Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Stoffe und Kleidung, Tela y Ropa, Tissu et Vêtements, Tessuto e Abbigliamento, Fabric and Clothes

A

apron (W3)

Engl. "apron" = dt. "Schürze", "Schurz", "Schutzblech" zähle ich zu den Ampelwörtern (wie engl. "adder" und engl. "umpire"). Aus engl. "a napron" (13. Jh.) wurde im Laufe der Zeit "an apron".

Engl. "apron" geht zurück auf altfrz. "naperon", "napron" (= dt. "kleine Tischdecke"), einer Verkleinerungsform von "nape", "nappe" = dt. "Tuch", "Stoff", "Lappen". Man findet es heute als frz. "napperon" = dt. "Zierdeckchen". Im Englischen gab es sein "n" ab und aus "a napron" wurde "an apron".

"apron": A layer of hard material like concrete or timber that protects soil from erosion, e.g., pavement at the spillway of a dam.

Als weiteren Vorfahren findet man lat. "mappa" = dt. "Serviette", "Mundtuch", "Wischtuch", "Signaltuch" und als "mappa mundi" = dt. "Weltkarte", "Landkarte". Im Englischen findet man weiterhin engl. "napkin" = dt. "Serviette", "Wischtuch", "Windel", "Monatsbinde".

Die Wandlung von "-m-" zu "-n-" fand bereits im Altfranzösischen statt. Man findet es auch in der Wandlung

Mit der Zeit übernahm engl. "apron" weitere Schutzfunktionen.

dt. "Kittelschürzen" = engl. "apron dresses"

Engl. "to be tied to her apron strings" = dt. "an ihrem Rockzipfel hängen", engl. "apron strings" = übertragen dt. "Abhängigkeit", wörtlich dt. "Schürzenbänder", "Rockzipfel" spielt auf die Zeit im Kindesalter an.

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Apron


(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/

Apron | Apron-string Tenure (An) | Bishops Apron | Blue-apron Statesman (A) | Mothers Apron Strings


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/exploreraltflash/?tag=&page=5


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/ZgP_MpbFTOaqC1PSWf2qdw

Tahitian mourner's costume A tahitian mourner's costume comprising a mask headdress, a breastplate and an apron. Contributed by Museum


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/exploreraltflash/?tag=&page=45


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/U3oICyzmS76zNy0ks6h3oA

Masonic memorabilia I inherited this collection of Masonic memorabilia. The apron belonged to my granddad who was a grand master and the ... Contributed by Individual


(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/exploreraltflash/?tag=&page=55


(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/ahistoryoftheworld/objects/WmkG09lWQl-b7X10rJ0-vQ

Apron This handmade item was collected by the owner's sister in China. Contributed by Individual


(E?)(L?) http://www.bdb.co.za/shackle/archives/archive_summary.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.bdb.co.za/shackle/articles/grandmas_apron.htm

WHO FIRST WROTE ABOUT GRANDMA'S APRON? 0604


(E?)(L?) http://www.business-english.de/daily_mail_quiz.day-2008-10-24.html

24.10.2008 to be tied to somebody's apron strings


(E?)(L?) http://www.ccel.org/ccel/easton/ebd2.html?term=Apron


(E?)(L?) http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/super-index_I.htm

Little Blue Apron


(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/toc/dontoc-a.html


(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/toc/dontoc-f.html

full apron


(E?)(L?) http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/A/AE_apron.html


(E?)(L?) http://spanish.dictionary.com/definition/apron


(E?)(L?) http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/dod_dictionary/index.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/doctrine/other/aap_06_08.pdf


(E?)(L?) http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/exposing-the-feminine-mystique.html

Exposing the Feminine Mystique

Although the beginning of the'60s showcased women in frilly white aprons, spatula in hand and crying child on hip, females hadn't been in such a role forever. During World War II (1941–45), women left the sphere of house and home and adopted what had been considered male roles in society. They worked in factories and kept America running as the country's young men headed off to war.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=apron


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402

APRON STRING HOLD. An estate held by a man during his wife's life.


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/f

Fillmore, Millard, 1800-1874: The Shoemaker's Apron - A Second Book of Czechoslovak Fairy Tales and Folk Tales (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/g

Gates, Eleanor, 1875-1951: Apron-Strings (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/m

Matulka, Jan, 1890-1972: The Shoemaker's Apron - A Second Book of Czechoslovak Fairy Tales and Folk Tales (English) (as Illustrator)


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2
Peonies: Apron Strings

(E?)(L?) http://www.hmssurprise.org/Resources/DanaSFLex.html

"APRON": A piece of timber fixed behind the lower part of the stern [sic], just above the fore end of the keel. A covering to the vent or lock of a cannon.


(E?)(L?) http://hotforwords.com/2008/11/10/apron/


(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/wordname.html

an apron a napron


(E?)(L?) http://www.lib.ru/ENGLISH/american_idioms.txt

apron | cling to one's mother's apron strings | hang on to one's mother's apron strings | let go of one's mother's apron strings | tied to one's mother's apron strings


(E?)(L?) http://www.lookingatbuildings.org.uk/glossary/glossary.html?no_cache=1&tx_contagged%5Bpointer%5D=2


(E?)(L?) http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/exhibitions/tieswithtradition/index.shtml

Ties with Tradition - Macedonian apron designs


(E?)(L?) http://southseas.nla.gov.au/refs/falc/0062.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apron
Limericks on apron

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apron conveyor
Limericks on apron conveyor

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apronectomy
Limericks on apronectomy

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=aproned
Limericks on aproned

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=aproneer
Limericks on aproneer

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=apron string
Limericks on apron string

(E1)(L1) http://owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=3256

to be tied to her apron strings
...
In addition to describing a garment that is usually fastened in the back and worn over all or part of the front of the body to protect clothing, apron also refers to a variety of other things in the sense of something that protects or is placed in front: ...


(E1)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apron


(E1)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apron string


(E?)(L?) http://www.sawdustmaking.com/GLOSSARY/glossary_of__woodworking_t.htm

Apron link


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/A




(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=a

apron-man


(E?)(L?) http://thespottedapron.wordpress.com/

The Spotted Apron


(E2)(L1) http://www.kruenitz1.uni-trier.de/cgi-bin/callKruenitz.tcl


(E?)(L1) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=apron


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/a.html

Apron strings


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/t.html

Tied to your mother's apron strings


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2006-3-Mar.htm

...
False Starts and New Beginnings


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/apron_strings_tied_to/

Apron strings, Tied To


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1298


(E?)(L?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYPzeAHcrW0

Apron


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=apron
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "apron" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1640 / 1700 auf.

Erstellt: 2013-05

B

basf
Leather Glossary
Synonyms and Abbreviations

Acronyms and abbreviations related to leather and leather commerce.

(E?)(L?) http://www.performancechemicals.basf.com/ev-wcms-in/internet/en_GB/portal/show-content_le/content/EV/EV9/glossary/index


C

cloth (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/cloth


Coburgs (W3)

Engl. "Coburgs" ist die Bezeichnung eines aus Coburg stammenden Stoffes.

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/81/3768.html

E. Cobham Brewer 1810–1897. Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. 1898.

Coburgs: A corded or ribbed cotton cloth made in Coburg (Saxony), or in imitation thereof. Chiefly used for ladies’ dresses.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Coburgs
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Coburgs" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1820 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-03

Codpiece (W3)

Engl. "Codpiece" = dt. "Hosenbeutel", "Hosenlatz" enthält ein altes Wort engl. "cod" = dt. "Hülse", "Schote", "Beutel", "Tasche", "Sack", "Hodensack".

Mir drängt sich das dt. "Kuttel" auf. Allerdings bezeichnset dt. "Kuttel", "Kutteln" ein "essbares Stück Eingeweide" und geht weiter zurück auf mhd. "kutel" (13. Jh.) = dt. "Eingeweide von Tieren". Die weiter herkunft ist ungewiss.

Ein anderes Wort dt. "Kotze" findet man als Bezeichnung für dt. "grobes Wollzeug", "wollene Decke", "wollener Mantel". Hier trifft man auf mhd. "kotze", ahd. "chozzo", "chozza" und altfränk. "*kotta" = dt. "mantelähnlicher Umhang aus grobem Wollstoff". Verwandt damit sind auch altfrz. "cotte", frz. "cotte" = dt. "Rock", mlat. "cotta" = dt. "Mönchsgewand" und natürlich engl. "coat" = dt. "Rock" (und damit auch engl. "Dufflecoat", "Petticoat", "Trenchcoat").

Ein weiterer Anwärter ist das umgangssprachliche dt. "Kittchen" = dt. "Gefängnis". Dieses geht aus der Gaunersprache hervor und geht zurück auf ein altes dt. "Kitt", "Kitte, "Kütte" = dt. "Haus", "Herberge", "Gefängnis".

Ob allerdings engl. "cod" und / oder dt. "Kuttel" und / oder dt. "Kutte" und / oder dt. "Kittchen" einen gemeinsamen Ursprung haben ist damit weiterhin ungewiss.

engl. "Bodice" (16. Jh.) = dt. "Mieder" geht zurück auf "bodies". Das Kleidungsstück bestand ursprünglich aus zwei Teilen - deshalb nahm man den Plural von engl. "body" = dt. "Körper" ("pair of bodies"). Im Laufe der Zeit veränderte sich die Aussprache des verkürzten "bodies" zu "bodice". Die Pluralendung "-ice" findet man auch in engl. "dice" und "mice".

Engl. "doublet" (14. Jh.) = dt. "Wams" geht zurück auf frz. "doublet" = dt. "Paar". Die Bezeichnung bezieht sich auf auf den gefalteten und gesteppten, also doppelten Stoff.

Engl. "Farthingale" (16. Jh.) = dt. "Reifrock", "Krinoline" geht über altfrz. "verdugale" zurück auf span. "verdugado" und span. "verdugo" = dt. "Reis", "Trieb", "Gerte", "Stab", "Stock" und bezieht sich auf die Walknochen, die ursprünglich für die weit ausladenden Röcke als Stützen verwendet wurden.

Engl. "surfeit" = dt. "Übermaß" geht zurück auf frz. "sur-" = dt. "über" (lat. "super-") und frz. "faire" = dt. "machen". Es kann also auch mit dt. "Übertreibung" übersetzt werden. Die Einschränkung auf die Bedeutung dt. "übermäßig essen und trinken" erfolgte bereits mit der Übernahme ins Englische im 14. Jh.

Engl. "Privies" = dt. "Toilette" geht mit engl. "private" und engl. "privy" zurück auf lat. "privus" = dt. "für sich bestehend", "einzeln". Engl. "Privies" bezeichnete also zunächst etwas "Privates", einen "privaten Ort".

Engl. "privilege" = dt. "Privileg" geht zurück auf lat. "privilegium" = dt. "besondere Verordnung", "Ausnahmegesetz", "Vorrecht" und setzt sich zusammen aus lat. "privus" = dt. "gesondert", "einzeln" und lat. "lex", "legis" = dt. "Recht" und bezeichnete also das "Sonderrecht".

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=codpiece

codpiece (n.): mid-15c., "a bagged appendage to the front of the breeches; often conspicuous" [OED], from Old English codd "a bag, pouch, husk," in Middle English, "testicles" (common Germanic, compare Old Norse koddi "pillow," Dutch kodde "bag") + piece (n.).


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=codpiece
Limericks on "codpiece"

(E?)(L?) http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

Shakespeare concordance: word forms beginning with C: codpiece (7) | codpieces (1) | cods (1)


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/codpiece


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/codpiece

codpiece


(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=c

codpiece


(E?)(L?) http://takeourword.blogspot.de/2014/05/mommy-whats-codpiece.html

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Mommy, What's a Codpiece?
...
A bagged appendage to the front of close fitting hose or breeches worn by men of the 15th to 17th c.: often conspicuous or ornamented.

Codpiece-Antonio Navagero (1565), from Wikipedia

Men of the period wore hose or leggings, and a longish coat or jacket over those. The hose were not joined at the crotch, so the genitals could be exposed, but the naughty bits were, in the beginning, covered by the length of the jacket (doublet). However, fashion tastes brought about a rise in the hemline of the doublet. Once it started approaching the tops of the thighs, men risked exposing their genitals as they mounted and dismounted their horses and during other activities. Thus the "codpiece" was born. It was originally a simple triangle of cloth laced to the gap in the hose, but with time it grew larger and more ornate, and it even acquired padding. As tastes changed, the "codpiece" eventually went out of fashion, but it can still be seen today in period clothing, and also among certain groups such as heavy metal rockers and superheroes (certain versions of Batman in film, for example).

The word "codpiece" is, etymologically, "a piece for the scrotum or testicles", as "cod" is the Old English word for "testicle" by transference from its previous meaning, "scrotum". The "scrotum" meaning arose from the word's earlier, broader sense of "pouch". "Codpiece" dates from the late 15th century, while "cod" turns up in the written record around 1000. One could say that a "codpiece" is a "piece for the pouch"!
...



(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Codpiece
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Codpiece" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-05

Cotton (W3)

Engl. "cotton" (spätes 13. Jh.) = dt. "Baumwolle" ist mit dem Stoff von den Spaniern nach Europa gebracht worden. Der Begriff geht zurück auf arab. "el kutn", "al qutn", das eventuell schon von den Ägyptern übernommen wurde. Die Spanier vereinten den Artikel mit dem Wort und machten daraus span. "algodon", port. "algodão". Die Franzosen, Engländer und Deutschen verstanden die Araber anscheinend besser und übernahmen es (eventuell auch durch provenzalische (provenz. "coton") und italienische (ital. "cotone") Vermittlung) als altfrz. "coton" (12. Jh.), engl. "cotton" (spätes 13. Jh.), ndl. "katoen" bzw. dt. "Kattun", das inzwischen untergegangen ist.

Es gibt auch ein Verb engl., amerik. "cotton" = dt. "sich anfreunden (mit)", "gut auskommen (mit)". Im 15./16. Jh. nahm engl. "cotton", "cottoning a cloth" die Bedeutung engl. "to form a nap on cloth" an. Diese Bedeutung ist untergegengen, könnte aber zur Bildung der heutigen Bedeutung beigetragen haben. So sprachen Hutmacher im 16. Jh., die "cloth with a nap or downy surface" bevorzugten, von "it cottoned well", wenn die Materialien für einen Hut gut zusammen passten. Man nimmt an, dass auf diesem Weg die Bedeutung des heutigen Ausdrucks engl. "to cotton well" = dt. "sich vertragen", "zustimmen", auch "Erfolg haben", "gelingen", "verfeinern" und im 17. Jh. "gut zusammenarbeiten" entstand. Die Bedeutung dt. "zu jemandem eine Zuneigung haben", "jemandem zugetan" kam um das Jahr 1805 auf.

Eine weitere Möglichkeit zur Herkunft des Verbs engl. "cotton" ist welsh "cytuno" = engl. "consent", "agree".

Das verb engl. "to cotton" = engl. "to take on a nap, to acquire a smooth, glossy surface" soll zum ersten Mal im Jahr 1488 in den "Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland" zu finden sein. (s. Wordorigins.org)

Im frühen 20. Jh. erhielt engl. "cotton" eine weitere Bedeutung dt. "verstehen", "kapieren".

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Cotton


(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/WORT

| Stapleton Cotton Combermere | Charles Cotton | George Edward Lynch Cotton | John Cotton | Sir Henry John Stedman Cotton | Sir Robert Bruce Cotton | Cotton-spinning machinery | Cotton (Family) | Cotton goods and yarn | Cotton and cotton industry | Cotton manufacture | Cotton Mather


(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/

cotton | cotton eye joe


(E?)(L?) http://www.archive.org/details/king_cotton




(E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/l/lavcot14.html

Lavender Cotton


(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/toc/dontoc-c.html

cotton | cotton bating | cotton content | cotton drill | cotton fiber content paper | cotton linters | cotton parchment | cotton thread | cotton wool


(E?)(L?) http://cottonmonster.com/

Cotton Monsters!


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cotton

...
Philip Miller of the Chelsea Physic Garden sent the first cotton seeds to American colony of Georgia in 1732.
...
"Cotton gin" is recorded from 1794 (see gin (n.2)).

cotton (v.) "to get on with" someone (usually with to), 1560s, perhaps from Welsh "cytuno" "consent", "agree". But perhaps also a metaphor from cloth finishing and thus from cotton (n.). Related: "Cottoned"; "cottoning".


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2

Päonien: Ball o' Cotton | Puffed Cotton


(E?)(L?) http://www.lib.ru/ENGLISH/american_idioms.txt

cotton | cotton picking | cotton-pickin' | on high cotton | sitting on high cotton


(E1)(L1) http://www.medterms.com/script/main/alphaidx.asp?p=c_dict

Cotton rat


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=absorbent cotton


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=cotton


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Browse=Co*&Start=5700

| cottonade | cotton ball | Cotton Belt | cotton boll | cotton bollworm | cotton cake | cotton candy | cotton flannel | cotton for brains | cotton gin | cotton grass | cotton-grass | cottongrass | Cottonian | cotton mill | cotton mouse | cottonmouth | cottonmouth moccasin | cottonmouth snake | cottonmouth water moccasin | cotton mule | cotton on | cotton picking | cotton-picking | cotton plant | cotton rat | cotton rose | cotton rosemallow | cottonsedge | cotton sedge | cotton seed | cottonseed | cottonseed cake | cottonseed meal | cottonseed oil | cotton stainer | cotton strain | cottontail | cottontail rabbit | cotton thistle | cotton tie | cottonweed | Cotton Whig | cottonwick | cottonwood | cotton wool | cottony | cottony-cushion scale | cottony leak


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/cotton


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/???

| Cotton Belt | cotton candy | cotton gin | cotton grass | cottonmouth | cotton-picking | cottonseed | cottonseed oil | cotton stainer | cottontail | cottonweed | cottonwood | Cottonwood | cotton wool | cottony | Egyptian cotton | guncotton | pima cotton | Sea Island cotton | silk cotton | silk-cotton tree | upland cotton


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/es/archive/2007/07/


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/es/archive/2006/11/

algodón: cotton


(E?)(L?) https://sourcemap.com/view/86

Levi's 501 Cotton


(E?)(L?) https://sourcemap.com/view/588

Organic Cotton


(E?)(L?) http://www.stofflexikon.com/beach-cotton/103/beach-cotton.html

Beach-cotton | Cotton | Cottonade | Cottonswiss-Ausrüstung | Feincotton | Gminder-Cotton | Silcotton | Super-Cotton | Wintercotton


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW178/page2.html#tocottonto

...
So the notion of "success" that we find in the first uses of cotton in the sense you intend, apparently was an extension of the "success" in cloth finishing or hat making.


(E?)(L?) http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/sayindex.htm

Cotton on


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/i.html

In the tall cotton - viel Baumwolle bringt Wohlstand


(E?)(L?) http://wisplants.uwsp.edu/commonnames.html

cotton | cotton-grass | cotton-weed | cottonwood | snake-cotton


(E1)(L1) http://www.w-akten.de/worte.phtml

"cotton wool" = dt. "Watte"


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/tag-index/


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Arabic_origin


(E?)(L?) http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cotton

Etymology

Middle English "cotoun", from Anglo-Norman "cotun", from Old Italian (Genoa) "cotone", from Arabic (Egypt) "qútun", (Hispano-Arab) "qutun", variants of Arabic "qutn", from root "*qtn", possibly originally from Ancient Egyptian.

Cognate to Dutch "katoen", German "Kattun", Italian "cotone", Spanish "algodón", and Portuguese "algodão".


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/030201.html#cotton

Cotton (verb)

Perchance to Slobber.
...
To "cotton" to someone or something is a slightly folksy way of saying that you get along with or have taken a liking to that person or thing.
...
"Cotton" as a verb is, somewhat surprisingly, directly derived from our old friend "cotton" the fabric, or, as the Oxford English Dictionary puts it, "the white fibrous substance, soft and downy like wool, which clothes the seeds of the cotton-plant." The noun "cotton" is a very old word, entering English around 1286 from the Old French "coton," which came in turn from the Arabic "qutun."
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/cotton/


(E?)(L?) http://wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0509


(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/arabic.html


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Cotton
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Cotton" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1580 auf.

Erstellt: 2013-03

D

dress (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/dress


E

F

fabric (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/fabric


G

gorgeous, gorge, Gurgel (W3)

Das engl. "gorgeous" geht zunächst zurück auf mfrz. "gorgias" = "wimple" = "Schleier", der Kopf, Nacken und Schultern bedeckte, das Gesicht jedoch frei ließ. Mit Änderung der Mode wandelte sich auch der Schleier "gorgias" und wurde zu "elegant". Nach England kam das Wort in der Form "gorgayse", das später zu "gorgeous" wurde. Seit dem 15. Jh. wurde "gorgeous" entschleiert und bedeutete seither nur noch "prächtig", "prachtvoll".

Die ie. Wurzel "*gwer-", "gwor-", verlor das initiale "g" schon im Lateinischen. Es hatte etwa die Bedeutung "Schlucht", "Kehle", "Schlund". Hierauf wird auch engl. "gorge" = "Schlucht", "Kehle" und die dt. "Gurgel" zurück geführt.

Das lat. "vorago" = "Schlund", "Abgrund", "bodenlose Tiefe", bzw. lat. "vorare" brachte engl. "devour" = "verschlingen", "fressen", engl. "vorax" = "gefräßig", frz. "voracité" = "Gefräßigkeit", "Gier", engl. "gorge" = "Schlucht", "Kehle" und auch russ. "gorlo" = "throat" hervor.
Auch das engl. "gorgeous" und "gorgias" = "neckerchief" = "Halstuch", "necklace" = "Halskette" gehen über afrz. "gorgias" = "elegant", "enjoying elegance" darauf zurück.

...
ETYMOLOGY: Middle English "gorgeouse", probably from Old French "gorgias", "jewelry-loving", "elegant", from "gorge", "throat". See gorge.

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=gorgeous


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordcentral.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gorgeous
In einem Newsletter "M-W's Daily Buzzword" von Merriam-Webster findet man:


...
"Gorgeous" comes from a Middle French word for a piece of clothing an elegant lady of the Middle Ages would have worn.
...
In medieval French, the word "gorgias" meant "wimple". ... It's a cloth headdress that covered the head, neck, and shoulders, leaving only the face exposed. In the Middle Ages, elegant and fashionable European women wore elaborate wimples, and over time "gorgias" also came to mean "elegant". English speakers learned the word from French and adopted it, originally with the spelling "gorgayse", which was later modified to the modern "gorgeous". By the 15th century, "gorgeous" had lost the "wimple" sense in English and simply meant "elegant" or "beautiful".
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/g/g0200800.html


Gorgeous Guy (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/gorgeousguy.html
Hier findet man die Geschichte, wie aus "Dan Baca", (a 29-year-old network engineer), ein "internet celebrity" namens "Gorgeous Guy" wurde.

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


H

I

J

K

L

Latex (W3)

Dt. "Latex", frz. "latex" (1706), engl. "latex" (1662) ist eine neulateinische Bildung zu lat. "latex", Gen. lat. "laticis" = dt. "Flüssigkeit", "Nass", griech. "látax" = dt. "der Tropfen". Als Wurzel wird ide. "*lat-" = "nass" postuliert. Im Mittelirischen findet man mirish. "laith" = dt. "Bier", walis. "llaid" = dt. "Schlamm, "Matsch", lith. "latakas" = dt. "Pfütze", "Lache", altnord. "leþja" = dt. "Schmutz", "Dreck".

Als Bezeichnung für dt. "milchige Flüssigkeit von Pflanzen" findet man engl. "latex" seit 1835.

Die Bedeutung engl. "latex" = engl. "water-dispersed polymer particles" findet man seit 1937.

"Latex" wird aus dem Milchsaft verschiedener Pflanzen (insbesondere Kautschukmilch) hergestellt und ist ein elastisches Material, das zur Herstellung von Farben, Gummi, Kautschuk, Klebstoff verwendet wird. Chemisch handelt es sich dabei um wässrige Dispersionen von natürlichen oder synthetischen Polymeren.

(E?)(L?) http://www.artlex.com/ArtLex/L.html#anchor4480622


(E?)(L1) http://www.canoo.net/services/WordformationRules/Derivation/To-V/Suffixe-F/ier.html
latexieren

(E?)(L?) http://www.chemie.de/lexikon/
Latexfarbe

(E?)(L?) http://www.chemie.de/lexikon/d/Chemikalienliste
Latex (siehe Kautschuk)

(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/latex


(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/dt/dt2001.html


(E3)(L1) http://davesgarden.com/guides/terms/go/527/


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=latex


(E?)(L?) http://www.farbimpulse.de/glossar/liste.html?suche=a
Latexfarbe

(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=latex


(E?)(L?) http://tlc.howstuffworks.com/home/latex-paint.htm
Latex Paint

(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/how-to-remove-latex-paint-stains.htm
How to Remove Latex Paint Stains

(E?)(L?) http://ratgeber.gesundheitkompakt.de/Diaphragma


(E?)(L?) http://ratgeber.gesundheitkompakt.de/Frauenkondom


(E?)(L?) http://ratgeber.gesundheitkompakt.de/Kondom


(E?)(L?) http://www.g-netz.de/Gesundheit_A-Z/Index_I-N/Latexallergie/latexallergie.shtml
Latexallergie

(E?)(L1) http://www.label-online.de/label-datenbank?label=122
Qualitätsverband umweltfreundliche Latexmatratzen, QUL

(E2)(L1) http://www.mobot.org/mobot/glossary/list.asp?list=french


(E2)(L1) http://www.mobot.org/mobot/glossary/list.asp?list=english
latex | laticifer (latex tube)

(E?)(L?) http://hpd.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/list?tbl=TblChemicals&alpha=S
Styrene-butadiene latex

(E?)(L?) http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/encyclopedia.html
Latex agglutination test

(E?)(L?) http://www.onmeda.de/krankheiten/latexallergie.html
Latexallergie

(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/latex


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/latex paint


(E?)(L1) http://www.seilnacht.com/Lexikon/psbild.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/L
latex | latex condom | latex nightcap | spermicidal latex condom

(E6)(L?) http://www.stofflexikon.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.vvork.com/?tag=latex


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Latex
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Dt. "Latex" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1850 auf.

Erstellt: 2011-10

M

Mohair (W3)

Die Bezeichnung de., frz., engl. "Mohair" (1610) geht zurück auf arab. "Muhayyar", "Mukhaya", womit die im Umland der Stadt Ankara die Wolle der Angoraziege bezeichnet wurde. Die arabische Bezeichnung wird als "bestes Flies" oder "Stoff aus Haaren", "Stoff aus Ziegenhaar" übersetzt. Engländer und Niederländer fühlten sich an engl. "hair" erinnert und wandelten die Bezeichnung zu engl. "Mohair". In Frankreich wurde daraus frz. "moire" = dt. "Ziegenhaarstoff" und frz. "moiré" = dt. "Moiré-Effekt", "matt schimmerndes Muster auf Stoffen", nach dem Glanz der Mohairwolle.

"Mohair" ist die englische Bezeichnung für "Angorawolle", aber auch die ganz oder teilweise "aus Angorawolle gewebten Stoffe" führen häufig den Namen "Mohairs", obschon ein wesentlicher Unterschied zwischen ihnen und den Kamelotts nicht besteht.

(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/M2.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/mohair

"MOHAIR", subst. masc.: Étymol. et Hist. 1868 Mohair granité (Figaro, p.4, col.1, 19 février ds Bonn., p.95). Empr. à l'angl. mohair, v. moire étymologie.


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=mohair

mohair (n.)

1610s, earlier mocayre, 1560s, "fine hair of the Angora goat," also "a fabric made from this," from Middle French mocayart (16c.), Italian mocaiarro, both from Arabic mukhayyar "cloth of goat hair," literally "selected, choice," from khayyara "he chose." Spelling influenced in English by association with hair. Moire "watered silk" (1650s) probably represents English mohair borrowed into French and back into English.


(E6)(L?) http://www.fashion-base.de/Mohair.htm


(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402

"MOHAIR". A man in the civil line, a townsman, or tradesman: a military term, from the mohair buttons worn by persons of those descriptions, or any others not in the army, the buttons of military men being always of metal: this is generally used as a term of contempt, meaning a bourgeois, tradesman, or mechanic.


(E?)(L?) http://www.liberation.fr/instantane/0101102574-les-mots-arabes-persans-et-turcs

Les mots arabes, persans et turcs: ... mohair


(E?)(L?) http://fashion.logosdictionary.org/fashion/fashion_dict.view_definition?code=752077&lingua=IT

kid mohair


(E?)(L?) http://fashion.logosdictionary.org/fashion/fashion_dict.html_fashion.cerca_voce

mohair


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/mohair


(E?)(L?) http://littre.reverso.net/dictionnaire-francais/definition/mohair/48691


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/M

mohair knickers


(E?)(L?) http://www.sockshop.co.uk/by_type/specialist-products-a-z/index.html

Capricorn Mohair Socks | Mohair Socks


(E6)(L?) http://www.stofflexikon.com/


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1965

Mohair Sam - by Charlie Rich


(E1)(L1) http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/epc/langueXIX/dg/08_t1-2.htm

mots français d'origine non-latine
22. -- Arabe: mohair


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Arabic_origin


(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/arabic.html


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Mohair
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Mohair" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1710 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2014-01

N

no strings attached (W2)

(E?)(L?) http://www.englishcut.com/archives/000055.html

...
That string was put there by the cloth merchant, to indicate a slight flaw in the silk weave. You can only just, just see the flaw in the photo- a tiny light thin line going across the fabric, perpendicular to the string.
It was a very minor flaw, but that's how it works with the best merchants. Sometimes a piece of cloth will arrive at my door with a piece of string attached to it, and I won't be able to see the flaw unless I look VERY hard, sometimes more than once.
But these cloth merchants are extremely strict with themselves, which is how it should be.
So when I need a perfect, flawless length of cloth for a job, I'll say to the merchant, "Give me 3 metres, no strings attached."
Yes, that is where the phrase "No strings attached" comes from. And yes, it's still being used with its original meaning on Savile Row to this day.


Das heisst also, wenn ein Schneider eine fehlerfreie Stoffbahn erhalten möchte, dann sollte eben so gut sein, dass kein Faden notwendig ist, der auf mögliche Fehlstellen hinweist, eben "no strings attached".

O

off the cuff (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.info/wav/offthecuff.wav
Der englische Ausdruck bedeutet soviel wie "aus dem Stegreif", "aus dem Ärmel". Der "cuff" ist eine "Manschette". Und diese wurde von manchen Rednern benutzt, um kurze Notizen für einen "Toast" oder eine kleine Rede zu notieren.

P

Pattern (W3)

Engl. "pattern" (14. Jh.), frz. "pattern" (1922) = dt. "Muster", "Schema", "Modell", "Vorlage", "Schablone", "Struktur", "Probemünzen", geht über mengl. "patron" zurück auf altfrz. "patron". Das frz. "patron", von dem auch dt. "Patrone" abstammt, bezeichnete eine "Musterform für Pulverladungen". Als weitere Vorfahren findet man mlat. "patronus" = dt. "Musterform", wörtlich dt. "Vaterform", und lat. "patronus" = dt. "Patron" = dt. "Beschützer", lat. "pater" = dt. "Vater".

Auch in der Sprachwissenschaft gibt es ein "Pattern" = dt. "Muster", "Sprachmuster". Es bezeichnet ein "Strukturmodell für einen Satz, nach dem eine unbegrenzte Anzahl gleich strukturierter Sätze mit unterschiedlichen lexikalischen Elementen gebildet werden kann".

(E2)(L1) http://web.archive.org/web/20120331173214/http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Pattern


(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/


(E?)(L1) http://www.artlex.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.businessdictionary.com/terms-by-letter.php?letter=P


(E?)(L?) http://www.christianlehmann.eu/


(E?)(L?) http://linguistik.uni-regensburg.de:8080/lido/Lido

pattern | pattern drill


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/pattern

PATTERN, subst. masc.

Étymol. et Hist. 1922 (H. Piéron in L'Année psychol. ds Quem. DDL t.25). Empr. à l'angl. pattern «modèle, type, patron», forme altérée du moy. angl. patron, empr. au fr. patron*, cette forme s'étant spécialisée, dep. ca 1700, dans la désignation de choses alors que l'angl. patron subsistait pour parler de personnes (NED).


(E?)(L?) http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/toc/dontoc-p.html

pattern | pattern board | patterned papers


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pattern

pattern (n.)

early 14c., "outline, plan, model, pattern;" early 15c. as "model of behavior, exemplar," from Old French patron and directly from Medieval Latin patronus (see patron).

Extended sense of "decorative design" first recorded 1580s, from earlier sense of a "patron" as a model to be imitated. The difference in form and sense between patron and pattern wasn't firm till 1700s. Meaning "model or design in dressmaking" (especially one of paper) is first recorded 1792, in Jane Austen.

pattern (v.)

1580s, "to make a pattern for, design, plan," from pattern (n.). Meaning "to make something after a pattern" is c.1600. Phrase pattern after "take as a model" is from 1878.


(E?)(L?) http://filext.com/alphalist.php?extstart=%5EP


(E?)(L?) http://www.gespensterweb.de/html/lexikon.html


(E?)(L?) http://www-306.ibm.com/software/globalization/terminology/index.jsp

pattern | pattern-matching character


(E?)(L?) http://www.investopedia.com/terms/p/

Pattern | Pattern Day Trader


(E?)(L?) http://www.investopedia.com/categories/technicalanalysis.asp

Pattern | Pattern Day Trader


(E?)(L?) http://www.investorwords.com/cgi-bin/letter.cgi?p

pattern | pattern day trader


(E?)(L?) http://xlinux.nist.gov/dads//

pattern | pattern element


(E?)(L?) http://xlinux.nist.gov/dads//HTML/pattern.html

pattern (definition), Definition: A finite number of strings that are searched for in texts.
...


(E?)(L?) http://openliterature.net/?s=pattern


(E?)(L?) http://papercut.fr/index/


(E?)(L?) http://publicpatterntransport.tumblr.com/

This is a collection of seat patterns on public transport.


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pattern


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/patterning


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/patternmaker


(E?)(L?) http://www.reppa.de/lex.asp?ordner=p&link=Pattern.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.shakespeareswords.com/Glossary?let=p




(E?)(L?) http://www.sitzmusterdestodes.com/

Sitzmuster-Sammlung


(E?)(L1) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definitionsAlpha/0,289930,sid9_alpP,00.html


(E?)(L?) http://thegreatpatterncollection.com/

Public transport seat's pattern archive.


(E1)(L1) http://www.waywordradio.org/tag/pattern/


(E?)(L1) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/P/pattern.html

...
A pattern is the formalization of a problem/solution pair, used to make an object-oriented design decision.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/p/pattern_recognition.html

pattern recognition


(E6)(L1) http://mathworld.wolfram.com/letters/P.html

Pattern | Pattern of Two Loci


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=Pattern
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Pattern" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1570 / 1640 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


Erstellt: 2013-07

Pumps
Pump (W3)

Die "Pumps" wurden aus dem Englischen entlehnt und finden sich erstmals (in Bezug auf Schuhe) im Jahr 1594 bei Shakespeare. Sie sollen jedoch bereits seit 1555 bekannt gewesen sein.

Im Englischen findet man sie als Singular "Pump". Eine Theorie besagt, dass sich ihre Bezeichnung auf das Geräusch beim Laufen bezieht. Andere Hinweise bezeihene sich auf Übernahmen aus ndl. "pampoesje", jap. "pampoes" oder auf einen arabischen Ursprung.

(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.deichmann.com/website/schuhtipps_abc_AbisF.php
Fessel-Pumps | Laschenpumps | Pumps | Slingpumps | Stegspangenpumps

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pump


(E3)(L1) http://www.logosdictionary.org/fashion/fashion_dict.index_fashion_pag?lettera=s&lingua=IT&pag=1
sling pump

(E?)(L?) http://www.swr3.de/-/id=150658/x8ddjr/index.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.swr3.de/musik/lyrix/-/id=47416/did=162216/ygqcpx/index.html
Winehouse, Amy: Fuck me Pumps

(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumps


Q

R

S

shoelace, laccio, lazo , Lasso (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=lace


Der engl. "shoelace" = "Schnürsenkel" setzt sich zusammen aus engl. "shoe" = "Schuh" und "lace" = "Band", "Borte", "Litze", "Schnur", "Spitze", "Tresse".

"Lace" geht über mengl. und afrz. (1230) "las" = "Netz" zurück auf lat. "*laceum", "laqueus" = "Schlinge", "(Fall-)Strick" und hängt möglicherweise mit der Bedeutung "umgarnen" und "locken" zusammen.

Das ital. "laccio", das span. "lazo" und das ins Deutsche übernommene engl. "Lasso" gehen ebenfalls auf lat. "laqueus" = "Schlinge" zurück.

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E?)(L1) http://www.shoelaceknot.com/


Ian's Shoelace Site


Fun, fashion & science in this quirky site about shoelaces. Whether you want to learn to lace shoes, tie shoelaces, stop shoelaces from coming undone, calculate shoelace lengths or even repair aglets, Ian's Shoelace Site has the answer!

Lacing Shoes | Tying Shoelaces | Slipping Shoelaces? | Crooked Shoelaces? | Shoelace Lengths | Shoelace Tips | Shoelace Books | Shoelace Polls | Shoelace F.A.Q. | Shoelace Links


(E?)(L?) http://www.shoelaceknot.com/shoelace/crisscrosslacing.htm




slipshod (W3)

Das engl. "slipshod" = "schlampig", "schludrig" hat seinen Ursprung im 16. Jh. Zu dieser Zeit kamen in England "slippers" = "Pantoffel" (vgl. "Schlappen") auf. Diese hießen "slipshoes". "slipshod" ist demnach ein Partizip Perfekt des mutmaßlichen Verbs "to slipshoe" und bedeutet eigentlich etwa "pantoffelig" oder wörtlicher "schleifschuhig".

sockshop.co.uk
Sock-Index

(E?)(L?) http://www.sockshop.co.uk/by_type/specialist-products-a-z/index.html




Erstellt: 2013-09

T

U

V

W

whale tail
longhorn (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://adibfricke.com/blog/worter-des-jahres-2005/


(E?)(L1) http://www.americandialect.org/index.php/amerdial/truthiness_voted_2005_word_of_the_year/


(E?)(L?) http://www.doubletongued.org/index.php/dictionary/whale_tail/


(E?)(L?) http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=1480616


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/check.php4?id=1632&choice=1&sid=1086914


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whale_Tail


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whale_tail
Im Jahr 2005 wurde der "whale tail", der "Walschwanz", zum Wort des Jahres in der Kreativ-Abteilung gewählt.

"Whale Tail" ist ein aus Hose oder Rock herausschauender Tanga-Slip, "the appearance of thong or g-string underwear above the waistband of pants, shorts, or a skirt". Er wurde - wie sonst - zunächst von Stars wie Britney Spears und Anna Kournikova vorgeführt und wurde so zu einer Modeerscheinung.


In Texas ist der "whale tail" auch als "longhorn" bekannt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.whale-tail.com/
Wer noch ein unklares Bild dieses Gegenstandes hat kann es auf dieser Site verstofflichen (Achtung: "adult content").
Die Site des Australiers Gavin Hamilton soll den Ausdruck im Oktober 2003 geprägt haben.

X

Y

Z

zip
ZIP (W3)

Das Wörtchen engl. "zip" ist ein richtiger Tausendsassa. Die Grundbedeutung ist etwa dt. "schwirren", "zischen". Und da man mit "Reißverschluss" nicht mehr langwierig Knöpfen mußte, sondern mit "Schwung" durchziehen konnte, nannte man ihn engl. "zip fastener" oder auch nur kurz engl. "zip".

Man kann aber auch "zum Einkaufen flitzen", engl. "zip to the shops". Oder man kann seine Hausaufgaben "schnell erledigen", engl. "zip through the homework".

In Amerika kann man amerik. "zip" auch in der Bedeutung "Null" finden. So kann im Sport eine Spiel engl. "two to zip" = dt. "zwei zu null" enden.

Dann gibt es noch die Dateiendung ".zip" für komprimierte Dateien, damit die "ZIP-Datei" besser durch die Leitung flitzt. Der Vorgang des Komprimierens und Dekomprimierens einer Datei heßt entsprechend "zippen" bzw. "entzippen", engl. "unzip". Diese "ZIP" soll jedoch die Abkürzung für engl. "Zigzag Inline Package" = dt. "zeilenweise im Zickzack gefaltetes Datenpaket" sein.

Und dann gibt es noch eine weitere Abkürzung "ZIP" = amerik. "Zone Improvement Plan" (engl. "postal code") und amerik. "ZIP code" = dt. "Postleitzahl", "PLZ".

Weiterhin findet man:

(E?)(L?) http://www.abkuerzungen.de/




Erstellt: 2011-05