Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Mythologie, Mitología, Mythologie, Mitologia, Mythology

A

amarth (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.alumni.uni-bremen.de/neues/newsletter5/hdr_2c.php

...
So standen die walisischen Negativ-Wörter "amar" = "Wunde", "amarch" = "Unehre" und "amorth" = "Fluch" gemeinsam Pate für Sindarin "amarth" = "Verhängnis".
...


B

babylon
Dreams Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.babylon.com/dictionary-tools/


Erstellt: 2010-09

bartleby181
bartleby182
bartleby183
Bulfinch, Thomas
The Age of Fable
Beauties of Mythology

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/bulfinch/
Thomas Bulfinch

Written to "teach mythology not as a study but as a relaxation from study", these ageless volumes span the ages: from the Olympus of Zeus and the Valhalla of Thor, to the Round Table of King Arthur and the escapades of Robin Hood.

u.a.: Vols I–II. Stories of Gods and Heroes.

CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record
NEW EDITION, REVISED AND ENLARGED
NEW YORK: REVIEW OF REVIEWS, 1913
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2000

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/181/


Introduction | Prometheus and Pandora | Apollo and Daphne | Pyramus and Thisbe | Cephalus and Procris | Juno and her Rivals, Io and Callisto | Diana and Actæon | Latona and the Rustics | Phaëton | Midas | Baucis and Philemon | Proserpine | Glaucus and Scylla | Pygmalion | Dryope | Venus and Adonis | Apollo and Hyacinthus | Ceyx and Halcyone: Or, the Halcyon Birds | Vertumnus and Pomona; Iphis and Anaxarete | Cupid and Psyche | Cadmus | The Myrmidons | Nisus and Scylla | Echo and Narcissus | Clytie | Hero and Leander | Minerva and Arachne | Niobe | The Grææ and the Gorgons | Perseus and Medusa | Perseus and Atlas | Andromeda, or the Sea-Monster | The Wedding Feast | Monsters: Giants | The Sphinx | Pegasus and Chimæra | The Centaurs | The Pygmies | The Griffin, or Gryphon | The Golden Fleece | Medea and Æson | Meleager and Atalanta | Hercules | Hebe and Ganymede | Theseus | Olympic and Other Games | Dædalus | Castor and Pollux | Bacchus | Ariadne | The Rural Deities | Erisichthon | Rhœcus | The Water Deities | The Camenæ | The Winds | Achelous and Hercules | Admetus and Alcestis | Antigone | Penelope | Orpheus and Eurydice | Aristæus, the Bee-Keeper | Amphion | Linus | Thamyris | Marsyas | Melampus | Musæus | Arion | Ibycus | Simonides | Sappho | Diana and Endymion | Orion | Aurora and Tithonus | Acis and Galatea | The Trojan War | “The Iliad” | The Fall of Troy | Menelaus and Helen | Agamemnon, Orestes, and Electra | Troy | Return of Ulysses | The Læstrygonians, or The Lotus-eaters | Scylla and Charybdis | The Phæacians | Fate of the Suitors | Adventures of Æneas | Dido | Palinurus | The Infernal Regions | Elysium | The Sibyl | Æneas in Italy | Camilla | Evander | Infant Rome | Nisus and Euryalus | Mezentius | Pallas, Camilla, Turnus | Pythagoras | Egyptian Deities | Oracles | Origin of Mythology | Statues of Gods and Goddesses | Poets of Mythology | Modern Monsters | The Phœnix | The Cockatrice, or Basilisk | The Unicorn | The Salamander | Eastern Mythology: | Hindu Mythology | Castes | Buddha | The Grand Lama | Prester John | Northern Mythology | Valhalla | The Valkyrior | Of Thor and the Other Gods | Thor’s Visit to Jotunheim, the Giant’s Country | The Death of Baldur | The Elves | Ragnarok, the Twilight of the Gods | Runic Letters | The Skalds | Iceland | Teutonic Mythology | The Nibelungen Lied | Wagner’s Nibelungen Ring | The Druids | Iona

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/182/


King Arthur and His Knights

Introduction | The Mythical History of England | Merlin | Arthur | Arthur (Continued) | Sir Gawain | Caradoc Briefbras; or, Caradoc with the Shrunken Arm | Launcelot of the Lake | The Adventure of the Cart | The Lady of Shalott | Queen Guenever’s Peril | Tristram and Isoude | Tristram and Isoude (Continued) | Sir Tristram’s Battle with Sir Launcelot | The Round Table | Sir Palamedes | Sir Tristram | Perceval | The Sangreal, or Holy Graal | The Sangreal (Continued) | The Sangreal (Continued) | Sir Agrivain’s Treason | Morte d’Arthur

The Mabinogeon

Introductory Note | The Britons | The Lady of the Fountain | The Lady of the Fountain (Continued) | The Lady of the Fountain (Continued) | Geraint, the Son of Erbin | Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued) | Geraint, the Son of Erbin (Continued) | Pwyll, Prince of Dyved | Branwen, the Daughter of Llyr | Manawyddan | Kilwich and Olwen | Kilwich and Olwen (Continued) | Taliesin

Hero Myths of the British Race

Beowulf | Cuchulain, Champion of Ireland | Hereward the Wake | Robin Hood

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/183/


Introduction | The Peers, or Paladins | The Tournament | The Siege of Albracca | Adventures of Rinaldo and Orlando | The Invasion of France | The Invasion of France (Continued) | Bradamante and Rogero | Astolpho and the Enchantress | The Orc | Astolpho’s Adventures continued, and Isabella’s begun | Medoro | Orlando Mad | Zerbino and Isabella | Astolpho in Abyssinia | The War in Africa | Rogero and Bradamante | The Battle of Roncesvalles | Rinaldo and Bayard | Death of Rinaldo | Huon of Bordeaux | Huon of Bordeaux (Continued) | Huon of Bordeaux (Continued) | Ogier, the Dane | Ogier, the Dane (Continued) | Ogier, the Dane (Continued)

bnf.fr - LldrA
BnF - Bibliothèque nationale de France
La légende du roi Arthur

(E?)(L?) http://expositions.bnf.fr/arthur/

La légende du roi Arthur

À l’occasion des trois expositions consacrées à la légende du roi Arthur, les Champs Libres, la "Bibliothèque nationale de France", la médiathèque de Troyes et le château de Chantilly proposent un voyage à travers leurs collections arthuriennes.


Erstellt: 2016-05

C

D

doppelganger
Doppelgänger (W3)

Der engl. "doppelganger" kam im 19. Jh. nach England. Wie der dt. "Doppelgänger" war auch der engl. "doppelganger" ursprünglich ein Gespenst, das eienem Lebenden ähnlich sah. Aber sowohl der dt. "Doppelgänger" als auch sein engl. "doppelganger" wandelten sich langsam zum lebenden "doppelganger", als zu einem Menschen der einem anderen zum Verwechseln ähnlich sieht.

drake
Drache (W3)

Engl. "drake" (und dt. "Drache") geht zurück auf griech. "drakon", lat. "draco" = "große Schlange", "Drache".

dúath
mallor
mallorn
i (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.alumni.uni-bremen.de/neues/newsletter5/hdr_2c.php

...
Man vergleiche auch walisisch "du" = "schwarz" mit Sindarin "dúath" = "Schatten" oder walisisch "melyn" = "gelb" mit Sindarin "mallor" = "golden" wie in "mallorn" = "Goldbaum" (Plural "mellyrn").

Ebenfalls sei erwähnt, dass der definite Artikel im Walisischen oft die Form "y" aufweist, im Sindarin die Form "i".
...


E

F

G

Glamour (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/cgi-bin/wotdarch.cgi
"Glamorous" women were originally "gramarous" but not in the sense of "grammatical". In the Middle Ages a "grammar" was a witch's manual for invoking spells and demons (engl. "gramary" = "Zauberei").

H

harpy
Harpys (W3)

Das engl. "harpy" = "Harpyie", "Hyäne", "Hexe" geht zurück auf die griechischen Sturmdämonen in Gestalt eines Mädchens mit Vogelflügeln.

"Nikothoe" war eine der "Harpyien", die auf der Flucht vor den Boreaden "Zetes" und "Kalais" über der Peloponnes in den Fluss Tigres stürzte, der seitdem "Harpys" hieß. (Apollod.1,9,21,6)

haunt (W3)

Engl. "haunt" = dt. "spuken" kann je nach Kontext auch die Bedeutungen engl. "frequent" = dt. "häufig" (when a theater-goer haunts Broadway), engl. "trouble" = dt. "beunruhigen" (when a veteran is haunted by the memories of battle) und engl. "linger" = dt. "trödeln", "lungern" (when a would-be firefighter haunts around the firehouse) annehmen.

Engl. "haunt" wurde im 13., 14. Jh. aus dem Altfranzösischen übernommen und soll weiter auf ein altnordisches Wort mit der Bedeutung engl. "to lead home", "pull", "fetch", "claim" zurück gehen und letztlich zur Wortfamilie von engl. "home", dt. "Heim" gehören. Im Deutschen findet man in diesem Umfeld beispielsweise auch den Ausdruck "Heimsuchung" bzw. als Verb dt. "heimsuchen".

Man findet engl. "haunt" auch als Substantiv mit der Bedeutung dt. "häufig besuchter Ort", "Lieblingsplatz", "Treffpunkt", "Schlupfwinkel", "Lager", "Futterplatz", als vergleichbar mit einer "Heimstätte".

Der Bedeutungswandel von engl. "haunt" geht also aus von einem germanischen Wort germ. "*haimatjan" = dt. "heim gehen", "heim bringen", aus der Familie dt. "Heim" über altnord. "heimta" = dt. "nach Hause bringen", "heim bringen", altfrz. "hanter" = dt. "oft aufsuchen", "frequentieren", auch "vertraut sein mit", (das eigene Haus wurde ja sicherlich oft aufgesucht) (heute frz. "hanter" = dt. "heimsuchen", "verfolgen", "spuken"), mengl. "haunten". Möglicherweise kam dazu der Aberglaube, dass die Toten weiterhin in ihrem ehemaligen Haus herumspukten. Shakespeare nimmt darauf Bezug in seinem Stück "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (1590, a play that includes the adventures of four young Athenian lovers and a group of six amateur actors (mechanicals), who are controlled and manipulated by the fairies who inhabit the forest in which most of the play is set). Das Substantiv engl. "Haunt" = dt. "ein häufig besuchter Ort", "Lieblingsplatz" ist schon etwas vorher zu finden. Engl. "haunt" für einen dt. "Geist, der an einem Ort spukt" ist seit 1843 zu finden.

Als Wurzel wird ein ide. "tkei-" postuliert.

Heute kann engl. "haunt", (engl. "old haunts"), auch jeden oft besuchten Ort bezeichnen, wie etwa, ein Kneipe, ein Restaurant, ein Fitness-Studio, oder der Treffpunkt in einem Park.

Und wenn man von Erinnerungen oder Ängsten heimgesucht wird ist man sozusagen selbst ein engl. "haunt". (A person can also be haunted by past experiences. - He is still haunted by the car accident he was involved in several years ago.)



(E?)(L?) http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/latintexts/a/1111-aa092998b-Plinys-Haunted-House.htm

Pliny's Haunted House

A Latin Ghost Story

By N.S. Gill
...


(E?)(L?) http://antiques.about.com/od/regionalantiquing/ig/Seattle-Underground-Tour/Inside-Haunted-Vault.htm

Seattle Underground Tour in Photos

By Pamela Wiggins

Haunted Tour Inside the "Haunted" Vault on Seattle Underground Tour
...


(E?)(L?) http://asianhistory.about.com/od/countryhistoriesatoz/tp/5-Haunted-Asian-Historical-Sites.htm

5 Haunted Asian Historical Sites

Five of the Spookiest Places in Asia

By Kallie Szczepanski
...


(E?)(L?) http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/easterneuropedestinations/fl/Haunted-Eastern-Europe.htm

Haunted Eastern Europe

Spooky Destinations

By Kerry Kubilius
...


(E?)(L?) http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/praguesights/fl/Haunted-Prague.htm

Haunted Prague

Ghosts of the Czech Capital

By Kerry Kubilius
...


(E?)(L?) http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/czechrepublic/fl/Haunted-Czech-Republic.htm

Haunted Czech Republic

Ghosts and Demons of Famous Locations

By Kerry Kubilius
...


(E?)(L?) http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/poland/fl/Haunted-Poland.htm

Haunted Poland

White Ladies, Dragons, and other Ghosts

By Kerry Kubilius
...


(E?)(L?) http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/TransylvaniaTravel/fl/Haunted-Transylvania.htm

Haunted Transylvania

Ghosts and Vampires in Romania

By Kerry Kubilius
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2012/07/07


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2011/08/12


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2007/03/01


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/word/haunt

haunt


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/sounds/haunt.mp3

Hear it!


(E?)(L?) http://www.anglo-norman.net/gate/

| haunt | haunte | haunteint | haunter


(E?)(L?) http://trailers.apple.com/trailers/lions_gate/thehauntinginconnecticut2ghostsofgeorgia/

The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia


(E?)(L?) https://archive.org/details/House_On_Haunted_Hill.avi

The House on Haunted Hill – Free - Vincent Price gives a stellar performance as the suavely malevolent host of a “haunted house party.” (1959)


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080527162201/http://www.bartleby.com/61/45/H0084500.html

haunt


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080511142114/http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE533.html

ide. "tkei-"

DEFINITION: To "settle", "dwell", "be home". Oldest form "*tkei-", becoming "*tkei-" in centum languages.

Derivatives include "home", "hangar", and "situate".
...


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20090603211347/http://hiberno-english.com/

haunted // v. p.part. lucky - origins of this usage obscure. 'The weather was great – we were haunted', Cork.


(E?)(L?) http://www.arkive.org/ringed-boghaunter/williamsonia-lintneri/

Ringed boghaunter (Williamsonia lintneri)


(E?)(L?) http://www.artnet.com/Artists/ArtistIndex.aspx?alpha=A1

A Haunted Man


(E?)(L?) http://www.ascii-art.de/ascii/ghi/haunted.txt

haunted


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-chase-vault

Oistins, Barbados
The Chase Vault
A Barbados crypt where it's said that the coffins refuse to stay put
tombs, haunted
20 Mar 2015


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/lud-s-church

Lud's Church
Staffordshire, England
Lud's Church
This haunting stone chasm is a hotbed of mossy rock and English legend
legends, hidden, geological oddities
17 Mar 2015


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/nevertold-casket-company

Nevertold Casket Company
Seattle, Washington
Nevertold Casket Company
This Seattle curio shop collects and sells haunted items in order to spread wonder one grim artifact at a time
wunderkammer, haunted, commercial curiosities
06 Mar 2015


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/hell-house-altar

Hell House Altar
Ilchester, Maryland
Hell House Altar
This haunting stone gazebo is one of the few remnants of an abandoned college that has been a magnet for local legends
haunted, ruins, abandoned
05 Mar 2015


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&lat=40.77&lng=-73.98&q=haunted&formatted_address=&source=desktop
Die Suche nach engl. "haunt" auf der Seite "www.atlasobscura.com" lieferte am 26.04.2015 über 400 Treffer, also Orte weltweit bei deren Beschreibung auf engl. "haunt" zurück gegriffen wird.

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/WSmTcsviTVCtWuZ8noejeA

POSTER FROM ACADEMY CINEMA, OXFORD STREET

This is my poster from the Academy Cinema, a film club in Oxford Street, which was a favourite haunt of art house cinema buffs in the 1960s. They had a Laurence Olivier Season every year as well as regularly showing foreign films which the Censor of the time wouldn't tolerate.
...


(E?)(L?) http://filmschatten.blogspot.de/

Creature from the Haunted Sea (1961)


(E?)(L2) http://www.britannica.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.charles-dickens.org/the-haunted-man-and-the-ghosts-bargain/

The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain
by
Charles Dickens
Free Public Domain E-Books from the Classic Literature Library


(E?)(L?) http://www.charles-dickens.org/three-ghost-stories-the-haunted-house/

Three Ghost Stories: The Haunted House
by
Charles Dickens
Free Public Domain E-Books from the Classic Literature Library


(E?)(L?) http://www.classic-literature.co.uk/classic-literature.asp


(E?)(L?) http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shark-week/videos/the-haunting-ghost-shark/

The Haunting Ghost Shark


(E?)(L?) http://www.djfl.de/entertainment/djfl/1125/112583.html

Der Fluch der Betsy Bell - An American Haunting


(E?)(L?) http://www.djfl.de/entertainment/djfl/1075/107966.html

Haunted - Haus der Geister


(E?)(L?) http://www.djfl.de/entertainment/djfl/1105/110692.html

Haunted Hill


(E?)(L?) http://www.dosits.org/resources/all/featuresounds/hauntingrefrains/

Haunting Refrains


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/menuh/




(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=haunt

"haunt" (v.) early 13c., "to practice habitually", "busy oneself with", "take part in", from Old French hanter "to frequent", "resort to", "be familiar with" (12c.), probably from Old Norse "heimta" "bring home", from Proto-Germanic "*haimat-janan", from "*haimaz-" (see "home"). Meaning "to frequent (a place)" is c. 1300 in English. Use in reference to a spirit returning to the house where it had lived perhaps was in Proto-Germanic, but it was reinforced by Shakespeare's plays, and it is first recorded 1590 in "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Related: "Haunted"; "haunting". Middle English "hauntingly" meant "frequently;" sense of "so as to haunt one's thoughts or memory" is from 1859.

"haunt" (n.) "place frequently visited", c. 1300, also in Middle English, "habit", "custom" (early 14c.), from "haunt" (v.). The meaning "spirit that haunts a place", "ghost" is first recorded 1843, originally in stereotypical U.S. black speech.


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=H

Haunted (GB 1967) | Haunted (USA 2002) | Haunted Junction (J 1999)


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=M

Most Haunted (GB 2002)


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/haunt

haunt


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/haunted

haunted


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/haunting

haunting


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/hauntingly

hauntingly


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/haunts

haunts


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/a




(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/d




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/e




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/f




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/g




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/h

Harris, J. W. (John William), 1849-: Inferences from Haunted Houses and Haunted Men (English) (as Author) Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 1804-1864: The Haunted Mind (From "Twice Told Tales") (English) (as Author) Hewet, Henry W.: Homes and Haunts of the Most Eminent British Poets, Vol. I (of 2) (English) (as Illustrator) Hewet, Henry W.: Homes and haunts of the most eminent British poets, Vol. II (of 2) (English) (as Illustrator) Hope, Laura Lee: The Outdoor Girls in a Motor Car; Or, The Haunted Mansion of Shadow Valley (English) (as Author) Howells, William Dean, 1837-1920: Shapes that Haunt the Dusk (English) (as Editor) Howe, William F., 1828-1902: Danger! A True History of a Great City's Wiles and Temptations - The Veil Lifted, and Light Thrown on Crime and its Causes, and Criminals and their Haunts. Facts and Disclosures. (English) (as Author) Howitt, William, 1792-1879: Homes and Haunts of the Most Eminent British Poets, Vol. I (of 2) (English) (as Author) Howitt, William, 1792-1879: Homes and haunts of the most eminent British poets, Vol. II (of 2) (English) (as Author) Hubbell, Walter, 1851-1932: The Haunted House: A True Ghost Story - Being an account of the mysterious manifestations that have taken place in the presence of Esther Cox, the young girl who is possessed of devils, and has become known throughout the entire dominion as the great Amherst mystery (English) (as Author) Hummel, Abraham H., 1849-1926: Danger! A True History of a Great City's Wiles and Temptations - The Veil Lifted, and Light Thrown on Crime and its Causes, and Criminals and their Haunts. Facts and Disclosures. (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/j




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/l




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/m




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/o




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/p




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/r




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/s




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/t




(E?)(L?) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/w




(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A78683692

The Haunting of Bikini Atoll
Created Mar 21, 2011 | Updated Mar 22, 2011
MEN OTEMJEJ REJ ILO BEIN ANIJ. (Everything is in the hands of God)
– Motto on the flag of Bikini Atoll
...


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A13785032

The Haunting of Esther Cox


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/big.htm

Top 5 Real-life Haunted Houses


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/big.htm

Family Vacations: Spooky Cemeteries and Haunted House Tours


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/big.htm

How Haunted Houses Work


(E?)(L?) http://www.kuriositas.com/p/archive.html




(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/index

Haunted House on eBay | Haunted Rubber Ducky | Haunted Gmail Account | Hands Resist Him - The eBay Haunted Painting |


(E?)(L?) http://www.google.com/custom?domains=http%3A%2F%2Fhoaxes.org&q=Haunt&sa=Search&sitesearch=http%3A%2F%2Fhoaxes.org

Ungefähr 353 Ergebnisse


(E?)(L?) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sharon-hill/weird-word-salad-the-term_b_3303219.html

Sharon Hill
Weird Word Salad: The Terminology of the Unexplained
Posted: 05/19/2013

...
There is a problem with how the word "paranormal" is used because it is often utilized in a way that is perhaps not consistent with the original intent.
...
"Paranormal" and other terms for strange goings-on have changed over time. The word "paranormal" was coined around 1920. It means "beside, above or beyond normal". Therefore, it's anything that isn't "normal" - or, more precisely, it is used as a label for any phenomenon that appears to defy scientific understanding.
...
The term "paranormal" used to just mean extrasensory perception and psychic power but, since the 1970s in particular - thanks to TV shows and proliferation of the subject in popular culture - the term expanded in scope to include all mysterious phenomena seemingly shunned by standard scientific study. It was a convenient way to bring many similarly peculiar topics under one heading for ease of marketing. So today, it can include everything that sounds mysterious: UFOs, hauntings, monster sightings, strange disappearances, anomalous natural phenomena, coincidences, as well as psychic powers.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/haunted/

haunted


(E6)(L?) http://www.laut.de/The-Haunted

Haunted, The


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/




(E?)(L?) http://www.moviemaze.de/filme/103/house-on-haunted-hill.html

House on Haunted Hill


(E?)(L?) http://www.moviemaze.de/filme/1493/der-fluch-der-betsy-bell.html

Der Fluch der Betsy Bell - An American Haunting


(E6)(L1) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap081030.html

2008 October 30: Haunting the Cepheus Flare


(E6)(L1) http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap971031.html

October 31 1997: Haunting Mars


(E?)(L?) http://www.oddmusic.com/gallery/index.html

"Waterphone": Haunting creation invented by Richard A. Waters


(E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=haunt

Search Results for "haunt" — 24 match(es) (in Shakespeares Werken)


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

haunt (17) | haunted (7) | haunting (2) | haunts (9) | temple-haunting (1)


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=3568

engl. "old haunts" = "häufig besuchte Orte", "die Lieblingsplätze"


(E?)(L?) http://www.planet-mammiferes.org/drupal/en/node/38?indice=Petropseudes+dahli

Rock Ringtail Possum, Rock-Haunting Ringtail, Dahl's Ringtail Phalanger


(E?)(L?) http://www.rampantscotland.com/features/haunted.htm

Haunted Scottish Castles

It is hardly surprising that many of Scotland's castles are associated with ghosts, apparitions and strange noises - they have histories in some cases stretching back over 600 years. Here is just a selection of thirty of them (from a list of 150 known to have a reputation!), plus links to castle web sites where you can learn more about the castles and see illustrations of the buildings (but probably not the ghosts...)


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/haunt

haunt


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/haunting

haunting


(E?)(L?) http://transatlantica.revues.org/5933

Les maisons hantées américaines aux XIXe et XXe siècles

The Haunted House in Contemporary Filmic and Literary Gothic Narratives of Trauma

Monica Michlin
...


(E?)(L?) http://transatlantica.revues.org/5988

Les maisons hantées américaines aux XIXe et XXe siècles

The Mechanics of Fear: Organic Haunted Houses in American Cinema

Anne-Marie Paquet-Deyris

Résumé

Most haunted house narratives, whether literary or filmic, are based on the same basic principle of intrusion of some outside, usually unidentified force which sows the seeds of chaos and destruction within the boundaries of a home. What is particularly fascinating is precisely the way in which the group, and most often the family, reacts to this external force. But the whole point is also to determine the exact nature of the threat and to assess who—or what—the intruder is, so as to circumscribe “it” and return the community to some form of normality. In this respect, even though a direct descendant of a more conventional haunted house film genre, the 1980s family horror imposes a reversal of viewpoints. It actually seems to be reverting to some more classical Hollywood narrative structures after the bloodbaths of the previous decade in horror feasts, such as The Hills Have Eyes (1977) or Dawn of the Dead (1978), which argued then for a new form of society. It also demonstrates how the outside-the-norm entity is finally not considered exogenous any more but rather endogenous and how it appropriates and somehow tries to incorporate some, if not all, members of the household.

In his 1981 film The Entity, Sidney Furie stages Barbara Hershey’s body (Carla Moran) as a vehicle for the revelation process and in their 1982 Poltergeist, Tobe Hooper and Steven Spielberg also use young Heather O’Rourke (Carol Anne Freeling) as a medium in very different kinds of houses, no longer darkened and isolated in some desolate part of the American East Coast but now part of the West Coast urban sprawl. Not unlike the next houses on the block, sometimes even belonging to the same housing development, they nevertheless come alive through the impetus given by some obscure catalizer. The same question reemerges: what are the true nature and impact of the haunting in such nondescript places?
...
Playing diversely on the Greek etymology of the term "phenomenon" ("phainestai"/"to appear"), writers and directors alike focus on the apparitional modes of the various manifestations emanating from the haunted houses.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/cunny-haunted

cunny-haunted


(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=h




(E?)(L?) http://www.skepdic.com/haunted.html

haunted house


(E?)(L?) http://www.studiocanal.de/trailer.php?buchstabe=H&id=1469

Haunted - Haus der Geister


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1964

Haunted House - by Jumpin' Gene Simmons


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1993

Haunted Heart - by Sammy Kershaw


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1999

U Don't Know Me (Like U Used To) - by Brandy feat Shaunta & Da Brat


(E?)(L?) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=2010

Say You'll Haunt Me - by Stone Sour


(E?)(L?) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=2013

2013 - Came Back Haunted - by Nine Inch Nails


(E?)(L1) http://www.translationdirectory.com/article_index_1101_1200.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.translationdirectory.com/article1167.htm

1167 Top Ten Grammar Errors that Haunt Web Pages


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SH

Haunted | Haunted | Haunted Junction


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SM

Most Haunted


(E?)(L?) http://filmlexikon.uni-kiel.de/index.php?action=lexikon&tag=det&id=8477

"verwunschenes Haus", auch: "Spukhaus", "Spukzimmer"; engl.: "haunted house"
...


(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/haunted-oak

The Haunted Oak


(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/idea-xx

Idea XX

Drayton, Michael (1563 - 1631)

1 An evil spirit, your beauty, haunts me still,
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/haunter_1/

haunter


(E?)(L?) http://www.wilkie-collins.com/the-haunted-hotel/

The Haunted Hotel 1879
by
Wilkie Collins
Free Public Domain Books from the Classic Literature Library


(E?)(L?) http://www.worstpreviews.com/trailer.php?id=1322&item=0

The Haunting in Connecticut


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=haunt
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "haunt" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1580 auf.

Erstellt: 2015-04

I

iwarp
Fairy Tales

(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/

Free Public Domain's presentation of Fairy Tales is an attempt to welcome the young and young-at-heart into the wonderful and magical land of Fairy Tales. This site presently lists hundreds of tales from The Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Anderson Fairy Tales, Arabian Nights Entertainments, Blue Fairy Book, Crimson Fairy Book, Red Fairy Book, Violet Fairy Book, and the Yellow Fairy Book, and will be an on-going project to bring to you Fairy Tales from around the world.

Where possible, Free Public domain has included the original editor's notes so that you the viewer can get an idea of the light in which these Fairy Tales were viewed by the Editors.

The Download Section has now been updated. I have added a wide selection of books. Many thanks to Project Gutenberg.


(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/blueMN.html

Blue Fairy Book

Table of Contents
THE BRONZE RING | PRINCE HYACINTH AND THE DEAR LITTLE PRINCESS | EAST OF THE SUN AND WEST OF THE MOON | THE YELLOW DWARF LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD | THE SLEEPING BEAUTY IN THE WOOD | CINDERELLA; OR, THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER | ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP | THE TALE OF A YOUTH WHO SET OUT TO LEARN WHAT FEAR WAS | RUMPELSTILTZKIN | BEAUTY AND THE BEAST | THE MASTER-MAID | WHY THE SEA IS SALT | THE MASTER CAT; OR, PUSS IN BOOTS | FELICIA AND THE POT OF PINKS | THE WHITE CAT | THE WATER-LILY. THE GOLD-SPINNERS | THE TERRIBLE HEAD | THE STORY OF PRETTY GOLDILOCKS | THE HISTORY OF WHITTINGTON | THE WONDERFUL SHEEP | LITTLE THUMB | THE FORTY THIEVES | HANSEL AND GRETTEL | SNOW-WHITE AND ROSE-RED | THE GOOSE-GIRL | TOADS AND DIAMONDS | PRINCE DARLING | BLUE BEARD | TRUSTY JOHN | THE BRAVE LITTLE TAILOR | A VOYAGE TO LILLIPUT | THE PRINCESS ON THE GLASS HILL | THE STORY OF PRINCE AHMED AND THE FAIRY PARIBANOU | THE HISTORY OF JACK THE GIANT-KILLER | THE BLACK BULL OF NORROWAY | THE RED ETIN


(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/crimsonMN.html

Crimson Fairy Book

Table of Contents
Preface | Lovely Ilonka | Lucky Luck | The Hairy Man | To your Good Health! | The Story of the Seven Simons | The Language of Beasts | The Boy who could keep a Secret | The Prince and the Dragon | Little Wildrose | Tiidu the Piper | Paperarello | The Gifts of the Magician | The Strong Prince | The Treasure Seeker | The Cottager and his Cat | The Prince who would seek Immortality | The Stone-cutter | The Gold-bearded Man | Tritill, Litill, and the Birds | The Three Robes | The Six Hungry Beasts | How the Beggar Boy turned into Count Piro | The Rogue and the Herdsman | Eisenkopf | The Death of Abu Nowas and of his Wife | Motikatika | Niels and the Giants | Shepherd Paul | How the wicked Tanuki was punished | The Crab and the Monkey | The Horse Gullfaxi and the Sword Gunnfoder | The Story of the Sham Prince, or the Ambitious Tailor | The Colony of Cats | How to find out a True Friend | Clever Maria | The Magic Kettle


(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/redMN.html

Red Fairy Book

Table of Contents
Introduction | The Twelve Dancing Princesses | The Princess Mayblossom | Soria Moria Castle | The Death of Koschei the Deathless | The Black Thief and Knight of the Glen | The Master Thief | Brother and Sister | Princess Rosette | The Enchanted Pig | The Norka | The Wonderful Birch | Jack and the Beanstalk | The Little Good Mouse | Graciosa and Percinet | The Three Princesses of Whiteland | The Voice of Death | The Six Sillies | Kari Woodengown | Drakestail | The Ratcatcher | The True History of Little Goldenhood | The Golden Branch | The Three Dwarfs | Dapplegrim | The Enchanted Canary | The Twelve Brothers | The Nettle Spinner | Farmer Weatherbeard | Mother Holle | Minnikin | Bushy Bride | Snowdrop | The Golden Goose | The Seven Foals | The Marvellous Musician | The Story of Sigurd


(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/yellowMN.html

Yellow Fairy Book

Table of Contents
Introduction | The Cat and the Mouse in Partnership | The Six Swans | The Dragon of the North | Story of the Emperor's New Clothes | The Golden Crab | The Iron Stove | The Dragon and his Grandmother | The Donkey Cabbage | The Little Green Frog | The Seven-headed Serpent | The Grateful Beasts | The Giants and the Herd-boy | The Invisible Prince | The Crow | How Six Men travelled through the Wide World | The Wizard King | The Nixy | The Glass Mountain | Alphege, or the Green Monkey | Fairer-than-a-Fairy | The Three Brothers | The Boy and the Wolves, or the Broken Promise | The Glass Axe | The Dead Wife | In the Land of Souls | The White Duck | The Witch and her Servants | The Magic Ring | The Flower Queen's Daughter | The Flying Ship | The Snow-daughter and the Fire-son | The Story of King Frost | The Death of the Sun-hero | The Witch | The Hazel-nut Child | The Story of Big Klaus and Little Klaus | Prince Ring | The Swineherd | How to tell a True Princess | The Blue Mountains | The Tinder-box | The Witch in the Stone Boat | Thumbelina | The Nightingale | Hermod and Hadvor | The Steadfast Tin-soldier | Blockhead Hans | A Story about a Darning-needle


(E?)(L?) http://fpd.iwarp.com/violetMN.html

Violet Fairy Book

Table of Contents
Introduction | A Tale of the Tontlawald | The Finest Liar in the World | The Story of Three Wonderful Beggars | Schippeitaro | The Three Princes and Their Beasts | The Goat's Ears of the Emperor Trojan | The Nine Pea-hens and the Golden Apples | The Lute Player | The Grateful Prince | The Child Who Came From An Egg | Stan Bolovan | The Two Frogs | The Story of a Gazelle | How a Fish Swam in the Air and a Hare in the Water | Two In a Sack | The Envious Neighbour | The Fairy of the Dawn | The Enchanted Knife | Jesper Who Herded the Hares | The Underground Workers | The History of Dwarf Long Nose | The Nunda, Eater of People | The Story of Hassebu | The Maiden With the Wooden Helmet | The Monkey and the Jelly-fish | The Headless Dwarfs | The Young Man Who Would Have His Eyes Opened | The Boys With the Golden Stars | The Frog | The Princess Who Was Hidden Underground | The Girl Who Pretended To Be A Boy | The Story of Halfman | The Prince Who Wanted To See the World | Virgililus the Sorcerer | Mogarzea and his Son


J

Jack o'lantern (W3)

Die engl. Bezeichnung "jack-o'lantern" = "Kürbislaterne" ("Irrlicht") geht zurück auf "Jack-with-a-lantern" = "man with a lantern", "will-o'-the-wisp" = dt. "Irrlicht", "Illusion", "Phantom".

Kürbislaternen gehören zum bevorzugten Inventarium des Halloween-Festes.

(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/cumbria/features/halloween/pumpkin.shtml


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/cumbria/features/halloween/pumpkin/pumpkin_gallery.shtml


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.jackolantern.de/


(E1)(L1) http://owad.de/check.php4?id=1415&choice=3&sid=4014


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/
Issue 164
(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/dictionary.pl?letter=j

...
Der Teufel schickte ihn zurück woher er gekommen war - und weil es so dunkel, kalt und windig und der Weg so weit war, bekam Jack ein Stück Kohle direkt aus dem Höllenfeuer mit auf den Weg.

Jack legte die glühende Kohle in eine ausgehöhlte Rübe damit sie nicht verlöschte und machte sich auf. Seitdem wandelt seine verdammte Seele mit der Laterne am Vorabend von Allerheiligen durch die Dunkelheit - bis zum Tag des jüngsten Gerichts ...
...


K

L

M

metaphysics (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=metaphysics

1387, "branch of speculation which deals with the first causes of things," from M.L. "metaphysica", neut. pl. of Medieval Gk. "(ta) metaphysika", from Gk. "ta meta ta physika" = "the (works) after the Physics," title of the 13 treatises which traditionally were arranged after those on physics and natural sciences in Aristotle's writings. The name was given c.70 B.C.E. by Andronicus of Rhodes, and was a ref. to the customary ordering of the books, but it was misinterpreted by L. writers as meaning "the science of what is beyond the physical." Hence, "metaphysical" came to be used in the sense of "abstract, speculative" (e.g. by Johnson, who applied it to certain 17c. poets, notably Donne and Cowley, who used "witty conceits" and abstruse imagery). The word originally was used in Eng. in the singular; plural form predominated after 17c., but singular made a comeback late 19c. in certain usages under Ger. influence.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=metaphysics


Monatsnamen des Auenland-Kalenders: afteryule, rethe, halimath (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.alumni.uni-bremen.de/neues/newsletter5/hdr_2e.php

...
Die Sprache der Hobbits, die ursprünglich der der Rohirrim ähnelte, wird ebenfalls meist durch Tolkiens englische „Übersetzung” vertreten, bei der er große sprachliche Kreativität und eine profunde Kenntnis der englischen Lautwandelprozesse bewies.

So übernahm er die Monatsnamen des Auenland-Kalenders aus dem Altenglischen und „modernisierte” die Form der lange ausgestorbenen Wörter. Er gab ihnen die Form, die sie im Englischen wahrscheinlich heute hätten, wenn sie nicht durch lateinische Monatsnamen ersetzt worden wären, z.B. "afteryule" = "Januar" von altengl. "after-geola" = "Nach-Jul", "rethe" = "März" von altengl. "réthe" = "wild", "grausam" oder "halimath" = "September" von altengl. "halig-monath" = "heiliger Monat" ( der Erntefeste).
...


museumoftalkingboards
Museum of Talking Boards

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumoftalkingboards.com/
Ein "Ouija board" ist eine Alphabettafel die in spiritistischen Sitzungen verwendet wird.


"Ouija knows all the answers. Weird and mysterious. Surpasses, in its unique results, mind reading, clairvoyance and second sight. It furnishes never failing amusement and recreation for the entire family. As unexplainable as Hindu magic—more intense and absorbingly interesting than a mystery story. Ouija gives you entertainment you have never experienced. It draws the two people using it into close companionship and weaves about them a feeling of mysterious isolation. Unquestionably the most fascinating entertainment for modern people and modern life."

With these words, William Fuld (businessman, designer, toy maker, with no branch factories or offices) invites you, the American people, to enter the strange, twilight world of Ouija, the Wonderful Talking Board.
...


Erstellt: 2012-05

Mythology (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mythology


N

Nightmare
Nachtmahr
Night
Nacht
negro
mortal
morbid
murder
Mord (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/cgi-bin/wotd.cgi?word=nightmare
A frightening dream or intensely distressing experience of any kind; a female demon that attacks people in their sleep.

Modern English speakers have, by and large, given up the meaning of a female goblin called a "nightmare" = "Nachtmahr" in favor of a bad dream of any sort.

Middle English, a female demon that attacks sleeping people; based on "night" + "mare" = "goblin".

"Night" is from a verbal root "*negw-" "to be dark" which turns up in German "Nacht", Latin "nox", "noctis", Greek "nux", and Russian "noch". It also underlies Latin "niger" = "black," which devolved into Italian "negro" = "black".

Old English "mare" means "goblin" (= "Kobold"), "incubus" (= "Alpdruck", "Schreckgespenst") and is related to Latin "mori" = "die," found in "mortal" (= "sterblich"), "morbid" (= "krankhaft") and to English "murder" (= "Mord").

O

P

pythoness (W3)

Engl. "pythoness" (14. Jh.) = dt. "Pythia", "pythische Priesterin", "Wahrsagerin" geht zurück auf die mythische Schlange, die von Apollo erschlagen wurde. Die Bezeichnung geht über altfrz. "phitonise", lat. "pythonissa" zurück auf griech. "python", und bezieht sich möglicherweise auf "Pytho", einem alten Namen für die Stadt "Delphi", in deren Nähe die sagenhafte Begegnung statt fand. Ein weiterer Bezug könnte zu griech. "pythein" = dt. "rot" hergestellt werden.

Auch der Name der Priesterin des Orakels zu Delphi, "Pythia", dürfte sich auf den alten Namen Delphis beziehen.

Es gibt jedoch auch Hinweise, die den Namen Delphis auf den Namen der Schlange beziehen.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pythoness


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pythoness


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0703


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=pythoness
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "pythoness" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1780 auf.

Erstellt: 2011-05

pythonic (W3)

Engl. "pythonic" (1855) = dt. "wahrsagerisch", "prophetisch", "orakelhaft" geht zurück auf griech. "python" = dt. "Weissagung", "Wahrsagung". Diese Bedeutung bezieht sich auf die riesige mythologische Schlange "Python", die das Orakel von Delphi bewachte bis sie von Apollon getötet wurde.

Und entsprechend kann sich engl. "pythonic" = dt. "groß", "monströs" auch auf die griechische Python und deren heutige Nachkommen beziehen.

Eine weitere Bedeutung von engl. "pythonic" nimmt Bezug auf die englische Comedygruppe "Monty Python".

Und schließlich kann engl. "pythonic" auch auf eine Programmiersprache "Python" Bezug nehmen, die der Entwickler nach "Monty Python" benannt haben soll.

Umgangssprachlich findet man auch noch die Anspielung auf "Penis".

(E?)(L?) http://home.comcast.net/~wwftd/wwftds.htm


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pythonic


(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=pythonic


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=pythonic
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "pythonic" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 auf.

Erstellt: 2011-05

Q

R

Roi Arthur
König Artus
King Arthur (W3)

Der sagenhafte König der keltischen Briten mit Namen dt. "König Artus", frz. "Roi Arthur", engl. "King Arthur", auch "Arthus" genannt, lebte - wenn überhaupt um 500 n.Chr. und hat möglicherweise gegen die eindringenden Sachsen gekämpft und fiel in der Schlacht am Camlann 537.

Er taucht allerdings erst in der 1135 in der "Historia regum Britanniae" des "Geoffrey of Monmouth" auf worin er vom lokalen Helden zum glanzvollen Herrscher von weltpolitischer Bedeutung erhoben wird. Zur weiteren Heroisierung trägt dann der anglonormannische Dichter Wace bei, der Artus im Jahr 1155 in seiner französischen Übersetzung "Roman de Brut" zum feudalhöfischen Kriegsherrn stilisiert.

In diesem Werk taucht auch zum ersten Mal die Tafelrunde von König Artus auf, die aus ausgewählten und vorbildlichen Rittern bestand.

Der Mythos fand Fortsetzungen in den Sagen von Parzival und wurde in ganz Europa durch Prosa- und Verserzählungen verbreitet. Man findet Variationen in den Werken von "Chrétien de Troyes", "Hartmann von Aue", "Gottfried von Straßburg", "Wolfram von Eschenbach", "Sir Thomas Malory", "A. Tennyson", "J. Cocteau", "T. Dorst", "C. Hein" bis hinzu Verwertungen in der neueren Fantasy-Literatur.

(E?)(L?) http://www.dialogus2.org/arthur.html
Virtuelle Dialoge mit "Le Roi Arthur". Schreiben Sie König Arthur und er wird Ihnen antworten.

(E?)(L?) http://expositions.bnf.fr/arthur/

Eine Seite der "Bibliothèque nationale de France":


(E?)(L?) http://www.pourquois.com/histoire_geo/ou-vecu-roi-arthur.html
Où a vécu le Roi Arthur ?

Erstellt: 2010-10

S

Shivering Boy (W3)

Der "zitternde und Schauder erregende Junge" ist eine Gestalt aus den englischen Erbschaftskrimis.

(E1)(L1) http://www.pantheon.org/articles/s/shivering_boy.html

Shivering Boy, The

by Micha F. Lindemans

At Triermain Castle, in Northumberland, it is not so much a sight as a touch that is to be feared .... the touch of tiny, icy fingers, and a little boy's voice whispering, "Cold, cold, forever more."

The boy, legend has it, lived in the fifteenth century, and had inherited the castle when his father died. The uncle who was made the boy's ward wanted the castle for himself, so he starved the boy until he was barely alive, then abandoned him on Thirwell Common in the midst of a winter storm. The boy perished in the snow. But he returned to the castle in death, and walks the halls, teeth chattering, a spectral six-year-old shivering with the cold. If he enters the room of someone asleep, he may simply stand whimpering by the bed ... or he may reach out and lay an ice-cold hand on the sleepers brow. To feel his touch, or see his sad little figure, is a portent of trouble to come.


Sunsprite - Rose

Der Name der Rose engl. "Sunsprite" ist wohl mit dt. "Sonnenfee" zu übersetzen (engl. "sprite" = dt. "Elfe", "Fee", "Kobold", "Schemen", "Geist").

(E6)(L?) http://www.edmundsroses.com/

Sunsprite | Sunsprite Tree Rose


(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/browse.lasso




(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

Sunsprite | Sunsprite, Cl.


(E?)(L1) http://www.justourpictures.com/roses/textindex.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.pickeringnurseries.com/

Cluster Flowered, Chrome Yellow
Baden-Baden 1972, Gamble Award for Fragrance 1979, Mason 1989



(E?)(L1) http://www.rogersroses.com/gallery/chooserResult.asp


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosefile.com/Gallery/aSinglesClustersKZ/index.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosefile.com/Gallery/SmallPhoto/index.html


Erstellt: 2013-09

T

theninemuses
The Nine Muses
Fantastic Beasts and their names

(E?)(L?) http://www.theninemuses.net/hp/fb.html
Acromantula | Ashwinder | Augurey | Basilisk | Bowtruckle | Centaur | Chimaera | Crup | Demiguise | Doxy | Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus | Dragon | Dugbog | Erkling | Erumpent | Fairy | Fire Crab | Ghoul | Glumbumble | Gnome | Griffin | Hippocampus | Hippogriff | Imp | Jarvey | Kappa | Kelpie | Knarl | Leprechaun | Lethifold | Mackled Malaclaw | Manticore | Merpeople | Moke | Mooncalf | Newton Artemis Fido Scamander | Niffler | Phoenix | Pixie | Plimpy | Puffskein | Quintaped | Ramora | Red Cap | Re'em | Runespoor | Salamander | Scamander, Newton Artemis Fido | Sea Serpent | Snidget | Sphinx | Troll | Unicorn | Werewolf | Winged Horse | Yeti

theosophy (W3)

Engl. "theosophy" (1642) ("theosophical"), = "Gottesweisheit", die "durch mystische Schau Gottes erhaltene Erkenntnis des Seins" geht zurück auf lat. "theosophia" (ca. 880), griech. "theosophia" (ca. 500) "Weisheit der göttlichen Dinge", griech. "theos" = "Gott" und "sophos" = "klug", "kundig".

(E?)(L?) http://www.blavatsky.net/


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=theosophy


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=theosophy


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Thea


Erstellt: 2010-02

U

uib
The tongues of Arda, the invented world of J.R.R. Tolkien

(E?)(L1) http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/
Alle Beiträge handeln von der Sprache bzw. den Sprachen in Tolkiens Mythos. Insbesondere sind die Hauptsprachen behandelt.


...
...


uib
Quenya - the Ancient Tongue

(E?)(L?) http://www.uib.no/People/hnohf/quenya.htm

Also spelt: "Qenya", "Qendya", "Quendya"
Also called: "High-elven" / "High-elvish", the "High Speech of the Noldor", the "Ancient Speech", the "speech of the Elves of Valinor", "Elf-latin" / "Elven-latin", "Valinorean", "Avallonian", "Eressëan", "parmalambë" ("Book-tongue"), "tarquesta" ("high-speech"), "Nimriyê" (in Adûnaic), "Goldórin" or "Goldolambë" (in Telerin), "Cweneglin" or "Cwedhrin" (in Gnomish).



...
The Quenya past tense always shows the final vowel "-ë" (though secondary endings may of course be added; for instance, we see "-er" where the verb has a plural subject). This vowel "-ë" is very often part of the ending "-në", which seems to be the most general past tense marker in Quenya. A-stem verbs typically add this ending. For instance, a verb "orta-" = "to rise" / "raise" is listed in the Etymologies (entry ORO, LR:379), and the song Namárië in LotR demonstrates that its past tense is "ortanë".
Other attested examples:
...


Das Wort "Etymologies" erscheint 6 mal auf der Seite.

uoregon
Tolkien Fonts
Tolkien Languages

(E?)(L?) http://babel.uoregon.edu/yamada/fonts/tolkien.html


(E?)(L1) http://babel.uoregon.edu/yamada/guides/tolkien.html

We have discovered, in our searches, some fonts based on the writing systems created by the immortal J.R.R. Tolkien. PC fonts are available from links on our Tolkien Language Guide page. (Linked above.)


Urban Legend
FOAF (W3)

(E6)(L1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_legend

"Urban Legend" is also the name of a 1998 movie.

Urban legends are a kind of folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. Urban legends are sometimes repeated in news stories and, in recent years, distributed by email. People frequently say such tales happened to a "friend of a friend" - so often, in fact, that "FOAF" has become a commonly used acronym to describe this sort of story.

Some urban legends have survived a very long time, evolving only slightly over the years, as in the case of the story of a woman killed by spiders nesting in her elaborate hairdo. Others are new and reflect modern circumstances, like the story of the man on a business trip being seduced by a woman and waking up the next morning minus a kidney surgically removed for transplant. Some urban legends have a basis in true events, such as the case of the young man shooting bullets into a large saguaro cactus and being killed when his gunfire severed the trunk, resulting in the falling plant crushing him. Even when essentially true, however, the stories often become distorted by many retellings.

Despite their name, "urban legends" do not necessarily take place in an urban setting. The name is designed to differentiate them from traditional folklore created in pre-industrial times.

Urban legends often are born of fears and insecurities, or specifically designed to prey on such concerns.

Contents


V

vistecprivat
Middle-earth Science Pages

(E?)(L?) http://lalaith.vpsurf.de/M-earth.html

List of Contents


Erstellt: 2011-08

W

wicked (W3)

Das Adjektiv engl. "wicked" bedeutet dt. "böse", "schlecht", "schlimm", "niederträchtig", "schändlich", "verrucht", auch - etwas abgemildert - dt. "schalkhaft", und als Slangausdruck auch "toll", "großartig" oder einfach als Verstärkung im Sinne von dt. "sehr" (vgl. dt. "verdammt gut").

Eine ähnliche Bedeutung hat auch engl. "vicious" = dt. "böse", "boshaft", "böswillig", "bösartig", "übel", "verdorben", "skrupellos", "schlecht", "brutal", "unerträglich", das mit altfrz. "vicios", frz. "vicieux" und lat. "vitiosus", mlat. "vicious" = dt. "fehlerhaft", "mangelhaft", "verfälscht" und lat. "vitium" = dt. "Fehler", "Mangel", "Schaden" in Verbindung steht.

Als Substantiv findet man engl. "wick" gleich in zweifacher Bedeutung.

Einmal als dt. "Docht", wobei eine Verwandtschaft zu dt. "wickeln" vorliegt. Auch das altdt. "wich", "wicha", mhdt. "wicke" bedeutete dt. "Faserbündel", "Docht". Als Wurzel wird ide. "*ueg-" = dt. "weben", "knüpfen", "Gespinst" postuliert. Dazu gesellt sich auch altind. "vagura" = dt. "Fangstrick", "Netz zum Wildfang", "Garn", lat. "velum" = dt. "Segel", "Hülle", "Tuch", altir. "figim" = dt. "webe" und auch dt. "Wachs", das ursprünglich dt. "Gewebe der Bienen" bedeutete. Auch der "Wacholder" könnte zur Familie gehören, da seine Zweige zum Flechten benutzt wurden.

Und es gibt auch ein engl. "wick" = dt. "wick" = dt. "Dorf", "Weiler". Dieses "wick" steht in Verbindung zu dt. "weichen" und entwickelte sich über die Bedeutung "zurückweichen", "Rückzugsort" zu der Bedeutung "Dorf". "den Suffix "-wick", "-wig" findet man auch in vielen deutschen Ortsnamen. So heißt ein Ort in meiner Nähe "Contwig". Und in England findet man die Variante "-wich" in "Sandwich" oder "Greenwich" , "grüne Ort". Weitere Beispiele sind engl. "Norwich", lat. "vicus", ndl. "Noordwijk", dt. "Kettwig", dt. "Bardowick", "Schleswig", "Sandwig" (das von den Anhgelsachsen als engl. "Sandwich" exportiert wurde), dt. "Braunschweig" ("Brunos Ort"). Auch alleinstehend findet man es als dt. "Wyk" auf Föhr und span. "Vigo".



Ein interessanter Vertreter dieser Wortfamilie ist auch der "Vikar", der auf lat. "vicarius" = dt. "Stellvertreter" basiert und zu lat. "vicis" = dt. "Wechsel", "Platz", "Stelle" gebildet wurde.

Alles sicherlich ganz interessant - aber weder der "Wickel" noch die "Weiche" haben etwas mit dem Adjektiv engl. "wicked" = dt. "böse", "schlecht" zu tun. Dieses engl. "wicked" ist verwandt mit engl. "witch" = dt. "Hexe", "Zauberin" und engl. "wizard", = dt. "Zauberer", "Hexenmeister". Diese Wortfamilie wird zurück geführt auf altengl. "wicca" = dt. "Zauberer". Und als Adjektiv entstand daraus auch engl. "wick" = dt "zauberartig". Aus unerfindlichen Gründen (vielleicht wegen der eingängigeren Aussprache) wurde diesem die Endung "–ed" angehängt. Damit ist also die ursprüngliche Bedeutung von engl. "wicked" = dt. "hexenartig", "zauberartig" und das mußte ja irgendwann zu dt. "schlecht" und "schlimm" mutieren.

Interessanterweise ist diese Herkunft von engl. "wicked" derart in Vergessenheit geraten, dass man mittlerweile auch eine engl. "wicked witch" = dt. "böse Hexe", wörtlich jedoch "hexenartige Hexe" finden kann.

Als Wurzel wird ide. "*weg-" postuliert mit der Grundbedeutung dt. "wach", "wachen", "wecken". Daraus hat sich evtl. über den "Totenwächter" oder "der Tote Erweckende" die Assoziation "hexen", "zaubern" eingestellt. Als Mitglieder der Wortfamilie findet man

Fazit:

Das Homonym engl. "wick" hat sich also dreimal entwickelt:

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080629052913/http://www.bartleby.com/61/63/w0146300.html

...
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English, alteration of "wicke", ultimately from Old English "wicca", "sorcerer". See "witch".
...


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080406035658/http://www.bartleby.com/61/roots/IE553.html

ENTRY: "*weg-"

DEFINITION: To be strong, be lively. Oldest form "*weg-", becoming "*weg-" in centum languages.

Derivatives include "watch", "vigilante", "reveille", and "velocity".

1. Suffixed o-grade form "*wog-e-". "wake", from Old English "wacan", "to wake up", "arise", and "wacian", "to be awake", from Germanic "*waken".

2. Suffixed o-grade form "*wog-no-". "waken", from Old English "wæcnan", "wæcnian", "to awake", from Germanic "*waknan".

3. "watch", from Old English "wæccan", "to be awake", from Germanic "*wakjan".

4. Suffixed form "*weg-yo-". "Wicca", "wicked", "witch"; "bewitch", from Old English "wicca", "sorcerer", "wizard" (feminine "wicce", "witch"), from Germanic "*wikkjaz", "necromancer" (- "one who wakes the dead").

5. "bivouac", from Old High German "wahta", "watch", "vigil", from Germanic "*wahtwo".

6a. "wait", from Old North French "waitier", "to watch";

6b. "waft", from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German "wachten", "to watch", "guard".

Both a and b from Germanic "*waht-".

7. Suffixed (causative) o-grade form "*wog-eyo-". "vegetable", from Latin "vegere", "to be lively".

8. Suffixed (stative) form "*weg-e-". "vigor"; "ravigote", from Latin "vigere", "to be lively".

9. Suffixed form "*weg-(e)li-". "vedette", "vigil", "vigilant", "vigilante"; "reveille", "surveillant", from Latin "vigil", "watchful", "awake".

10. Suffixed form "*weg-slo-". "velocity", from Latin "velox", "fast", "lively".

(Pokorny e- 1117.)


(E?)(L?) http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/biowomen1/a/011311-CW-How-Jezebel-Came-To-Be-Known-As-The-Wicked-Queen-Jezebel.htm

How Jezebel came to be known as the wicked queen Jezebel.

Infamous Queen Was a Product of Her Times
...


(E?)(L?) http://womenshistory.about.com/od/hatshepsut/a/wicked_usurper.htm

Hatshepsut the Wicked Stepmother?

Was Hatshepsut a Scheming Usurper of Thutmose III's Throne?
...


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20090809112603/http://www.hiberno-english.com/archive.php

"wicked", adj. "angry", "cross" - s.v. "wicked", from dial. "wick", adj. use of OE "wicca" "wizard", the fem. of which is "wicce" "witch". 'He's getting wicked', Dáithí Ó hÓgáin/Limerick.


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/noble-horizons-retirement-home

Noble Horizons Retirement Home
Salisbury, Connecticut
Noble Horizons Retirement Home
Retirement home where the actress who played the Wicked Witch of the West passed away
Memento Mori
09 May 2012

Margaret Hamilton played the Wicked Witch of the West in the 1939 film, The Wizard of Oz.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/sunken-pirate-stronghold-at-port-royal

Sunken Pirate City at Port Royal
Port Royal, Jamaica
Sunken Pirate City at Port Royal
Nature took her revenge on the 'Wickedest City in the World'
Watery Wonders, Disaster Areas, Incredible Ruins
03 Jun 2010


(E?)(L?) https://www.bu.edu/mfeldman/Boston/wicked.html

The Wicked Good Guide to Boston English


(E?)(L?) http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/super-index_C.htm

The Wicked Rat


(E?)(L?) http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/super-index_P.htm




(E?)(L?) http://www.drmardy.com/dmdmq/w#wickedness

wickedness


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=wicked

"wicked" (adj.) c. 1200, extended form of earlier "wick" - "bad", "wicked", "false" (12c.), which apparently is an adjectival use of Old English "wicca" - "wizard" (see "wicca"). Formed as if a past participle, but there is no corresponding verb. For evolution, compare "wretched" from "wretch". Slang ironic sense of "wonderful" first attested 1920, in F. Scott Fitzgerald. As an adverb from early 15c. Related: "Wickedly".


(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/no rest for the wicked

No rest for the wicked (adapted from Isaiah 57:20)


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/search?search_type=article_quick_search&searchstring=wicked&approved_entries_only_chk=1

Title - Status - Relevance


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A30501712

American Regional Dialects - New England's Wicked Good Accent

Created Mar 14, 2008 | Updated Jun 7, 2013

Introduction to American Dialects | Southern Drawl | Tawking the Tawk in Noo Yawk | New England's Wicked Good Accent | Philly Talk and Pittsburghese | The Midwestern 'Non-Accent' | Da Chicago Dialect and the Northern Cities Vowel Shift
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Of particular note when discussing New England vocabulary is the all purpose intensifier "wicked" ("like a witch"), popularly used by younger New Englanders in place of the word "very". "That was wicked awesome" can be heard on the streets of Boston. If something in particular was "extremely good", then it was a "wicked pissa".
...


(E?)(L?) http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/ls?field1=ocr;q1=wicked;a=srchls

Search Results: 1,647,092 items found for "wicked" in Full-Text + All Fields


(E?)(L?) http://www.ipl.org/div/farq/wickedFARQ.html

Source of "Something Wicked This Way Comes"

Example Questions that can be answered by this FAQ:

I’m trying to find the name and author of a poem that has the line "The landscape turns to ashen crumbs, when something wicked this way comes."

The above verse is actually from a series of commercials for Lexus cars; we were asked about it many times when the ad first started being broadcast. The actual source of the line "something wicked this way comes" is act IV, scene 1 of the play Macbeth:

By the pricking of my thumbs, Something wicked this way comes. Open, locks, Whoever knocks!

This can be found in -Bartlett’s Quotations-, located online at:


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/W1.html

Wick, Wicked | Wicked Bible. | Wicked Prayer Book (The) | Wicked Weed (The)

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"Wick" is the Anglo-Saxon "weoce", a "rush" or "reed", but "wicked" is the Anglo-Saxon "wæc" or "wac", "vile".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/100/pages/page123.html

...
1434
    By the pricking of my thumbs,
Something wicked this way comes.
      Open, locks,
      Whoever knocks!
          Macbeth. Act iv. Sc. 1.


and in print at your local public or college library; it’s one of the standard reference sources for quotations.


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/menuw/




(E?)(L?) http://www.kuriositas.com/2011/08/escape-from-oz.html

Escape from Oz

5 August 2011


(E?)(L?) http://learnamericanenglishonline.com/Word%20of%20the%20Day/2013/October/wicked.html

wicked


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-March/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-December/subject.html

...
In the 1870s, Chicago was also known as the "Wicked City". This was never very popular as a specific nickname that you'd see in, say, the Sporting News, but Chicago's "wickedness" was and still remains very popular. Jokes about Chicago and religion (or the lack thereof) filled the news paragraphs of the period.

Here are a few "wicked" examples.
...
I'd posted a "wicked windy city" in the archives. Other cities, such as New York and St. Louis, were also called "wicked" - but usually Chicago.
...


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-September/subject.html

wicked little critta Lynne Murphy


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2000-December/subject.html

Rensselaer; Fat Pizza & Wicked Chocolate Bapopik
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"Wicked Chocolate" is a brand of chocolate milk here. I've also seen "wicked" beers and lemonade.
...


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2000-March/subject.html

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Does anyone have data that show the regional distribution of "wicked" and "hella" meaning "very" ("wicked smart", "hellacool", etc.)? My guess would be that "wicked" is East or NE and "hella" is West, but that's just a guess. Does anyone hear/use both?
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Is "pissa" still used in the east? In the mid-80s you would say "it's wicked pissa cool" if the thing you were talking about were "extra cool", and "pissa" could just be used as an approval, as in "You got the new Culture Club record? Pissa!" But while "wicked" seemed to spread outside New England, "pissa" never seemed to.
...
I heard "wicked mother" ("hot", etc.) a lot at Indiana University.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/427/000269617/

Eleanor Audley, Actor, Wicked stepmother in "Cinderella"


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/100/000030010/

Aleister Crowley, Author, Wickedest man in the world


(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/258/000032162/

Margaret Hamilton, Actor, Wicked Witch of the West


(E?)(L?) http://www.openculture.com/freemoviesonline

Aleister Crowley: The Wickedest Man in the World - Free – Takes you into the life of Aleister Crowley, an English occultist, ceremonial magician, poet, and mountaineer, responsible for founding the religion of Thelema.


(E?)(L?) http://www.openculture.com/2014/03/aleister-crowley-the-wickedest-man-in-the-world.html


(E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=wicked

Search Results for "wicked": 30 match(es)


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

wicked (68) | wicked'st (1) | wickedly (1) | wickedness (11)


(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/o/?i=764696

wicked (68)

Shakespeare concordance: all instances of "wicked"

"wicked" occurs 68 times in 63 speeches within 25 works.

Possibly related word: wick


(E?)(L?) http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/05/inverted-meanings-sick/

Inverted meanings: "sick", "bad", and "wicked"

A common trick of slang is to invert meanings, so that seemingly negative words are used as terms of approval. "Bad" and "wicked" are two established examples, although it may surprise you to see just how far back their positive uses go.

The OED records ‘bad’ and ‘wicked’ used in a positive sense as long ago as 1897 and 1920 respectively:
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/257500.html

"No rest for the wicked"

Meaning: Literal meaning - "the wicked shall be tormented".
... Origin


(E?)(L?) http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/why-do-we-pronounce-the--ed-in-wicked?page=2

...
Now here’s a surprise: Some of our unusual adjectives weren’t created this way. One of them is "wicked". You might wonder if the word has anything to do with the noun "wick", the thing that you burn in a candle or an oil lamp. Actually, no. You can put the "–ed" suffix on "wick", and talk about a "/wikt/ candle" or "/wikt/ lamp", but in those cases, the word has just one syllable, as you’d expect.

According to the OED, the source for "wicked" is the Old English noun "wicca", meaning "wizard". The feminine form of this word is the source of our word "witch". This noun "wicca" had an adjective form, "wick", which picked up an "–ed" suffix for no apparent reason. So etymologically, a "wicked witch" is nothing more than a "witch-like witch". Objections over how this meaning of "wicked" evolved to mean "evil" are well-founded, but that’s a bigger topic than we can get into here.
...


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/wicked

wicked


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/throw%20a%20wicked%20fuck

throw a wicked fuck


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/Wicked%20Willie

Wicked Willie


(E?)(L?) http://www.toonopedia.com/wanda.htm

Oh, Wicked Wanda!


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1970




(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1985




(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1992




(E?)(L?) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=2009




(E?)(L?) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=2012




(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Wicked

Top Definition: "Wicked"

New England slang that adds emphasis. Synonymous with "really", "very" and "hella".
...



(E?)(L?) http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/gods-judgment-wicked-bishop

God's Judgment on a Wicked Bishop

Southey, Robert (1774 - 1843)


(E?)(L?) https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/wicked

...
Wicked has two quite contradictory meanings. If something is pure evil, then it is wicked. Think Darth Vader. On the other hand, as an informal slang term, wicked also means excellent — as in "that DJ is wicked, man!" Go figure.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/tag/wicked/

Wicked


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/wicked-bible/

Wicked Bible

Posted by Grant Barrett on August 25, 2012 · Add Comment

The so-called Wicked Bible is a 1631 version of the King James, printed by Robert Barker and Matin Lucas. This particular Bible is so-called because the printers somehow managed to leave out the word not in the commandment against adultery. They were, indeed, punished. Behold the offending page. This is part of a complete episode.


(E?)(L1) http://www.who2.com/?s=Wicked+Witch+of+the+West%2C+The

The Wicked Witch of the West


(E?)(L?) http://www.wickedblog.com/

Angela Allen: Wicked Writer and Blogger


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_%E2%80%93_Die_Hexen_von_Oz_(Roman)

Wicked – Die Hexen von Oz oder Wicked – Die Hexen von Oz. Die wahre Geschichte der bösen Hexe des Westens (Originaltitel: Wicked. The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West) ist ein Roman von Gregory Maguire.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/111606C.html#wicked

Dear Word Detective: Why is it that New Englanders misuse the term "wicked"?
...
Words change their meanings, or add new meanings, constantly. In fact, it's not unusual for words to nearly reverse their meanings over the centuries. Back in the 13th century, for instance, the English word "nice", rooted in the Latin "nescius" ("not knowing", "ignorant"), meant "foolish" or "stupid".

In the case of "wicked", what we have here is a new slang sense of "wicked", analogous to the current slang use of "bad" to mean "good", that does not in any way preclude the use of the word's original meaning of "evil" or "cruel". The Wicked Witch of the West is still both "wicked" and "bad" in the original senses of the words.

Speaking of "witches", "wicked", dating to the 13th century, is actually an adjective form of the Old English word "wicca", meaning "male witch" or "wizard", which also gave us the word "witch". The word "wicca" is best known today as the name of a neo-pagan religion which has gained considerable popularity since the mid-20th century.

The slang use of "wicked" to mean "excellent" (or as a positive intensifier, as in "wicked fast") is indeed native to New England, especially the Boston area, but it has spread widely into other areas of the US since it first became popular in the 1980s. Surprisingly, use of "wicked" in this ironic sense dates back at least to the 1920s, with the first occurrence in print found so far being in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "This Side of Paradise".


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/have-one-s-wicked-way

"have-one-s-wicked-way", (intransitive, idiomatic) To have sexual intercourse.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/no-rest-for-the-wicked

"no-rest-for-the-wicked"

Primarily used today for mild comic effect, meaning "one must work" (particularly because one has been lax), as in Annie usage.

Origin

From the Book of Isaiah verses 48:22 and 57:20-21, originally Hebrew. First attested in English in 1535, in Coverdale Bible of Miles Coverdale. Quoted in biblical sense for centuries, humorous secular sense popularized from 1930s, particularly due to use as title of popular Little Orphan Annie strip by Harold Gray in 1933.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/overwicked

"overwicked"

Adjective (comparative more overwicked, superlative most overwicked)

Too wicked; wicked to an unreasonable extent.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/unwicked

unwicked


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wicked

wicked


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wicked-witch-of-the-west

Wicked Witch of the West (computer definition)


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wickeder

wickeder


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wickedest

wickedest


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wickedly

wickedly


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wickedness

wickedness


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wickednesses

wickednesses


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=wicked
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "wicked" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1510 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#wicked

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-02

X

Y

Z

Zwergennamen bei Tolkien: Dain, Durin, Fundin, Gimli, Gandalf (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.alumni.uni-bremen.de/neues/newsletter5/hdr_2e.php

...
Die Namen der Bewohner Wilderlands entstammen verschiedenen altgermanischen Sprachen, so wiederum dem Altenglischen und dem Gotischen und Altisländischen.
Viele der „öffentlichen” Zwergennamen wie Dain, Durin, Fundin oder Gimli sind skandinavischen Ursprungs und meist der altisländischen Lieder-Edda entnommen - wie auch der Name des Zauberers Gandalf.
...