Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Hören, Oír, Entendre, Ascoltare, Hear - Gehörsinn, Sentido del Oído, l'Ouïe, Senso dell'Udito, Sense of Hearing - Ohr, Oreja, L'Oreille, Orecchio, Ear

A

B

C

D

din (W3)

Engl. "din" = dt. "Lärm", "Getöse", "Geklirr", "Waffenklirren", "Gerassel", als Verb dt. "durch Lärm betäuben", "predigen", "jemandem etwas einhämmern", "lärmen", "dröhnen", ist eines der ältesten Worte der englischen Sprache und soll auch als sanskr. "dhuni" mit der Bedeutung dt. "brüllen", "tosen", "toben", "brausen" zu finden sein. Engl. "din" scheint mit dt. "donnern" verwandt zu sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=din

"din" (n.), Old English "dyne" (n.), "dynian" (v.), from Proto-Germanic "*duniz" (cognates: Old Norse "dynr", Danish "don", Middle Low German "don" "noise"), from PIE root "*dwen-" "to make noise" (cognates: Sanskrit "dhuni" "roaring", "a torrent").


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=din

Limericks on din


(E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=din
Bei Shakespeare findet man engl. "din" 134 mal.


Search Results for "din" — 134 match(es)


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/din

din


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=din
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "din" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1580 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

E

F

G

H

hubbub (W3)

Engl. "hubbub" (1555) = engl "uproar", "noise", "confusion" = dt. "Aufruhr, "Geräusch", "Durcheinander", "Stimmengewirr", "Lärm", "Tumult", soll ein Überbleibsel aus dem Keltischen sein. Vermutlich handelt es sich um eine Interjektion schott., gäl., kelt. "ub! ub!", "ub ub ubub!", mit der "Verachtung" und "Geringschätzung" zum Ausdruck gebracht werden sollte. Oder es basiert auf einem irischen Kriegsruf ir. "abu".

Als Synonyme für engl. "hubbub" findet man engl. "ado", "agitation", "brouhaha", "clamour", "clatter", "commotion", "confusion", "din", "disorder", "disturbance", "flap", "fuss", "hullabaloo", "hurly-burly", "noise", "pandemonium", "racket", "rumpus", "stir", "tumult", "turmoil", "uproar".

Als Antonyme für engl. "hubbub" findet man engl. "peace and quiet", "silence", "serenity", "tranquillity", "quietness", "calmness.

(E?)(L?) http://absoluteshakespeare.com/glossary/w.htm

"WHOOBUB", sub. "hubbub"


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2012/10/01


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/hubbub


(E?)(L?) http://www.billcasselman.com/new_2013_January%202/hubbub_new_origin.htm

Hubbub: Newly Proposed Origin
...
In fact, the historical evidence for a Celtic origin is skimpy, not to say invisible. A far more likely ancestor exists and it is the thousand-year-old Arabic name for "howling sandstorm", "haboob".

A "haboob" is a powerful sandstorm, from Arabic "habub" "blowing violently", "blowing as a high wind". The Arabic verbal stem "habb" means "to blow". As one American traveler wired home, after being caught in a Sudanese "haboob", “it’s one hell of a lollapalooza. Lasts three hours but that’s way long enough and it can drive sand grit straight into your skin.”
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hubbub

"hubbub" (n.) 1550s, whobub "confused noise," generally believed to be of Irish origin, perhaps from Gaelic "ub!", expression of aversion or contempt, or Old Irish battle cry "abu", from "buide" "victory."


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402

1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue by Francis Grose

HUBBUB. A noise, riot, or disturbance.


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=2108

...
SYNONYMS: "ado", "agitation", "brouhaha", "clamour", "clatter", "commotion", "confusion", "din", "disorder", "disturbance", "flap", "fuss", "hullabaloo", "hurly-burly", "noise", "pandemonium", "racket", "rumpus", "stir", "tumult", "turmoil", "uproar"


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hubbub

hubbub


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue073.html

...
Once source has abu coming from Old Irish "buide" "victory", which was also the relative of "Boadicea", the name of that warrior queen of the Britons who fought valiantly against Rome. Interestingly, that would make "Boadicea" (or, more correctly, "Boudicca") the ancient Britons' version of "Victoria".


(E?)(L?) http://hubbub.typepad.com/blog/

The Hubbub


(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Hubbub


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A

"hubbub": loud confused noise from many sources


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/hubbub

"Hubbub" is a fun, rhyming word for an "uproar", a "brouhaha", or another crazy situation that has gone completely higgledy-piggledy.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html

2008-06: Words borrowed from Irish: shebeen | dornick | hubbub | cosher | smithereens | AWADmail 311


(E?)(L?) http://wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0608

Jun 2008: Words borrowed from Irish: shebeen | dornick | hubbub | cosher | smithereens | AWADmail 311


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=hubbub
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "hubbub" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

hullabaloo (W3)

Engl. "hullabaloo" = dt. "Getöse", "Lärm", "Radau", "Spektakel", "Trubel", "Tumult", "Rebellion", "protest", geht vermutlich zurück auf engl. "hallo", "Hollo!", "Ho!, Holla ho!" und schott. "balloo", eine schottische Interjektion um Kinder zu besänftigen. Man findet engl. "hollo-ballo", "halloo-balloo", "hullabaloo" in gedruckter Form seit etwa 1760.

Eine sichere Herleitung ist jedoch nicht zu finden. Von den folgenden Herleitungsansätzen mag sich jeder die passende aussuchen.

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2008/10/08

...
In Play: Hullabaloos are usually raised or put up: "Adam Bahm raised a big hullabaloo at the police station over his wife's changing the locks on the doors to their house." Any large uproar hard to ignore counts as a hullabaloo: "I thought the public would have put up a bigger hullabaloo over the tax break that the local bubble-gum factory received."
...
..., some have speculated that it originated in an Old French expression "hola" from ho "Ho!" + "la" "there". "Hollo", of course, went on to become today's "hello".


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/8582.html

Hullabaloo


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/Hullabaloo/


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hullabaloo

"hullabaloo" (n.) 1762, "hollo-ballo" "uproar", chiefly in northern England and Scottish, perhaps a rhyming reduplication of "hollo" (see "hello").


(E?)(L?) http://pauls-notes.blogspot.de/

...
Can exposure to words affect our moods? Certainly! Here's a list of beautiful words as selected by Robert Beard (AKA Dr Language). Doesn't it feel good just reading them? "Wonderful", "love", "destiny", "fantastic", "blossom", "peace", "sunshine", "sweetheart", "enthusiasm", "butterfly", "smile", ... And if you're seeking amusement, just read this selection from the list of the funniest English words: "fuddy-duddy", "whippersnapper", "pettifogger", "hullabaloo", "mollycoddle", "bamboozle", "snollygoster".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/hullabaloo

Hullabaloo (USA 1965-1966)


(E?)(L?) http://www.hullabaloo-movie.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=1082

...
Origin: "Hullabaloo" is from the obsolete phrase "halloo-balloo". This is a fun word to use in conversation, and it's perfect if you need an unusual synonym instead of "noise" or "commotion". "Hullabaloo" began its life as the word "halloo", meaning to urge or incite with shouts. Then, by a process called "rhyming reduplication", the "balloo" part was added to form "halloo-balloo", which eventually transformed into "hullabaloo".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=117

hullabaloo


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=3270

...
Still others suggested it stemmed from "hurly-burly" or "hubbub", the latter of which allegedly evolved from a Celtic war cry. Another theory goes back to the Latin "ululates", which means howling.

Etymologists being a resourceful lot, more theories have made the rounds including the French hunting cry "bas le loup" ("bring down the wolf"), the Irish place name "Ballahooly" and the Turkish "kalabalik", which has the same sense as "hullabaloo".
...
SYNONYMS: "bedlam", "big scene", "brouhaha", "chaos", "clamour", "commotion", "confusion", "free-for-all", "furore", "fuss", "hassle", "hubbub", "hue and cry", "melee", "noise", "pandemonium", "racket", "riot", "row", "ruckus", "to-do", "uproar".
...


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/2008/03/28.html

...
Origin: "Hullabaloo" is perhaps a corruption of "hurly-burly" , or the interjection "halloo" with rhyming reduplication.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW121/page2.html#hullabaloo

...
Though no one knows for sure, this word is thought to derive from "halloo" / "hullo", the source of "hello", with the "balloo" portion being a rhyming reduplication. It first appears in writings from Scotland and the north of England and did not take its current form until the 20th century. The first form in the written record is "hollo-ballo" from 1762. The meaning has always been "tumultuous noise" or "commotion". There is the suggestion that the "baloo" part is related to "baloo" "a lullaby word", deriving from the phrase "bas le loup", supposedly part of an old French "lullaby". This sounds a bit iffy to us, as no one seems able to find this "lullaby" or explain why there is a wolf in it (loup means "wolf").

Another source claims that "hullabaloo" was the Irish word for "wailing at funerals", but again, there is no evidence to support this.


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?tvdbid=4153&m=SH&title=Hullabaloo

Hullabaloo


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/hullabaloo

"Hullabaloo" is a lovely term for a fuss or commotion, usually over something of little or no importance, like a celebrity's new hair style.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/090699.html#hullabaloo


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/hullabaloo.html

2007-01: Odd-looking words: hootenanny | teetotum | tohubohu | snuggery | hullabaloo | AWADmail 243


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0107

hullabaloo


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-hul1.htm

...
The standard explanation is that it was at first a rhyming cry "halloo-baloo!", perhaps from the hunting field. However, the Oxford English Dictionary points to the old Scots term "balow" or "baloo", which appeared in some early nursery rhymes and which has been used in Scots since the eighteenth century for a "lullaby". How a noise intended to "lull" babies to sleep turned into part of a word for uproar and confusion is best left to the reader’s imagination.

A more inventive suggestion is that it derives from French. In itself that’s not much of a stretch because of the close links between Scotland and France at this period. However, the French origin suggested, "bas le loup!", "bring down the wolf", is just too much of a stretch to swallow. On the other hand, the word "hurluberlu" exists in French, meaning "scatter-brained". This appears to have been first used by Rabelais in the sixteenth century.

There’s also "hurly-burly", boisterous activity, known from about 1540 and which famously appears in the scene with the three witches at the start of Shakespeare’s Macbeth: “When the Hurly-burly’s done, \ When the battle’s lost, and won”. This seems to be a contracted form of "hurling and burling", where a "hurling" is an even older term for a commotion, disturbance or tumult. "Burling" never existed on its own, and is no more than a rhyming variation on the first word, as has happened also in "namby-pamby", "itsy-bitsy" and others.

The French "hurluberlu" that I mentioned is roughly contemporary with "hurly-burly". There is a suggestion that Rabelais’ usage might be linked both to it and to the Scots words that eventually produced "hullabaloo", through related terms that shared the old idea of hurling.

By the way, the usual spelling now is "hullabaloo", but it has been spelled in so many ways down the years that that has to be considered arbitrary. The first time it appeared, in Smollett’s Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves of 1762, it is spelled very differently: “I would there was a blister on this plaguy tongue of mine for making such a "hollo-ballo"”.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=hullabaloo
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "hullabaloo" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

raucous (W3)

Das Adjektiv engl. "raucous" = dt. "rauh", "heiser", findet man zum ersten mal gedruckt im Jahr 1769. Es wird auf lat. "raucus" = engl. "hoarse", lat. "raucitas" = dt. "Heiserkeit" zurück geführt. Ursprünglich bedeutete engl. "raucous" = dt. "unangenehm schroff", "grell", und wandelte sich zu dt. "ausgelassen", "wild", "rowdyhaft".

Als Wurzel wird ein lautmalerisches ide. "*reu-", "*rau-" postuliert, das an engl. "roar" = dt. "brüllen", "brausen", "tosen", "donnern" erinnert. Diese Wurzel findet man auch in anderen indoeuropäischen Wörtern und in sanskr. "rayati" = engl. "bark" = dt. "bellen", griech. "oryesthai" = engl. "to howl" = dt. "heulen", "brüllen", "schreien", russ. "rev" = engl. "a roar". Engl. "roar" geht ebenfalls auf diese Wurzel zurück.

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2010/05/25

05/25/2010 raucous


(E?)(L?) http://www.classicsunveiled.com/romevd/html/vocabr.html

lat. "raucus", "rauca", "raucum" = engl. "harsh"


(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/word-of-the-day-raucous/

...
"Raucous" entered the language in the 18th century from a Latin word meaning "hoarse", "harsh", "rough".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=raucous

"raucous" (adj.) 1769, from Latin "raucus" "hoarse" (also source of French "rauque", Spanish "ronco", Italian "rauco"), related to "ravus" "hoarse", from PIE echoic base "*reu-" "make hoarse cries" (cognates: Sanskrit "rayati" "barks", "ravati" "roars"; Greek "oryesthai" "to howl", "roar"; Latin "racco" "a roar"; Old Church Slavonic "rjevo" "I roar"; Lithuanian "rekti" "roar"; Old English "rarian" "to wail", "bellow"). Middle English had "rauc" in the same sense, from the same source.


(E?)(L?) http://www.linguee.de/downloads/completeDict-latin9.txt




(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/1999/07/29.html

raucous: ...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/raucous

raucous


(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/landing/?w1=raucous

Something that makes a racket could be said to be raucous, but etymology plays no part in this coincidence. Raucous is a nearly direct Latin import from the 18th century. Racket is less convincingly derived but is older and probably native English word, of possible imitative origin. Laughter is the favorite right-hand companion of raucous today.


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A




(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/raucous


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=raucous
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "raucous" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1580 / 1780 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

ruckus (W3)

Engl. "ruckus" (Ende 19. Jh.) = dt. "Krawall", "Störung", "Kontroverse", "Streit", wird zurück geführt auf eine Vermengung von engl. "ruction" = dt. "Tohuwabohu", "Krach", "Krawall", "Schlägerei" und engl. "rumpus" = dt. "Krach", "Krawall", "Trubel", "Streit", und soll seit 1890 nachweisbar sein.

Die Herleitung von engl. "ruckus" von engl. "raucous" = dt. "rauh", "heiser" bietet sich zwar an, wird aber als nicht zutreffend angesehen.

Engl. "ruction" wird als Verkürzung von engl. "insurrection" = dt. "Aufstand" erklärt. Für engl. "rumpus" ist die Herkunft unbekannt.

(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/southernese.html

"Kick up a ruckus" verb phrase. Cause a commotion.

"Ruckus" n. A loud noise or anything that makes one. Etymology: Early High-Falutin "raucus", where it was bard from Latin.


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=ruckus

"ruckus": (n.) 1890, possibly a blend of "ruction" and "rumpus".


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/ruckus

"ruckus", pl. ruckuses


(E?)(L?) http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/browse-eggcorns/

"ruckus" » "raucous"


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=3124

ruckus


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ruckus

ruckus


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html

1997-04: Portmanteau words: palimony | muzzy | prissy | ruckus | splurge | splatter | splotch


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0497

ruckus


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=ruckus
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "ruckus" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1810 / 1910 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

S

T

U

uproar (W3)

Engl. "uproar" (um 1660, engl. "uproarious", 1819) = dt. "Tumult", "Toben", "Lärm" kam aus den Niederlanden nach England und ist eng mit dt. "Aufruhr" verwandt, mit dt. "rühren" = engl. "stir". Engl. "uproar" ist nicht verwandt mit engl. "roar" = dt. "brüllen", das mit dt. "röhren" verwandt ist.

Uber die Wurzel ide. "*kere-" ist engl. "uproar" und dt. "Aufruhr" verwandt mit dt. "Krater", der über lat. "crater" auf griech. "krater" = dt. "Mischkrug", "Mischkessel" zurück geht.



Bei Adelung findet man:


Der "Aufruhr", des -es, plur. doch sehr selten, die -e, das Abstractum von "aufrühren",

1. Eigentlich eine heftige Bewegung mehrerer aus Widersetzlichkeit gegen die rechtmäßige Obrigkeit, Gewaltsame Vertheidigung mehrerer des Ungehorsams gegen die Obrigkeit; da es denn eigentlich einen noch höhern Grad der Widersetzlichkeit bedeutet, als Empörung. Einen Aufruhr erregen, anfangen, anstiften. Den Aufruhr dämpfen. Es entstand ein heftiger Aufruhr. Es lässet sich zu einem Aufruhre an.

2) Figürlich in der höheren Schreibart, eine jede heftige Bewegung. Er bemüht sich umsonst, den Aufruhr des wallenden Blutes zu besänftigen, Zachar. Eine tödtende Unruhe jagt mich überall herum, meine ganze Seele ist Aufruhr, von Brawe. Ich seh' es, daß dein Herz in neuem Aufruhr ringt, Weiße.

Anm. "Aufruhr" lautet Nieders. "Uproor", Schwed. "Uproor", Engl. "Uproar". Im Nieders. hat das einfache "Roor", und im Friesländischen "Röring" eben dieselbe Bedeutung. Man könnte in Versuchung gerathen, dieses Wort von dem Niedersächsischen "raren", Angelsächs. "raran", Engl. "roar". Holländ. "reeren"; Franz. "reer", "schreyen", herzuleiten, weil dergleichen Bewegung gemeiniglich mit einem großen Geschreye verbunden ist. Allein es ist wohl unstreitig, daß es von dem folgenden "aufrühren" abstammet, weil in einem Aufruhre, wie Frisch saget, die bösen Leute, als die Grundsuppe des Pöbels, rege gemacht und aufgerühret werden. S. das folgende. Es ist sonderbar, daß dieses Wort im Hochdeutschen männliches Geschlechtes ist, da doch das einfache "Ruhr" überall das weibliche Geschlecht hat. "Aufruhr" selbst ist im Oberdeutschen weibliches Geschlechtes, daher es Luther Sir. 46, 9; Luc. 23, 19: Apostelg. 23, 10; Judä v. 11. gleichfalls in diesem Geschlechte gebraucht; ob er es gleich in andern Stellen männlich genommen hat. Der Plural kommt selten vor, vermuthlich weil es eigentlich ein Abstractum ist. Ist er ja nöthig, so ist Aufruhre schicklicher als Aufrühre. Für "Aufruhr" kommt bey dem Ottfried "Urheiz" und "Wertisal", bey dem Tatian "Gistriti", und bey dem Kero "Widarwigo" vor. "Giruornissi" gebraucht Tatian von einer heftigen Bewegung des Meeres.

"Aufrühren", verb. reg. act. "herauf rühren", durch Rühren in die Höhe bringen.

1) Eigentlich, das Dicke, was sich in einem flüssigen Körper auf den Grund setzet, durch Rühren herauf bringen. Den Roth, die Hefen aufrühren. Metonymisch auch, das Wasser, das Bier aufrühren. Der brausende Sturm, der das Meer von Grunde aus aufrührete, Dusch.

2) Figürlich. (1) * Die Unterthanen wider ihre Obrigkeit in eine heftige Bewegung bringen. Sie haben wider Ottonem aufgerühret, Hedion Kirchenhist. bey dem frisch. Diese Bedeutung ist veraltet; indessen ist das Substantiv der Aufruhr noch in derselben gänge und gebe. Schon bey dem Tatian bedeutet er "giruorit folc", er bewegte das Volk. (2) Von neuen erwähnen, von neuen in Bewegung bringen; in verächtlichem Verstande. Eine längst vergessene Sache wieder aufrühren. Einen alten Streit aufrühren. So auch die Aufrührung


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080624034423/http://www.bartleby.com/61/65/u0136500.html

"uproar", from Middle Low German "ror", motion, from Germanic "*hror-;"


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080624034423/http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE226.html

ide. "*kere-"

DEFINITION: To "mix", "confuse", "cook". Oldest form "*kere-", becoming "*kere-" in centum languages. 1. Variant form "*kra-" (- "*krae-"). a. "uproar", from Middle Low German "ror", "motion", from Germanic "*hror-"; b. "rare", from Old English "hrer", lightly boiled, half-cooked, possibly from Germanic "*hror-" (see a). 2. Zero-grade form "*kre-". a. Suffixed form "*kre-ti-". "idiosyncrasy"; "dyscrasia", from Greek "krasis", a "mixing"; b. suffixed form "*kre-ter-". "crater", "krater", from Greek "krater", "mixing vessel". (Pokorny er- 582.)


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/16998.html

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

"Uproar" is not compounded of "up" and "roar", but is the German "auf-rühren" ("to stir up").


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=uproar

"uproar" (n.) 1520s, "outbreak of disorder", "revolt", "commotion", used by Tindale and later Coverdale as a loan-translation of German "Aufruhr" or Dutch "oproer" "tumult", "riot", literally "a stirring up", in German and Dutch bibles (as in Acts xxi:38). From German auf (Middle Dutch op) "up" (see up (adv.)) + "ruhr" (Middle Dutch "roer") "a stirring", "motion", related to Old English "hreran" "to move", "stir", "shake" (see "rare" (adj.2)). Meaning "noisy shouting" is first recorded 1540s, probably by mistaken association with unrelated "roar".


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a

Allen, William G.: Into An Uproar. (English) (as Author)


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402

1811 DICTIONARY OF THE VULGAR TONGUE.

"ROARATORIOS AND UPROARS". "Oratorios and operas".


(E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=uproar
"uproar" bei Shakespeare:


Uncommercial Traveller

Title: The Uncommercial Traveller Author: Charles Dickens Source: Gutenberg Source URL: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/914 THE UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELLER CHAPTER I–HIS GENERAL LINE OF BUSINESS Allow me to introduce myself–first negatively. No landlord is my friend and brother, no chambermaid loves me, no waiter worships me, no boots admires and envies me. No round of beef or tongue or […]

Macbeth

Essays on Macbeth: John Boe, The Tragedy of Macbeth Macbeth is one of Shakespeare’s best-known plays, despite being supposedly cursed: in theatrical circles its name is taboo, and it is referred to simply as ‘the Scottish play’. It is also one of the shortest plays, at just over half the length of Hamlet. Drawing on […]

Titus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus is Shakespeare’s first Classical play, written in the early 1590's, and his first tragedy. It has obvious classical influences, notably from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, which is discussed onstage, and from Seneca’s graphic tragedies written in Neronian Rome. It has sometimes been criticised as immature and unsubtle, some Victorian critics even dismissing the play as […]

Henry IV part 1

“So shaken as we are, so wan with care”: so King Henry IV, the former Bolingbroke, begins a play that remains half in the shadow of the regicide at the end of Richard II. The King worries about his son, whom he sees as a prodigal and liable to be supplanted by the far more […]

The Rape of Lucrece

The story of Lucrece, found in both Ovid and Livy, has inspired scores of famous depictions. Britten, Rembrandt, Chaucer, Titian, Gower, Dante, Raphael and Richardson all used the story in their work, but none as famously as Shakespeare in his long narrative poem, The Rape of Lucrece (1594). The poem shares its theme with Venus […]

Henry VI part 1

Henry VI, Part 1 invites controversy. The First Folio prints it chronologically among Shakespeare’s histories, first of three Henry VI plays, diverging from order of composition. Thereby Heminge and Condell imply an intended sequence, but Henry VI, Part 1 may be a ‘prequel’ after The First Part of the Contention betwixt the Two Famous Houses […]

Henry VIII

The First Folio provides Henry VIII’s only authoritative text (1623), probably a clerical copy and not a performance script. It provides a sequel to the triumph of Henry VII which ends Richard III, using episodes from the careers of his son Henry VIII and other descendants of figures in that earlier play. The script shares […]

Word of the Day: Christmas

Shakespeare was, I’m sure, no grinch, but he does only mention ‘Christmas’ a mere three times, twice in the same play. That play is Love’s Labour’s Lost, and within it, Berowne is the xmas-obsessed character. Near the start of the play, as the King of Navarre and his friends prepare to vow themselves to celibacy, […]

Word of the Day: Tennis

Wimbledon has begun, and I have fulfilled my promise of typing ‘Tennis’ into the dialogue box of the Open Shakespeare website as the prelude to another wander through the works of Mr William Shakespeare. Six examples come out, some from famous scenes, some less so. It would be hard, for example, to find a more […]


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/o/?i=771664

"uproar" occurs 5 times in 5 speeches within 5 works.

Possibly related word: "uproars"
Users have searched 17 times for "uproar" in Open Source Shakespeare.
The numbers below indicate the number of speeches in which "uproar" appears in each listed work. If a single speech contains "uproar" more than once, the speech will still be counted once as part of the total count.
You may want to see all the instances at once.


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/o/?i=783176

"uproars" occurs 1 time in 1 speech within 1 work.
Possibly related word: "uproar"
Users have searched 2 times for "uproars" in Open Source Shakespeare.
The number below indicates the number of speeches in which uproars appears in the listed work. If a single speech contains uproars more than once, the speech will still be counted once as part of the total count.


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/uproar

uproar


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/uproarious

uproarious


(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=u




(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=uproar
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "uproar" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1610 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

V

W

X

Y

youpronounce.it
You pronounce it

(E?)(L1) http://youpronounce.it/

Use YouTube to improve your English pronunciation. Real people, real situations, easy and fun to use.


Erstellt: 2015-11

Z