Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Malapropismus, Malapropismo, Malapropisme, Malapropismo, Malapropism

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bartleby.com/116
Malaprops

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/116/

H.W. Fowler (1858–1933). The King’s English, 2nd ed. 1908.

Chapter I. Vocabulary

MALAPROPS

BEFORE classifying, we define a "malaprop" as a word used in the belief that it has the meaning really belonging to another word that resembles it in some particular. ...
We have touched shortly upon some four dozen of what we call "malaprops". Now possible "malaprops", in our extended sense, are to be reckoned not by the dozen, but by the million. Moreover, out of our four dozen, not more than some half a dozen are uses that it is worth any one's while to register individually in his mind for avoidance. The conclusion of which is this: we have made no attempt at cataloguing the mistakes of this sort that must not be committed; every one must construct his own catalogue by care, observation, and the resolve to use no word whose meaning he is not sure of — even though that resolve bring on him the extreme humiliation of now and then opening the dictionary. Our aim has been, not to make a list, but to inculcate a frame of mind.


Erstellt: 2016-08

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catachresis (W3)

Engl. "catachresis" (1550) = dt. "Katachrese", "Bildbruch", frz. "catachrèse", geht über lat. "catachresis" zurück auf griech. "katáchresis", zu griech. "katachrestikós" = dt. "uneigentlich", setzt sich zusammen aus griech. "kata-" = dt. "von - herab", "abwärts", "gegen", "über - hin", "gänzlich", "völlig" und griech. "chresthai" = dt. "brauchen", "gebrauchen" - bedeutet also etwa wörtlich dt. "gegensätzlicher Gebrauch".

Als Wurzel wird ide. "*gher-" postuliert.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "catachresis" kann der Linguistik bzw. Rhetorik zugeordnet werden. Es bezeichnet den Gebrauch von Wörtern in einem falschen Kontext oder den unpassenden Gebrauch einer Redewendung bzw. einer Metapher.

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080625064850/http://www.bartleby.com/61/22/c0152200.html

"catachresis", Noun, pl. "catachreses" ETYMOLOGY: Latin "catachrsis", improper use of a word, from Greek "katakhrsis", "excessive use", from "katakhrsthai", to "misuse" : "kata-", "completely"; see "cata–" + "khrsthai", "to use"; see "*gher-2" in Appendix I.

OTHER FORMS: "catachrestic", "catachrestical" (ADJECTIVE), "catachrestically" (ADVERB)


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080310020656/http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE161.html

ENTRY: "*gher-(2)"

DEFINITION: To "like", "want". Oldest form "*gher-", becoming "*gher-" in centum languages.

1. Suffixed form "*gher-n-": engl. "yearn", from Old English "giernan", "gyrnan" = engl. to "strive", "desire", "yearn", from Germanic "*gernjan".

2. Possibly extended form "*ghre-":

a. engl. "greedy", from Old English "grædig" = engl. "hungry", "covetous", "greedy", from Germanic "*grediga-" = engl. "hungry", formed from "*greduz" = engl. "hunger".

b. engl. "catachresis", "chresard", "chrestomathy", from Greek "khresthai" = engl. to "lack", "want", "use", from "khre" = engl. "it is necessary".

3. Suffixed zero-grade form "*ghr-to-": engl. "hortative", "exhort", from Latin "hortari" = engl. "to urge on", "encourage" ("to cause to strive or desire").

4. Suffixed zero-grade form "*ghr-i-": engl. "charisma", "Eucharist", from Greek "kharis" = engl. "grace", "favor".

5. Suffixed zero-grade form "*ghr-yo-": engl. "chervil", from Greek "khairein" = engl. "to rejoice", "delight in". (Pokorny 1. "gher-" 440.)


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20060419104745/http://www.bartleby.com/68/48/1148.html

CATACHRESIS (n.), CATACHRESTIC, CATACHRESTICAL (adjs.)

This noun (pronounced KAT-uh-KREE-sis) and its adjectives (pronounced KAT-uh-KRES-tik-[uhl]) describe either the misuse of a word or a mistaken form of a word, as in a mixed metaphor such as "He kept a tight rein on his boiling temper", a paradox such as "a tall dwarf", or an explanation of a word that leads to a folk etymology, such as "sparrow grass" for "asparagus". These examples are catachrestic(al), and each such locution is itself a "catachresis". See also FOREIGN PLURALS.


(E2)(L1) http://rhetoric.byu.edu/

"catachresis", Gk. "misuse", lat. "abusio", engl. "figure of abuse", "abusion"

The use of a word in a context that differs from its proper application.

This figure is generally considered a vice; however, Quintilian defends its use as a way by which one adapts existing terms to applications where a proper term does not exist.

Examples
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Related Figures Related Topics of Invention See Also


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/catachresis

"catachresis"

Misuse or strained use of words, as in a mixed metaphor, occurring either in error or for rhetorical effect.

Origin of catachresis: Latin, 1580-1590, "Catachresis" is derived from the Greek root "chrêsis" which meant "to use". The prefix "cata-" means "down", "back", "against". The word "katachrêsthai" meant "to misuse" in Greek.


(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/2013/04/catachretic-love.html

Wednesday, 24 April 2013

Catachretic Love

There's a rhetorical term called "catachresis", which is rather hard to define. That is to say that like most rhetorical terms it has several different definitions that have amassed over a couple of millennia. Some authorities just say that is the "misuse of a word" - a "malapropism". But others have the more interesting definition that it is "a word wrenched out of its normal usage in a surprising, impossible metaphor".

The classic example of this is Hamlet's "I will look daggers at her". This was, of course, the origin of the phrase. Look daggers is the catachresis because... well how can you look daggers. Look isn't even a transistive verb - you look at the cat, you don't look the cat. So shouldn't it really be an adverb like look angrily? Of course it works. It works very well. Indeed it works because it's so damned surprising.

Another Shakespearean example is "Tis deepest winter in Lord Timon's pockets". That means Timon's broke. But it's a metaphor that sort of doesn't work, and therefore works really well. It's a use of language that's so wrong it's right.

Anyway, yesterday, in an e-mail conversation with The Antipodean, I was making a joke about song titles that contained the word love, when I realised how many of them were "catachretic". For example, there's Leonard Cohen's "Dance Me to the End of Love". That's a perfect "catchresis". You would expect the sentence to end with a noun of space or time - "Dance Me to the End of the Night" or "Dance Me to the End of the Street" - and instead you get love, which isn't a place, unless you believe the Doors line "She lives on Love Street", which is another "love-catachresis".

Robert Palmer has a catachretic amour: Doctor, Doctor, give me the news. I've got a bad case of loving you; but I don't think Addicted To Love is a catachresis, that's just a metaphor.

"Love Minus Zero" by Dylan is a definitely a "catachresis". "Dr Love" by Bobby Sheen probably counts. "Love Me Tender" is a catachresis, because it should be "Love Me Tenderly". And I'm pretty sure "Crazy In Love" is a catachresis. But...

Well, you can probably see that "catachresis" is a question of judgement. Rhetoricians will argue forever about how it exactly it differs from enallage (the substitution of one part of speech for another, so "Love Me Tender" counts). But if you can think of another catachretic love, please put it in the comments.

P.S. Before someone points it out, I know "Bad Case of Loving You" is by Moon Martin.

Posted by M.H. Forsyth at 11:01 10 comments:
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(E?)(L?) http://www.kokogiak.com/logolepsy/ow_c.html

"catachresis", n. - incorrect use of a word or phrase, especially from any etymological misunderstanding

"catachresis", n. - use of wrong words. catachrestic, adj.


(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/catachresis

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The first recorded use of "catachresis" dates to 1553, and it has been used to describe (or decry) misuses of a word ever since. "Catachresis" comes to us by way of Latin from the Greek word "katachresis", which means "misuse".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

"catachresis"

Definition: Using the wrong word, e.g. saying disinterested (i.e. impartial) when you want to say uninterested (i.e. not interested).

Notes: 1. As a language-change process, catachresis can also be viewed as a powerful source of creativity.

Etymology: The word derives from the Greek katakhresthai, misuse of a word.

Oxford English Dictionary - Its first citation is from 1589: "Catachresis or the Figure of abuse." (Puttenham Eng. Poesie (Arb.) 190 marg.,)

similar: solecism | barbarism | vulgarism | confusage | confusables | acyrology


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=catachreses
Limericks on "catachreses"

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=catachresis
Limericks on "catachresis"
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"catachresis", plural "catachreses": the misapplication of a word or phrase

"Mrs. Malaprop" is a character in Sheridan's play "The Rivals", who often mixes up words that sound similar. That kind of "catachresis" is called a "malapropism" after her. In the example quoted (with slight adjustment to make it scan), she means proceed, of course. Her name derives from the French "mal à propos", meaning "inopportunely" or "inappropriately".

Wider examples of "catachresis" include confusing "blatant" with "flagrant", and using "anticipate" instead of "expect". If you do it by mistake, it's called "lexical catachresis"; if you do it deliberately, it's the "rhetorical kind".

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=catachrestic
Limericks on "catachrestic"

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=catachrestically
Limericks on "catachrestically"

(E?)(L?) http://www.onelook.com/?loc=olthes1&w=catachresis

We found 32 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word catachresis:

General dictionaries General (25 matching dictionaries) Art dictionaries Art (4 matching dictionaries) Business dictionaries Business (1 matching dictionary) Miscellaneous dictionaries Miscellaneous (2 matching dictionaries)


(E?)(L1) http://www.onelook.com/reverse-dictionary.shtml?s=catachresis

"catachresis": strained or paradoxical use of words either in error (as "blatant" to mean "flagrant") or deliberately (as in a mixed metaphor: "blind mouths").

Showing words related to catachresis, ranked by relevance.


(E?)(L?) http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/catachresis

Name of a misusage - What do you call the catachresis(? or misusage) when one uses an unreasonably extreme form of an attribute or adjective in a sentence where a more moderate one would be correct? (e.g.there are two ...

Term for the blatant use of the wrong word? - In my line of work I am confronted with people who blatantly or ignorantly misspeak. Ex: Customer - "Hi. Can I get a bagel" Me - "I'm sorry, we only sell pretzels here sir." Customer - "Yeah, ...

“Season's greetings” or “Seasoned greetings” [closed] - Today I heard the phrase "Seasoned greetings." Is this just some clever word play on the traditional "Season's greetings," meant to mean greetings spiced up with seasoning, or is it a legitimate ...

Is there a word to describe someone who often inaccurately uses words? - Or a word to describe the act of inaccurately using complicated or unusual words (often in an attempt to sound more intelligent)? I considered 'bombastic' but it doesn't have that quality of ...

What's up with the word “egregious”? - According to Google's dictionary (and MacOS/iOS dictionary), egregious has the following definitions: I've seen words with multiple definitions, but not ones that are exact contradictions. Some ...

A word for when a word is used incorrectly (grammatically) but can still be parsed in a grammatically correct way? - Does such a word exist? An example: Do good. Supposing that my intention in saying "Do good!" was actually "Do well (on your test)!", the sentence still parses correctly as "Do good (deeds)!" I ...


(E?)(L?) https://mcl.as.uky.edu/glossary-rhetorical-terms

"Catachresis": a harsh metaphor involving the use of a word beyond its strict sphere.

*I listen vainly, but with thirsty ear. MacArthur, Farewell Address

*Cynthia prima suis miserum me cepit ocellis. Propertius I.1.1


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=C




(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/glossary

"Catachresis" (Greek, "misuse"): An eccentric metaphor.


(E?)(L?) https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/catachresis

catachresis


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html

2008-07: Words about words and language: grammatolatry | catachresis | parapraxis | lingua franca | orthoepy | AWADmail 317


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/catachresis.html

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ETYMOLOGY: Here's a catchall word for all those mixed metaphors, malapropisms, and bushisms. It derives via Latin from Greek katakhresthai (to misuse).
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(E?)(L?) https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/wwftd/conversations/messages/110

catachresis | catachrestic


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=catachresis
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "catachresis" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#catachresis

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

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Farberisms (W3)

"Farberisms" are sayings in the style of Dave Farber (whom you may have heard about with regard to Internet). Some of these are from the "master" himself. Others simply exemplify his style.

(E?)(L?) http://www.cs.arizona.edu/icon/oddsends/farber.htm

David J. Farber

Last updated October 23, 1997

a long list


(E?)(L?) http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/001737.html

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Other relevant examples can be found in the list of "Farberisms" on the Icon site, many of which are idiom blends ("he flipped his cork", "that's a different cup of fish"), while others are just "malaprops" ("this report reads like a bleached whale", "he's as ugly as godzilla the hun"), or other sorts of modifications of "fixed expressions" ("let's solve two problems with one bird").


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Farberisms
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Farberisms" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Farberisms

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

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malaprop (W3)

Der engl. "Malapropism" geht zurück auf einen Charakter in dem Schauspiel "The Rivals" des irischen Dramatikers Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - ). Das Schauspiel "The Rivals" war ein bekanntes Volkstheaterstück, und "Mrs. Malaprop" wurde zu einem allgemeinen Ausdruck, zunächst in der Form engl. "malaprop" und später als engl. "malapropism", das seit 1849 nachweisbar ist.

Die Namensgebung des Kömodiencharakters "Mrs. Malaprop" basiert dabei auf frz. "mal à propos" = dt. "ungelegen", "zur Unzeit", das sich zusammensetzt aus frz. "mal" = dt. "schlecht", "schlimm" und frz. "à propos" = dt. "angemessen" (frz. "propos" = dt. "Gesprächsthema", frz. "proposer" = dt. "vorschlagen").

Ein "Malapropismus" ist also etwas "Unpassendes".

Übrigens:

Der erste Nachweis für "Deadlock" ("dead lock") findet sich im Jahr 1779 in dem Schauspiel "The Critic" von Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - 1816) (der selbe Sheridan, der der englischen Sprache auch "Malapropism" hinzugefügt hat).

(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/malaprop

malaprop


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-September/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-June/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2008-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-December/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-June/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-March/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2006-February/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2005-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-April/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-October/subject.html

Malaprops on American On-Line News James A. Landau


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/003/000022934/

Yogi Berra AKA Lawrence Peter Berra
Born: 12-May-1925
Birthplace: St. Louis, MO
Died: 22-Sep-2015
Location of death: West Caldwell, NJ
Cause of death: unspecified
Gender: Male
Race or Ethnicity: White
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Baseball
Nationality: United States
Executive summary: New York Yankee "malapropist"
Military service: US Navy (WWII)
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(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2002-8-Aug.htm

Words for funny uses of words: malaprop | spoonerism | mondegreen | rodomontade
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The synonym "malapropism" derives form "malaprop", and not vice versa.
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(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"malaprop"

"Mrs. Malaprop", character in R. B. Sheridan's comedy "The Rivals", noted for her misuse of words

humorous misuse of a word sounding like the one intended


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=malaprop
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "malaprop" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1810 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#malaprop

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

Malapropism (W3)

"malapropism": an act of misusing or the habitual misuse of similar sounding words, especially with humorous results.

Der engl. "Malapropism" geht zurück auf einen Charakter in dem Schauspiel "The Rivals" des irischen Dramatikers Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 - ). Das Schauspiel "The Rivals" war ein bekanntes Volkstheaterstück, und "Mrs. Malaprop" wurde zu einem allgemeinen Ausdruck, zunächst in der Form engl. "malaprop" und später als engl. "malapropism", das seit 1849 nachweisbar ist.

Die Namensgebung des Kömodiencharakters "Mrs. Malaprop" basiert dabei auf frz. "mal à propos" = dt. "ungelegen", "zur Unzeit", das sich zusammensetzt aus frz. "mal" = dt. "schlecht", "schlimm" und frz. "à propos" = dt. "angemessen" (frz. "propos" = dt. "Gesprächsthema", frz. "proposer" = dt. "vorschlagen").

Ein "Malapropismus" ist also etwas "Unpassendes".

A "malapropism" is any well-intended saying that takes on a different and often ludicrous meaning when a similar yet utterly inappropriate word is used. To wit: "He is the very pineapple of politeness."

Ein Beispiel wäre etwa: By eating healthy and exercising regularly he hoped to become nearly immoral. [statt "immortal"]

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/eponyms/eponym_list_m.html

"malapropism": A humorously mispronounced or misused word or phrase. "Mrs Malaprop", character in play "The Rivals" by Irish dramatist Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751-1816).


(E?)(L?) http://grammar.about.com/od/mo/g/malapterm.htm

"malapropism"

Glossary of Grammatical and Rhetorical Terms
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(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2012/10/07


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2010/10/12


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2007/05/31


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/malapropism

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Word History:

Today's Good Word is a commonization of the surname of "Mrs. Malaprop", a character in Richard Sheridan's comedy "The Rivals". "Mrs. Malaprop" was noted for using wrong words, but words that made sense in a humorous way. Sheridan, who was wonderful at creating funny but appropriate names, derived her name from the French phrase "mal à propos" "inappropriate". "Mrs. Malaprop" thus is the eponym of "malapropism".


(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/malapropisms/

Malapropisms

By Sharon
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(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/5-mixed-up-malapropisms/

5 Mixed-Up Malapropisms


(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/4-exasperating-malapropisms/

4 Exasperating Malapropisms


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2004/02/26/malapropism


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2007/03/08/malapropism


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/malapropism

malapropism: the usually unintentionally humorous misuse of a word.

"malapropism", noun ...


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=malapropism

"malapropism" (n.) 1826, from "Mrs. Malaprop", character in Sheridan's play "The Rivals" (1775), noted for her ridiculous misuse of large words (such as "contagious countries" for "contiguous countries"), her name coined from "malapropos".

"malaprop" (n.) 1823, from name of theatrical character "Mrs. Malaprop" (see "malapropism"). Related: "Malapropian".


(E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/malapropisms.html
Malapropisms: What are they? | Malaprop Books | Famous Examples | Top Malapropisms | Mondegreens | Links

This is the hilarious world of malapropisms, verbal slips and gaffes, Bushisms, Colemanballs, and, of course, Mrs. Malaprop.
... (E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/malapropisms.html

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The word "malapropism" comes from the fictitious character of "Mrs. Malaprop". Find out more about Mrs. Malaprop and her original malapropisms.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/mala_explain.html

In his 1775 Restoration comedy, The Rivals, Richard Sheridan introduced a humorous character by the name of "Mrs. Malaprop". The name is derived from the French "mal à propos", which means inappropriate (we also have the word "malapropos" in English), and describes the manner in which she used many words in her speech. See some Mrs. Malaprop quotations here.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/mala_malapropisms.html
Mrs. Malaprop's Malapropisms

Here are some of the original malapropisms from the lady herself: Mrs. Malaprop in Richard Sheridan's play The Rivals (1775).

In case you're not sure what it is that Mrs. Malaprop is intending to say we've put the correct word(s) in square brackets after each quotation.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.fun-with-words.com/mala_famous.html

Famous Malapropisms

Famous people are far from immune to making mistakes. Unfortunately for them, unlike us "nobodies", when they come out with a hilarious slip of the tongue it is often recorded for posterity on pages like this! Below is a selection of celebrity malapropisms – from politicians, TV stars, and sports personalities. Can you spot the inappropriately used word in each quotation?
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(E?)(L?) https://www.grammarly.com/blog/what-is-a-malapropism/

What Is a Malapropism?
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But Sheridan’s "Mrs. Malaprop" wasn’t the first fictional character to utter "malapropisms". In his play "Much Ado About Nothing", William Shakespeare created a character called Dogberry, a watchman who constantly tosses off malapropisms:
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(E?)(L?) https://www.grammarly.com/blog/8-embarrassing-yet-common-malapropisms/

8 Embarrassing (Yet Common) Malapropisms


(E?)(L?) http://daily.jstor.org/the-monstrous-words-lurking-in-your-language/

Chi Luu July 27, 2016

The Monstrous Words Lurking in Your Language

Mrs. Malaprop (from whom the malapropism got its name ) in a production of "The Rivals."

Who would even remember that “vitamin” once came from “vital” and “mineral“? [geprägt von Casimir Funk (1884-1967) aus lat. "vita" = dt. "Leben" und engl. "amine" = dt. "organische Stickstoffverbindung", "Amin".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.jstor.org/stable/4177997

Malapropisms and the Structure of the Mental Lexicon

David Fay and Anne Cutler

Linguistic Inquiry

Vol. 8, No. 3 (Summer, 1977), pp. 505-520

Published by: The MIT Press

Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4177997

Page Count: 16


(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/lower2/mmalaprop.html

Virginia: What's a malapropism?

Wesley: It's when you accidentally replete a word with another word that sounds somewhat simian, often with comic effect.
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(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S1=ADS-L

Search Results: ADS-L: 92 matches (only the first 50 will be shown).




(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day/malapropism-2014-11-02

Nov 02 malapropism


(E1)(L1) http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/wftwarch.pl?011508

"Goodman Aiskowitz" was born on this date in 1899. Who was "Goodman Aiskowitz"? He was the radio actor, writer, and columnist better remembered as "Goodman Ace". Together with his wife Jane, Ace created and starred in "Easy Aces", a long-running radio comedy whose translation into television was less successful. Ace called "TV" 'a clever contraction derived from the words "Terrible Vaudeville"' and went on to label it "our latest medium" before confiding, "[w]e call it a medium because nothing is well done."

But let's go back to the radio series that made Goodman Ace a household name. That domestic comedy featured his wife saying such classic lines as the double-entendre "I am his awfully-wedded wife"; the philosophic "home wasn't built in a day"; and the pragmatic "the chickens have come home to roast."

Wordlovers and wits know such word twists are named "malapropisms" after "Mrs. Malaprop", the similarly misspeaking character in Richard Sheridan's stage play "The Rivals". Radio actress Jane Ace updated the usually unintentionally humorous misuse or distortion of a word or phrase from the 18th century to the 20th century when she proudly proclaimed herself "a ragged individualist" and offered up a bemused "you could have knocked me down with a fender."


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

malapropism


(E?)(L?) http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/spoonerisms-mondegreens-eggcorns-and-malapropisms

Spoonerisms, Mondegreens, Eggcorns, and Malapropisms

Learn what these words mean and whether you've ever spoken a spoonerism or heard a mondegreen.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/writing/modern-malapropisms

Modern Malapropisms

Grammar Girl features an excerpt from Robert Alden Rubin's new book Going to Hell in a Hen Basket: An Illustrated Dictionary of Modern Malapropisms.
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(E?)(L?) http://english.stackexchange.com/tags

Questions arising from error (real or perceived): "solecism", "malapropism", "mondegreens", "eggcorns", "disputed usages", so-called "corruption", "folk etymologies", but also requests for interpretation when the text in question arguably contains an error, and questions which stem from a misunderstanding. Do not use when an error has not been made: for example, "which is correct" questions arise from uncertainty, not error.


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW138/page4.html#malapropisms


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW139/page4.html#malapropism


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/malapropism.html

Malapropism
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See Also: Irony; Hyperbole; Sarcasm; Slang; Jargon; Tautology; Understatement; Litotes; Rhetorical Question; Cliche; Allegory Portmanteau Word; Spoonerism


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/

Wednesday, September 2nd / Wednesday, May 14th

malapropism

Not What I Meant to Say Word of the Day:

This noun belongs to the select set of English words derived from the names of fictional characters. Mrs. Malaprop, from Sheridan's 18th century play The Rivals, rarely missed an opportunity to use the wrong word, to great comic effect. Slips of the tongue today pay homage to her.


(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/medical-misapprehensions/

Medical Misapprehensions

August 7, 2008

By Ben Zimmer

On the Web you can find some well-traveled lists of medical malapropisms, supposedly collected from patients who misunderstand names of diseases and medications. So for instance, "Alzheimer's disease" becomes "old-timer's disease", "sickle-cell anemia" becomes "sick as hell anemia", "spinal meningitis" becomes "smilin' mighty Jesus", and "phenobarbital" becomes "peanut butter balls". These lists are good for a laugh, but it turns out misunderstandings of medical terminology can sometimes have dangerous or even deadly consequences.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/candlepwr/


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/candlepwr/a-time-to-flout-a-time-to-flaunt/

CandlepowerAd and marketing creatives

A Time to Flout, A Time to Flaunt

June 17, 2010

By Julia Rubiner

I listen to a lot of NPR. Unless the correspondent is doing a "man in the street"-type interview, the subjects generally appear intelligent, educated and literate. At least they used to. I've heard several malapropisms in recent weeks, some of which are so common that I figure it's time I spoke up.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/dogeared/


(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/dogeared/eggcorns-finally-get-their-due-in-bountiful-book-of-malapropisms/

Dog EaredBooks we love

Eggcorns Finally Get Their Due in a Bountiful Book of Malapropisms

October 8, 2015

By Mark Peters

Do you like sowing your wild oaks? Do you sometimes feel like a social leopard? Could you use a new leaf on life? Or do you just enjoy the infinite creativity of the English language, even when people make mistakes? If you answered yes to any of the above, you need to check out Robert Alden Rubin's terrific new book Going to Hell in a Hen Basket: An Illustrated Dictionary of Modern Malapropisms.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A




(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms_(L-Z)

"Mrs. Malaprop", a character in The Rivals, a play by Richard Brinsley Sheridan - "malapropism" (a humorous misuse of a word)


(E1)(L1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malapropism


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/back-h2.html#malaprop

Malapropisms


(E?)(L?) http://wordinfo.info/units/index/M


(E?)(L?) http://wordinfo.info/unit/4519/ip:1/il:M

Word Unit: Malapropisms, Part 1 (Mrs. Malaprop and her Malapropisms)

Malapropism is defined as a ridiculous misuse of words

The forms malaprop and malapropism are an allusion to Mrs. Malaprop, a character in Richard Sheridan's play The Rivals (1775), noted for her ridiculous misuse of words.

Sheridan coined her name with a back formation from malapropos which means "in an inappropriate or awkward manner and at the wrong time or place".

The term was borrowed from French mal à propos, “badly for the purpose, inappropriate” (mal “badly”; à propos, “appropriately, to the purpose”).

Here are a few of the original malapropisms from the lady herself, Mrs. Malaprop:
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Malapropisms uttered by other people
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The Bushisms
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Here are a few malapropisms that have been gathered from around the Internet:
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(E?)(L?) http://wordinfo.info/unit/3606/ip:1/il:M

Word Unit: Malapropisms, Part 2 (Ludicrous-English Caused by Blunders and Incompetence)

Be aware of faulty speech and writing habits so you can confirm and strengthen the good ones
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The Origin of the Word Malapropism

“She’s as headstrong as an allegory on the banks of the Nile” and “He is the very pineapple of politeness” are two of the absurd pronouncements from "Mrs. Malaprop" that explain why her name became synonymous with the ludicrous misuse of English.

A character in Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s play "The Rivals" (1775), "Mrs. Malaprop" consistently uses language "malapropos", that is, "inappropriately". The word "malapropos" comes from the French phrase "mal á propos", made up of "mal"; "bad, badly" and "á", "to" and "propos", "purpose, subject"; and means "inappropriate".

The Rivals was a popular play, and "Mrs. Malaprop" became enshrined in a common noun, first in the form "malaprop" and later in "malapropism"; which is first recorded in 1849. Perhaps that is what "Mrs. Malaprop" feared when she said, "If I reprehend any thing in this world, it is the use of my oracular tongue, and a nice derangement of epitaphs!"

Language Is Essential to Our Success in Life
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Just What Does Ludicrous Mean?
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"Ludicrous" was borrowed from Latin "ludicrus", from "ludicrum", "joke, amusement", and from "ludere", "to play". The current sense of causing derisive laughter, ridiculous, is first recorded in English in 1782, in Frances Burney's Cecilia.
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Ludicrous Headlines, Advertisements, and Other Malapropisms

Examples of Ludicrous-Newspaper Statements
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(E?)(L?) http://wordinfo.info/units/index/Q/page:4

Word Unit: Quotes: Malaprops, Malapropisms (speaking a foreign language in English; the inability to tell what a person does not mean until he/she has spoken).

Quotations
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(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html

malapropism


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0896


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0301


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/malapropism.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/malapropism1.html

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ETYMOLOGY:

After Mrs. Malaprop, a character in Richard Sheridan's play, The Rivals (1775), who confused words in this manner. The name Malaprop is coined from French "mal à propos" (inappropriate). Earliest documented use: 1830.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/




(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Malapropism
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Malapropism" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1820 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Malapropism

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

malapropos (W3)

Das Adjektiv engl. "malapropos" (1660-1670) = dt. "unangebracht", engl. "unseasonable", "unsuitable", "inappropriate", geht zurück auf frz. "mal à propos" = engl. "badly to the purpose".

(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2016/06/19/nonpareil


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2007/11/30/malapropos

"malapropos", adjective [mal-ap-ruh-POH] = "unseasonable"; "unsuitable"; "inappropriate".

Definitions for malapropos Origin of "malapropos": French, 1660-1670, "malapropos" comes from French mal à propos, "badly to the purpose".


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/malapropos

malapropos


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/malapropos

malapropos


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A

"malapropos": at an inconvenient time


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=malapropos
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "malapropos" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#malapropos

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

Mrs. Malaprop (W3)

"Mrs. Malaprop" ist eine Figur in R. B. Sheridan's Komödie "The Rivals". Sie benutzt ständig Wörter in einem falschen Zusammenhang, bzw. verwechselt ähnlich klingende Wörter. Daraus entwickelte sich amerik. "malaprop", engl. "malapropism" = dt. "(lächerliche) Wortverwechslung".

Der engl. "Malapropism" geht zurück auf einen Charakter in dem Schauspiel "The Rivals" von Richard Sheridan. Das Schauspiel "The Rivals" war ein bekanntes Volkstheaterstück, und "Mrs. Malaprop" wurde zu einem allgemeinen Ausdruck, zunächst in der Form engl. "malaprop" und später als engl. "malapropism", das seit 1849 nachweisbar ist.

Die Namensgebung des Kömodiencharakters "Mrs. Malaprop" basiert dabei auf frz. "mal à propos" = dt. "ungelegen", "zur Unzeit", das sich zusammensetzt aus frz. "mal" = dt. "schlecht", "schlimm" und frz. "à propos" = dt. "angemessen" (frz. "propos" = dt. "Gesprächsthema", frz. "proposer" = dt. "vorschlagen").

(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/10853.html

Malaprop (Mrs.)


(E?)(L?) http://daily.jstor.org/the-monstrous-words-lurking-in-your-language/

Chi Luu / July 27, 2016

The Monstrous Words Lurking in Your Language

Mrs. Malaprop (from whom the malapropism got its name ) in a production of "The Rivals."

“You have hissed all my mystery lectures. I saw you fight a liar in the back quad; in fact, you have tasted a whole worm. You will leave by the next town drain.”

(“You have missed all my history lectures. I saw you light a fire in the back quad; in fact, you have wasted a whole term. You will leave by the next down train.”).

Perhaps no Oxford don has been quite so celebrated for his error-prone speech than the absent-minded Reverend "William A. Spooner", who lent his name to the often comical practice of switching around the speech sounds of different words. Whether Reverend Spooner ever said those actual words or not, it’s true that "spoonerisms" and other such slips of the tongue can reveal some pretty interesting things about language — how we associate and map words and sounds in our brains.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/candlepwr/prostate-with-grief/

CandlepowerAd and marketing creatives

Prostate With Grief

September 22, 2009

By Julia Rubiner

Want to avoid using words that "sound somewhat like the ones intended but are ludicrously wrong in the context"? Let our Editorial Emergency team, Simon Glickman and Julia Rubiner, help you to avoid coming off like the reincarnation of "Mrs. Malaprop"!

We got such an outpouring of "I know, right?" on our piece "She Literally Misused the Word" that we've decided to follow through on an earlier promise we made, when we wrote: "Next time: "Malapropisms" — you know, when people say distract when they mean detract, or antidote when they mean anecdote."
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(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"malaprop": "Mrs. Malaprop", character in R. B. Sheridan's comedy The Rivals, noted for her misuse of words humorous misuse of a word sounding like the one intended


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Mrs. Malaprop
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Mrs. Malaprop" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Mrs. Malaprop

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-08

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Malapropismus, Malapropismo, Malapropisme, Malapropismo, Malapropism

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Partridge, Eric
Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English
Colloquialisms, and Catch-Phrases, Solecisms and Catachresis, Nicknames, and Vulgarisms

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0025949802/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0025949802/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0025949802/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0025949802/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0025949802/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 1440 Seiten
Verlag: Macmillan General Reference; Auflage: 8th (März 1985)
Sprache: Englisch


Wordslinger Eric Partridge intended his dictionary to be a "humble companion" to the Oxford English Dictionary - a ribald companion is more like it! In Partridge's domain, a gentleman's pleasure-garden has little to do with the horticultural, referring as it does to the genitalia muliebria. On the other hand, play pussy is a Royal Air Force term meaning "to take advantage of cloud cover," and since the 1970s British forces have called intelligence operatives secret squirrels. And so it goes.

There is enough slang, cant ("i.e., language of the underworld"), and expletives here for all takers - there's low, Cockney rhyming, "picturesque Australian similes," society phrases, and even the semiproverbial. Dorothy Wordsworth, of all people, used a nod is as good as a wink to a blind horse--a phrase "applied to a covert yet comprehensible hint, though often stupidity is implied."

Partridge also reveals low language's less larky side. His book can be a dark record of linguistic prejudice through the ages. Of course, in a slang dictionary, nothing is what it seems. Elevated means "drunk"; a deep-freezer is "a girl or woman of the prim or keep-off-me type"; and stage fright is late-20th-century rhyming slang for "a (glass of) light (ale)." Are you able to descry what the jocular Seduce my ancient footwear really means? If not, consider consulting Partridge's masterwork, as large as life and twice as natural.


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Toseland, Martin
The Ants Are My Friends
Misheard Lyrics, Malapropisms, Eggcorns, and Other Linguistic Gaffes

(E?)(L?) http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-ants-are-my-friends-martin-toseland/1014568737?ean=9781906032067

Overview

Do you take things for granite? Do you need a secretary at your beckoned call? In "The Ants Are My Friends" — delightfully misheard from Bob Dylan's "Blowing in the Wind" — Martin Toseland has collected the very best, and very worst, linguistic gifts of the gaffe. Examples have been plucked gleefully from three categories of blunders: "malapropisms" — named after "Mrs. Malaprop" in Sheridan's play The Rivals where the wrong word pops out to bizarre results; "eggcorns" — where a new word is created from misheard real one (the name comes from someone misunderstanding "acorn" as "eggcorn", as it has the same shape); and of course "mondegreens", or misheard lyrics, a rich vein of accidental invention. Such classic mondegreens are collected as Ray Parker Jr.'s "Who Ya Gonna Call, Gus Foster", Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams are Made of Cheese", Roy Orbison's "Only Baloney", AC/DC's "Dirty Deeds Done with Sheep", and Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tangerine Man".

ISBN-13: 9781906032067


Erstellt: 2014-06

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