Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Einkaufen, Comprar, Acheter, Acquistare, Shopping

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atlasobscura.com
What Do You Call the Corner Store?
Bodega, deli, packie, offy, party store and more

(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-do-you-call-the-corner-store

by Dan Nosowitz, July 07, 2016




Erstellt: 2016-07

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flea market (W3)

Der dt. "Flohmarkt", der engl. "flea market" (1917 / 1920), und der ital. "mercato delle pulci", kommen aus Frankreich. Dort wurde er als "marché aux puces" kultiviert.

Die "Flöhe", die dort einst mitkultiviert wurden, trifft man heute aber (hoffentlich) nicht mehr dort an.

Die Bezeichnung "Flohmarkt" war in früheren Zeiten durchaus wörtlich gemeint. Die oftmals angebotenen Wäschestücke, die in irgendwelchen dunklen Ecken - z.b. auf dem Dachboden - zwischengelagert waren, hatten nicht selten unerwünschte Bewohner.

Eine Erklärung führt den "Flohmarkt" auf den Verkauf von Kleidung des Kleinadels zurück. Mit dem Kauf der Kleider übernahm man auch unweigerlich die entsprechende Kleinbevölkerung.

Schon im Mittelalter gab es Händler, die die abgelegten Kleider der Reichen in Paris anboten - mitsamt den darin lebenden Flöhe. Nach der großen Flohplage im Jahr 1890 verbannte der Stadtrat die Händler in den Norden der Stadt, auf den "Marché aux puces". Von da aus kam der Flohmarkt auch in andere Städte Frankreichs und wurde auch in anderen Ländern übernommen und als Lehnübersetzung eingeführt.

(E?)(L?) http://fleamarket.about.com/od/insidershoppingtips/a/howtohaggleforbiggerbargains.htm

How to Haggle at Flea Markets, Yard Sales, and More
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/marche-aux-puces-de-saint-ouen-the-oldest-fleamarket-in-paris

A Guide to "Les Puces": The Oldest Flea Markets in Paris


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/search?utf8=%E2%9C%93&lat=&lng=&q=flea+market&formatted_address=&source=desktop&nearby=false

Atlas Results for flea market

Story Results for flea market


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/waldo-farmer-s-and-flea-market

Waldo, Florida
Waldo Farmer's and Flea Market
North Central Florida's largest flea market and a weekend roadtripper's dream


(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/la-salle-hall

Brooklyn, New York
La Salle Hall
Now the site of a high school and an upscale flea market this was almost the site of the largest cathedral in the US
schools, churches, architectural oddities
13 Aug 2014


(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/into-the-wild-francois-daneck-s-colonial-house

Saint-Ouen, France
Francois Daneck's Colonial Concept
Collection of antique taxidermy and natural specimens, near one of Paris's oldest flea markets
Natural History, Wonder Cabinets, Purveyors of Curiosities
07 Nov 2012


(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/francois-richard-s-scientific-devices-and-odd-machinery

Saint Ouen, France
François Richard's Scientific Devices and Odd Machinery
A charming flea market shop dedicated to retrofuturistic apparati
Instruments of Science, Purveyors of Curiosities, Retro-Tech
07 Nov 2012


(E?)(L1) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/electronics-flea-market

Cupertino, California
Electronics Flea Market
If you are looking for a used Russian battery, Chinese Ham Radio or other electronic oddities this Flea Market is a good place to start
Electrical Oddities, Purveyors of Curiosities
11 Dec 2009


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/eJsKizR_QtCqCbrkjK26HA

American hospital teapot - This was used to serve tea at the Hahnemann hospital in Philadelphia. The owner bought it at a "flea market" in the US. Contributed by Individual


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/-_krIIkqRaORooJAciyNfA

China half timbered house I bought this china half timbered house in a "flea market". It is labelled Mermaid - a china house in Tudor style. It ... Contributed by Individual


(E?)(L?) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/flea-market

flea market


(E?)(L?) http://grainedit.com/2009/08/17/cristiana-couceiro-modern-collage-work/

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In a recent issue of Moloko, she talked about gathering source material. “On Saturdays I like to go through the "flea market" collecting memories. "Feira da Ladra" as we call it here in Lisbon. That means "Thief Fair", which is funny collecting other people’s memory to build a new one”. Her source material comes from a variety of modern sources including: record covers, Canadian logos, 1960s paperback books, Latvian magazines, Swiss posters, as well as work from the Bauhaus.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.lib.ru/ENGLISH/american_idioms.txt

[flea market] {n. phr.} A place where antiques, second-hand things, and cheap articles are sold, and especially one in the open air. * /The local antique dealers held a flea market and fair on the high-school athletic field./ * /There are many outdoor flea markets in Europe./


(E?)(L?) http://mentalfloss.com/big-questions/origins

Why Are Flea Markets Called That?
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A third explanation comes from colonial America. The Dutch traders who settled New York had an outdoor market they called the "Vlaie" (sometimes spelled as "Vly", or "Vlie") Market, named from the Dutch word for "swamp" and referencing the market’s location on what was once a salt marsh. English speakers pronounced the word with an "f" up front (update 12/6: and sometimes a long "I" on the end), and the "Fly Market" / "Flea Market" and other places like it eventually all became "flea markets".


(E?)(L?) http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/ghosts-of-amsterdam-12-photos

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After discovering some negatives at a "flea market" and scanning them onto her computer, Teeuwisse then went to each of these Amsterdam locations to take more recent shots. She then merged the two together to make the past come alive. It's a wonderful way to pay tribute to our past and remember the ones who came before us.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=flea market

Limericks on "flea market"


(E?)(L?) http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/09/flea-market-computer-bug-name/

Video: how did the flea market and computer bug get their names?

There are insects in our idioms, but how did they get there? Ashley Wagner looks at how creepy-crawlies made their way into some popular expressions.


(E?)(L?) http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/what-is-the-origin-of-the-term-flea-market

What is the origin of the term "flea market"?

"Flea market" comes from the French "marché aux puces", a name originally given to a market in Paris which specialized in shabby second-hand goods of the kind that might contain fleas. The earliest English use that the 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary has found dates from 1922.


(E?)(L?) http://www.rgcshows.com/

Welcome to the best choice in Flea Markets and Outdoor Markets

We are a leading show producing company since 1957. We produce Concerts, Auto Shows, Trade Shows and specialize in Event Services, including Fair and Event Management and Food and Beverage Management. Our events and services include Movie and Television location rentals, "Flea Markets" and Outdoor Markets.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue089.html

Issue 89 Spotlight : "flea market"

The term is a direct translation from French "marché aux puces", which is what such markets were called "A flea market".
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The following quote from G. S. Dougherty (1922) explains why informal markets where people gather selling used items came to be known by that name: "It is called the 'Flea' Market because there are so many second hand articles sold of all kinds that they are believed to gather fleas."
...


(E?)(L?) http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/sayingsf.htm#Flea market

Flea market


(E?)(L?) http://www.tjf.or.jp/deai/contents/teacher/mini_en/html/furimaketto.html

The "flea market", often abbreviated "furima" in Japanese, is a place where people can sell things they no longer need or things they have made themselves.
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The five best-selling items are, according to the Tokyo Recycle Citizen's Group, women's clothes, children's clothes, sundries, old clothes for young people, and gift items.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=F

"flea market" an open-air street market for inexpensive or secondhand articles


(E?)(L?) http://www.vvork.com/?page_id=8343

flea market


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/121597.html#fleamarket

...
There are two theories about the origin of "flea market" ...
According to etymologist Christine Ammer, the first "flea market" may have been New York's raucous Fly Market, a fixture in Lower Manhattan from before the American Revolution until around 1816. The "Fly" came from the Dutch name for the market, "Vly" or "Vlie", which meant "valley", and was pronounced, you guessed it, "flea". Voila, "flea market". Maybe.

However, while the "Fly Market" certainly existed, and its name was evidently indeed pronounced "flea market", the actual origin of the term most probably lies in Paris, where Le "Marche aux Puces" (literally, "market of the fleas") was a popular shopping venue. Le Marche aux Puces took its name, as you might have guessed by now, from the semi-humorous (and probably at least partly accurate) popular perception that the market's ragtag goods were more than likely to be infested with fleas.

In any case, "flea market" first appeared in English in the 1920's and is most likely a simple translation of the French market's name. If "flea market" had gained currency from the Manhattan "Fly Market", it almost certainly would have appeared in print much earlier than it did.


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/flea_market/

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Generally, the word "flea" connotes low-rent or cheap, because such places were often infested with "fleas" (cf. "fleabag"). The term "flea market" is a translation of the French "marché aux puces", literally "market with fleas", an open-air market where second hand goods are sold.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/computer-flea-market

computer flea market


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/flea-market

flea market


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=flea market
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "flea market" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1800 / 1930 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#flea market

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-07

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greengrocer (W3)

Der engl. "greengrocer" = dt. "Obsthändler", "Gemüsehändler" setzt sich zusammen aus "green" wie "Grünzeug" und "grocer", dem aus dem Französischen übernommenen dt. "Grossist".

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/greengrocer


grocer
grossier
Grossist
gross
Gros
groat
Groschen
grosbeak (W3)

Der bereits Mitte des 13. Jh. aufkommende und aus Frankreich von afrz. "grossier" stammende engl. "grocer" (mengl. "grosser") verkaufte seine Waren "en gros", also "in großen Mengen". Zu Grunde liegt lat. "grossarius" = "Großhändler", "Grossist".

Bereits im 16. Jh. (also lange vor dem Aufkommen der Supermärkte) war aus dem "Grossist" ein Kleinwarenhändler im Sinne von "a merchant selling individual items of food" geworden.

Engl. "gross" = "dick", "feist", "plump" geht zurück auf lat. "grossus" = "groß", "dick", "grob".

Das dt. "Gros" = "12 Dutzend" = "144 Stück" ist seit etwa 1400 auch in England als "gross" zu finden. Ironischerweise leitete man daraus ein "small gross" = "1 Dutzend" = "12 Stück" und zur Klarheit ein "great gross" = "12 Dutzend" ab.

Das lat. "grossus" ist auch in der Welt der Münzen zu finden, als mittelalterliches engl. "groat" = "four pence" = "thick penny" und als dt. "Groschen" = "10 Pfennige", ursprünglich aber auch "12 Pfennige".

Auch der Name des Vogels engl. "grosbeak" = "Kernbeißer" verweist auf den "großen", "groben", "kräftigen" "Schnabel".

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=grocer


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=grocer


(E?)(L?) http://www.familybusinessmagazine.com/oldworld.html
22. J.P. Epping of Pippsvadr - Grocers/Germany - Founded: 1595

(E?)(L?) http://www.progressivegrocer.com/

About Progressive Grocer
Progressive Grocer has been the voice of the food retail industry for over 84 years. Serving the largest audience in the market, Progressive Grocer's readers are top management at headquarters and top decision-makers at store level. From chain supermarkets to independent supermarkets, super centers, wholesalers and food brokers, readers rely on Progressive Grocer for its authoritative, comprehensive, relevant and research-based editorial and news. By anticipating, reporting and interpreting important data and trends, Progressive Grocer fulfills its mission: accelerating insight and opportunity for leading grocery retailers, and accelerating brand and sales success for leading manufacturers.


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=grocer


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW156/page2.html#grocer
grocer/gross

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/grocer


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grocer


Grocerant (W3)

Das "Restaurant" beim "Grocery" scheint um 1996 als "Grocerant", auch "groceraunt", das Licht des Supermarkts erblickt zu haben.

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/turnsofphrase/tp-gro1.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/groceraunt.asp


groceries (W3)

Die Produkte, die ein "grocer" verkauft findet man anscheinend nur im Plural als engl. "groceries". Das sind wohl in erster Linie Nahrungsmittel, aber auch allgemein Haushaltswaren.

The products sold in a "grocery store" are "groceries" - the word is not used in the singular in this sense.

(E?)(L?) http://www.lebensmittellexikon.de/l0000300.php
Groceries (en - Lebensmittel)

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/weblog/permalink/groceries/
Free Groceries Giveaway

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/groceries

groceries Synonyms
groceries n.
food, edibles, produce, comestibles, foodstuffs, perishables, vegetables, viands, staples, green groceries, produce, fruits, dairy products, processed foods, frozen foods, freeze-dried foods, dried foods, desiccated foods, instant foods, packaged foods, canned foods.


grocery
grocery store (W3)

Ein engl. "grocery" (eigentlich "grocery store") ist ein Lebensmittelgeschäft in dem auch Haushaltsartikel erhältlich sind. Dieser von einem engl. "grocer" betriebene Laden kam 1828 in den USA auf, obwohl es den "grocer", den "Grossisten", bereits im 13. Jh. gab. Im Jahr 1913 gab es in Montana, USA, den ersten "Self-service grocery".

(E?)(L?) http://www.bdb.co.za/shackle/archives/archive_0304.htm#ripper
DID JACK THE RIPPER SHOP AT GRANDAD'S GROCERY? 0303

Riding the internet's magic carpet, I've made the intriguing discovery that my maternal grandfather, Arthur Locke, of fond memory, may just possibly have sold groceries to London's notorious mass murderer, Jack the Ripper, and perhaps to some of his victims. For details, please click on CANADIAN SENIOR YEARS.

(E?)(L?) http://www.caloriesperhour.com/index_food.php

Food Calories & Nutrition Calculator
Groceries: Misc. Groceries | Dairy & Eggs | Fruit | Liquor Meat | Poultry | Seafood | Spices Vegetables | All Groceries | Brand Lists | 100 Calorie Pack Lists


(E?)(L?) http://www.cheapcooking.com/
"You'll find frugal tips for cutting back on your grocery bill, cheap recipes and shopping hints, money saving tips and techniques, and a downloadable grocery list and price book."

Recipes are browsable by type. Also includes suggested cookbooks, related links, and a free weekly newsletter.

(E?)(L?) http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0106/p18s03-bogn.html?entryBottomStory

The average grocery store has 30,000 distinct items, of which 20,000 are dumped and replaced annually. We have too much choice ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.grocerychoice.gov.au/

GROCERYchoice is an Australian Government initiative. It helps consumers find the cheapest supermarket chain in their area without having to compare hundreds of prices.

Each month, GROCERYchoice publishes the price of grocery baskets at supermarket chains across Australia. The baskets include 500 products typically purchased by Australian households.


(E?)(L?) http://www.heise.de/newsticker/Australien-Opposition-fordert-Ende-der-staatlichen-Supermarkt-Empfehlung-im-Internet--/meldung/114891


(E?)(L?) http://money.howstuffworks.com/grocery-store-prices-for-14-items-in-1957.htm
Grocery Store Prices for 14 Items in 1957

(E?)(L?) http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/budget-grocery-shopping-tips.htm
Budget Grocery Shopping Tips

(E?)(L?) http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/how-to-save-money-at-the-grocery-store.htm
How to Save Money at the Grocery Store

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.schnucks.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.familybusinessmagazine.com/top150.html
...
85. Schnuck Markets (90)
Founded as small St. Louis grocery store, now operates 100 hypermarkets (drugs, florist, salad bars, videos, etc.) in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana.
...

(E?)(L?) http://www.rareroses.com/pictures/nicolekordana.html
Nicole Kordana - A grocery store miniature that has done very well.

(E?)(L?) http://www.senioryears.com/jack.html


(E?)(L?) http://theimaginaryworld.com/groceryA1.html

VINTAGE SUPERMARKET PHOTOS


(E?)(L?) http://online.wsj.com/article_email/SB105182720211039500.html


(E?)(L2) http://www.yankeegrocery.com/spice_mill/yhspgloss.html
Glossary of herbs and spices

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/grocery


groceteria (W3)

Anfang des 20. Jh. ließ sich ein amerikanischer Händler die Bezeichnung "groceteria" schützen. Es verband "grocery" mit "cafeteria".

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=grocer


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tyre-kicker (W3)

Engl. "tyre-kicker", amer. "tire-kicker" = dt. "Kunde, der zwar großes Interesse zeigt und viel nachfragt, aber nie etwas kauft", geht zurück auf den Ausdruck engl. "kick the tyres" der eine sinnlose Gebärde von Autokäufern beschreibt, die ein Auto begutachten ohne es kaufen zu wollen. Er entspricht dem dt. "Reifentreter", der gleichsam den Autokauf (bzw. "Nicht-Kauf") von den Reifen abhängig macht.

Engl. "tyre", "tire" = dt. "Reifen" geht wohl zurück auf engl. "attire" = dt. "Kleidung", "Gewand".

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=1742


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=tyre kicker


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=tyre-kicker
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "tyre-kicker" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2013-05

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