Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Neologismus, Neologismo, Néologisme, Neologismo, Neologism

A

archive
Neologisms
Dictionary of Findable Words and Phrases

(E?)(L?) http:///
Eine aktuelle Adresse konnte ich leider nicht finden. Der Inhalt ist noch im Internet-Archiv aufbewahrt.

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080329065639/http://pages.zoom.co.uk/leveridge/dictionary.html

This website is being developed as a record of new and evolving words and phrases in the English language, with special reference to UK English usage. One of its prime aims is to act as a repository for new words and phrases which are not otherwise listed on the Net - or at least not found by Search Engines. Hence the working title: Dictionary of Findable Words and Phrases.

Content is intended to include etymology, definitions, derivations, origins, neologisms, coinages, usage, dialect, slang, first citations, abbreviations and acronyms.


Erstellt: 2010-05

B

bbc
101 years in 101 words

(E?)(L?) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/3755482.stm

Tuesday, 19 October, 2004

A study of when new words became common during the past century has had some surprising findings, such as the word "celebs" being used in 1913, the word "sex" meaning sexual intercourse being first used in 1929, and "mobile phone" dating from 1945.

Egghead (1907), wizard (1922), punk (1974), hot-desking (1991), and dumb down (1933) might also strike you as being whizzo (1905).
1904 hip | 1905 whizzo | 1907 egghead | 1908 realpolitik | 1909 tiddly-om-pom-pom | 1910 sacred cow | 1911 gene | 1912 blues | 1913 celeb | 1914 cheerio | 1915 civvy street | 1916 U-boat | 1917 tailspin | 1918 ceasefire | 1919 ad-lib | 1920 demob | 1921 pop | 1922 wizard | 1923 hem-line | 1924 lumpenproletariat | 1925 avant garde | 1926 kitsch | 1927 sudden death | 1929 sex | 1930 drive-in | 1931 Mickey Mouse | 1932 bagel | 1933 dumb down | 1935 racism | 1936 spliff | 1937 dunk | 1939 Blitzkrieg | 1941 snafu | 1942 buzz | 1943 pissed off | 1944 DNA | 1945 mobile phone | 1946 megabucks | 1947 Wonderbra | 1948 cool | | 1951 fast food | 1952 Generation X | 1954 non-U | 1955 boogie | 1956 sexy | 1957 psychedelic | 1959 cruise missile | 1960 cyborg | 1961 awesome | 1962 bossa nova | 1963 peacenik | 1964 byte | 1965 miniskirt | 1966 acid | 1967 love-in | 1968 It-girl | 1969 microchip | 1970 hypermarket | 1971 green | 1972 Watergate | 1973 F-word | 1974 punk | 1975 detox | 1976 Trekkie | 1977 naff all | 1978 trainers | 1979 karaoke | 1980 power dressing | 1981 toyboy | 1982 hip-hop | 1983 beatbox | 1984 double-click | 1985 OK yah | 1986 mobile | 1987 virtual reality | 1988 gangsta | 1989 latte | 1990 applet | 1991 hot-desking | 1992 URL | 1993 having it large | | 1995 kitten heels | 1996 ghetto fabulous | 1997 dot-commer | 1998 text message | 1999 Google | 2000 bling bling | 2001 9/11 | 2002 axis of evil | 2003 sex up | 2004 chav


BBC - war words

(E?)(L?) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/2909173.stm
BBC's roundup of war words

C

cambridge.org
Archive for the ‘New words’ Category

(E?)(L?) http://dictionaryblog.cambridge.org/category/new-words/

Categories


Erstellt: 2014-06

D

E

edgy (W3)

Engl. "edgy" = dt. "kantig", "scharf" (engl. "sharp", "having an edge") sollen seit dem Jahr 1775 nachweisbar sein. (Bei OWAD findet jedoch schon Nachweise um das Jahr 1200.) Weitere Bedeutungen sind dt. "nervös", "unruhig", "scharfkantig", "gereizt" und als Neologismus "außergewöhnlich".

Im Jahr 1775 soll auch "Columbia" als Bezeichnung für die heutigen "United States of America" aufgetaucht sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.eltern.de/pubertaet/erziehung-und-entwicklung/lexikon-jugendsprache.html?t_action=showLexicon

Engl.: Rand. Ungewöhnliche, abgefahrene Menschen, die sich nicht in ein Raster einordnen lassen, sind edgy.


(E1)(L1) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/southernese.html

"Edgy-cation" n. Larnin whut gives you a edge in life. "He got lots of smarts but not much edgy-cation."


(E?)(L?) http://www.jargonf.org/
Edgy | Edgy Eft


nom propre féminin. [nom de code (Ubuntu)]. Abréviation courante de "Edgy Eft", la version 6.10 d'Ubuntu.


(E?)(L?) http://webteam.lssu.edu/sites/banished/complete_list.php


(E?)(L?) http://webteam.lssu.edu/sites/banished/archive/2002.php

"EDGY" - "Supposedly referring to creative work that is provocative and interesting, the word now has become a signal that someone is trying to 'market' yet another piece of contrivedly offensive hack work. We should limit the word to physical things that have edges, such as an 'edgy coffee table.'" - Ron LaLonde, Inuvik, Northwest Territories, Canada.


(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/inframes.cfm


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=1857

...
Etymology: circa 1200. Developed from Old English "ecg" – "corner", "edge", "sword" – and is related to Old Frisian "egg" ("edge"), Old Saxon "eggia" ("point", "edge"), Old High German "ecka", modern German "Ecke", and Old Icelandic "egg" ("corner", "angle", "edge").

Being edgy can be a good thing or a bad thing.
...
"Edgy" can also be used to describe "something new and daring". In this context, it comes from the expression "cutting edge" (also referred to as "leading edge"), a term frequently used by businesses to describe products with the latest technologies. The arts and culture scene is a big fan of "edgy" these days, using it to describe everything from movies, music and art to literature, cuisine and nightclubs.
...


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/edgy


(E?)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/about/topten2000.html

"Edgy" A style of advertising, video production, or copywriting that appears to lack the refinement and sophistication of more polished 'traditional' efforts but captures the truer essence of the subject; also amazingly irritating.


(E?)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/about/topten2002.html

Top Advertising Word
"Frothy" A fresh or original idea. Supplants "edgy" which was THE word for a few years now.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=edgy
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "edgy" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1770 auf.

Erstellt: 2012-03

F

Flappers (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://history1900s.about.com/library/weekly/aa022201a.htm

A nickname given to young women in the 1920s who defied convention by refusing to use corsets, cutting their hair short, and wearing short skirts, as well as by behavior such as drinking and smoking in public.



...
The term "flapper" first appeared in Great Britain after World War I. It was there used to describe young girls, still somewhat awkward in movement who had not yet entered womanhood. In the June 1922 edition of the Atlantic Monthly, G. Stanley Hall described looking in a dictionary to discover what the evasive term "flapper" meant:

[T]he dictionary set me right by defining the word as a fledgling, yet in the nest, and vainly attempting to fly while its wings have only pinfeathers; and I recognized that the genius of 'slanguage' had made the squab the symbol of budding girlhood.
...


Aus der Mailingliste der ADS:

(E?)(L?) http://blogs.myspace.com/flapperflock

I was searching the Ancestry.com newspapers for "Fluky" and "Chicago" and "mustard" and this nice "Flappers' Dictionary" came up.

_The Flappers' Dictionary._


G

gamming (W3)

(Australian slang; mainly, but not exclusively, aboriginal; pronounced "gam'n", probably from "gam" = "meetings of seamen at sea".)
V: Joking, pulling somebody's leg;
Adj: fake, imitation, pretend.

H

I

J

jessesword
Science Fiction Citations

(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/
Auf der Site von Jesse Sheidlower (Principal Editor of the North American Editorial Unit of the OED) geht es um das früheste Auftreten von Begriffen, die aus der Welt des Science Fiction stammen.

(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/home

Hunting for the earliest citations of SF words
Welcome to the new version of the Oxford English Dictionary's science fiction words site. The base project was originally set up so that knowledgeable aficionados could help the OED find useful examples of words in their fields of interest. This first project, and still the only public one, is devoted to science fiction.

While the original version of the site was focused on the OED's needs alone, this version should be of broader interest to anyone interested in science fiction, whether or not they are able to help the OED's research. The most notable change is that a view of an individual term will also pull in all the examples of that term collected for the OED's databases from science fiction sources. We are also making an attempt to rewrite entries to provide clearer definitions, background history, and more. Please stay with us as we continue to improve the site.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list

Science Fiction Citations
664 records found; displaying 1 - 50. (03.04.2009)




(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list/?subject=sf_criticism

SF Criticism Citations
170 records found; displaying 1 - 50.

alternate future (n.) | alternate history (n.) | alternate reality (n.) | alternate universe (n.) | alternate world (n.) | alternative future (n.) | alternative history (n.) | alternative reality (n.) | alternative universe (n.) | alternative world (n.) | anime (n.) | BEM (n.) | big dumb object (n.) | biopunk (n.) | Buck Rogers (n.) | bug-eyed monster (n.) | catastrophe (adj.) | counterfactual (n.) | cyberpunk (n.) | cyberpunk (n.) | cyberpunkish (adj.) | dark fantasy (n.) | dark fantasy (n.) | different story (n.) | | edisonade (n.) | epic fantasy (n.) | epic fantasy (n.) | fan fiction (n.) | fantasist (n.) | fantastic (n.) | fantastic (n.) | fantastic (adj.) | fantastical (n.) | fantasy (n.) | fantasy (n.) | fix-up (n.) | future history (n.) | future war (n.) | | genre (n.) | genre fantasy (n.) | genre science fiction (n.) | golden age (n.) | Gotham (n.) | hard science fiction (n.) | heroic fantasy (n.) | high fantasy (n.) | hobbitomane (n.) | hobbitry (n.) | horror (n.) | Hugo (n.) | imaginative (adj.) | infodump (n.) | infodumping (n.) | interplanetary (n.) | mad scientist (n.) | mainstream (adj.) | Mary Sue (n.) | military science fiction (n.) | milsf (n.) | Nebula (n.) | New Wave (n.) | non-genre (adj.) | off-trail (adj.) | | planetary romance (n.) | post-apocalypse (adj.) | post-apocalyptic (adj.) | postcyberpunk (n.) | postcyberpunk (adj.) | postholocaust (adj.) | primary world (n.) | proto-cyberpunk (n.) | proto-cyberpunk (adj.) | proto-science fiction (n.) | pseudo-science (n.) | pseudo-scientific (adj.) | pulp science fiction (n.) | science fantasy (n.) | science fantasy (n.) | science fantasy (n.) | science fantasy (n.) | science fiction (n.) | science fictional (adj.) | science-fictionality (n.) | science-fictionalized (adj.) | science-fictionally (adv.) | science-fictioner (n.) | science fictionish (adj.) | science-fictionist (n.) | science fictiony (adj.) | science-fictive (adj.) | scientific fiction (n.) | scientific romance (n.) | scientifiction (n.) | scientifictional (adj.) | scientifictionally (adv.) | scientifictionist (n.) | sci-fi (n.) | sci-fic (n.) | secondary world (n.) | sense of wonder (n.) | sf (n.) | SF/F/H (n.) | sf-ish (adj.) | sfnal (adj.) | SFX (n.) | sharecrop (n.) | sharecrop (v.) | sharecropped (adj.) | sharecropper (n.) | sharecropping (n.) | sharecrop-writer (n.) | shared world (n.) | skiffy (n.) | slash (n.) | slipstream (n.) | slipstreamer (n.) | slipstreamish (adj.) | slipstreamy (adj.) | soft science fiction (n.) | soft science fiction (n.) | space fiction (n.) | space-fictional (n.) | space opera (n.) | space-operatic (adj.) | speculative fiction (n.) | splatterpunk (n.) | splatterpunk (n.) | splatterpunkish (adj.) | steampunk (n.) | steampunk (n.) | steampunkish (adj.) | Sturgeon's Law (n.) | sub-creation (n.) | sub-creator (n.) | subgenre (n.) | sword and sorcery (n.) | swords and sandals (n.) | technothriller (n.) | tie-in (n.) | Tolkienesque (adj.) | Tolkienian (adj.) | uchronia (n.) | uchronian (adj.) | uchronic (adj.) | uncyberpunkish (adj.) | universe (n.) | urban fantasy (n.) | | Vernean (adj.) | -verse (n.) | weird (n.) | weird (adj.) | Wellsian (n.) | Wellsian (adj.) | worldbuilder (n.) | world-building (n.)


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list/?subject=sf_fandom

SF Fandom Citations
78 records found; displaying 1 - 50.

actifan (n.) | apa (n.) | apazine (n.) | BNF (n.) | COA (n.) | completism (n.) | completist (n.) | con (n.) | condom (n.) | congoer (n.) | congoing (n.) | conreport (n.) | conrunner (n.) | conrunning (n.) | croggle (v.) | croggled (adj.) | egoboo (n.) | fanac (n.) | fanboy (n.) | fandom (n.) | fanfic (n.) | fan fiction (n.) | fangirl (n.) | fanmag (n.) | fanne (n.) | fannish (adj.) | fannishness (n.) | fanzine (n.) | femmefan (n.) | fen (n.) | FF (n.) | filk (n.) | filk (v.) | filker (n.) | filking (n.) | filk sing (n.) | filk singer (n.) | filksinging (n.) | filk song (n.) | fillo (n.) | fugghead (n.) | fuggheaded (adj.) | fuggheadedness (n.) | gafiate (v.) | gafiation (n.) | gamer (n.) | Hugo (n.) | illo (n.) | ish (n.) | K/S (n.) | mundane (n.) | mundane (adj.) | neo (n.) | neofan (n.) | ob (n.) | promag (n.) | prozine (n.) | relaxacon (n.) | retcon (n.) | science fictioneer (n.) | Semiprozine (n.) | slan (n.) | slash (n.) | SMOF (n.) | smof (v.) | stf (n.) | stfcon (n.) | stfdom (n.) | stfnal (adj.) | trekker (n.) | trekkie (n.) | trufan (n.) | trufandom (n.) | trufen (n.) | unfannish (adj.) | worldcon (n.) | zine (n.)


K

L

Liliputaner (W3)

Der "Liliputaner", der Begriff für zwergwüchsige Menschen, geht zurück auf engl. "Lilliputian" = "winzig", "klein".
Der engl. "Lilliputian" ist eine Wortschöpfung des englischen Schriftstellers Jonathan Swift.Sein Held Gulliver entdeckt auf seinen Reisen die Insel "Liliput", auf der ein Volk winziger Menschen lebt. In England benutzt man das Wort allerdings nicht.

Vielleicht hat ihn das kleine Wort engl. "little" = "klein" und frz. "petit" dazu animiert.

(E?)(L?) http://www.w-akten.de/begrifflichkeiten.phtml


(E?)(L?) http://www.wdr5.de/lilipuz/intro.phtml
Der WDR5 bietet eine Kinderserie namens "Lilipuz" an.
Lilipuz das Radio für Kinder.

M

macmillandictionary.com
BuzzWords

(E?)(L?) http://www.macmillandictionary.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/

About BuzzWords

The BuzzWord may not be a word you'll find in any dictionary, and it's not always a brand-new term either: it may be a new way of using an existing word (e.g. "troll"), or a new way of putting words together (e.g. "drug driving", "chillax"). Whatever the reason for its present popularity, the BuzzWord is a word that is current and in sudden or increasing use – it might not stay around forever, but it's worth knowing what it means and how people are using it today.

About the author

Macmillan Dictionary BuzzWord author Kerry Maxwell has an MA in Linguistics from the University of Manchester. She has worked in academic research and as a lexicographer in the publishing industry.

Kerry lives in York, UK, where she works as a freelance author and editor. Kerry is author of Brave New Words: A Language Lover's Guide to the 21st Century (Pan Macmillan, 2007) and has been writing the Macmillan Dictionary BuzzWord column since 2003.


(E?)(L?) http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/recent.html

Archive sorted by date


Erstellt: 2016-11

Meme (W3)

"Meme" has become the word for talking about change.

"Meme" was created by the British scientist Richard Dawkins and is defined by Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary as "an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture.

N

neologia
Neologism Sites on the Web

(E?)(L?) http://neologia.org/html/neologism_sites.html

Neologics:

There are many Internet websites devoted largely or entirely to neologisms. Some are impressive projects with careful management, but alas, many seem thrown together with questionable content and little or no updating. This guide sorts the good from the not so good.

The links below are believed to be exhaustive of all quality websites dealing with English neologisms as a significant focus. They are listed alphabetically, each rated from 1 to 5 in descending order of value to the neologist. A “5” is the pinnacle of the array, while a “1” barely merits a mouse click. Keep in mind that many wannabe sites were tossed into the “0” rating pool and drowned (they don’t appear here).
...



Erstellt: 2010-05

Neologism, What is a neologism? (W3)

A "neologism" (griech. "neos" = "new", "logos" = "Word") is a new word that comes into use. Technology is an area particularly rich in them; "CD", "Internet", "information superhighway", etc.

(E?)(L?) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/0,,sid9_gci212629,00.html
What is a neologism?


A "neologism" is a newly invented word or term. "Neologisms" would seem to occur at a greater rate in cultures with rapidly changing technologies and with greater means for information dispersal.

A "neology" is, according to our Webster's, the use of a new word or the use of an existing word but given a new meaning. A second meaning given by Webster's for "neologism" is that of "a meaningless word coined by a psychotic."


(E?)(L?) http://www.usingenglish.com/glossary/neologism.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/neologism


Neologismen im Englischen

Alle Worte waren einmal "Neologismen".
In diesem Sinne hier einige Beispiele für Neologismen im Englischen (laut OED):

Erstellt: 2013-12

O

oxforddictionaries.com
Adorbs new words added to OxfordDictionaries.com – WDYT?

(E?)(L?) http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014/08/oxford-dictionaries-update-august-2014/

...
Below is a selection of just some of the words going into OxfordDictionaries.com in this quarter’s update. WDYT? Let us know what you think about the new words in the comment section below, or discuss them in the Oxford Dictionaries Community.

| acquihire | air punch | amazeballs | anti-vax | baller | bare | bedroom tax | binge-watch | brick | bro hug | catfish | clickbait | cord cutter | cotch | cray | doncha | douchebaggery | dox | e-cig | FML | fratty | hench | hexacopter | hot diggity | hot mess | hot mic | humblebrag | hyperconnected | ICYMI | in silico | listicle | live-tweet | mansplain | nailed on | neckbeard | olinguito | pharmacovigilance | pogonophobia | side boob | side-eye | SMH | spit take | subtweet | trackback | trigger warning | vax | WDYT | YOLO | zonkey


Erstellt: 2014-08

P

Phrops (W3)

Engl. "Phrops" bezeichnet Euphemismen, die genau das Gegenteil in eine beschönigende Hülle kleiden. ("Im Moment habe ich wenig Zeit, aber wir müssen unbedingt mal zusammen Essen gehen.") "Phrops" setzt sich zusammen aus engl. "phrase" und engl. "opposite".

(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=Phrops
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Phrops" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2011-06

Q

R

S

Science Fiction (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.epilog.de/Lexikon/S/Science_Fiction.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/SF/sf_citations.shtml


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/SF/sf_fan.shtml

Der Begriff »Science Fiction« ist seit den 30er Jahren in allgemeinerem Gebrauch; ein frühe Nennung findet sich in Hugo Gernsbacks Leitartikel zur 1. Ausgabe von Science Wonder Stories (Juni 1929). Einige Autoren (Edgar Fawcett; Edgar Allan Poe; William Wilson) haben jedoch schon früher versucht, mit der SF vergleichbare Arten literarischer Produktion zu definieren, und andere frühe spekulative Autoren haben ihre eigenen Manifeste verfaßt. Erst seit der Gründung der spezialisierten SF-Pulp-Magazine in den USA läßt sich ein gewisses Maß an Übereinstimmung feststellen.
Die Kategorie, auf die sich Gernsback mit Scientifiction bezieht, wird von ihm im Leitartikel zur 1. Ausgabe von Amazing Stories (April 1926) folgendermaßen beschrieben: »Mit 'scientifiction' meine ich Erzählungen im Stil von Jules Verne, H. G. Wells und Edgar Allan Poe - eine reizvolle Phantasieerzählung mit wissenschaftlichen Tatsachen und prophetischem Weitblick vermischt ... Diese erstaunlichen Geschichten lesen sich nicht nur ungeheuer interessant, sie sind auch stets aufschlußreich. Sie vermitteln Wissen ... in einer sehr ansprechenden Form ... Neue Abenteuer, die uns die heutige Scientifiction schildert, werden morgen schon nicht mehr unmöglich sein ... Viele großartige wissenschaftliche Erzählungen, die einmal von historischem Interesse sein werden, müssen erst noch geschrieben werden ... Die Nachwelt wird auf sie verweisen, denn sie haben einen neuen Weg markiert, nicht nur für die Literatur, sondern auch für den Fortschritt.«
...


Das OED (Oxford English Dictionary) hat sich ebenfalls des Themas angenommen und sammelt entsprechende Ausdrücke.

slavant (W3)

Der engl. "slavant" ist eine Neubildung aus "slave" = "Sklave" und "servant" = "Diener" und bezeichnet jemanden der "spouse who does all and receives little in return".

T

time.com
When Did Everything Become ‘Epic’?

Wörter und ihre Verwendung sind immer auch Moden unterworfen. Was heute "gut" muß morgen "super" sein und dann wieder "großartig" oder - mit Understatement - "nicht schlecht". In der Zeitschrifte "TIME" erschien in der Ausgabe "September 8-15, 2014" in der Rubrik "The Answers Issue / Language" ein Artikel "When Did Everything Become ‘Epic’?". Auf der Seite ist eine Zeitspirale abgebildet mit Worten die zu einer bestimmten Zeit aufkamen um auszudrücken, dass man etwas als engl. "excellent" einschätzte. Die entsprechenden Begriffe stellten zum Zeitpunkt ihres ersten Auftretens Neologismen dar - zumindest mit der Bedeutung "excellent".

(E?)(L?) http://time.com/3204259/when-did-everything-become-epic/

YEAR OF FIRST KNOWN USE OF WORD TO MEAN "EXCELLENT" SOURCES: OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY; GREEN’S DICTIONARY OF SLANG


Erstellt: 2014-09

toothapillar (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordcentral.com/byod/byod_browse.php?term=To&type=alpha&offset=20

a caterpillar that turns into a toothfairy


U

Uni Rice
Neologisms

(E?)(L?) http://www.owlnet.rice.edu/%7Eling215/NewWords/index.html

The following neologisms and novel uses of words in English were collected by members of the class Linguistics/English 215, Words in English: Structure, History and Use, taught by Suzanne Kemmer at Rice University 1996-99. Over the course of the semester, students collected instances of words and word uses that appear to be new in the language. They defined the words, described their origin where possible, illustrated their use, and analyzed the words in terms of their structure and the types of word formation processes they exemplify.

The list below includes many different structural word formation types, including novel derivations, clippings, back formations, and compounding processes of various sorts. The words also exemplify a wide range of semantic/pragmatic phenomena such as metaphor, metonymy, euphemism, and eponymy.

The words on this page give a good picture of the creative aspects of word formation and use in present day English. Speakers do not confine themselves to existing, conventional units when using language; to express their exact meaning in a given context, they take advantage of the wide range of creative resources provided by their language. Many of these creations become more frequent and conventionalized over time. Looking at new words allows us to get a glimpse of lexical change in progress.


Erstellt: 2010-05

V

W

wordcentral.com
Build Your Own Dictionary
New Words Discovered

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordcentral.com/byod/
Have you discovered a great new word?
Let the world know!
You're the author of this unique dictionary - so let us know which words you think belong in it. Just fill in the boxes on the next three screens to submit your word*.
Check words that have been submitted by others.

Am 29.12.2006 waren folgende Wörter aufgeführt:



wordsources - Words for Our Modern Age

(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsources.info/words-for-modern-age.html
Auch mit einem "Focusing on Words Newsletter".

X

Y

Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Neologismus, Neologismo, Néologisme, Neologismo, Neologism

A

Ayto, John
Twentieth Century Words
20th Century Words
New Words coined in each decade

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602308/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602308/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602308/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602308/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602308/etymologpor09-20
Ayto, John (British lexicographer)
"Words are a mirror of their times."
Gebundene Ausgabe: 640 Seiten
Verlag: Gb (1999)
Sprache: Englisch


Synopsis
This book presents an overview of the development of English vocabulary from 1900 to the present day. It is a wonderful collection of words that define the twentieth century. A chapter is devoted to each decade of the twentieth century, with each one divided into two parts. The first part is an introductory essay setting the background against which the following new words came into being, and areas of particular importance or interest will be highlighted. Following this is a dictionary-style presentation of vocabulary that came into English during that decade. These words are listed alphabetically, and entries will include the earliest recorded date of each word. There is also a Chronology which highlights the key entries for each decade and gives an overview of the century's history and developments.


B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

Knowles, Elizabeth - Oxford Dictionary of New Words

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602359/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602359/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602359/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602359/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198602359/etymologpor09-20
Broschiert: 357 Seiten
Verlag: Import; Auflage: 2nd (1998)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung
Dieses Wörterbuch enthält die neuen Wörter des britischen und amerikanischen Englisch der letzten 15 Jahre. Die Wortauswahl berücksichtigt alle wichtigen Bereiche, wie zum Beispiel Politik und Gesellschaft, Geschäftswelt und Neue Medien.


L

M

N

O

P

Payack, Paul J.
A Million Words And Counting
How Global English Is Rewriting The World

(E?)(L?) http://de.scribd.com/book/171529814/A-Million-Words-And-Counting-How-Global-English-Is-Rewriting-The-World

Published by Kensington Books on May 1, 2008
307 pages

About the book

In 2007, the English language passed the million-word mark. That shouldn't come as a surprise since over a billion Earthlings speak English (no one knows about other planets, but they probably speak it, too). That makes for a lot of word-coiners (neologists) out there. And where are all these new words coming from? Hollywood? Technology? The Internet? Corporate boardrooms? Youthspeak? How do world events--from tsunamis and hurricanes to political doublespeak and presidential linguistic bumbling--influence the words we use on a daily basis? What do e-mails, text messages, and emoticons contribute to the language?

Let WordMan Paul J.J. Payack take you on a global tour of English-speaking worlds - virtual and otherwise: A Million Words? Fundoo!

Podcast, Chinglish, truthiness, crunk. Just a year or two ago, these words were gibberish to most English speakers. Today they pop up in everyday conversation worldwide, just four of the ten thousand new words added to the English language every year. Spurred by the universality of the Internet - where it is the de facto lingua franca - and the global reach of its media, English is growing at a rate unprecedented in its 1500-year history. Indeed, in the spring of 2007, the English word count surpassed a million - over ten times the number available in French.

At the crest of this linguistic tsunami surfs Paul J.J. Payack, aka the WordMan. As president of the Global Language Monitor, he has tracked the latest developments - the fascinating hybrids, the bizarre etymologies, the lasting malapropisms - in the language shared by two billion of the Earth's citizens. Aided by a worldwide network of similarly obsessed "language mavens" and armed with his own powerful word-counting algorithm, Payack ensures that no new English word falls from the tongue or marks the page without being counted toward the Million Word March.

A Million Words and Counting is a celebration of the vast variety and ever-evolving expressiveness of humanity's most universal language. Fun and informative, this guide is a joyful exploration of English as it spreads across the globe, as it is spoken today, and as it expands into the future. Each entertaining chapter of this ambitious linguistic survey examines another source of new English, including Hollywood, youth culture, other languages, corporate boardrooms, and tongue-tied presidents. An engaging compendium of English-language facts and factoids, this is a trivia lover's goldmine and a logophile's playground.


Erstellt: 2014-06

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Weis, Erich (Autor)
PONS Kompaktwörterbuch Englisch - Ausgabe 2007/08

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3125171377/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3125171377/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3125171377/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3125171377/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3125171377/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 1800 Seiten
Verlag: Ernst Klett Sachbuch Verlag; Auflage: Neubearb. (24. September 2007)
Sprache: Englisch, Deutsch


Aus der Amazon.de-Redaktion
Kennen Sie das? In der Schule in Englisch immer zu den Besseren gehört und trotzdem das Gefühl nicht losgeworden, dass man für ganz banale Alltagsgespräche schlecht gerüstet ist? Das war auch die Schuld der Wörterbücher, die uns noch die abstrusesten Vokabeln wie "Hülsenauszieher" oder "Kehlader" übersetzten, aber mit grundlegenden Floskeln und Wendungen für stotterfreie Plaudereien geizten.

Allein dafür, dass sie heutigen Englisch-Lernern hier systematisch Formulierungshilfen an die Hand geben, gebührt den Herausgebern des neuen PONS Kompaktwörterbuchs ein großes Lob. Von A wie "Abneigung ausdrücken" oder "Anbieten" bis Z wie "Zögern", "Zuständigkeit ausdrücken" oder "Zustimmen" gibt es Infoboxen, mit denen man seine kommunikative Kompetenz gezielt trainieren kann. Auch der Wortschatz präsentiert sich auf dem neuesten Stand: Sollte man bei "ageism" einen "spin doctor" konsultieren? Und welches sind eigentlich die "Einstiegsdrogen" für "Leistungsträger"?

Für die, die zunächst ihre Grammatik auffrischen müssen, gibt es in aller Kürze das Wichtigste zu Zeitformen, Pluralbildung und Pronomen. Wer das nicht nötig hat, kann sich in die feinen Unterschiede zwischen amerikanischem und britischem Englisch einarbeiten: Während der Londoner von "sleeping partner" spricht, sagt die New Yorkerin "silent partner" - gemeint ist jeweils der stille Teilhaber. Und bloß weil beide von "résumé", "boot", "panhandle" oder "pissed" sprechen, meinen sie noch lange nicht dasselbe.

So dürfte dieses Nachschlagewerk bei Wiedereinsteigern und Fortgeschrittenen, zum Beispiel Oberstufenschülern, kaum Fragen offen lassen, wobei auch Teilbände Deutsch-Englisch und Englisch-Deutsch erhältlich sind. Wer hingegen beruflich oder im Studium mit Englisch zu tun hat, sollte bei 120.000 Stichwörtern und einer begrenzten Anzahl von Anwendungsbeispielen -- das Verb "do" nimmt gerade mal anderthalb Spalten in Anspruch - besser gleich zu einer noch größeren Ausgabe greifen. Für alle Fälle eben.
Patrick Fischer

Kurzbeschreibung

Rund 130.000 Stichwörter und Wendungen Mit CD-ROM Sie brauchen ein aktuelles Wörterbuch mit allen wichtigen Neuwörtern? Die Jahresausgabe 2007/08 bietet Ihnen: zahlreiche Neuwörter pro Sprache, z.B. "asbo" und "tweenager"; "Sparwut" und "googeln" aktuellen Wortschatz mit vielen passenden Beispielsätzen Infokästen mit ausführlichen Formulierungshilfen Verbtabellen, Grammatik und farbige Landkarten.

Den kompletten Wörterbuchinhalt zusätzlich auf CD-ROM Gemäß der Rechtschreibreform 2006 Systemvoraussetzungen Windows 2000, Windows XP


(E?)(L?) http://www.pons.de/produkte/3-12-517137-7/?aCode=40136&newsletter=2009-01/selbstlerner

Kennen Sie tweenies?
Dann brauchen Sie ein aktuelles Englisch-Wörterbuch mit allen wichtigen Neuwörtern: das PONS Kompaktwörterbuch Englisch. Jetzt um 5.000 auf 135.000 Stichwörter und Wendungen erweitert. Mit vielen Beispielsätzen, Infokästen mit ausführlichen Formulierungshilfen, Verbtabellen, Grammatik und farbigen Landkarten.

Die CD-ROM enthält zusätzlich den kompletten Wörterbuchinhalt zum mobilen Nachschlagen für PDA, Smartphone und PC. Und übrigens: Ein "tweenie" ist zwischen 8 und 12 Jahre alt, also noch kein richtiger Teenager, sondern irgendwie "in between".

Englisch-Deutsch, Deutsch-Englisch
Buch und CD-ROM
Format: 13 x 19,8 cm; ca. 1.800 Seiten
ISBN: 978-3-12-517137-4
EUR 24,95

Sie brauchen ein aktuelles Wörterbuch mit allen wichtigen Neuwörtern?
Die Jahresausgabe 2007/08 bietet Ihnen: Systemvoraussetzungen: Windows 2000, Windows XP


X

Y

Z