Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Literatur, Literatura, Littérature, Letteratura, Literature

A

Alice in Wonderland
Alice in Wonderland syndrome
Lilliput sight (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_Liddell


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_in_Wonderland


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alice_in_Wonderland_syndrome
Die Namens-Patin für "Alice in Wonderland", "Alice Liddell", war die Jugendliebe von "Charles Lutwidge Dodgson", der das Werk 1865 unter seinem Pseudonym "Lewis Carroll" herausgab.
"Alice Pleasance Liddell" (May 4, 1852 - November 16, 1934) was the inspiration for the heroine of the children's classic "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" by Lewis Carroll (pen name of "Charles Lutwidge Dodgson").

Nach dieser Geschichte, in der ja viele Tiere auftreten, wurde später ein bestimmtes Krankheitsbild benannt.

"Alice in Wonderland syndrome" ("AIWS"), or "micropsia", is a disorienting neurological condition which affects perception by the human eye.
Sufferers perceive objects (including animals and other humans, or parts of humans, animals, or objects) as appearing substantially smaller than in reality. Generally, the object appears far away at the same time. For example, a family pet, such as a dog, may appear the size of a mouse, or a normal car may look shrunk to scale.
This leads to another name for the condition, namely, "Lilliput sight". The condition is in terms of perception only; the mechanics of the eye are not affected, only the brain's interpretation of information passed from the eyes.
...
The disorder is named after Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland", where the title character experiences many situations similar to those of micropsia and macropsia. Since it is known that Carroll suffered from migraines, there is some speculation that he might have written that work from direct experience.


author, authority (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.abanet.org/ceeli/publications/other_pubs/hickson_texas_int_law.pdf
Cf. ELIZABETH TONKIN, NARRATING OUR PASTS: THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF ORAL HISTORY 39
(1992). Tonkin notes that the link between power and story-telling is connected at the level of language, for the words "authority" and "author" have a common etymology.

B

barnesandnoble
Barnes & Nobles
Etymologie-Literatur
Etymology-Literatur

(E?)(L?) http://www.barnesandnoble.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bn.com/


(E?)(L?) http://books.barnesandnoble.com/search/results.aspx?WRD=Etymologie


(E?)(L?) http://books.barnesandnoble.com/search/results.aspx?WRD=Etymology


bartleby004
Milton, John
Complete Poems Written in English

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/hc/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/4/

Harvard Classics, Vol. 4
The Complete Poems of John Milton
Written in English
John Milton
Paradise Lost and Regained—among the greatest epic poems of any age—combined with the full array of Milton’s English works secure his eternal place among the poet laureate pantheon.

CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record
NEW YORK: P.F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY, 1909–14
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2001

Contents


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/4/index1.html

John Milton. (1608–1674). Complete Poems.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Contents
Introductory Note
Poems Written at School and at College, 1624–1632 Poems Written at Horton, 1632–1638 Poems Written During the Civil War and the Protectorate, 1642–1658 Paradise Lost, 1658–1663
The Verse | The First Book | ... | The Twelfth Book

Paradise Regained, 1665–1667
The First Book | ... | The Fourth Book

Samson Agonistes, 1667–1671
Milton’s Introduction
Lines 1–249 | ... | Lines 1500–1761


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/4/index2.html

John Milton. (1608–1674). Complete Poems.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Index to Titles


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/4/index3.html

John Milton. (1608–1674). Complete Poems.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Index to First Lines


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/people/Milton-J.html
John Milton

bartleby006
Burns, Robert
Poems and Songs

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/hc/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/

Harvard Classics, Vol. 6
The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns
Robert Burns
The most lauded poet of Scotland, Burns had a love of his nation’s songs, like Auld Lang Syne, which has been infectious ever since the world over. The musical highland dialect in the 557 works is translated in a glossary of over 1,900 words and phrases.

CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record
NEW YORK: P.F. COLLIER & SON COMPANY, 1909–14
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2001


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/index1.html

Robert Burns. (1759–1796). Poems and Songs.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.

Contents




(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/index2.html

Robert Burns. (1759–1796). Poems and Songs.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Index to Titles



(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/index3.html

Robert Burns. (1759–1796). Poems and Songs.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Index to First Lines



(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/6/1002.html

Robert Burns (1759–1796). Poems and Songs.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.
Glossary



(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/people/Burns-Ro.html
Robert Burns

bartleby211
Volume I. From the Beginnings to the Cycles of Romance

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/211/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume I: English FROM THE BEGINNINGS TO THE CYCLES OF ROMANCE
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby212
II. The End of the Middle Ages

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/212/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume II: English - THE END OF THE MIDDLE AGES
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby213
III. Renascence and Reformation

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/213/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume III: English - RENASCENCE AND REFORMATION
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby214
IV. Prose and Poetry from Sir Thomas North to Michael Drayton

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/214/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume IV: English - PROSE AND POETRY - SIR THOMAS NORTH TO MICHAEL DRAYTON
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Note | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby215
V. The Drama to 1642: Part I

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/215/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume V: English - THE DRAMA TO 1642 - Part One
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby216
VI. The Drama to 1642: Part II

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/216/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume VI: English - THE DRAMA TO 1642 - Part Two
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Table of Principal Dates




bartleby217
VII. Cavalier and Puritan

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/217/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume VII: English - CAVALIER AND PURITAN
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Table of Principal Dates




bartleby218
VIII. The Age of Dryden

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/218/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume VIII: English - THE AGE OF DRYDEN
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Prefatory Note | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby219
IX. From Steele and Addison to Pope and Swift

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/219/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume IX: English - FROM STEELE AND ADDISON TO POPE AND SWIFT
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby220
X. The Age of Johnson

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/220/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume X: English - THE AGE OF JOHNSON
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Prefatory Note | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby221
XI. The Period of the French Revolution

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/221/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume XI: English - THE PERIOD OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Prefatory Note | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby222
XII. The Romantic Revival

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/222/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume XII: English - THE ROMANTIC REVIVAL - The Nineteenth Century, I
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Preface | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby223
XIII. The Victorian Age: Part I

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/223/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume XIII: English - THE VICTORIAN AGE - Part One - The Nineteenth Century, II
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Prefatory Note | Table of Principal Dates




bartleby224
XIV. The Victorian Age: Part II

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/224/index.html

THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE
An Encyclopedia in Eighteen Volumes
Volume XIV: English - THE VICTORIAN AGE - Part Two - The Nineteenth Century, III
Edited by A. W. Ward & A. R. Waller
Bibliographic Record
CONTENTS: Prefatory Note | Table of Principal Dates




Benedick (W3)

Der in Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" auftretende "Benedick" geht auch auf den Namen "Benedict" zurück.

bibliomania.com
Literature online

(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/

Free Online Literature with more than 2000 Classic Texts

read

Choose a section: Fiction | Poetry | Short Stories | Drama | Interviews | Articles

Choose: Collections | Editorial | History of Drama | History of Poetry | History of the Novel | SEARCH BY THEME | Samuel Hopkins Adams | A St John Adcock | Joseph Addison | Max Adeler | AEsop | Louisa M. Alcott | Thomas Bailey Aldrich | James Lane Allen | JE Amos | Leonid Andreyev | Appollonius of Rhodes | Apuleius | Gertrude Atherton | Stacy Aumonier | J. A. Barbey d'Aurevilly | Jane Austen | Jane Barlow | J. M. Barrie | Charles Baudelaire | Beaumont and Fletcher | William Beckford | Charles de Bernard | Ambrose Bierce | R.D. Blackmore | William Blake | Frederick Booth | George Borrow | The Bronte Sisters | Rupert Brooke | George Brooke | Noah Brooks | Robert Browning | Henry Cuyler Bunner | John Bunyan | Thomas A. Burke | Samuel Butler | Francis Buzzell | George W. Cable | Lewis Carroll | Miguel Cervantes | Geoffrey Chaucer | Anton Chekhov | Kate Chopin | Irvin S. Cobb | Captain Roland T. Coffin | Mary Coleridge | Wilkie Collins | William Congreve | James B. Connolly | Joseph Conrad | Susan Coolidge | Fenimore Cooper | Jilly Cooper | Francois Coppee | William Cowper | Stephen Crane | Allan Cunningham | George WM. Curtis | Mary Stewart Cutting | Alphonse Daudet | Samuel Davis | Rebecca Harding Davis | Richard Harding Davis | Honore De Balzac | Daniel Defoe | John W. De Forest | Walter De La Mare | Villiers De L Isle Adam | Thomas Deloney | Guy De Maupassant | Alfred de Musset | Marguerite de Navarre | Gerard de Nerval | Charles Dickens | Fyodor Dostoevsky | Arthur Conan Doyle | John Dryden | Alexandre Dumas | Mary Tracy Earle | TS Eliot | George Eliot | Sir George Etherege | J. Meade Falkner | George Farquhar | Henry Fielding | Gustave Flaubert | Anatole France | Oliver Francis | Harold Frederic | Stephen Fry | Richard Garnett | Vsevolod Garshin | Mrs Gaskell | Theophile Gautier | John Gay | Murray R. Gilchrist | George Gissing | Nikolai Gogol | Oliver Goldsmith | Catherine Grace Gore | Maxim Gorky | Robert Grant | Julian Green | Frederick Stuart Greene | Frances Gregg | The Brothers Grimm | H. Rider Haggard | Thomas Hardy | Henry Harland | Joel Chandler Harris | Francis Bret Harte | Alexander Harvey | John Hawkesworth | Nathaniel Hawthorne | Lafcadio Hearn | Heliodorus | O. Henry | Herodotus | Homer | Wm. C. Honeyman | Anthony Hope | Clemence Housman | Thomas Hughes | Victor Hugo | Aldous Huxley | Henrik Ibsen | Washington Irving | Henry James | Jerome K. Jerome | Sarah Orne Jewett | Doctor Johnson | Ben Jonson | James Joyce | John Keats | Jonathan F. Kelly | Omar Khayyam | Charles Kingsley | Rudyard Kipling | Gustav Kobbe | Vladimir Korolenko | Jean De La Fontaine | Charles & Mary Lamb | D.H. Lawrence | Gaston Leroux | Addison Lewis | Livy | Jack London | Samuel Lover | Katherine Mansfield | J.F. Marmontel | Captain Marryat | Somerset Maugham | Katherine S. B. McDowell | Herman Melville | Prosper Merimee | Charlotte Mew | Richard B. Middleton | Mary Russell Mitford | Moliere | George Moore | Arthur Morrison | Hector H. Munro | W. H. H. Murray | Newbold Noyes | John Oakum | Fitz-James O'brien | Seumas O'Brien | Baroness Orczy | Thomas Otway | Ovid | Thomas Nelson Page | Charles Perrault | Petronius | Phaedrus | Elizabeth Stuart Phelps | Charles-Louis Philippe | David Pinching | Pliny the Younger | Edgar Allan Poe | Eleanor H Porter | Alex Preston | Alexander Pushkin | Thomas de Quincey | Francois Rabelais | Craig Raine | Ernest Renan | Barnaby Rich | Hallie Erminie Rives | Benjamin Rosenblatt | Dante Gabriel Rosetti | Edgar Saltus | Sir Walter Scott | Anna Sewell | William Shakespeare | Mary Shelley | Richard Sheridan | Henryk Sienkiewicz | Tobias Smollett | Somerville & Ross | Sophocles | Harriet Prescott Spofford | Richard Steele | Laurence Sterne | Robert L Stevenson | William James Stillman | Frederic Jesup Stimson | Frank R. Stockton | Louise Stockton | Lorimer Stoddard | Bram Stoker | H. Beecher Stowe | Agnes Strickland | David Stuart Davies | Surtees | Jonathan Swift | JM Synge | Bayard Taylor | William M. Thackeray | Leo Tolstoy | George A. Townsend | Anthony Trollope | John Trowbridge | Mark Twain | Sir John Vanbrugh | Jules Verne | Virgil | Voltaire | Horace Walpole | Stanley Waterloo | H G Wells | Edith Wharton | William Hale White | Walt Whitman | Oscar Wilde | J. M. Wilson | Owen Wister | PG Wodehouse | William Wycherley | Yeats | Emile Zola | Anon.

study

Choose a section: Study Guides | Teacher Resources

Choose: History | Literary Criticism | W. H. Auden | Jane Austen | The Bronte Sisters | Albert Camus | Raymond Chandler | Clarke and Kubrick | Joseph Conrad | Charles Darwin | Richard Dawkins | Daniel Defoe | Charles Dickens | John Donne | George Eliot | F. Scott Fitzgerald | Gustave Flaubert | Sigmund Freud | The Gawain Poet | Gothic Authors | Graham Greene | Thomas Hardy | Homer | Gerard Manley Hopkins Aldous Huxley | Islam | Ben Jonson | James Joyce | D.H. Lawrence | Mikhail Lermontov | Linguistics | Katherine Mansfield | Christopher Marlowe | Andrew Marvell | Arthur Miller | John Milton | Thomas More | George Orwell | Jean Rhys | Sir Walter Scott | William Shakespeare | Sophocles | Stendhal | Leo Tolstoy | Anthony Trollope | Sergeyevich Turgenev | Virgil | Evelyn Waugh | H G Wells | Edith Wharton | Oscar Wilde | Virginia Woolf

research

Choose a section: Non Fiction | Reference | Biographies | Religious Texts

Choose: History of American Lit. | Walter Bagehot | Sir Henry Bessemer | Biographical Dictionary | Brewer's Phrase & Fable Brewer's Readers Guide | Lewis Carroll | Christianity | Clausewitz | Culpeper | A.S. Eddington | Ralph W. Emerson | Benjamin Franklin | Sigmund Freud | Gibbon | Grocott's Quot. - Alpha | Grocott's Quot. - Thematic | Hobson Jobson | Mrs. Humphry | Islam | Thomas Jefferson | Percival Lowell | Machiavelli | Charles Mackay | Karl Marx | James Nasmyth | Nefzaoui | Friedrich Nietzsche | Thomas Paine | Samuel Pepys | Ernest Rhys (ed) | Roget's Thesaurus | Count of Rumford | Percy B. Shelley | Samuel Smiles | Adam Smith | Soule's Synonymes | William M. Thayer | John Tyndall | Vatsyayana | Webster's Dictionary


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/3/frameset.html

Reference

Welcome to the Bibliomania reference section. This is where you can find, in one place, fully searchable copies of your favourite language reference books, including dictionaries, books of quotations, synonyms, thesaurus, and literary sources. Doing vocabulary exercises? Look up the words in "Websters' Dictionary", then put them into our search engine and find many examples of use by the great authors.

Writing an article? Find some inspiration in "Bartlett's Dictionary of Quotations" or "Grocott's Dictionary of Quotations".

Writing an essay, or your first novel? Use "Roget's Thesaurus" and "Soule's Synonyms" to find different ways of expressing your ideas.

Wondering where that word comes from? It might well be from India or a precursor to one of the Indian languages. "The Hobson Jobson Dictionary" of Anglo/Indian Words will tell you.

Looking for a literary reference, or obscure author biography? Its probably there in "Brewer's Phrase and Fable", or "Brewer's Reader's Handbook". But you could also try Rhys' "Biographical Dictionary" and "Simonds' History of American Literature"

On a non-literary theme, are you looking at a homeopathic remedy but want to find out about the herbs in it? "Culpeper's Complete Herbal" will give you the answers.

If you want to be notified of new titles as they appear, register with bibliomania and click the email alerts box.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/29/61/frameset.html

Fiction: James Joyce - Ulysses


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/1/65/112/frameset.html

Non Fiction: Adam Smith - Wealth of Nations


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/3/255/frameset.html

Reference: Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/1/64/111/frameset.html

Non Fiction: Machiavelli - Prince


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/1/frameset.html

Non Fiction

Bibliomania brings you a wide selection of non-fiction books that have influenced generations.




(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/17/frameset.html

Fiction: Daniel Defoe


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/0/0/29/frameset.html

Fiction: James Joyce


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/0/2/277/1298/frameset.html

Poetry: Collections - Collected French Verse

Table of contents


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/NonFiction/Machiavelli/Prince/index.html

Non Fiction: Machiavelli - Prince


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/3/258/frameset.html

Soule's Synonymes

Prefaces

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Erstellt: 2016-11

bookrags
Literature summaries online

(E?)(L?) http://www.bookrags.com/

BookRags is the premier research site for students, with over 8.3 million pages of literature summaries, biographies, literary criticism, essays, encyclopedias, and eBooks sourced from over 100 respected education databases.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bookrags.com/Etymology


Brobdingnagian (W3)

Engl. "Brobdingnagian" (1728) = dt. "außerordentlich groß", "kolossal", "enorm", engl. "of huge size", "enormous", "gigantic", "tremendous", geht auf ein imaginäres Land zurück in dem alles sehr groß war. Das Land wird von Jonathan Swift in seinem Werk "Gullivers Reisen", engl. "Gulliver's Travels", beschrieben.

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2014/4

04/11/2014 Brobdingnagian


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2007/12

12/07/2007 Brobdingnagian


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/Brobdingnagian

Brobdingnagian


(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/giants-causeway

Northern Ireland
Giant's Causeway
Northern Ireland's Brobdingnagian stepping stones 


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/B3.html

Brobdingnagian


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/2537.html

Brobdingnag


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/2537.html

Brobdingnagian


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Brobdingnagian
(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/1999/07/01/brobdingnagian

Brobdingnagian


(E?)(L?) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn_b.html#brobdingnagian

brobdingnagian


(E?)(L?) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Brobdingnagian

Pronunciation of "Brobdingnagian".

Definition of "Brobdingnagian":  marked by tremendous size

Did You Know?

In Jonathan Swift's novel Gulliver's Travels, Brobdingnag is the name of a land that is populated by a race of human giants "as tall as an ordinary spire steeple."
...
(Swift himself had used "Brobdingnagian" as a noun to refer to the inhabitants of Brobdingnag.)


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Brobdingnagian

Limericks on "Brobdingnagian"


(E?)(L?) http://quoteinvestigator.com/category/jonathan-swift/

Category Archives: Jonathan Swift


(E?)(L?) http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Of-Nerds-And-Words-The-etymology-of-technology-2863066.php

Of Nerds And Words / The etymology of technology terms we know and love

Anu Garg, Special to SF Gate Published 4:00 am, Thursday, March 14, 2002

When Gulliver came across that race of brutes known as "Yahoos" during his travels to fantastic lands, who could have guessed that one day that name would be worth $200 billion on Wall Street? Coined by Jonathan Swift in his masterly 1726 satire "Gulliver's Travels", the word has come a long way in its nearly 300-year-old journey to becoming one of the best-known Internet addresses in the world. It was Swift's genius that led to several coinages from his famous book entering the English language, including "Brobdingnagian" ("something very big"), "Lilliputian" ("something very small") and "Laputan" ("impractical visionary").
...


(E?)(L?) https://www.waywordradio.org/?s=Brobdingnagian




(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brobdingnag

"Brobdingnag" is a fictional land in Jonathan Swift's satirical novel Gulliver's Travels occupied by giants. Lemuel Gulliver visits the land after the ship on which he is travelling is blown off course and he is separated from a party exploring the unknown land. Apparently this name is a typo, as in the book prologue Gulliver calls it Brobdingrag.

The adjective Brobdingnagian has come to describe anything of colossal size.
...


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2008-8-Aug.htm

Brobdingnagian (unit bias)

Gulliver’s first voyage gave us a term for “tiny; miniature”. His second gave us a term for “huge”.

Brobdingnagian – gigantic; immense; enormous
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/brobdingnagian.html
(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0695
(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0308

brobdingnagian


(E2)(L1) http://www.wordspy.com/diversions/fave-words.asp

Brobdingnagian


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-bro1.htm

Brobdingnagian

It is given to only a limited number of people to add a word to the language, or at least to have been given the credit for doing so. But Jonathan Swift originated eight in his most famous and enduring book, Gulliver’s Travels, of 1726.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/brobdingnagian

Brobdingnagian


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Brobdingnagian
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Brobdingnagian" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1730 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Brobdingnagian

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2017-02

Brother Cadfael - Rose
Bruder Cadfael - Rose



Der walisische Name "Cadfael" bedeutet soviel wie "Anführer", "der Erste im Kampf", engl. "battle prince", von wal. "cad" = "Kampf" und "mael" = "Prinz" , engl. "prince". (lat. "princeps" = "im Rang der Erste", "die erste Stelle einnehmend", lat. "primus" = "Erster" und lat. "capere" = "einnehmen").

Benannt wurde die englische Tee-Rose "Brother Cadfael" ("AUSglobe") nach einer Romanfigur. Die englische Autorin Ellis Peters schrieb einen mittelalterlichen Kriminalroman, in dem der kräuterkundige Mönch "Bruder Cadfael" die Rolle des "Detektivs" spielt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.behindthename.com/nm/c.html#cadfael


(E6)(L1) http://www.davidaustinroses.com/


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/menub/

Brother Cadfael


(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/browse.lasso

Brother Cadfael mp Medium Pink, English Rose (Shrub) 1990


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=B

Bruder Cadfael (GB 1994-1996)


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=860


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Brother Cadfael
Limericks on Brother Cadfael

(E?)(L?) http://www.pflanzen-im-web.de/pflanzen/pflanzen-suche/Rosen/index.php

Englische Rose "Brother Cadfael" (Ausglobe) ~ Rosa Hybr.


(E?)(L1) http://www.rogersroses.com/gallery/chooserResult.asp

Brother Cadfael (Ausglobe)


(E6)(L1) http://www.rosefile.com/RosePages/Galleries.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SB

Bruder Cadfael


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/duftrosen.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/duftrosen/b_duftrosen.htm#brother_cadfael


(E?)(L?) http://www.welt-der-rosen.de/namen_der_rosen/was_namen_der_rosen.htm

Brother Cadfael




(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453131657/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453131657/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453131657/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453131657/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453131657/etymologpor09-20
Peters, Ellis
Bruder Cadfael, der Detektiv. Der Rosenmord. Der geheimnisvolle Eremit.
Ein mittelalterlicher Kriminalroman
Broschiert - Heyne
Erscheinungsdatum: 1997
ISBN: 3453131657
Autorenporträt

Ellis Peters ist das Pseudonym der englischen Autorin Edith Pargeter. 1913 in Wales geboren, arbeitete sie nach ihrer Schulzeit als Apothekenhelferin, verlor aber ihr Ziel, Schriftstellerin zu werden, niemals aus den Augen. Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg begann sie Romane zu schreiben, außerdem übersetzte sie eine Reihe tschechischer Werke ins Englische. 1959 begann ihre Karriere als Krimiautorin, und bereits zwei Jahre später, 1961, wurde "Der Tod und die lachende Jungfrau" mit dem Edgar-Allan-Poe-Award ausgezeichnet. Ellis Peters starb im Oktober 1995.

Da "Bruder Cadfael" Erfolg bei den Krimifans hatte, erschienen weitere Kriminalromane in denen er sein detektivisches Können unter Beweis stellen konnte.

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453186753/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453186753/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453186753/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453186753/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453186753/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und das fremde Mädchen

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453867955/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453867955/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453867955/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453867955/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453867955/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und das Geheimnis der schönen Toten

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453770730/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453770730/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453770730/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453770730/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453770730/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und das Mönchskraut

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098420/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098420/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098420/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098420/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098420/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und das Mönchskraut

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453210956/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453210956/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453210956/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453210956/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453210956/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und der Hochzeitsmord

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453873319/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453873319/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453873319/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453873319/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453873319/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und die Mörderische Weihnacht

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453108175/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453108175/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453108175/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453108175/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453108175/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und die schwarze Keltin

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098412/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098412/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098412/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098412/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098412/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael und ein Leichnam zuviel

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098447/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098447/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098447/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098447/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453098447/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfael, Zuflucht im Kloster

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453160983/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453160983/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453160983/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453160983/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3453160983/etymologpor09-20
Bruder Cadfaels Buße

C

collectanea (W3)

Engl. "collectanea" = "Sammlung von Texten verschiedener Autoren" geht zurück auf lat. "collectus", und setzt sich zusammen aus lat. "col-" = dt. "zusammen", "mit", "völlig" und lat. "legere" = dt. "sammeln".

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=collectanea


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/collectanea


D

db-thueringen
Die Prosadialoge der englischen Renaissance (1528-1545)
: Erscheinungsformen und Strukturen

(E?)(L?) http://www.db-thueringen.de/servlets/DocumentServlet?id=1752


(E?)(L?) http://www.db-thueringen.de/servlets/DerivateServlet/Derivate-2773/Schoell.htm

In der Dissertation geht es um die Prosadialoge, die im England der henricianischen Zeit entstanden. Behandelt werden die Autoren Thomas Morus, Thomas Starkey, Roger Ascham und Thomas Elyot. Die Dialoge sind, wie in der Arbeit gezeigt wird, zwar thematisch unterschiedlich gelagert (Politik, Philosophie, Religion und Erziehung/Sport), weisen aber strukturell allesamt auf die Funktion von Verständigung und sprachlicher Vermittlung hin. Für diese Funktion erweist sich die Dialogform in dieser politisch bewegten Zeit als ideal geeignet.



Die Prosadialoge der englischen Renaissance (1528-1545): Erscheinungsformen und Strukturen
Dissertation zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades Doctor philosophiae (Dr. phil.)
vorgelegt dem Rat der Philosophischen Fakultät der Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
von Oliver Schöll

Inhalt




DK (W3)

"DK" steht für "Dorley Kindersley Verlag".

(E6)(L?) http://www.dk.com/


(E6)(L?) http://www.dorlingkindersleyverlag.de/


Dolly Varden - Rose

"Dolly Varden" ist eine Figur aus der Novelle "Barnaby Rudge" von Charles Dickens. Die Vorliebe für farbenreiche Kleidung ließ diese virtuelle Figur zum Namensgeber für Rosen, Fische ("a type of colorfully spotted trout"), eine Musikfruppe und eine Farbe werden.

(E?)(L?) http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/notebook/fish/dolly_v.php


(E6)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Colors_D.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.anthus.com/Colors/Cent.html#4
"Dolly Varden" als Farbe: - #ffbcad - Light Pink


(E2)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/61/97/D0329700.html

Dolly Varden
SYLLABICATION: Dol·ly Var·den
PRONUNCIATION: dl värdn
NOUN: A colorfully spotted trout (Salvelinus malma) of northwest North America and eastern Asia.
ETYMOLOGY: After "Dolly Varden", a character known for her colorful costume in the novel Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens.


(E?)(L?) http://www.billcasselman.com/canadian_words_and_sayings_promo/promo_page_one.htm

Dolly Varden Trout


(E?)(L?) http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/168300/Dolly-Varden-trout


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=34438
Dolly Varden (hybrid rugosa, Paul, 1914) - Hybrid Rugosa, Shrub. Apricot - pink, yellow undertones. Large bloom form. Blooms in flushes throughout the season. USDA zone 4a through 5b. Height of up to 39" (up to 100 cm). Paul and Son (1914), William Paul and Son (1914).

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=34439
Dolly Varden (polyantha, deRuiter, 1930) - Polyantha. Light pink. Small to medium, double (17-25 petals), in large clusters bloom form. Continuous (perpetual) bloom throughout the season. USDA zone 6b through 9b (default). De Ruiter Innovations BV (1930).

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2
Peonies: Dolly Varden

(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2006-2-Feb.htm


(E6)(L?) http://www.laut.de/wortlaut/artists/d/dolly_varden/index.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.lebensmittellexikon.de/s0000670.php


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa

...
The last thing out is "Dolly Varden" hash. It is made of red flannel, old rubber shoes, and salt beef. Dolly used to make it when she was a girl, all except the old rubber shoe ingredient, that having been added since her day, ...
(Anmerkung: "Dolly Varden" = "breitrandiger, blumengeschmückter Damenhut" oder "bunt geblümtes Damenkleid")
...
"Dolly Varden Pie" (1872)
Apropos to the season, an exchange gives a recipe for a "Dolly Varden" pie: "Take about four yards of light dough, gather it up in tucks and flounces, crimp the edges, and fill up with fruit; then lay on the over-skirt, fasten it with buttons of dough connected with frills ...
...


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.visitkenai.com/sportfishing/dolly.asp


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolly_Varden_trout

Origin of the name
It appears that the first recorded use of the "Dolly Varden" name to refer to a species of fish, was to S. confluentus, now commonly known as the bull trout. This was likely due to over-lapping ranges and similar appearances among members of the two species.


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/words/Dolly%20Varden

...
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia ...


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0300


E

enidblytonsociety
Enid Blyton Society

Enid Mary Blyton, Schriftstellerin, (11.08.1896 (London) - 28.11.1968 (Beckenham (Kent))

(E?)(L?) http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/

Society Shed | Author of Adventure | Enid Blyton Day | Fireside Journal | Cave of Books | Interactive Island | Secret Passage | Lashings of Links

Welcome to the website of the "Enid Blyton Society". Formed in early 1995, the aim of the Society is to provide a focal point for collectors and enthusiasts of Enid Blyton through its magazine "The Enid Blyton Society Journal", issued three times a year, its annual "Enid Blyton Day", an event which attracts in excess of a hundred members, and its website. Most of the website is available to all, but Society Members have exclusive access to secret parts as well! Join the Society today and start receiving your copy of the Journal three times a year. Don't forget also that we have an Online Shop where you'll find back issues of the Journal as well as rare Enid Blyton biographies, guides and more.

Popular Series:

Famous Five | Secret Seven | Adventure Series | Five Find-Outers | Barney Mysteries | Secret Series | Adventurous Four | Malory Towers | St Clare's | Naughtiest Girl | Six Cousins | Galliano's Circus | Faraway Tree | Wishing-Chair | Noddy


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/exploreraltflash/?tag=&page=63
Enid Blyton memorabilia Enid Blyton was a nursery teacher and these were school reports that she wrote. My late father, whose family name was ... Contributed by Individual

(E?)(L1) http://www.dahlie.net/


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=E


(E?)(L?) http://www.hp-lexicon.org/index/master-index-b.html
Blyton, Enid

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Blyton, Enid


(E?)(L?) http://www.pcgo.de/news/web-fundstueck-enid-blyton-society-1234556.html

Surftipp: Web-Fundstück: "Enid Blyton Society"

Über 750 Bücher gehen auf ihr Konto. Sie erdachte die Geschichten um "Hanni und Nanni", "Die schwarze Sieben", "Dolly" oder "Fünf Freunde" (eine neue Kinoadaption startet am 26. Januar). Um das Werk der Kinderbuchautorin Enid Blyton (1897 bis 1968) zu würdigen, formierte sich 1995 die "Enid Blyton Society".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SE


(E?)(L?) http://databases.unesco.org/xtrans/stat/xTransStat.a?VL1=A&top=50&lg=0
Die 50 Autoren, die weltweit am häufigsten übersetzt wurden waren am 02.06.2008:

...
BLYTON, ENID 3433
...

(E?)(L?) http://www.wasistwas.de/sport-kultur/alle-artikel.html
Enid Blyton: Schon mit 14 schrieb sie für Kinder

Erstellt: 2012-01

F

Fantasy, Fantasie, Phantasie, Phänomen (W3)

Der Begriff "Fantasy" = "Phantasie", "Einbildungskraft", "Hirngespinst" wird "in der Szene" assoziiert mit Betandteilen der Magie, Phantastische Wesen, Helden, Mystisches, vielfach vorrangig auf mittelalterliche Inhalte wie Schwertkämpfe, blankes Metall auf nackter Haut, Kampf gegen Drachen, Hexen, Dämonen und Zauberer, die Welt der Elfen und Feen.

Der "Szene-Begriff" "Fantasy" (für eine Gattung von Romanen, Filmen, ...) soll entscheidend von J.R.R. Tolkien (Professor der Universität Oxford) in seinem ersten Roman "The Tolkien" (1937) geprägt worden sein.

Das Wort "Fantasy", dt. "Fantasie" oder "Phantasie" geht zurück auf lat. "phantasia", griech. "phantasía" und "phantázesthai" = "erscheinen" und ist weiter verwandt mit "phaínesthai" = "Phänomen".

Das Wort "Phänomen" geht entsprechend zurück auf lat. "phaenomenon" = "Erscheinung", griech. "phainómenon" = "das Erscheinende" und "phaínesthai" = "erscheinen".

Frankenstein (W3)

Normalerweise wird "Frankenstein" (umgangssprachlich seit 1838) mit einem Monster gleichgesetzt. "Baron Frankenstein", "Viktor Frankenstein" oder auch "Dr. Frankenstein" war jedoch der Forscher, der das Monster aus Leichenteilen bastelte. Beide Figuren findet man in der Novelle von Mary Wollstonecraft-Shelley (1818).

Ein Theorie besagt, dass Mary Wollstonecraft-Shelley bei einem früheren Deutschlandbesuch auch die Burg Frankenstein besucht hat.

Der Name der Burg bedeutet etwa "Stein der Franken", "Burg der Franken", "Burg der Freien".

Seit 1990 kann man den Präfix engl. "franken-" auch ganz allgemein in der Bedeutung "non-natural" finden.

"Frankenstein" fand als "Frankenstein-Dracula Variation" auch Eingang in die Sprache der Schachspieler.

"Frankenstein" has even morphed into other words; for instance genetically modified crops are sometimes called "frankenfood" with the idea that we don’t really know what the knock on effects of creating these organisms are. In 1816 a 19 year old Mary Shelly had eloped with her husband the poet Percy Shelly and was hanging around with another notable of the time, Lord Byron. It was Lord Byron who suggested as a sort of game that each of them should write a ghost story.

(E?)(L?) http://www.archive.org/details/Tales_of_Tomorrow_16_Frankenstein




(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/6770.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/222/1104.html
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley: Frankenstein

(E?)(L?) http://www.chess.com/openings/


(E?)(L?) http://www.chess.com/opening/eco/C27_Vienna_Game_Stanley_Variation_Frankenstein_Dracula_Variation
C27 Vienna Game: Stanley Variation, Frankenstein-Dracula Variation

1.e4 e5 2.Nc3 Nf6 3.Bc4 Nxe4 4.Qh5 Nd6 5.Bb3 Nc6 6.Nb5 g6 7.Qf3 f5 8.Qd5 Qe7 9.Nxc7+ Kd8 10.Nxa8 b6 167 0 view

(E?)(L?) http://www.comedix.de/lexikon/db/frankenstein.php


(E?)(L?) http://www.djfl.de/entertainment/djfl/f.html
Frankenstein (1931)

(E?)(L?) http://www.djfl.de/entertainment/djfl/m.html
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Frankenstein


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=F
Frankenstein, wie er wirklich war (USA/GB 1973) | Frankensteins Tante (CS/D/A/F 1987)

(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=S
Sprechstunde bei Dr. Frankenstein (D 1996-1997)

(E?)(L1) http://www.handlungsreisen.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.hyperkommunikation.ch/literatur/shelley_frankenstein.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.hyperkommunikation.ch/personen/shelley.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.hyperkommunikation.ch/personen/vaucanson.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list/?subject=sf_criticism

Frankenstein complex (n.): antedating 1947 Isaac Asimov, 'Little Lost Robot' - the anxiety and distrust humans feel for robots


(E2)(L1) http://www.mundmische.de/
Frankensteins Gesellenstück

(E?)(L?) http://www.toonopedia.com/
Frankenstein (1940) • Frankenstein (1966) • Frankenstein (1973) • Frankenstein Jr. | Monster of Frankenstein

(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1973


(E?)(L?) http://www.top40db.net/Lyrics/?SongID=73050&By=Year&Match=
Frankenstein - by Edgar Winter Group

(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SF
Frankenstein, wie er wirklich war | Frankensteins Kater | Frankensteins Tante

(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SS
Sprechstunde bei Dr. Frankenstein | Spreepiraten

(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=frankenstein

Frankenwords:
franken | franken paper | franken boobie | franken tits | franken-douche | Franken-fine | franken-gun | frankenband | Frankenbelly | Frankenberger | FrankenBerry | Frankenbike | frankenbitch | frankenblumpkin | frankenblunt | Frankenboner | Frankenboo | frankenboobs | Frankenbraun | frankenbung | Frankenbush | Frankenchicken | frankenclop | Frankencode | Frankencougar | frankencut | Frankendesign | frankendike | frankendolling | frankendong | Frankendouche | Frankendyke | frankenesque | Frankenface | Frankenfaith | Frankenfaithful | Frankenfan | frankenfanny | Frankenfart | frankenfeltcher | frankenfit | frankenfood | frankenfoods | frankenfoot | frankenfritter | frankenfrog | FrankenFrogStien | frankenfuck | frankenfurniture | frankenfurter | Frankengina | Frankengoober | frankengoof | Frankengun | Frankenhead | frankenhooker | Frankenjackson | Frankenjuice | frankenlunch | FrankenMac | Frankenmilf | frankenmouth | Frankenmuth | frankennut | frankenpack | Frankenpaper | Frankenpenis | Frankenpets | Frankenpiss | FrankenPod | Frankenporksword | frankenporn | frankenpussy | frankenputer | frankenqueer | frankenraver | FrankenShart | Frankensicle | Frankensite | frankenskank | frankensnatch | Frankensplash | Frankenstack | Frankenstein | Frankenstein Blunt | frankenstein cum | frankenstein doobie | frankenstein drag queens from planet 13 | Frankenstein Fuckstick | frankenstein haircut | frankenstein meal | frankenstein paper | Frankenstein That Shit | Frankenstein Vagina | Frankenstein Walk | Frankensteine | Frankensteined | frankensteiner | Frankensteinification | frankensteins | Frankensteins Monster | frankenstien | frankenstien feet | Frankenstien's Foreskin | Frankenstoner | Frankenstupid | frankensystem | frankentard | Frankentities | Frankentits | Frankentitties | Frankentoe | frankentranny | frankenwaffel | frankenwank | Frankenwanken | frankenwanker | frankenweenie | frankenwhore | frankenword


(E?)(L?) http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/browse-mixed-new?id=SheFran&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed&tag=public


(E1)(L1) http://www.w-akten.de/begrifflichkeiten.phtml


(E?)(L1) http://www.wasistwas.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wasistwas.de/sport-kultur/alle-artikel/artikel/link//b77cd45b31/article/mary-shelley-frankensteins-mutter.html
Mary Shelley - Frankensteins Mutter

(E?)(L?) http://www.wispor.de/wpx-fah2.htm

Dies ist aber nicht richtig, das Geschöpf hat keinen Namen. Es wird im ganzen Roman nur Monster oder Dämon genannt.


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0896


(E6)(L?) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/frankenstein.html


G

global-language
E-book Downloads Page

(E?)(L?) http://www.global-language.com/djvueds/

AUTHOR TITLE/DATE


gnarl
gnarled
gnarler
gnarly
Knorren (W3)

Das engl. "gnarl" = "verdrehen", "verflechten" kam 1814 auf als Rückbildung von "gnarled".

Das engl. "gnarled" = "(Holz) voller Knoten"", "knotig", "knorrig" gehört zu den vielen Wörtern, die Shakespeare populär machte. Es erscheint zum ersten Mal 1603 in Shakespeare's "Measure for Measure" ("gnarl" = "to snarl" = "wütend knurren"). Im 19 Jh. griffen es romatische Dichter wieder auf.

Das engl. "gnarled" findet man oft in Zusammenhang mit der Beschreibung von Weinstöcken. Aber auch die Bezeichnung "gnarled syntax" fand ich bei meiner Suche.

Alle englischen und deutschen Varianten gehören zu den "kn-" Wörtern, die alle eine "knotige" Eigenschaft beschreiben (z.B. auch dt. "Knopf", "Knie", "Knauf"). Im Englischen findet man dazu ein altengl. "knar" = "Knoten in Holz" (1382). Im "Kluge" findet man unter "Knorren" den Hinweis auf ein altdt. "chniurig" mit der Bedeutung "muskulös", was auf die dabei hervortretenden "Beulen", "Knoten", "verdickter Gegenstand" zu beziehen ist.

Das engl. "gnarly" findet man 1829 zum ersten Mal. Ab 1970 benutzten es Surfer, um damit eine gefährliche ("sehr verdrehte") Welle zu bezeichnen. Ab 1980 findet man "gnarly" in der Jugendsprache in der Bedeutung "hervorragend" und "abscheulich", d.h. es kann sowohl positiv als auch negativ verstärkend wirken.

In einem Newsletter von Merriam Webster vom 24. August 2005 findet man neben dem aus der Surfersprache in die Allgemeinsprache eingegangenen hawaiianischen "Nuumehelani" = "referring specifically to a place in Oahu" = "the heavenly site where you are alone" auch den Hinweis auf "gnarly".

Dazu findet man die Vermutung, dass "gnarly" an einem Strand mit "Monterey Cypressen mit knotigen Wurzeln" aufkam. Ursprünglich als Bezeichnung für eine gefährliche Welle erhielt es die Bedeutung engl. "bad", "nasty", "cool", "good".

(E?)(L?) http://www.abc.net.au/wordmap/what_is_slang.htm

...
Slang can be limited in the community of speakers who use it. Particular activities can give rise to such a special community. Surfers use terms like "gnarly" and "rad", racegoers use expressions like "bet London to a brick", and "mudlark".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.baens-universe.com/articles/The_Gnarly_Man


(E?)(L?) http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/G/gnarly.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.collinslanguage.com/results.aspx?action=define&context=9&text=gnarled
"gnarly" = "Dangerous" or "scary", especially in relation to extreme sports. E.g. "That climb was gnarly". Also applies to describe a person. "He is gnarly" means a person is "hard" or "brave".

"gnarly", Surfing slang, used as an expression of the sea's state when a strong wind is blowing across the shoreline making the waves untidy and quite dificult to surf. (Also spelled "KNARLEY") 1. "Heavy", "intense". Heavy, difficult waves, usually quite big. 2. "Rough Going". "Danger Ahead". "That knarley wave fully biffed my board on the rocks."

(E?)(L?) http://lexicon.ff.cuni.cz/pdf/pgmc_torp/pgmc_torp.pdf
"plappern", "murren", "knurren" (engl. "snarl" = "gnarl")

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=gnarl


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=gnarl


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402
Grose, Francis - Dictionary of the vulgar tongue, 1811:


"GNARLER". A little dog that by his barking alarms the family when any person is breaking into the house.

Ein engl. "gnarler" ist also eine "Knurrer".


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2004-1-Jan.htm

Last Saturday was the 75th birthday of Popeye, a gnarly, one-eyed cartoon character who butchered the English language. The Popeye comic strip contributed several words to our language - as best I can tell, more words than any other strip except Li'l Abner.


(E3)(L1) http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/g/gnarly.html


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=gnarl


(E?)(L?) http://www.swr3.de/musik/poplexikon/-/id=47414/did=177028/nrdp3m/index.html
Gnarls Barkley

(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue097.html

...
"Gnarly", by the way, comes from surfing and originally referred to something dangerous or treacherous (probably something like a grizzly bear or a gun; just kidding - of course it referred to waves as you suggested, Patrick).  It was soon picked up by non-surfers with that meaning but then, as is sometimes wont to happen in English, it did a 180 degree turn and came to mean something at the opposite end of the spectrum: "cool".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordcentral.com/cgi-bin/student?book=Student&va=gnarl

"Gnarly" is a synonym of "gnarled". It's also a slang term that can mean "difficult", "nasty", or "cool". Drew Barrymore recently used the "nasty" sense when she spoke of someone who had "some pretty gnarly karma coming".


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/gnarled


grass roots (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-gra5.htm
Obwohl der Ausdruck "grass roots" bereits seit über 2 Jahrhunderten in Gebrauch ist, ist er erst 1901 in einer literarischen Quelle nachweisbar; in Rudyard Kiplings Novelle "Kim" (1901): "Not till I came to Shamlegh could I meditate upon the Course of Things, or trace the running grass-roots of Evil".

Gulliver effect, Liliputaner

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/Gullivereffect.asp
Den Begriff "Liliputaner", für zwergwüchsige Menschen hat tatsächlich Jonathan Swift erfunden. Sein Held "Gulliver" entdeckt auf seinen Reisen die Insel "Liliput", auf der ein Volk winziger Menschen lebt. In England benutzt man das Wort "Liliputaner" allerdings nicht.

Dafür gibt's den "Gulliver effect", wenn eine grosse Firma oder Organisation von mehreren kleineren attackiert wird.

gutenberg
Burton, Richard Francis
Vikram and the Vampire

(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2400
Classic Hindu Tales of Adventure, Magic, and Romance, by Burton, Richard Francis, Sir, 1821-1890

gutenberg
Polidori, John William
The Vampyre

(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/6087
A Tale, by Polidori, John William, 1795-1821 - Jul 2004 6087

H

Hekuba, Bei mir Hekuba! (W3)

(E2)(L2) http://www.blueprints.de/wortschatz/
Die Redensart hat ihren Ursprung in Shakespeares Hamlet. Dort heißt es (II, 2): "Was ist ihm Hekuba, was ist er ihr, dass er um sie soll weinen".
"Hekuba" war die Mutter Hektors, der in Homers Werk der Ilias zu Andromache sagt, ihn bekümmere das Leid der Trojaner, des Priamus und selbst seiner Mutter Hekuba weniger als das ihre.
Heute, wenn auch selten genutzt, sagt man "Bei mir Hekuba!", wenn man mit einer gewissen Selbstironie seine Ahnungs- und Interesselosigkeit bekundet.
Ich hab' kein Interesse, weiß von nichts - "Bei mir Hekuba!".
(© blueprints Team)

HS Augsburg
BIBLIOTHECA AUGUSTANA
Bibliotheca Anglica
Chronology

(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/harsch/index.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/welcome.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/2_link.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/augusta.html


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/a_resona.html

Bibliotheca Augustana

Ausgewählte lateinische, griechische, deutsche, englische, französche, italienische und spanische Texte, grafisch ganz exquisit dargeboten von Microsoft-Hasser Ulrich Harsch, Professor für Kommunikationsdesign und elektronisches Publizieren an der Fachhochschule Augsburg.

Der Witz dieser bibliotheca besteht darin, dass sie und auch ihr schmaler erklärender Rahmen vollständig in Latein daherkommen, eingeschlossen gute Ratschläge wie cave Gatem et Exploratorem! Wer Billem Gatem weniger cavet als der Internet-Anthologist dieses Site, hat übrigens nicht weniger davon. Die Texte sehen in Harschs Präsentation so schön aus, dass man fast denkt, der Bildschirm könnte dem gedruckten Buch vielleicht doch das Wasser abgraben.


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/anglica/Chronology/e_chrono.html

Chronology

Old English Literature Middle English Literature Early Modern English Literature Modern English Literature


(E?)(L1) http://www.hs-augsburg.de/~harsch/anglica/Authors/e_alpha.html
02.11.2008:


Authors and anonymous works

Page last updated: January 25, 2016




huff and puff (W3)

Die Redewendung "huff and puff" = dt. "schnaufen und keuchen" findet man in einer Kindergeschichte über drei Schweinchen. Darin zerstört der Wolf ihre kleine Behausung aus Stroh und Zweigen: "He huffed and he puffed, and he blew the house in". Nachdem eines der Schweinchen ein Haus aus Ziegelsteinen gebaut hatte, konnte der Wolf "schnaufen und keuchen" ohne dass die Behausung zusammenfiel. Wenn heute eine Anstrengung mit "huff and puff" umschrieben wird, dann wird auf den schließlichen Mißerfolg des Wolfes angespielt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/H/Huff_and_puff.asp


(E?)(L?) http://www.smh.com.au/news/books/huff-and-puff-3-little-pigs-blown-away/2008/01/25/1201157608124.html


(E?)(L?) http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/huff+and+puff


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Little_Pigs


(E?)(L?) http://de.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080323100741AAdfujb


I

J

Jahrmarkt der Eitelkeit (W3)

(E2)(L2) http://www.blueprints.de/wortschatz/
Der englischer Schriftsteller William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 - 1863) beschreibt in seinem Hauptwerk "Vanity Fair - Or, A Novel without a hero" (1848) bzw. zu deutsch "Jahrmarkt der Eitelkeit - Ein Buch ohne Helden" die englische Gesellschaft der Napoleonzeit.

Noch heute etikettieren wir gesellschaftliche Anlässe, bei denen sich Menschen zur Schau stellen und es heißt "sehen und gesehen werden" als "Jahrmarkt der Eitelkeit".

(© blueprints Team)

(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=J
Jahrmarkt der Eitelkeit (GB 1967)

JLLIT (W3)

Journal for Language and Literary (E6)(L?) http://www.shakespeare.uk.net/journal/jllit_home.html
An International Journal for Language and Literary Studies - ISSN 1478 - 9116

Volume Three Issue One - September 2004 - Articles Volume Two Issue One - September 2003 Volume One Issue One - October 2002 - Editorial - Articles

K

L

laphamsquarterly
Literature Under the Influence of ...

(E?)(L?) http://laphamsquarterly.org/visual/charts-graphs/?page=76

Literature Under the Influence of ...


Erstellt: 2012-11

letter (W3)

The application of the word "letter" exclusively to written characters is a recent limitation of its sense. As a technical term of traditional grammar, it originally stood for an entity possessing three attributes or aspects: nomen, figura, and potesias. Early writers may be misinterpreted if the implications of this concept are not realised.

literature, literary (W3)

Das frz. "littéraire" = dt. "literarisch" = engl. "literary", frz. "littérature" = dt. "Literatur" = engl. "literature" gehen zurück auf lat. "literatura" = "Buchstabenschrift", "Schrift", "Sprachlehre", lat. "littera" = "Buchstabe", "Aufgezeichnetes" und weiter auf lat. "linere" = "bestreichen".

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/literature


M

Miracle of the Rose
unread bestseller

(E?)(L1) http://www.logophilia.com/
Paul McFedries hatte sich in seinem Newsletter vom 11.02.2003 den "ungelesenen Bestseller" vorgenommen. Er weist auf das erste(?) Zitat in einem Artikel "Miracle of the Rose" von Alexandre Still in "Newsweek" vom 26.09.1983 hin. In dem Artikel geht es um den (unread) Bestseller "The Name of the rose" im Deutschen "Im Namen der Rose".

Interessant finde ich die private Liste der 10 ungelesenen Bestseller von McFedries; an erster Stelle listet er dort die Bibel auf.

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/unreadbestseller.asp

Here's my all-time Top 10 unread bestsellers list:


N

O

OTA
Oxford Text Archive

(E?)(L?) http://ota.ahds.ac.uk/

The Oxford Text Archive develops, collects, catalogues and preserves electronic literary and linguistic resources. We also give advice on the creation and use of these resources, and are involved in the development of standards and infrastructure for electronic language resources.




Von den deutschen Autoren habe ich gefunden: Die Bibel | Bible. German. trans. Luther. | Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von: Faust | Grimm, Jacob: Märchen | Grimm, Jacob: Märchen | Hölderlin, Friedrich: Hyperion | Kafka, Franz: In der Strafkolonie | Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim: Minna von Barnhelm oder das Soldatengluck | Mann, Thomas: Tonio Kröger | Meyer, Conrad Ferdinand: Die Hochzeit des Mönchs, Lyric poems | Stramm, August: Gedichte | Wittgenstein, Ludwig: Letze Schriften über die Philosophie, Bemerkungen über die Philosophie der Psychologie, Vermischte Bemerkungen

(E?)(L?) http://ota.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/index-id.html
Von den 2.540 (02.04.2009) aufgeführten Werken sind eine große Anzahl frei zugänglich.

Oxfordian
Oxfordianer
Stratfordian
Stratfordianer (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.info/wav/oxfordian.wav


(E?)(L?) http://shakespeareauthorship.com/whynot.html


(E?)(L?) http://shakespeare-oxford.com/
Ein "Oxfordianer" ist seltsamerweise nicht jemand, der in Oxford seinen Abschluss gemacht hat, sondern jemand, der überzeugt ist, dass William Shakespeare's Werke von einem "Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford" (1550-1604) geschrieben wurden.

Ein "Stratfordianer" ist jemand, der überzeugt ist, dass William Shakespeare seine Werke auch wirklich selbst geschrieben hat. Diese Bezeichnung geht auf die englische Stadt "Stratford-on-Avon" zurück, dem Geburtsort von Shakespeare.

Die Mitglieder der "Shakespeare Oxford Society" dürften wohl alle "Oxfordianer" sein

P

paperco
British Paper Standard Formats
Paper Sizes

(E?)(L?) http://www.paperco.co.uk/06pcousefulinfo/06pcousefulinfofile.cfm?ccs=244

...
In 1959 the British Standards Institute adopted a standardized system of sizes for printing and writing papers. This new standard was based on the International Standards Organisation (ISO) sizes in use in most other countries.

The A B C Series of Sizes ...


pepysdiary
Pepys Diary
The Diary of Samuel Pepys
Pepys, Samuel
Newton-Pepys Problem

(E3)(L1) http://www.pepysdiary.com/
This site is a presentation of the diaries of Samuel Pepys, the renowned 17th century diarist who lived in London, England (read more about him). A new entry written by Pepys will be published each day; 1 January 1660 was published on 1 January 2003. This site is run by Phil Gyford (who is far from an expert on Pepys) and questions and comments are more than welcome at phil-pepys@gyford.com.
If this is your first time here, you may find the the story so far and the frequently asked questions useful. There is some information about the text and feel free to ask questions on the discussion group. You can also read the site in other formats.

Hier findet man täglich den entsprechenden Eintrag aus Pepys Diary von 1660/61. Im Archiv waren am 24.02.2004 zu finden:
1660/61: January - December
1661/62: January - February
Dazu gibt es zu jedem Tag Informationen zum geschichtlichen Umfeld. Zu einigen der mit einem direkten Link versehenen Stichwörter findet man auch etymologische Hinweise.
Background info: This section contains information about people, places and many other elements of life in Pepys' time, the 1660s.
Art and Literature | Entertainment | Fashion | Food and Drink | General reference | Glossary | Government and Law | Health | Holidays and Events | Money | People | Places | Religion | Science and Technology | Travel and Vehicles | Work and Education

(E?)(L?) http://www.pepysdiary.com/archive/
08.04.2009:
Diary archive

(E?)(L?) http://www.pepysdiary.com/background/

Encyclopedia:
Art and literature (2 topics) | Literature (74 topics) | Entertainment (1 topic) | Dancing (6 topics) | Fairs (3 topics) | Games (12 topics) | Music (2 topics) | Instruments (18 topics) | Songs (3 topics) | Sports (8 topics) | Theatre | Plays (88 topics) | Fashion (20 topics) | Food and drink | Drink (1 topic) | Alcoholic drinks (12 topics) | Non-alcoholic drinks (4 topics) | Food (13 topics) | Baked goods (9 topics) | Dairy produce (7 topics) | Fruit and vegetables (24 topics) | Meat (31 topics) | Seafood/fish (21 topics) | Further reading (8 topics) | General reference (7 topics) | Maps (3 topics) | Glossary (95 topics) | Government and law (11 topics) | Government (23 topics) | Law (12 topics) | Navy (12 topics) | Naval equipment (10 topics) | Holidays and events (27 topics) | Money and business (15 topics) | Companies (9 topics) | People (1849 topics) | Samuel Pepys (4 topics) | Pepys’ household (1 topic) | Pepys’ servants (current) (4 topics) | Pepys’ servants (past) (16 topics) | Places (1 topic) | London | Areas of London (23 topics) | Churches and cathedrals (36 topics) | Coffee houses (6 topics) | Government buildings (13 topics) | Livery halls (6 topics) | Other London buildings (33 topics) | Pepys’ homes (3 topics) | Royal buildings (4 topics) | Whitehall Palace - places within (13 topics) | Streets in London (115 topics) | Taverns (113 topics) | Theatres (6 topics) | London environs (49 topics) | Deptford - places within (4 topics) | Greenwich - places within (10 topics) | Vauxhall - places within (3 topics) | Woolwich - places within (4 topics) | Rest of Britain (126 topics) | Barking, Essex - places within (1 topic) | Barnet, Hertfordshire - places within (1 topic) | Cambridge - places within (10 topics) | Gravesend, Kent - places within (2 topics) | Hatfield, Hertfordshire - places within (1 topic) | Portsmouth, Hampshire - places within (1 topic) | Rochester, Medway - places within (3 topics) | Wanstead, Essex - places within (1 topic) | Waterways (12 topics) | Welwyn, Hertfordshire - places within (1 topic) | Windsor - places within (5 topics) | Rest of the world (50 topics) | Religion (18 topics) | Science, technology, health (17 topics) | Health and medicine (16 topics) | Travel and vehicles (11 topics) | Ships (92 topics) | Work and education | Education (4 topics) | Jobs and professions (3 topics)


Der Engländer Samuel Pepys (pronounced "PEEPS", not "peppies") (23.02.1633–26.05.1703) ist vor allem bekannt durch sein Tagebuch (1660 - 31.05.1669) die als authentische zeitkritische Quelle der 2. Hälfte 17. Jh. gelten, in denen auch die Beschreibungen von "The Great Plague (1665)" und "The Great Fire of London (1666)" zu finden sind.

Seltsamerweise hatte er seine Tagebücher in einer eigenen Geheimschrift verfasst, die erst im Jahre 1825 entziffert werden konnte. Pepys' Geheimschrift allerdings lediglich eine persönliche Version eines bereits exisiterenden Systems, namens "Shelton shorthand" gewesen sein (benannt nach Thomas Shelton, der es im Jahr 1635 erstmals veröffentlichte). Eine andere Bezeichnung ist engl. "tachygraphy" (griech. "tachygraphein" = "schnell schreiben"). Neben seinen zeitkritischen Hinweisen findet man auch einiges zum Thema Wein und erfährt vieles über die damaligen Weinstile und deren Bezeichnungen.

Hauptberuflich war Pepys in der Britischen Admiralität und als Mitglied des Unterhauses tätig.

Mit seinen Werken hat Pepys nicht nur die Geschichtsbücher sondern auch die englische Sprache bereichert. So hat er etwa die engl. "chicken pox" = dt. "Windpocken" als "swine flu" = "Schweinegrippe" bezeichnet und benutzte engl. "fox" statt engl. "intoxicate" = dt. "betrunken machen", "berauschen".

(E?)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/66/a13.html
Einige Zitate Pepys'

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/218/index.html
EVELYN AND PEPYS | Diaries of Evelyn and Pepys Published as Written | Narcissus Luttrell’s Brief Historical Relation of State Affairs | Evelyn’s and Pepys’s Diaries Compared | Evelyn’s Father, Younger Days, Travels and Marriage | His Later Life and Activities | Evelyn and the Royal Society | His Love of Planting: Sylva | His Public Services | His Life of Mrs. Godolphin | Pepys’s Early Life and Marriage | Pepys on the Naseby | His Service in the Navy Office | His Blindness and the Closing of the Diary | Pepys and the Popish Plot | His Later Years | Character and Charm of the Diary

(E?)(L?) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/2621581.stm

...
If the diarist Samuel Pepys were alive today, he may well have used the web to record his thoughts. So Phil Gyford has turned his daily musings into a weblog.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.beebo.org/pepys/about.html


(E2)(L1) http://www.beyars.com/kunstlexikon/lexikon_6845.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.bibliomania.com/2/1/59/106/frameset.html

Pepy's Diary: Table of contents | Preface to the Original Edition | 1659-67


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p#a1181

Pepys, Samuel, 1633-1703


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L1) http://searchsoa.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid26_gci872171,00.html


(E3)(L1) http://www.wein-plus.de/glossar/Pepys.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.who2.com/samuelpepys.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.who2.com/upsidedownandbackwards.html


(E6)(L1) http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Newton-PepysProblem.html
Samuel Pepys hat seine Spuren auch in der Mathematik hinterlassen:


Newton-Pepys Problem

Samuel Pepys wrote Isaac Newton a long letter asking him to determine the probabilities for a set of dice rolls related to a wager he planned to make. Pepys asked which was more likely, ...


Ergebnis: Die Wahrscheinlichkeit mit 6*n Würfeln mindestens n Sechser zu würfeln (also 1 von 6, 2 von 12, 3 von 18, ...) ist bei 6*1 = 6 Würfeln am größten (mindestens eine 6 zu würfeln).

Pilgrim’s Progress, Progress
Mr Great Heart, Mr Standfast, Mr Worldly Wiseman (W3)

Auf den englischer Prediger und Schriftsteller John Bunyan (1628 - 1688) sollen folgende Begriffe zurückgehen:
"Pilgrim’s Progress" (1676), überhaupt das Wort "Progress", "vanity fair" (das von Thackeray als Buchtitel übernommen wurde und später zu einem Zeitschriftentitel wurde) und sprechende Charakternamen wie "Mr Great Heart", "Mr Standfast" und "Mr Worldly Wiseman".

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/15/1/
Hier findet man John Bunyan "The Pilgrim's Progress" als Online-Edition im englischen Original.

In seinem oft übersetzten Werk "The pilgrim's progress", "Die Pilgerreise" (1678-84) schildert John Bunyan den Weg des Christen durch alle Gefahren und Leiden des Lebens bis zur himmlischen Stadt (the greatest allegory every written in the English language).

plagiarism, Plagiat, plagiaire (W3)

Das engl. "plagiarism" und dt. "Plagiat", frz. "plagiat" ist heute beschränkt auf den Diebstahl geistigen Eigentums. Die Römer empfanden dies als Kidnapping, wie man aus der Herkunft von lat. "plagiarius" = dt. "Menschendieb" und lat. "plagium" = dt. "Menschendiebstahl" ersehen kann.

Der frz. "plagiaire" = dt. "Plagiator" ist ein Nachkomme des lat. "plagiarus", der sich als Anwerber und Hehler von Sklaven anderer Sklavenhalter betätigte. Das lat. "plagium" bedeutete entsprechend dt. "Umleitung", "Entführung".

Interessant ist, daß sowohl dt. "Plagiat" als auch frz "plage" = "Strand" auf "griech. "plagios" = dt. "schief", "schräg" zurück gehen. Also haben sich dt. "flach" und dt. "schräg" bei den Griechen nicht ausgeschlossen. Und ein weiter Strand sieht ja auch recht flach aus.

(E?)(L?) http://www.australianhelp.com/plagiarism

Plagiarism Guides

Verbatim plagiarism | Mosaic plagiarism | Inadequate paraphrase | Uncited paraphrase | Uncited quotations | Using material from another student's work


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.gale.com/free_resources/glossary/


(E?)(L?) http://www.heise.de/newsticker/data/jk-12.02.03-006


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S2=ads-l&q=etymology&s=&f=&a=99%2F12%2F08&b=2005

004430 00/02/09 01:37 24 Audrey Munson (off-topic plagiarism, continued)


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/index




(E?)(L?) http://www.plagiarism.org/

"Plagiarism.org, the online resource for educators concerned with the growing problem of Internet plagiarism. This site is designed to provide the latest information on online plagiarism and explain how Turnitin.com is now being used by educators all over the world to fight plagiarism and help bring academic integrity back into our schools.

Plagiarism.org offers detailed information on the technologies behind Turnitin.com, facts about Internet plagiarism, and a report on the growth of "cheatsites" online. We encourage anyone interested in using our anti-plagiarism technologies, or any of our other educational tools, to go directly to Turnitin.com. If you are already a member of the Turnitin.com academic community and would like to find out more about plagiarism and our proprietary technologies, we invite you to spend some time browsing our site.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.turnitin.com/
Suchdienste wie turnitin.com können Plagiate durch die Identifizierung von bestimmten Ausdrücken oder Fehlern entlarven.


"Turnitin.com is simple for teachers and their students to use, and it does work... Highly recommended for high school and academic libraries."


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html


(E?)(L?) http://container.zkm.de/ijie/ijie/no001/ijie_001_full.pdf

The term "plagiarism" is used to describe a wide range of acts (Oliphant, 2002). One well-accepted definition in literature is "the presentation of another's words or ideas as your own" (Babbie, 1998).

The term, deriving from the Latin root "Plagiarius", which means "a kidnapper", was first used by Martial, a Roman poet in the first century A.D. (Kolich, 1983). Traditionally, literary theft was compared to stealing a child or a slave, highlighting the powerful relationship between artistic and biological creations (Greenacre, 1978). Since the 18 century, the term "plagiarism" is restricted exclusively to literary theft (Garfield, 1980).


primrose path
primrose way (W3)

Engl. "the primrose path" = dt. "der Weg des geringsten Widerstandes", "der Pfad des Vergnügens", findet man zuerst in William Shakespeares "Hamlet" aus dem Jahr 1603. In seinem Werk "Macbeth" verwendet er die Form "the primrose way".

Engl. "primrose" = dt. "Schlüsselblume" wurde auch als Zeichen für das Erste oder Beste von etwas verstanden.

(E?)(L?) http://www.business-english.de/daily_mail_result.html?day=2010-01-07


(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/phrases-sayings-shakespeare.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/289325.html


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/primrose path


(E?)(L?) http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/sayindex.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/primrose+path.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/112402.html#primrose


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html


(E?)(L?) http://wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0111


Erstellt: 2012-10

prose (W3)

Engl. "prose" (14. Jh.) = dt. "Prosa" geht auf altfrz. "prose", lat. "prosa", adj. "prosus" = wörtlich dt. "geradeaus gerichtete" zurück. Die Prosa ursprünglich lat. "prosa oratio" ist also die "geradeaus gerichtete Rede", die "schlichte Rede". Darin findet man weiter lat. "prorsus", das aus lat. "pro-vorsus" = dt. "nach vorwärts gewendet" gebildet wurde.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=prose


(E?)(L?) http://openshakespeare.org/stats/word/prose

Statistics for 'prose'
Text Frequency


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_French_origin
List of English words of French origin

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_phrases_used_by_English_speakers
French phrases used by English speakers

(E?)(L?) http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/prose


Q

R

ragamuffin (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=r&p=1


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/070698.html#ragamuffin


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1296
ragamuffin Dec 96
Im 13. Jh. wurde der Teufel auch "the ragged" = "der Zerlumpte" genannt. Der mittelalterliche Spieleschreiber "Piers Plowman" nannte eine seiner dämonischen Figuren "ragamuffin" ("Ragamoffyn", demon in Piers Plowman (1393, attrib. William Langland)). Der zweite Teil "muffin" könnte auf ein ndl. Wort für "mitten" zurückgehen.

rhymezone
RhymeZone

(E?)(L?) http://www.rhymezone.com/

Type in a word below to find its rhymes, synonyms, definitions, and more:
Word: Find rhymes | Find synonyms | Find antonyms | Find definition | Find related words | Find similar sounding words | Find homophones | Match consonants only | Match these letters | Check spelling of word | Search for pictures | Search in Shakespeare | Search for quotations

Other great features on RhymeZone


S

sfbooklist
Science Fiction Books and Authors Database

(E?)(L?) http://www.sfbooklist.co.uk/
This site is a comprehensive bibliography of science-fiction and fantasy authors and their books. The database also contains links to official and fan sites of various authors where they exist.

slow coach, fast coach (W3)

Der im übertragenen Sinn auf Personen angewendete Ausdruck engl. "Slow coach" bezieht sich (wörtlich) auf einen langsam fahrenden Bus oder Zug. Der Ausdruck soll auf Charles Dickens zurück gehen, der in in Bezug auf "Mr. Pickwick" verwendete. In einer späteren Novelle "Martin Chuuzlewit" läßt er "Mr. Pecksniff" sagen:
"Some of us are slow coaches, some of us are fast coaches."

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=2207


snickerfunkydoodlebook (W3)

Engl. "" setzt sich zusammen aus emgl. "snicker" = "kichern", engl. "funky" = "irre", "modisch", "toll", engl. "doodle" = "kritzeln" und engl. "book" = "Buch" zu "Buch in das man tolle, witzige Zeichnungen und Notizen kritzelt".

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordcentral.com/byod/byod_browse.php?term=Sn&type=alpha&offset=40


spamula
D’Israeli, Isaac
Curiosities of Literature

(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/

Curiosities of Literature
Isaac D’Israeli (1766-1848)

Contents

This is an online presentation of Isaac D’Israeli’s Curiosities of Literature, a compilation of book-lore whose first volume was issued in 1791, with further instalments added in 1793, 1807, 1817 and 1823. Scanned, uploaded and edited by Stuart Heath 2005-6; revised 2011.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/index_first.html

Original Articles

Articles written for the first five editions of Isaac D’Israeli’s Curiosities of Literature, published between 1791 and 1807.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/index_three.html

Volume Three

Articles first published in the third volume of the sixth edition (1817) of Isaac D’Israeli’s Curiosities of Literature.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/index_second.html

Second Series

Articles from Isaac D’Israeli’s ‘A Second Series of Curiosities of Literature: consisting of researches in literary, biographical, and political history, of critical and philosophical inquiries, and of secret history,’ first published in 1823.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/index_lost.html

‘Lost’ Articles

Articles included in the early (1790s) editions of Isaac D’Israeli’s Curiosities of Literature, but omitted from later 19th-century editions.


(E?)(L?) http://www.spamula.net/col/index_etc.html

Prefaces About D’Israeli Also by D’Israeli Editor’s Notes


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_D'Israeli

Isaac D'Israeli (11 May 1766 – 19 January 1848) was a British writer, scholar and man of letters. He is best known for his essays, his associations with other men of letters, and as the father of British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.
...
His most popular work was a collection of essays entitled Curiosities of Literature. The work contained a myriad of anecdotes about historical persons and events, unusual books, and the habits of book-collectors. The work was very popular and sold widely in the 19th century, reaching its eleventh edition (the last to be revised by the author) in 1839. It is still in print.
...


Erstellt: 2012-11

T

textlog.de - Moru
Morus, Thomas
Utopia

(E?)(L?) http://www.textlog.de/thomas-morus.html
Thomas Morus (1480-1535)

(E?)(L?) http://www.textlog.de/morus-utopia.html

Thomas Morus - Utopia (1516)
Übersetzung: Ignaz Emanuel Wessely, 1896.

I. Vorrede | 1. Geleitbrief an Petrus Ägidius | 2. Voraussetzungen und Schwierigkeiten der Abfassung des Werkes | 3. Zweifel an der Genauigkeit des Berichtes | 4. Befürchtungen hinsichtlich der Aufnahme des Werkes | II. Bericht über die beste Staatsverfassung | 1. Die Gesandtschaft nach Flandern | 2. Der Weltreisende: Raphael Hythlodeus | 3. Der Reisebericht | 4. Der Philosoph als Fürstendiener | 5. Erfahrungen in England | - Kardinal John Morton | - Kritik des englischen Strafrechts | - Die Herkunft der Diebe | - Die Landsknechtsplage | - Schafzucht und Einhegungen | - Teuerung | - Notwendigkeit der Änderung | - Erwiderungen und Gegenargumente | - Das Beispiel der Polyleriten | - Möglichkeit der Nachahmung in England | - Der Streit mit dem Mönch | - Schluß des Berichts über das Gespräch bei John Morton | 6. Der Philosoph als Staatsmann | - Kritik der üblichen Außenpolitik | - Das Beispiel der Achorier | - Kritik der üblichen Finanzpolitik | - Das Beispiel der Makarenser | - "Theoretische" und "praktische" Philosophie | - Ein Philosoph kann weder Staatsmann noch Fürstendiener sein | 7. Das Privateigentum als Hindernis gerechter Politik | 8. Preis der Utopier | III. Erzählung von der Verfassung der Insel Utopia | 1. Die Lage der Insel | 2. Städte, Land und Landwirtschaft | 3. Die Stadt Amaurotum | 4. Die Behörden | 5. Die Gewerbe | 6. Der Tageslauf der Utopier | 7. Arbeitsverteilung, Kleidung und Wohlstand | 8. Sozialordnung und Bevölkerungspölitik | 9. Versorgung der Bevölkerung | 10. Die Mahlzeiten | 11. Der Reiseverkehr | 12. Handel und Zahlungsausgleich | 13. Einstellung der Utopier zu Geld und Geldeswert | 14. Die Gesandtschaft der Anemolier | 15. Nichtigkeit des Besitzes | 16. Unterricht und Wissenschaft | 17. Sittenlehre | - Tugend und Glückseligkeit | - Die Lehre von der Lust | 18. Körperbau und allgemeine Lebensweise der Utopier | 19. Aufnahme der humanistischen Wissenschaft, Buchdruck | 20. Fremde und Sklaven | 21. Krankenpflege | 22. Geschlechtsmoral und Ehegesetze | 23. Rechtsprechung | 24. Narren, Krüppel, natürliche Schönheit | 25. Ehrungen, Umgangsformen | 26. Gesetze und Gerichte | 27. Zeitweilige Überlassung von Beamten an Nachbarn | 28. Bündnisse | 29. Das Kriegswesen | - Kriegsgründe | - Eigene Truppen und Söldner | - Oberbefehl und Rekrutierung | - Einsatz von Frauen, Kampfmoral | - Kampftaktik, Verhalten nach dem Sieg | - Lagerbau und Waffen | - Behandlung der Besiegten, Nachkriegspolitik | 30. Die Religion der Utopier | - Liberaler Deismus | - Verhältnis zum Christentum | - Religiöse Toleranz | - Bestattung der Toten | - Aberglaube, Wunder, Sekten | - Die Priester | - Feste, Feiern und Gottesdienste | 31. Lob der utopischen Staatsverfassung | 32. Kritik der bestehenden Staaten | 33. Beschluss ohne Einwände


textmechanic.com
Text Mechanic
Text Manipulation Tools

(E?)(L?) http://www.textmechanic.com/

Welcome to TextMechanic.com! A collection of free, online, browser-based, text manipulation tools.

Text Tools: Obfuscation Tools: Randomization Tools: Combination / Permutation Tools: Numeration Tools: Math Tools: Timing Tools: Image Tools: Big File Tools: onSelect Tools: Miscellaneous Tools:


Erstellt: 2014-03

tufts
English Renaissance Materials

(E?)(L?) http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/perscoll?collection=Renaissance


(E?)(L?) http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cache/perscoll_Renaissance.html
English Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, ...


U

Ulysses (W3)

"Ulysses" ist der englische Name für "Odysseus". James Joyce hat die Reise des antiken Helden auf einen Tag reduziert.

(E?)(L?) http://wissen.spiegel.de/wissen/resultset.html?suchbegriff=ulysses

"Ulysses" ist auch der Name einer europäisch-amerikanischen Raumsonde, die erstmals die Pole der Sonne überflogen hat. Ulysses hat unerwartet lang durchgehalten: Während eines kompletten Sonnenfleckenzyklus hat die Sonde Daten gesammelt, zum Beispiel über den Sonnenwind und das Magnetfeld der Sonne. Nach über 17 Jahren endet die Ulysses-Mission am 1. Juli 2008.


Uni Pennsylvania
The Online Books Page

(E?)(L?) http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books


(E?)(L?) http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/new.html


(E?)(L?) http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/archives.html
A searchable and browseable collection of over 18,000 English works in various formats that are all free for personal, noncommercial use.
The Online Books Page (OBP) is updated with new material several times a week. A visit to "New Listings" page will show the variety of content you'll find throughout the collection.
The OBP is searchable by author and title. You can also browse the collection by author, title, or subject.
The site also has other additional information for fans of online books. Major parts of the site include pointers to significant directories and archives of online texts, special exhibits of particularly interesting online books, and information on how readers can help support the growth of online books
For non-English readers, the site provides a good directory of online book sites with non-English language material.
2003 is the tenth anniversary of the Online Books Page. Congratulations John on a job well done, and keep up the great work.
with: Specialty Archives and Other Online Book Collections

Uni Toronto
englische Literatur

(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display/


(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display/indexpoet.html
Rund 2100 englische Gedichte von rund 330 Autoren von Caedmon (7. Jh.) bis zum Beginn des 20. Jh. mit Zeitleiste und Glossar (in Englisch)

Poet Index | Poem Index | Random | Search | Introduction | Timeline | Calendar | Glossary | Criticism | Bibliography | RPO | Canadian Poetry | UTEL

Poet Index (07.06.2004)

unread bestseller (W3)

Paul McFedries hatte sich in seinem Newsletter vom 11.02.2003 den "ungelesenen Bestseller" vorgenommen. Er weist auf das erste von Zitat von "unread bestseller" in einem Artikel "Miracle of the Rose" von Alexandre Still in "Newsweek" vom 26.09.1983 hin. In dem Artikel geht es um den "unread Bestseller" "The Name of the rose" im Deutschen "Im Namen der Rose" von Umberto Eco.

Interessant finde ich die private Liste der 10 ungelesenen Bestseller von McFedries; an erster Stelle listet er dort die Bibel auf.

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/unreadbestseller.asp

Here's my all-time Top 10 unread bestsellers list:


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=unread bestseller
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "unread bestseller" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2011-07

Utopia (W3)

Dt. "Utopie", frz. "Utopie", engl. "Utopia", geht zurück auf griech. "ou topos" = dt. "nicht vorhandener Ort". Die Prägung des neu-lateinisch-griechischen Begriffs wird allgemein dem englischen Philosophen und Theologen Thomas Morus (1477 - 1535) zugeschrieben, dessen Werk "Utopia" in lateinischer Sprache im Jahr 1516 erschien.

Der Präfix "u-" kann dabei sowohl als griech. "eu" = dt. "wohl-", "gut-" als auch als griech. "ou" = dt. "nicht", "kein" interpretiert werden. Wenn man beide Varianten in die Übersetzung einbezieht bezeichnet "Utopie" also einen "schönen Ort, den es nicht gibt".

Sir Thomas Morus, englischer Politiker und Humanist, gab seinem Roman im Jahr 1516 den Titel "Utopia". Diese Wortschöpfung beruht auf griech. "où tópos" = dt. "kein Ort", "an keinem Ort", "Nirgendwo" (griech. "topos" = dt. "Ort", "Stelle"). Der Titel verselbständigte sich und wurde zum Synonym für einen Ort sozialer Perfektion oder für unrealistische Vorstellungen.

Thomas More orientierte sich bei seinem Idealstaat teilweise an Platons "Die Republik".

Nachdem im 20. Jh. George Orwell mit "1984" eine Art "Anti-Utopia" beschrieb, wurde der Begriff - mit griech. "dys" = dt. "un-", "miss-" - "dystopia" = dt. "Übel-Utopie" geprägt.

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Utopia


(E?)(L?) http://www.amiright.com/artists/utopia.shtml


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/36/3/

Harvard Classics, Vol. 36, Part 3

Utopia
Sir Thomas More

More describes the ideal commonwealth, where all work is for the common good: highlighting the abuses of power at the time and slyly suggesting necessary reforms.


(E1)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20080804202535/http://www.bartleby.com/81/U1.html
Utopia | Utopian

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20060309070429/www.bartleby.com/81/17027.html


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20060309070429/http://www.bartleby.com/81/17028.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/217/1212.html
XII. Hobbes and Contemporary Philosophy.
§ 12. Imaginary commonwealths: More’s Utopia and Harrington’s Oceana.
...

(E?)(L2) http://www.britannica.com/


(E1)(L1) http://etimologias.dechile.net/?utopia


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=utopia


(E?)(L?) http://www.gale.cengage.com/free_resources/glossary/glossary_tz.htm#u
Utopia | Utopian | Utopianism

(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c
Chesterton, G. K. (Gilbert Keith), 1874-1936: Utopia of Usurers and Other Essays (English) (as Author)

(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/m
More, Thomas, Sir, Saint, 1478?-1535: Utopia (English) (as Author) - Utopia (German) (as Author)

(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/m
Morrison, William Douglas, 1853-1943: News from Nowhere, or, an Epoch of Rest : being some chapters from a utopian romance (English) (as Author)

(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/w
Wells, H. G. (Herbert George), 1866-1946: A Modern Utopia (English) (as Author)

(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/dna/h2g2/Search?searchstring=Utopia&searchtype=goosearch&showapproved=1&go.x=0&go.y=0




(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list/?page=4&subject=sf_criticism
utopia (n.) | utopian (n.) | utopian (adj.) | utopic (adj.)

(E?)(L?) http://www.k-1.com/Orwell/index.cgi/work/essays/language.html
Why Socialists Don't believe in Fun - Utopia and socialism

(E?)(L?) http://lecoolbook.com/a-smart-guide-to-utopia-pre-order

A Smart Guide to Utopia


(E?)(L?) http://www.linotype.com/search-alpha-u.html
Auch eine Schriftfamilie trägt den Namen "Utopia".

(E?)(L?) http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/tmore.htm
Werke von Thomas More, Arbeiten über ihn und seine Zeit und weiterführende Links

(E?)(L?) http://www.mineralwaters.org/index.php?func=disp&parval=2648
"Utopia" (USA), Bezeichnung eines Mineralwassers

(E1)(L1) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15243a.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.new-utopia.com/
"New-Utopia ist eine virtuelle Nation in der Karibik. Die "Regierung" sitzt allerdings in Monaco.

(E?)(L1) http://www.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/ressources/bdl.html


(E?)(L1) http://66.46.185.79/bdl/gabarit_bdl.asp?Al=1<r=U
Utopia [Éponymes] | Utopie [Éponymes]

(E?)(L?) http://l.maison.pagesperso-orange.fr/etymo/


(E?)(L?) http://pagesperso-orange.fr/l.maison/etymo/idxa0.htm


(E?)(L?) http://pagesperso-orange.fr/l.maison/etymo/idxl0.htm


(E?)(L?) http://l.maison.pagesperso-orange.fr/etymo/dat8.htm#23


(E?)(L?) http://www.mheu.org/fr/chronologie/utopia.aspx
Titre: L'île d'Utopia, page 2 & 3 de l'édition de Louvain

(E?)(L?) http://www.omniglot.com/writing/utopian.htm

Utopian alphabet

Origin

St. Thomas More (1478-1535), a lawyer, writer, scholar, statesman, diplomat, political theorist and patron of the arts invented the Utopian alphabet during the 16th century.

This alphabet appears in his book Utopia, which was written in Latin and was published in 1516. The name Utopia is a pun meaning both the "good place" and "no place". The book is narrated by a traveller called Raphael Hythloday, who praises all aspects of life of the fictional country of Utopia. Hythloday's comments can be seen as an indirect critique of contemporary English society.
...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/
utopia | utopian | utopianism

(E?)(L?) http://www.rocksbackpages.com/library.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.sociosite.net/topics/index.php


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1960
Utopia - by Frank Gari

(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1980
Set Me Free - by Utopia

(E?)(L?) http://www.trivia-library.com/
A Perfect Society: Utopias

(E?)(L?) http://www.trivia-library.com/utopia-theory-in-history/index.htm
Utopia Theory in History

(E?)(L?) http://www.trivia-library.com/major-attempts-at-utopias-in-history/index.htm
Major Attempts at Utopias in History

(E?)(L?) http://www.trivia-library.com/utopias-paradise.htm
Utopias and Paradise

(E?)(L?) http://www.ub.uni-bielefeld.de/diglib/more/utopia/
Thomas Mores "Utopia" in digitaler Rekonstruktion

(E?)(L?) http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/AlphaIndex.html
Utopia M | Utopia M | Utopia Planitia M | Utopia Planitia M | Utopia Rupes M | Utopia Rupes M

(E1)(L1) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utopia


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_words_with_English_derivatives


(E?)(L?) http://www.wmf.org/sites/default/files/wmf_article/pg_30-31_russia_e.pdf
Utopian Dreams (pdf)
Date: Spring 2006
Keywords: Constructivism, ICON Magazine, modernism, Russian Federation
Related Projects: NARKOMFIN BUILDING
Country: Russia

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/back-g.html#utopia


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/utopia.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0510


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0996


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/waw/20030610061207.asp
"Literature is my Utopia. Here I ..." Helen Keller

(E1)(L1) http://www.wortwarte.de/
Cyberutopia

(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Utopia
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Utopia" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 auf.

Erstellt: 2012-04

V

Vanity Fair, vanity (W3)

Die seit einigen Monaten in Deutschland erscheinende Zeitschrift "Vanity Fair" steht in einer Reihe von Zeitschriften gleichen Namens. "Vanity Fair" geht dabei zurück auf eine allegorische Geschichte "The Pilgrim's Progress", von John Bunyan, die 1678 veröffentlicht wurde. Darin geht es um ein Stadtfest, engl. "town fair", das in einem Ort mit dem Namen "Vanity" abgehalten wird.

Der Autor William Thackeray übernahm diesen Ausdruck 1848 für eine Novelle "Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero", in der er die englische Gesellschaft des frühen 19. Jh. satirisch beschrieb.

Das engl. "vanity" bedeutet "self-love", "egotism", "narcissism", dt. "Eitelkeit", "Einbildung" aber auch "Schminktisch". das zugehörige engl. "to be vain" = "eitel sein", "to be in vain" = "vergebens", "fruchtlos", "umsonst sein".

Das Wort "vanity" geht zurück auf lat. "vanitatem" = "emptiness", "foolish pride".

(E?)(L?) http://www.vanity-fair.de/


(E1)(L1) http://www.owad.de/check.php4?id=1765
"Vanity" findet man auch in:





W

walrus
Was Tolkien named after walrus tusk?

(E?)(L?) http://www.asianage.com/main.asp?layout=2&cat1=6&cat2=42&newsid=78098&RF=DefaultMain

...
But one strange statement did catch my eye. "Walrus" he says is a "classic example of an extremely ancient word." Well, "walrus" is cited first from 1655, so it's older than briefs or knickers, but in language terms it is modern.

The Old English word for the beast, "horschwael", is to be found in the interpolation on northern seas in King Alfred's translation of Orosius' Historiae contra Paganos. Orosius had, I presume, never seen a walrus, being a native of Spain, and living mostly in North Africa.

Mr Winchester mentions that the etymology in the OED was written by J.R.R. Tolkien and his notes on the subject exist in a book in the Bodleian library; I wish he’d said more about them. The history of the words for the "walrus" is pretty complicated and dogged by folk etymologising. There seems, Tolkien suggests, to have been a confusion between the Old Norse "hrosshvalr", a kind of whale, and "rosmhvalr", the "walrus". Then Tolkien discounts other scholars' derivations of "rosm-", and he conjectures a non-Teutonic origin, as with "morse", another word for the creature, which might come from Finnish. (Finnish lay behind Tolkien’s invention of the language Quenya.) So "walrus" is not a "classic example" in the sense of being typical.

As a diversion, I noticed that the word "rewel" means "walrus ivory", and Tolkien’s third name was "Reuel". I very excitedly wondered if Tolkien were named after a tusk, but the Oxford Names Companion tells me that "Reuel" is a Hebrew name meaning "friend of God". It is to be found in 1 Chronicles 9:8 (though the Companion erroneously says 2 Chronicles). It was not so much a walrus as a red herring. (The Spectator)


weird (W3)

Das engl. "weird" = "unheimlich", "ulkig", "verrückt" hat in Zusammensetzungen die Bedeutungen "Schicksals-" wie in engl. "weird sisters" = "Schicksalsschwestern", "Nornen".

Und genau in diesem Ausdruck "weird sisters" (I. iii. 32; I. v. 8; II. i. 20; III. iv. 133; IV. i. 136) und in "the weird women" (III. i. 2) kam "weird" durch Shakepeares "Macbeth" in die englische Sprache.
In einigen Kopien kommt es in der Form "weyword" vor.

Falls es sich bei der Schreibweise "weyword" nicht gänzlich um einen Abschreibfehler handelt, könnte evtl. ein Zusammenhang zu dt. "weh", also "Wehe-Wort" und sinngemäß "Klagewort" bestehen. Die "Schicksalsgöttinnen" ("Norne", "Skuld", "Urd", "Werdandi") der nordischen Mythologie dürften sicherlich auch Anlaß zu "Wehklagen" gegeben haben.
(Aber das sind nur meine eigenen Assoziationen.)

(E?)(L?) http://bdb.co.za/shackle/articles/weird.htm
Neben den Ausführungen zu "weird" erfährt man hier auch:


..
Before dictionaries existed, English words were spelt in various ways. "Shakespeare" even spelt his own name several different ways. "The name Shakespeare is extremely widespread," says Linda Alchin, of William Shakespeare Info, "and is spelt in an astonishing variety of ways including "Shakspere", "Shakespere", "Shakkespere", "Shaxpere", "Shakstaff", "Sakspere", "Shagspere", "Shakeshafte" and even "Chacsper" as can be seen via details of possible ancestors."
...


Well roared lion
Gut gebrüllt Löwe (W3)

(E2)(L2) http://www.blueprints.de/wortschatz/
In Shakespeares Stück "Ein Sommernachtstraum" (5 Akt, 1 Szene) fällt der Ausspruch "Well roared lion", was übersetzt zu "Gut gebrüllt Löwe" wurde.

Heute bekunden wir mit diesem Ausspruch unseren Beifall, wenn jemand etwas treffend und schlagfertig bemerkt bzw. erwidert hat.

(© blueprints Team)

X

Y

Z

Zoll
Jeder Zoll ein ... - king - every inch a king (W3)

(E2)(L2) http://www.blueprints.de/wortschatz/
In William Shakespeares Werk "King Lear" (IV, 6) fragt der Graf von Gloster den langsam wahnsinnig werdenden König: "Ist's nicht der König?" und König Lear antwortet darauf voller Ironie und Bitterkeit: "Ja, jeder Zoll ein König." ("Ay, every inch a king.")
Wenn auch unüblich, so bezeichnen wir nach diesem Ausspruch auch heute noch Menschen. "Jeder Zoll ein Kavalier / eine Dame / ein Freund / eine Freundin!"
(© blueprints Team)

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Literatur, Literatura, Littérature, Letteratura, Literature

A

B

C

Chaucer, Geoffrey
Die Canterbury-Erzählungen

(E?)(L?) http://www.humanitas-book.de/

Die »Canterbury Erzählungen« von Chaucer gelten als eines der bedeutendsten Werke der englischen Literatur. Die Rahmenhandlung ist eine Pilgerfahrt nach Canterbury, auf der die Teilnehmer kleine Geschichten erzählen - zum Teil humorvoll, zum Teil ernst, aber alle äußerst präzise in der Beschreibung der menschlichen Natur. 2008. 794 S., geb. Anaconda.


Erstellt: 2013-06

Cork, John (Autor)
Stutz, Collin (Autor)
James Bond Enzyklopädie

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/383101227X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/383101227X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/383101227X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/383101227X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/383101227X/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 320 Seiten
Verlag: Dorling Kindersley (27. August 2008)
Sprache: Deutsch


Kurzbeschreibung
Das ultimative James-Bond-Kultbuch! Dieses großartig bebilderte Nachschlagewerk umfasst einfach alles, was Bond-Fans wissen wollen. Durchgängig mit Filmbildern und seltenen Archivfotos illustriert werden sämtliche Filme, Figuren, Hintergründe und Darsteller ausführlich vorgestellt. Dazu erfährt man alles über die Bond-Girls, Gegenspieler, Nebendarsteller, Fahrzeuge, Waffen und Gadgets. Detaillierte Filmporträts informieren über die Entstehung der einzelnen Bond-Filme und ermöglichen mit zahlreichen Hintergrundinformationen und original Filmfotos einen aufregenden Blick hinter die Kulissen. 100 Prozent 007!


D

Digitale Bibl. DB000059
Digitale Bibl. ZENO0033
English and American Literature
from Shakespeare to Mark Twain
Edited by Mark Lehmstedt

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534596/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534596/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534596/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534596/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534596/etymologpor09-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/band59.htm

Die originalsprachige Edition präsentiert auf über 170.000 Seiten das literarische Schaffen von 94 Autoren der englischen und amerikanischen Literatur aus dem Zeitraum vom späten 14. Jahrhundert bis ins erste Drittel des 20. Jahrhunderts - je nach Umfang und welt- bzw. nationalliterarischem Rang teils nahezu erschöpfend, teils in repräsentativer Auswahl.

Zum Textbestand gehören die bedeutendsten Dramen, Romane und Erzählungen der klassisch gewordenen englischsprachigen Literatur, das Werk der namhaftesten Lyriker und eine Auswahl von Essays und autobiographischen Schriften. Abgerundet wird die Edition durch illustrierte Biographien und bibliographische Notizen zu jedem Werk. Die Edition basiert auf zuverlässigen, wissenschaftlichen Kriterien genügenden Ausgaben, zu denen durchgängig eine seitengenaue Konkordanz hergestellt ist.

Vertretene Autoren: J. Austen, W. Beckford, A. Behn, E. Bellamy, A. Bierce, W. Blake, J. Boswell, Ch. Brontë, E. Brontë, J. Bunyan, R. Burns, S. Butler, Lord Byron, L. Carroll, G. Chaucer, J. Cleland, S. Coleridge, W. Congreve, J. Conrad, J. F. Cooper, S. Crane, D. Defoe, Ch. Dickens, J. Donne, A.C. Doyle, J. Dryden, F. Douglass, G. Eliot, R.W. Emerson, O. Equiano, H. Fielding, B. Franklin, E. Gaskell, J. Gay, G. Gissing, F. Godwin, W. Godwin, O. Goldsmith, Th. Gray, Th. Hardy, B. Harte, N. Hawthorne, O. Henry, W. Irving, H. James, S. Johnson, B. Jonson, J. Keats, D.H. Lawrence, E. Lear, M.G. Lewis, G. Lillo, J. London, H. W. Longfellow, J. Macpherson, Th. Malory, B. de Mandeville, K. Mansfield, Ch. Marlowe, H. Melville, G. Meredith, J. Milton, W. Morris, E.A. Poe, A. Pope, Th. De Quincey, A. Radcliffe, W. Raleigh, S. Richardson, D.G. Rossetti, W. Scott, W. Shakespeare, M. Shelley, P.B. Shelley, R.B. Sheridan, T. Smollett, E. Spenser, L. Sterne, R.L. Stevenson, B. Stoker, H. Beecher Stowe, J. Swift, A.Ch. Swinburne, J. M. Synge, A. Tennyson, W. Thackeray, J. Thomson, Mark Twain, H. Walpole, B.T. Washington, W. Whitman, O. Wilde, W.Wordsworth, E. Young.


(E?)(L?) http://www.zweitausendeins.de/artikel/dvds/computer/?show=180482&articlefocus=0

English and American Literature. "Querschnitt durch die englischsprachige Literatur von Byron bis Wilde" (Dresdner Neueste Nachrichten). Über 172.000 Seiten mit Werken von 94 Autoren der englischen und amerikanischen Literatur vom späten 14. bis ins frühe 20. Jahrhundert im englischen Original: Jane Austen, Lord Byron, John F. Cooper, Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Jack London, Herman Melville, Edgar Allan Poe, William Shakespeare, Robert L. Stevenson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Jonathan Swift, Mark Twain, Oscar Wilde u.v.a. Zum Textbestand gehören die bedeutendsten Dramen, Romane und Erzählungen der klassisch gewordenen englischsprachigen Literatur, das Werk der namhaftesten Lyriker und eine Auswahl von Essays und autobiografischen Schriften. Abgerundet wird die Edition durch illustrierte, ebenfalls in englischer Sprache abgefasste Biografien und bibliografische Notizen zu jedem einzelnen Werk.


Digitale Bibl. DB000091
Edgar Allan Poe
Werke
Englisch und Deutsch

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534491X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534491X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534491X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534491X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898534491X/etymologpor09-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/band91.htm

Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849), der Verfasser phantastischer Erzählungen wie »Der Untergang des Hauses Usher« oder klangvoller Gedichte wie »Der Rabe« war bereits zu Lebzeiten als Dichter berühmt und als Mensch berüchtigt und gilt heute als einer der faszinierendsten Autoren der amerikanischen Literaturgeschichte. Die zweisprachige Ausgabe seiner Werke enthält die bedeutendsten Erzählungen und Gedichte, das Versgedicht »Eureka« sowie den Roman »Arthur Gordon Pym«. Eine Einleitung von J. H. Ingram zum Leben des Autors liefert zahlreiche Hintergrundinformationen. Somit ergibt sich ein plastisches Gesamtbild dieses bis in die Gegenwart wirksamen amerikanischen Dichters.


Digitale Bibl. DB000129
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Sherlock Holmes
Sämtliche Romane und Erzählungen
Englisch und Deutsch

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898535290/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898535290/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898535290/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898535290/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898535290/etymologpor09-20
Plattform: Windows 95 / XP, Macintosh
Medium: CD-ROM

(E?)(L1) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/band129.htm

Im Original und in deutscher Übersetzung: Alle 60 Fälle von Sherlock Holmes.

Wohl kaum ein anderer Detektiv der Literaturgeschichte hat eine ähnliche Bekanntheit und Beliebtheit erlangt wie der Pfeife rauchende Exzentriker aus der Londoner Baker Street 221b. Zusammen mit seinem Freund Dr. Watson löste Sherlock Holmes seit 1887 auf brilliante Weise jene Rätsel, »die von der Polizei als hoffnungslos aufgegeben worden waren.« In insgesamt 56 Erzählungen sowie vier großen Romanen setzte Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) dem Meisterdetektiv ein unvergängliches Denkmal.

Die CD-ROM enthält sämtliche Fälle in der originalen englischen Fassung sowie in den deutschen Übertragungen von Leslie Giger, Gisbert Haefs, Werner Schmitz und Hans Wolf. Sie lässt so ein facettenreiches Gesamtbild des genialen Kombinierers entstehen.

Romane: Eine Studie in Scharlachrot (1887); Das Zeichen der Vier (1890); Der Hund der Baskervilles (1902); Das Tal der Angst (1915)

Erzählsammlungen: Die Abenteuer des Sherlock Holmes (1892); Die Memoiren des Sherlock Holmes (1894); Die Rückkehr des Sherlock Holmes (1905); Seine Abschiedsvorstellung (1917); Sherlock Holmes‘ Buch der Fälle (1927)

© 2002 by Kein & Aber AG Zürich


Digitale Bibl. KDB00023
100 englische Klassiker, die jeder haben muss

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533239/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533239/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533239/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533239/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533239/etymologpor09-20
Plattform: Windows XP / Vista
Medium: CD-ROM

(E?)(L?) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/dkdb23.htm

Die CD-ROM »100 englische Klassiker« erschließt auf über 45000 Bildschirmseiten - von den »Canterbury Tales« bis »Lady Chatterley's Lover« - die Meilensteine der englischen Literatur. In englischer Sprache, original und ungekürzt.

Vertiefen Sie Ihre Englischkenntnisse mit Hamlet, Frankenstein und Dracula.

Die Ausgabe enthält die Werke:
Austen: Pride and Prejudice; Mansfield Park - Beckford: Vathek. An Arabian Tale - Bellamy: Looking Backward: 2000-1887 - Blake: Poetry - Boswell: Life of Johnson - Brontë, Charlotte: Jane Eyre - Brontë, Emily: Wuthering Heights - Bunyan: The Pilgrim's Progress - Burns: Poetry - Butler (I): Hudibras - Butler (II): Erewhon - Byron: Childe Harold's Pilgrimage; Don Juan; Poetry - Carroll: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Through the Looking-Glass - Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales - Coleridge: Poetry - Congreve: The Way of the World - Conrad: Nostromo; Heart of Darkness - Defoe: The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe - Dickens: Oliver Twist or The Parish Boy's Progress; Great Expectations; A Christmas Carol - Donne: Poetry - Doyle: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes - Dryden: Poetry; All for Love or,The World well lost - Eliot: Middlemarch. A Study of Provincial Life - Fielding: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling - Gaskell: Cranford and Other Tales - Gay: The Beggar's Opera - Gissing: Born in Exile - Godwin, Francis: The Man in the Moon - Godwin, William: The Adventures of Caleb Williams - Goldsmith: The Vicar of Wakefield - Gray: Poetry - Hardy: Tess of the D'Urbervilles; Jude the Obscure - James: The American; The Turn of the Screw - Johnson: Poetry - Jonson: Poetry; Volpone or The Foxe - Keats: Poetry - Lawrence: Sons and Lovers; Lady Chatterley's Lover - Lear: A Book of Nonsense - Lewis: The Monk - Macpherson: The Poems of Ossian - Sir Malory: Le Morte DArthur - Mansfield: The Garden-Party - Marlowe: The Tragicall History of Doctor Faustus; Edward II. - Melville: Moby-Dick; Billy Budd, Sailor - Meredith: Modern Love and Poems of the English Roadside; The Egoist. A Comedy in Narrative - Milton: Paradise Lost - Morris: News from Nowhere - Pope: An Essay on Man - de Quincey: Confessions of an English Opium-Eater - Radcliffe: The Mysteries of Udolpho - Sir Raleigh: Poetry - Richardson: Pamela or Virtue Rewarded - Rossetti: Poetry - Scott: Waverley - Shakespeare: Sonnets; As you like it; A Midsummer Night's Dream; Hamlet; King Lear; Macbeth; Othello; Romeo and Juliet; The Tempest - Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft: Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus - Shelley, Percy Bysshe: Poetry; Queen Mab; Prometheus Unbound - Sheridan: The Rivals - Smollett: The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle - Spenser: The Faerie Queene - Sterne: The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman - Stevenson: Treasure Island; Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Stoker: Dracula - Swift: Travels into several remote Nations of the World. By Lemuel Gulliver - Swinburne: Poetry; Tristram of Lyonesse - Synge: The Playboy of the Western World - Tennyson: Poetry - Thackeray: Vanity Fair - Walpole: The Castle of Otranto - Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest; The Picture of Dorian Gray - Wordsworth: Poetry - Young: The Complaint, or Night Thoughts on Life, Death and Immortality


Digitale Bibl. KDB00050
Tesche, Siegfried
James Bond: Die Welt des 007

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533506/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533506/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533506/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533506/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3898533506/etymologpor09-20
Plattform: Windows XP
Medium: CD-ROM

(E?)(L?) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/dkdb50.htm

Dieses Buch ist eine unterhaltsame, schier unerschöpfliche Quelle von geheimen Hintergrundinformationen, unglaublichen Fakten und skurrilen Anekdoten über die Welt des berühmtesten Geheimagenten der Welt. 50 Jahre Roman- und Filmgeschichte auf einer CD-ROM - von »Casino Royale« bis »Casino Royale«, nebst ausführlicher Biographien der sechs Bond-Darsteller von Sean Connery bis Daniel Craig. Von dem James-Bond-Experten Siegfried Tesche.


E

F

G

Gelfert, Hans-Dieter
Kleine Geschichte der englischen Literatur

(E?)(L?) http://www.chbeck.de/Gelfert-Dieter-Kleine-Geschichte-englischen-Literatur/productview.aspx?product=11851

2., aktualisierte Auflage 2005. 384 S.: mit 33 Abbildungen. Paperback
ISBN 978-3-406-52856-9

Inhaltsverzeichnis


Erstellt: 2016-10

Grabes, Herbert
Das englische Pamphlet

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3484401176/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3484401176/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3484401176/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3484401176/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3484401176/etymologpor09-20
Broschiert: 220 Seiten
Verlag: Niemeyer, Tübingen
Sprache: Deutsch

H

I

J

K

L

M

Manguel, Alberto
A History of Reading

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140166548/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140166548/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140166548/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140166548/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140166548/etymologpor09-20
(London, Flamingo, 1997)
An interesting exploration of reading and readers through the ages from ancient Sumeria to the present day.
Taschenbuch: 384 Seiten
Verlag: Penguin (1. Oktober 1997)
Sprache: Englisch


Amazon.com
This wide-ranging and erudite exploration of the topic of reading is suffused with the spirit of Manguel's fellow Argentinian Jorge Luis Borges. Manguel takes us through the history of reading as if leading us room by room through the infinite library Borges constructed in one of his famous stories. Manguel's approach is not chronological, but thematic. His chapter topics jump from attempts to censor reading to the physical surroundings favored by readers, from the limitations of translations to the esotericism of books written for a restricted readership. Throughout he moves easily through time and geography to quote anecdotes and examples from diverse sources. Manguel's enthusiasm, and the impressive breadth of his reading, will make his readers eager to rush to the nearest library.


N

O

P

Pepys, Samuel (Autor)
Tagebuch

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106931/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106931/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106931/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106931/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3150106931/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 490 Seiten
Verlag: Reclam jun. , Philipp, Verlag GmbH (30. März 2009)
Sprache: Deutsch


Kurzbeschreibung
Es ist das Werk eines Mannes, der eine stürmische Zeit der englischen Geschichte mit großer Intensität erlebt und mit brillanter Feder in seinem "Geheimtagebuch" neun Jahre lang festgehalten hat. Es gibt nichts, wofür sich dieser Bürger der Metropole London nicht interessiert hätte. Vor allem die Politik hatte es ihm angetan, er war aber auch ein Theaternarr und Musikliebhaber und hinterließ einen fast lückenlosen Kalender des zeitgenössischen Londoner Kulturlebens. In seiner Begeisterung für Literatur und Predigten vermittelt er ein farbiges Bild des geistigen Lebens seiner Epoche.

Klappentext
»Königs Geburtstag und Restaurationstag. Vom Glockenläuten in der Stadt aufgewacht. Ins Büro, von wo mich meine Frau mit der Bemerkung abholt, wenn ich die schönste Frau in England sehen wolle, müsse ich sofort nach Hause kommen. Und wer war es? Die Schöne aus der Kirche, die uns neulich gegenüber saß und die jetzt geheiratet hat. Verbrachte den ganzen Nachmittag zu Hause. O Gott, welche Mühe ich hatte, der Versuchung zu widerstehen!«


(E?)(L?) http://www.reclam.de/trck/nl/1094/detail/978-3-15-010693-8

Pepys, Samuel: Tagebuch aus dem London des 17. Jahrhunderts
Ausw., Übers. und Hrsg.: Winter, Helmut
480 S. Geb. mit Schutzumschlag. Format 12 x 19 cm
ISBN: 978-3-15-010693-8
EUR (D): 24,90
Pepys’ von 1660 bis 1669 geführtes Diary gehört zu den Kostbarkeiten der englischen Literatur. In seinem Geheimtagebuch hat er mit brillanter Feder notiert, was er als Londoner Bürger in dieser ereignisreichen Zeit der englischen Geschichte erlebt hat - und es gab nichts, wofür er sich nicht interessiert hätte: für Politik natürlich, für Theater und Musik, für Literatur und Predigten, aber auch für gutes Essen und für Frauen. Pepys schildert mit unverstelltem Blick den Alltag in der Metropole und überliefert hautnah bedeutende Ereignisse seiner Zeit.

Autorinformation
Helmut Winter, 1935-2004, war als Anglist an der Universität Gießen tätig. Für Reclam hat er eine Auswahl aus dem Tagebuch von James Boswell übersetzt und Erzählungen von Nadine Gordimer herausgegeben.


Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Wicht, Wolfgang (Autor)
Utopianism in James Joyce's Ulysses

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3825310248/etymologpor09-20
Broschiert: 257 Seiten
Verlag: Universitätsverlag Winter (2000)
Sprache: Englisch

Erstellt: 2011-12

X

Y

Z