst einmal gewann er am 22. Mai 1455, doch das unterlegene Haus Lancaster gab keine Ruhe. Ab 1459 schlugen die Familien wieder aufeinander ein.


(E1)(L1) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/rosenwelt/krieg.htm


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosenkrieg


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haus_York


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haus_Lancaster


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Rosenkrieg
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Rosenkrieg" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1840 auf.

Erstellt: 2012-06

Rosenkriege (W3)

Die "Rosenkriege", engl. "Wars of the Roses", spielen auf die Wappensymbole der verfeindeten Herrscherhäuser York und Lancaster an.

(E?)(L?) http://www.damals.de/de/27/Hoch-lebe-der-Koenig.html?aid=189547&cp=1&action=showDetails&search=&search=Rosenkriege&cmtUri=/de/27/Zeitpunkte-Archiv.html

24.05.1487
Hoch lebe der König
Der Sieg Heinrich Tudors über seinen Rivalen König Richard III. von England aus dem Haus York 1485 und sein Herrschaftsantritt als Heinrich VII. markiert das Ende der „Rosenkriege“.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.damals.de/de/27/Tod-wegen-Hochverrats.html?aid=183254&cp=1&action=showDetails&search=&search=Rosenkriege&cmtUri=/de/27/Zeitpunkte-Archiv.html

18. Februar 1478
Tod wegen Hochverrats
Seit 1455 bestimmten die Rosenkriege das politische Geschehen in England. Die Anhänger des Adelshauses York hatten den aus dem Haus Lancaster stammenden König Heinrich VI. für abgesetzt erklärt und 1461 mit Eduard IV. einen eigenen König auf den Thron gebracht.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.schockwellenreiter.de/gartengeschichten/rosen.html

Heute versteht man unter einem Rosenkrieg das Hauen und Stechen zwischen Eheleuten, eigentlich sind damit aber die englischen Erbfolgemetzeleien gemeint, die zwischen 1455 und 1485 zwischen den Häusern York und Lancaster tobten und Shakespeare zu seinen großen Historiendramen inspirierten.

Der Krieg der Rosen begann 1455 in England, als die beiden Herrscherhäuser York und Lancaster um den Thron kämpften.

Eigentlich regierte Lancaster mit der Roten Rose ("rosa gallica") als Symbol, doch der König Heinrich VI. war geistesgestört und unfähig, das Land zu regieren. Daher zettelte sein Cousin, Herzog Richard von York (Symbol: Weisse Rose, "rosa alba"), einen Aufstand an, um selber König zu werden. Erst einmal gewann er am 22. Mai 1455, doch das unterlegene Haus Lancaster gab keine Ruhe. Ab 1459 schlugen die Familien wieder aufeinander ein und es zu den "Rosenkriegen", "Wars of the Roses".

Die Rose mit leichter Rosatönung vereinigt die zerstrittenen Parteien.


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/rosenwelt/krieg.htm

Rosenkriege - Friedensrosen - Kriegsrosen - Europäische Friedensrose, Ehekrieg
siehe auch: Englischer Rosenkrieg / Mindener Rosentag - Siebenjähriger Krieg
...


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geschichte_Englands#Die_Rosenkriege

...
Die Rosenkriege

Die Absetzung Richards II. durch den späteren Heinrich IV. und die Misserfolge im Hundertjährigen Krieg waren die Gründe für den Ausbruch der Rosenkriege. Bei ihnen handelte es sich um einen Machtkampf um die englische Krone, der zwischen dem Haus von Lancaster, dessen Wappen eine rote Rose enthielt, und dem Haus von York, welches eine weiße Rose im Wappen führte, ausgetragen wurde. Gesellschaftliche und wirtschaftliche Gründe waren das Vorhandensein großer Armeen nach dem Hundertjährigen Krieg, die keine Betätigungsfelder außerhalb Englands mehr hatten, sowie die Folgen der Pest.
...


Erstellt: 2012-06

S

schoolnet
Spartacus Educational

(E?)(L?) http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/

The Spartacus Educational website provides a series of free history encyclopaedias. Entries usually include a narrative, illustrations and primary sources. The text within each entry is linked to other relevant pages in the encyclopaedia. In this way it is possible to research individual people and events in great detail. The sources are also hyper-linked so the student is able to find out about the writer, artist, newspaper and organization that produced the material.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/SpartacusIndex.htm




(E?)(L?) http:///

UK USA Europe, Russia & Asia


(E?)(L?) http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/engineers.htm




Erstellt: 2012-08

T

Tory (W3)

Seit dem 17. Jh. traten in Großbritannien zwei Interessengruppierungen auf die als "Tory" ("Tories") und "Whig" ("Whigs") bezeichnet wurden. Auch im 18. Jh. formierten sich diese Gruppen noch nicht zu Parteien im heutigen Sinn.

Die "Tories" entstammten hauptsächlich dem landbesitzenden Adel (engl. "landed gentry") und unterstützten die Interessen der anglikanischen Kirche. Sie waren die Vertreter einer konservativen Politik. Im 19. Jh. ging daraus die Konservative Partei ("Conservative Party") hervor.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Tory" (1566) geht zurück auf irisch "toraidhe", "toruighe" = dt. "Verfolger", "Räuber", "Plünderer", wörtlich "Verfolger", "Sucher", altir. "toirighim" = dt. "Ich verfolge" und ir. "tóir", "toir" = dt. "verfolgen". Als Vorgänger hat man kelt. "*to-wo-ret-" = engl. "a running up to" und ide. "*ret-" = dt. "rennen", "rollen" postuliert.

Im 16. und 17. Jh. wurden irische Geächtete als "Tories" bezeichnet. Im 17. Jh. bezeichnete engl. "tórai" einen irischen - und damit katholischen - Räuber. Im 19. Jh. ging daraus die Liberale Partei ("Liberal Party") hervor.

Die "Whigs" kamen meist aus den Städten und waren Kaufleute und Neureiche. Sie waren meist keine Anhänger der anglikanischen Kirche.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Whig" geht zurück auf "Whiggamore" = dt. "Viehtreiber" (Westschotte der 1648 am Zug gegen Edinburgh teilnahm, ein schottischer Rebelle des 17. Jh.).

Natürlich waren diese Bezeichnungen nicht gerade ehrenhaft und sie entstanden als abwertende Bezeichnungen der jeweiligen Gegenseite.

(E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/boy/tory

Tory


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/10198.html

Liberal Unionists or Tory Democrats: Those Conservatives or Tories who have a strong bias towards democratic measures.


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/tory

"TORY", subst. masc.

Étymol. et Hist. 1. 1704 subst. (E. de Clarendon, Hist. de la rébellion et des guerres civiles d'Angleterre, I, 17 et n. ds Höfler Anglic.); 2. 1712 adj. (Remontrance aux "Torys" ..., 9, ibid.). Empr. à l'angl. "Tory", nom donné vers 1679-80, à l'orig. comme une insulte de leurs ennemis, à ceux qui s'opposaient à l'exclusion du duc d'York, converti au catholicisme, de la succession à la couronne d'Angleterre; puis "Tory" devint à partir de 1689 le nom d'un des deux grands partis pol. du pays (1689 "Tory party"), avant que cette appellation ne soit concurrencée puis évincée par conservative party « parti conservateur » au xixes., "Tory" ne subsistant que dans l'usage fam., notamment pour exprimer l'attachement à une politique ou à des valeurs démodées, ou comme terme dépréc. Empr. à un type irl. "*tóraidhe" "poursuivant" que différents dér. permettent de postuler, "Tory" désignait des opposants irlandais dépossédés vivant en hors-la-loi (1646), puis tous partisans armés ou des bandits (NED).


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/torysme

TORYSME, subst. masc.,

"Torysme", subst. masc., attest. 1717 "Torisme" (De Cize, Hist. du Whiggisme, p. 26 ds Bonn., p. 158), 1826 "torysme" (Revue encyclopédique, sept., 689 ds Höfler Anglic.); de tory, suff. "-isme*" prob. d'apr. l'angl. "torism", "toryism" att. dep. 1682 (NED).


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Tory

"Tory" (n.) 1566, "an outlaw," specifically "one of a class of Irish robbers noted for outrages and savage cruelty", from Irish "toruighe" "plunderer", originally "pursuer", "searcher", from Old Irish "toirighim" "I pursue", from "toir" "pursuit", from Celtic "*to-wo-ret-" "a running up to", from PIE root "*ret-" "to run", "roll" (see rotary).

About 1646, it emerged as a derogatory term for Irish Catholics dispossessed of their land (some of whom subsequently turned to outlawry); c. 1680 applied by Exclusioners to supporters of the Catholic Duke of York (later James II) in his succession to the throne of England. After 1689, "Tory" was the name of a British political party at first composed of Yorkist Tories of 1680. Superseded c. 1830 by Conservative, though it continues to be used colloquially. In American history, "Tory" was the name given after 1769 to colonists who remained loyal to George III of England; it represents their relative position in the pre-revolutionary English political order in the colonies. As an adjective from 1680s.


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/5402/pg5402.html

TORY. An advocate for absolute monarchy and church power; also an Irish vagabond, robber, Or rapparee.


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/k

Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1795-1870: Horse-Shoe Robinson - A Tale of the Tory Ascendency (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s

Stimpson, Herbert Baird: The Tory Maid (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2010/05/generous-haystack-and-crooked-nosed.html

...
In 1169 some Englishman invaded Ireland. ... Territory is best marked out with "stakes" (steaks don't work) and the Latin for stake is "palus" and so such territory is called a "pale". So the territory around Dublin was called "The Pale" and everything else was Irish and beyond The Pale.

Anyway, the English rampaged about, driving innocent Irishmen from their ancestral peat-bogs. These innocent Irishman found that in their straitened and vagabond conditions innocence no longer paid and many turned to banditry. They became thieves, or to give the proper Irish word "tories".

The word "tory" found its way into English as a pejorative term for an Irish Catholic. The English were mostly protestant with a protestant king called Charles II who died and was replaced by James II who was (like Mrs Malaprop) of the Roman Obedience. James II was not simply Catholic, he also appeared to have plans to give his Irish Catholic henchmen their land back and so his supporters were insultingly called "Tories".

The "Tories" did all right for a while. They didn't get to keep James II, who was ousted in the Glorious Revolution; but they stuck around well into the eighteenth century until they were wiped out by the "Whigs". In the late eighteenth century the "Whigs" themselves split and one faction, the Friends of Pitt, were insultingly referred to as "Tories". Everybody had by this time forgotten that "tory" meant "thief". The term essentially meant "You're like those people from a hundred years ago that we wiped out".

Even in 1812 when they were in government they preferred to call themselves "Whigs". They were the true "Whigs" in the way that the Real IRA consider themselves real. (I'm more frightened of the surreal IRA). Then in 1834 there was the Tamworth Manifesto and they decided to call themselves "Conservatives" and the name became official.

"Tory" has always been an insult. Indeed, the posters in this election campaign saying "I've never voted Tory before but..." were the first official posters ever to use the word.
...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Tory

Tory


(E?)(L?) http://littre.reverso.net/dictionnaire-francais/definition/tory/73993

"tory"

Nom donné en Angleterre primitivement aux partisans de Charles II, et qui est resté un parti politique soutenant la prérogative royale et les principes conservateurs. Les "torys" et les "whigs".
...
Quelques-uns écrivent, à l'anglaise, au pluriel "tories".
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm

tory (conservateur)


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Tory
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Tory" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-04

U

V

W

Wars of the Roses (W3)

Die "Rosenkriege", engl. "Wars of the Roses", spielen auf die Wappensymbole der verfeindeten Herrscherhäuser York und Lancaster an.

The Wars of the Roses were fought in Britain in the fifteenth century during the reign of Henry VI. These civil wars raged for thirty years, and both sides used the rose as a symbol. The Red Rose of Lancaster was ultimately victorious; the White Rose of York belonged to the vanquished. Shakespeare wrote about this bloody conflict in his epic three-part tragedy, Henry VI.

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Wars Of The Roses


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/e
Everett-Green, Evelyn, 1856-1932: In the Wars of the Roses, A Story for the Young (English) (as Author)

(E6)(L1) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/glossary.php


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/gl.php?n=47


(E?)(L?) http://history.howstuffworks.com/european-history/wars-of-the-roses.htm

Wars of the Roses, 1455–85, a struggle for the throne of England fought between the royal families of Lancaster and York. The name comes from the family symbols—a red rose for Lancaster, a white one for York. Much of the fighting was merely local, between the private armies of England's nobles.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.onelook.com/?w=Wars+of+the+Roses&ls=a

We found 19 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word Wars of the Roses:


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Wars of the Roses
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Wars of the Roses" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1710 / 1800 auf.

Erstellt: 2012-06

Whig (W3)

Seit dem 17. Jh. traten in Großbritannien zwei Interessengruppierungen auf die als "Tory" ("Tories") und "Whig" ("Whigs") bezeichnet wurden. Auch im 18. Jh. formierten sich diese Gruppen noch nicht zu Parteien im heutigen Sinn.

Die "Tories" entstammten hauptsächlich dem landbesitzenden Adel (engl. "landed gentry") und unterstützten die Interessen der anglikanischen Kirche. Sie waren die Vertreter einer konservativen Politik. Im 19. Jh. ging daraus die Konservative Partei ("Conservative Party") hervor.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Tory" geht zurück auf irisch "toraidhe" = dt. "Verfolger", "Räuber" und ir. "tóir" = dt. "verfolgen". Im 16. und 17. Jh. wurden irische Geächtete als "Tories" bezeichnet. Im 17. Jh. bezeichnete engl. "tórai" einen irischen - und damit katholischen - Räuber. Im 19. Jh. ging daraus die Liberale Partei ("Liberal Party") hervor.

Die "Whigs" kamen meist aus den Städten und waren Kaufleute und Neureiche. Sie waren meist keine Anhänger der anglikanischen Kirche.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "Whig" geht zurück auf "Whiggamore" = dt. "Viehtreiber" (Westschotte der 1648 am Zug gegen Edinburgh teilnahm, ein schottischer Rebelle des 17. Jh.).

Natürlich waren diese Bezeichnungen nicht gerade ehrenhaft und sie entstanden als abwertende Bezeichnungen der jeweiligen Gegenseite.

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/289.html

Song-Awa', Whigs, Awa'


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/index2.html

Awa', Whigs, Awa'


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/index3.html

O Gowdie, terror o' the whigs


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/1002.html

Whigmeleeries, crotches.


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/17401.html

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

"Whig" is from "Whiggam-more", a corruption of "Ugham-more" ("pack-saddle thieves"), from the Celtic "ugham" (a "pack-saddle"). The Scotch insurgent Covenanters were called "pack-saddle thieves", from the "pack-saddles" which they used to employ for the stowage of plunder. The Marquis of Argyle collected a band of these vagabonds, and instigated them to aid him in opposing certain government measures in the reign of James I., and in the reign of Charles II. all who opposed government were called the "Argyle whiggamors", contracted into "whigs". (See TORY.)
...

"Whiggism"

The political tenets of the "Whigs", which may be broadly stated to be political and religious liberty. Certainly Bishop Burnet’s assertion that they are “opposed to the court” may or may not be true. In the reigns of Charles II. and his brother James, no doubt they were opposed to the court, but it was far otherwise in the reign of William III., George I., etc., when the "Tories" were the anti-court party.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/219/index.html

Swift in London; Association with Addison and the Whigs


(E?)(L2) http://www.britannica.com/

Patriot Whigs (political party, Great Britain)


(E?)(L?) http://encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/1352.html

Whigs


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/whig

WHIG, subst. masc. et adj.

Étymol. et Hist. 1. 1690 adj. et subst. « partisan, ou qui est partisan, de la cause presbytérienne »
...
Empr. à l'angl. "whig" désignant tout partisan de la cause presbytérienne en Écosse au xviies., plus spéc. les covenantaires qui marchèrent contre Édimbourg en 1648, puis les partisans de l'exclusion du duc d'York, converti au catholicisme, de la succession au trône d'Angleterre, et enfin, dep. 1689, les membres du parti qui fut appelé plus tard parti libéral et était opposé au parti "tory", conservateur.

L'angl. "whig" semble être l'abrév. de "whiggamore" désignant des covenantaires rebelles de 1648 dont la marche fut appelée "whiggamore raid" (1649 "whigamore road" ds NED), l'orig. de "whiggamore" n'étant pas clairement établie (v. NED et Klein Etymol.). Le terme "whig" est passé en anglo-amér. pour désigner les partisans de la révolution puis en 1834 le parti opposé aux démocrates qui devint le parti républicain (sens donné ds Littré).


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/whiggisme

whiggisme


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/whigisme

whigisme


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Whig

Whig

British political party, 1657, in part perhaps a disparaging use of "whigg" "a country bumpkin" (1640s); but mainly a shortened form of "Whiggamore" (1649) "one of the adherents of the Presbyterian cause in western Scotland who marched on Edinburgh in 1648 to oppose Charles I." Perhaps originally "a horse drover", from dialectal verb "whig" "to urge forward" + "mare". In 1689 the name was first used in reference to members of the British political party that opposed the Tories. American Revolution sense of "colonist who opposes Crown policies" is from 1768. Later it was applied to opponents of Andrew Jackson (as early as 1825), and taken as the name of a political party (1834) that merged into the Republican Party in 1854-56.

In the spring of 1834 Jackson's opponents adopted the name "Whig", traditional term for critics of executive usurpations. James Watson Webb, editor of the New York Courier and Enquirer, encouraged use of the name. [Henry] Clay gave it national currency in a speech on April 14, 1834, likening "the whigs of the present day" to those who had resisted George III, and by summer it was official. [Daniel Walker Howe, "What Hath God Wrought," 2007, p.390]

"Whig historian" is recorded from 1924. "Whig history" is "the tendency in many historians ... to emphasise certain principles of progress in the past and to produce a story which is the ratification if not the glorification of the present." [Herbert Butterfield, "The Whig Interpretation of History," 1931]


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/files/12513/12513-h/12513-h.htm
In der "Dewey Decimal Classification" findet man:





(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/u


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/10996

Whig Against Tory
or
The Military Adventures of a Shoemaker, a Tale of the Revolution (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.heritage.nf.ca/dictionary/azindex/pages/5395.html

"whig" n [ = an adherent to the British political party opposed to the Tory].
Phrase: "there are whigs in that": there is something suspicious going on (P 54-67).
1937 DEVINE 57 "There's wigs in that story." Something suspected though not yet apparent.


(E?)(L?) http://www.laut.de/Afghan-Whigs

Afghan Whigs


(E?)(L?) http://www.neologisms.us/

Whig: a member of the Retro avantgarde, wielders of apodeictic anachronism


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Cotton%20Whig

...
The "Cotton Whigs" who had supported a conciliatory policy toward the South around 1850 were long gone a decade later when South Carolina seceded from the Union and forcibly seized Charleston's Federal Ft. Sumter, which triggered the U.S. Civil War. The "Whig Party" was succeeded by President Lincoln's Republican Party in 1854.


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Whig

Whig


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/1999/07/

Whig: a friend and supporter of the American Revolution.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/1999/07/04.html

Whig


(E?)(L?) http://www.rocksbackpages.com/library.html

Afghan Whigs


(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm

whig (libéral)


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1094

whigmaleerie


(E?)(L?) http://home.comcast.net/~wwftd/uvwxyz.htm#whigmaleerie

whigmaleerie


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Whig
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Whig" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-04

X

Y

York and Lancaster - Rose

While the "Red Rose of Lancaster" is a gallica and the "White Rose of York" is an alba, "York and Lancaster" is a damask rose. The flowers of this untidy shrub [rosa damascena versicolor] span the color possibilities: pink, white, white flecks on pink, pink flecks on white. The fable that named this rose alleges that Lancaster took a red rose from it, and York took a white.

(E?)(L1) http://www.apictureofroses.com/cms/home/nameindex-lesroses.htm

057 "York and Lancaster" "R. damascena variety" "Rosier d’Yorck et de Lancastre" "Rosa Damascena Variegata"


(E?)(L?) http://www.classicroses.co.uk/products/roses/york-and-lancaster/


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=York+and+Lancaster&searchmode=none


(E?)(L?) http://www.frost-burgwedel.de/index.php?nummer=1&vergleich1=&vergleich2=&vergleich3=&seite=rose&id=404

York and Lancaster - Rosa damascena


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

York and Lancaster | Rosa damascena = York and Lancaster rose.


(E?)(L?) http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchresult.cfm?keyword=%22Wars+of+the+Roses%22




(E?)(L?) http://www.r3.org/bookcase/arrival1.html

Historie of the Arrivall of Edward IV, in England and the Finall Recouerye of His Kingdomes from Henry VI. A.D. M.CCCC.LXXI
Edited by John Bruce, Esq. F.S.A.
Published for the Camden Society
M.DCCC.XXX.VIII
Part I
INTRODUCTION
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosenfoto.de/LiRosenfotoFSY.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosenwiki.de/index.php/York_and_Lancaster

York and Lancaster
Damascener, 16. oder 17. Jahrhundert, unbekannt
Synonyme: "Rosa x damascena 'Versicolor'", "Rosa x damascena 'Variegata'"
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/xyz_duftrosen.htm#york_and_lancaster


Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Geschichte, Historia, Histoire, Storia, History

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

Gable, Rebecca
Die Hüter der Rose

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/343103635X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/343103635X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/343103635X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/343103635X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/343103635X/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe - Ehrenwirth
Erscheinungsdatum: 3. September 2005
ISBN: 343103635X


Kurzbeschreibung
England, 1413: Der dreizehnjährige John of Waringham leidet darunter, im Schatten seiner ruhmreichen erwachsenen Brüder zu stehen. Als er glaubt, sein Vater wolle ihn in eine kirchliche Laufbahn drängen, reißt er aus und macht sich allein auf den Weg nach Westminster, um in den Dienst des jungen Königs Harry zu treten. An dessen Seite erlebt er die Wiederbelebung des hundertjährigen Krieges und die legendäre Schlacht von Agincourt. Doch Johns Gefangennahme setzt dem fröhlichen Ritterdasein ein jähes Ende. Kardinal Beaufort, des Königs Onkel und trickreichster Diplomat, kann ihn schließlich freikaufen. Der mächtige Kardinal ist seit jeher Johns väterlicher Freund, und selbst als John mit dessen Tochter Juliana durchbrennt und somit unerlaubt eine Lancaster heiratet, überdauert diese Freundschaft. König Harrys plötzlicher Tod auf dem Höhepunkt seines Ruhms schafft jedoch ein gefährliches Machtvakuum, sodass niemand mehr sicher ist, der einen Tropfen Lancaster-Blut in den Adern hat. Und während auf den Schlachtfeldern Frankreichs eine Jungfrau auftaucht, die die englischen Besatzer aus dem Land jagen will, beginnt John zu begreifen, dass er nicht nur um das Leben des kleinen Thronfolgers Henry bangen muss, sondern auch um das seiner eigenen Kinder...


H

Hastings, Juliet - Die weiße Rose
Apassionata

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3404148223/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3404148223/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3404148223/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3404148223/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3404148223/etymologpor09-20
von Juliet Hastings, Sabine Inzlingen, Claudia Dorf
Broschiert - Lübbe
Erscheinungsdatum: November 2002


Kurzbeschreibung
Geoffrey ist nur allzu bereit, der jungen Witwe Rosamund beizustehen, die sich gegen den ruchlosen Sir Ralph behaupten muss. Erotischer Roman vor dem Hintergrund der Rosenkriege.

Appassionata: Tess Challoner hat sich durchsetzen können: Sie spielt die Carmen in einer neuen Londoner Produktion. Um in dieser Rolle überzeugen zu können, muss sie aber noch viel über Sehnsucht und Leidenschaft lernen. Die Welt des Theaters bietet dazu zahllose Möglichkeiten ...


I

J

K

Kielinger, Thomas
Kleine Geschichte Großbritanniens

(E?)(L?) http://www.humanitas-book.de/

Großbritannien ist uns nah wie wenige andere Länder und lässt sich doch oft nur aus seiner Vergangenheit verstehen. Die Geschichte seiner Könige und seiner Kultur, seiner großen Männer und überragenden Frauen, seiner Gesellschaft und seiner geistigen Leistungen ist reich an Farben - Schattenseiten jedoch nicht ausgeschlossen. In seinem glänzend geschriebenen Buch führt Thomas Kielinger durch die Geschichte der Insel, die sich einst ein Weltreich baute. 2009. 287 S., Zeittafel, Karten, Stammtafel, Lit., Personenreg., kart. Beck.


Erstellt: 2016-11

L

Lang, Sean (Autor)
British History for Dummies

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470035366/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470035366/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470035366/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470035366/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0470035366/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 444 Seiten
Verlag: John Wiley & Sons; Auflage: 2. Auflage (10. November 2006)
Sprache: Englisch

Erstellt: 2010-10

M

Maurer, Michael
Geschichte Englands

(E?)(L?) http://www.reclam.de/detail/978-3-15-010971-7

3., aktual. und erw. Auflage 2014
588 S. Mit 9 Karten und 4 Stammbäumen
Geb. mit Schutzumschlag. Format: 12,2 x 19,5 cm
ISBN: 978-3-15-010971-7

Die 3., aktualisierte und erweiterte Auflage dieses Standardwerks reicht bis zur Geburt des Thronfolgers Prinz George. Aber der Jenaer Historiker Michael Maurer erfasst natürlich abseits des Stoffs für die Yellow Press zunächst und vor allem die tiefgreifenden politischen, sozialen und kulturellen Entwicklungen und Bewegungen im Großbritannien der letzten Jahre, die Regierungen Brown und Cameron, die Auswirkungen der globalen Finanzkrise, die EU-Politik und die regionalen Selbständigkeitsbestrebungen.

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Autorinformation

Michael Maurer ist Professor für Kulturgeschichte an der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena und Autor zahlreicher Bücher zur europäischen Geschichte des 18. Jahrhunderts, zur deutschen, englischen, irischen und schottischen Geschichte.


Erstellt: 2014-02

Maurer, Michael
Kleine Geschichte Englands

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106370/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106370/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106370/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106370/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106370/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 558 Seiten
Verlag: Reclam, Ditzingen; Auflage: Aktualis. u. erw. Ausg. (Oktober 2007)
Sprache: Deutsch


Über das Produkt
Die "Kleine Geschichte Englands" informiert in ausführlicher Darstellung, Epochenüberblicken und Zeittafeln, illustriert durch Karten, Stammtafeln und Tabellen, über die Geschichte Englands von der angelsächsischen Landnahme im frühen Mittelalter bis zur unmittelbaren Gegenwart, zum Ende der Ära Tony Blair.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bpb.de/publikationen/TEEDR4,0,0,Kleine_Geschichte_Englands.html

Autor Michael Maurer
Seiten 535
Erscheinungsdatum 08.03.2006
Erscheinungsort Bonn
Bestellnummer 1528
Bereitstellungspauschale: 4,00 EUR

Inhalt
Michael Maurers "Kleine Geschichte Englands" breitet knapp, übersichtlich und für Laien verständlich die Geschichte der Insel aus. Dabei umreißt der Autor den Band als Essenz des gegenwärtigen Forschungsstandes der englischen Geschichtswissenschaft; das Buch berücksichtigt aus Platzgründen die irische, schottische und walisischen Gegebenheiten nur in ihren Bezügen zur englischen Geschichte.

Der Band gliedert sich in sechs Abschnitte:


(E?)(L?) http://www.reclam.de/detail/978-3-15-010637-2?query=Klene+Geschichte

Aktual. und erw. Ausgabe 2007.
Geb. Format 9,6 x 15,2 cm. 558 S.
ISBN: 978-3-15-010637-2
EUR (D): 19,90
Für diese neue Hardcover-Ausgabe wurde die Kleine Geschichte Englands von Michael Maurer aktualisiert und um ein neu geschriebenes letztes Kapitel erweitert. Die Zeitgeschichte führt nun bis in die unmittelbare Gegenwart und kann nach dem Rücktritt Tony Blairs auch ein Resümee seiner Ära ziehen.

Inhaltsverzeichnis


N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z