Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Suffix, Sufijo, Suffixe, Suffisso, Suffix

Hinweis

Präfixe und Suffixe sind oft keine feststehenden Eigenschaften von Etymons (wörtlich: "das Wahre"), Stammwörtern. Viele der auf dieser Seite aufgeführten Präfixe / Suffixe können in einigen Beispielen auch ans andere Wortende wandern. Ich habe die Etymons in die Kategorie aufgenommen, in der sie meines Erachtens am häufigsten zu finden sind.

Selbstverständlich können fast alle diese Etymons - gerade in deutschen Wortkombinationen - auch als Infixe auftreten.

Um dem mehrfachen Vorkommen der Etymons Rechnung zu tragen habe ich sie (weitgehend) einheitlich mit "-etymon-" gekennzeichnet.

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affixes.org
-onym

(E?)(L?) http://www.affixes.org/o/-onym.html

"-onym" Also "-onymy", "-onymic", and "-onymous".

A name. [Greek onuma, name.]

The ending principally appears in words that describe kinds of words. See the table below for some examples.

Abstract nouns for the state or concept are formed in "-onymy": "homonymy", "metonymy", "toponymy".

Adjectives are formed in "-onymic" or "-onymous", sometimes both, though the former is rather more common ("eponymous", "metonymic", "synonymous", "toponymic").

Examples of words in -onym (All word origins are from Greek.)


Erstellt: 2014-08

-ance-, -ancy-, -ence-, -ency- (W2)

Der Suffix engl. "-ance-", der Verben zu Substantiven macht, geht zurück auf lat. "-antia", "-entia". Zunächst wurde aus dem Französischen die Endung "-ance" übernommen, später ubernahm man die Endung noch mal, allerdings direkt aus dem Lateinischen, als "-ence-". Allerdings vollzog sich dies nicht immer konsequent und später versuchte man auch ältere Gallizismen an die neue Schreibweise anzupasen.

Einer E-Mail der American Dialect Society Mailingliste vom 06.10.2005 war folgender Beitrag von Arnold M. Zwicky zu entnehmen.

Why the replacement of "ency/ancy" for "ence/ance"? How common is this?

In a fair number of cases, only the "-nce" version occurs: "confidence", "resistance", "persistence", "benevolence", "malevolence", "insolence", "independence".

In some cases, only the "-ncy" version occurs: "consistency", "malignancy", "fluency", "constituency".

When there are pairs, sometimes the meanings are very clearly distinct ("emergence" vs. "emergency"), sometimes more subtly so ("dependence" vs. "dependency"), and sometimes there's considerable semantic overlap ("coherence" vs. "coherency", "relevance" vs. "relevancy", "valence" vs. "valency").

When there's some overlap, the "-nce" version is more frequent, but the ratio of "-nce" to "-ncy" (in raw google web hits) varies quite a bit across the pairs: For "coherence" / "coherency", there's a technical sense of "coherence" in physics, but also specialized technical senses of "coherency" in several fields that are well represented on the web: "cache coherency" in computer science / engineering, and statistical "coherency" (paired with "consistency", an "-ncy"-only formation).

As far as i can tell, these "-ncy" technical uses don't vary with "-nce" at all; the form of the expressions is fixed. So the ratio is low.

But for "valence" / "valency", the words are in competition pretty broadly, in technical senses in chemistry, linguistics, and mathematics. The shorter and less complex "-nce" version then prevails by a wide margin. (I'm inclined to use "valency" in talking about the argument structure of verbs, probably because i'm often contrasting "valency" with "constituency", and "constituency" is a "-ncy"-only formation.)

For "relevance" / "relevancy", i find it very hard to see any specialization, and the shorter and less complex version prevails even more strongly. The longer and more complex versions might have some value on their own, however, just by virtue of their greater substance. To some ears they might seem weightier, more formal, more serious, more technical.

I suspect there's some literature on this, but i don't have the relevant part of my library to hand and so can't easily check out sources.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-ence


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-ance


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chir.ag
Tip of My Tongue
Find words with ...

(E?)(L1) http://chir.ag/projects/tip-of-my-tongue/
Wenn man englische Wörter sucht mit einem bestimmten String am Anfang in der Mitte oder am Ende, die bestimmte Buchstaben enthalten oder nicht enthalten, Wörter mit bestimmten bedeutungen oder Wörter mit einer Mindestlänge oder Maximallänge, dann kann man hier fündig werden.

Find that word that you've been thinking about all day but just can't seem to remember.




Erstellt: 2014-03

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dummies
Meeting the Most Often Used Suffixes

(E?)(L?) http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/meeting-the-most-often-used-suffixes.html

Some suffixes are used so frequently in the English language that you may not even think of them - much less recognize them - as suffixes. These include -d/-ed, which are used to indicate tense on a verb, and -s/-es, which are used to indicate number. Other suffixes are easy to identify, but you see them so often that they merit mention right up front.
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-ice- (W3)

Der engl. Suffix (bei Adjektiven und Substantiven) "-ice" geht zurück auf lat. "-itius", "-itia", "-itium" und weiter auf griech. "-sios".

(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/pre_suf_comb.pdf

-ice n suffix -s ME "-ice", "-ise", fr. OF, fr. L "-itius" (masc.), "-itia" (fem.), "-itium" (neut.), suffixes forming adjectives and nouns; akin to Gk "-sios", Skt "-tya": "act" (service) : "quality" (justice) : "condition" (cowardice)


-ise- (W3)

Der engl. Suffix (bei Verben) "-ise" bzw. "-ize" geht zurück auf lat. "-izare" und weiter auf griech. "-izein".

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-ise


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-ize


(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/pre_suf_comb.pdf

"-ise" vb suffix : "-ize" see spelling note 2.10 on page 24a of Webster's Third New International Dictionary


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-ise1.htm

The endings ‘-ise’ and ‘-ize’
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The broad rule is that the -ize forms are standard in the US, but that -ise ones are now usual in Britain and the Commonwealth in all but formal writing.
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-ize- (W3)

Der engl. Suffix (bei Verben) "-ise" bzw. "-ize" geht zurück auf lat. "-izare" und weiter auf griech. "-izein".

Die Endung engl. "-ize" dient dazu aus Substantiven (engl. nouns) und Adjektiven (engl. "adjectives") Verben zu machen ("symbolize", "modernize")

(E1)(L1) http://www.affixes.org/i/-ize.html

Forming verbs.
[French "-iser", via late Latin "-izare" from Greek verbs ending in "-izein".]
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(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080718023146/http://www.bartleby.com/68/
-ise, -ize | -ize | SPELLING OF WORDS ENDING IN -IZE, -ISE

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/youmeus/learnit/learnitv19.shtml

hyphenated adjectives: "-ise" and "-ize"


(E?)(L?) http://www.english-for-students.com/ize.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=-ize


(E?)(L1) http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0907013.html

"-ize" forms verbs from nouns and adjectives "formalize", "jeopardize", "legalize", "modernize", "emphasize", "hospitalize", "industrialize", "computerize"


(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/dictionary/all.php

Amazon-ized


(E?)(L?) http://www.perfectyourenglish.com/vocabulary/spelling-2.htm
Spelling: words ending in -ise and -ize

(E?)(L?) http://www.pseudodictionary.com/-ized

"-ized" - Strange American way of ending words. A no-brainer way of turning nouns into verbs. Frowned upon by many pedants.
e.g., British English: The burglar burgled the house. American English: The burglar burglarized the house.


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/-ize

"-ize", a verb-forming suffix occurring originally in loanwords from Greek that have entered English through Latin or French ("baptize"; "barbarize"; "catechize"); within English, "-ize" is added to adjectives and nouns to form transitive verbs with the general senses "to render", "to make" ("actualize"; "fossilize"; "sterilize"; "Americanize"), "to convert into", "give a specified character or form to" ("computerize"; "dramatize"; "itemize"; "motorize"), "to subject to (as a process, sometimes named after its originator)" ("hospitalize"; "terrorize"; "galvanize"; "oxidize"; "simonize"; "winterize"). Also formed with "-ize" are a more heterogeneous group of verbs, usually intransitive, denoting a change of state ("crystallize"), kinds or instances of behavior ("apologize"; "moralize"; "tyrannize"), or activities ("economize"; "philosophize"; "theorize").
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(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/pre_suf_comb.pdf

"-ize" vb suffix -ED/-ing/-S see spelling note 2.10 on page 24a of Webster's Third New International Dictionary [ME "-isen", fr. OF "-iser", fr. LL "-izare", fr. Gk "-izein"]


(E?)(L?) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/index.php?s=Etymology
Obamorphology
March 3, 2009 @ 10:12 am · Filed under Morphology, Names
Two little notes about Obama’s name and morphology:
1). In an article in the NYT yesterday I came across the verb form "Obama-tizing" (hyphen in the original), and realized that because his name ends with a vowel, you can’t just add "-ize". But why the choice of "t" as epenthetic consonant? It doesn’t sound totally natural […]

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/list/I

Word Unit: "-ize" (Latin: a suffix; "to act in a certain way"; "to treat in a certain way"; "to make into"; "to treat with"; "to do"; "to make"; "to cause").


(E?)(L?) http://wordinfo.info/unit/1106/ip:86

These word entries are just a small listing of the many words that exist with the -ize endings; so, be aware that there are many more words with this suffix which exist in this lexicon.

Another closely related suffix family with the same meanings, but a different spelling, is located at this "-ise" unit.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-ise1.htm

The endings ‘-ise’ and ‘-ize’
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The broad rule is that the -ize forms are standard in the US, but that -ise ones are now usual in Britain and the Commonwealth in all but formal writing.
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Erstellt: 2011-10

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prefixsuffix.com
English Language Roots
Word Prefixes, Suffixes & Syllables

(E?)(L?) http://www.prefixsuffix.com/

We improved our chart-based site, adding features such as a "root word search engine" which gives you access to over 2,000 root words, making our site one of the most comprehensive online references of English language word roots.

A Really Quick Primer

Because you came here, you know already that a word whose meaning you don't know can be broken down into smaller parts and analyzed, a mental process students go through for vocabulary tests. The core part of such an analysis is to identify root words that hint at the word's overall meaning.

As an example, take the word "introspect". It is broken down into the root "spect", meaning "to look", and the prefix "intro", which adds the meaning "within". So, "look within". See how easy that was?

If you are interested in more word study, you can read this site's brief write-ups on:


Erstellt: 2016-12

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spellingbee
A Dictionary of Prefixes, Suffixes, and Combining Forms
from Webster's Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged
2002

(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/pre_suf_comb.pdf


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-tic- (W3)

Der Suffix engl. "-tic-" geht zurück auf griech. "tekhnê", "téchne" = "Handwerk", "Wissenschaft".

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virtualsalt.com
How Words Work

(E?)(L?) http://www.virtualsalt.com/roots.htm

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Many words are made up of a root (or base word) and a prefix. Some words also have a suffix. For example, the root word "port" means to "carry" or to "bear". Attach the prefix "ex", meaning "out" or "out of", and you have the word "export", to "carry out". Attach the prefix "im", meaning "in" or "into" and you have "import", to "carry in". Attach the prefix "trans", meaning "across", and you have "transport", meaning to "carry across". Now let's attach the suffix "able", meaning "able to be", and you have "importable", "exportable", and "transportable".

The very words "prefix" and "suffix" are good examples, too. "Pre" means "before" and "fix" means to "fasten" or "attach", so quite literally, a "prefix" is "something attached to the beginning of something else". "Suf" is a variant of "sub", "below" or "under", so a "suffix" is "something fastened underneath something else" (in this case, behind the root).

By learning the common roots and prefixes (and a few suffixes) you will be able to discern the meaning of many new words almost immediately. (But do look them up for confirmation.) Take the word "abject", for example. If you know that "ab" means "away" or "down" and "ject" means to "throw", you can easily figure out that "abject" doesn't mean something happy. Rather "abject"'s root meaning of "thrown down" is quite close to the dictionary defintion of "cast down in spirit" or "sunk into depression".

Note that some modern words are formed by using abbreviated forms of other words. Thus, we see the use of the letter "i" for "Internet" in "iPhone", "iPod", and "iTunes", indicating that these items or services work with the Internet. Similarly, the use of "e" for "electronic" appears in words such as "elearning" (and various forms: "eLearning", "E-Learning", and so on), "e-commerce", and "e-business". The "e-terms" seem to have been coined before the "i-terms" became popular. And note that most of the "i-terms" are trademarks, while the others are general descriptors: "I'm going to download some iTunes from Apple's e-commerce site because I love e-music." At any rate, these abbreviated forms are not traditional prefixes, but because they are indeed attached to the front of what amounts to root words, they could be considered functional prefixes.
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Erstellt: 2015-01

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Suffix, Sufijo, Suffixe, Suffisso, Suffix

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Miller, D. Gary (Autor)
Latin Suffixal Derivatives in English
And Their Indo-European Ancestry

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologporta-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0199285055/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 422 Seiten
Verlag: Oxford University Press (28. September 2006)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung
This is the fullest account ever published of Latin suffixes in English. It explores the rich variety of English words formed by the addition of one or more Latin suffixes, such as "-ial", "-able", "-ability", "-ible", and "-id". It traces the histories of over 3,000 words, revealing the range of derivational patterns in Indo-European, Latin, and English. It describes the different kinds of suffix, shows how they entered English via different channels at different times, and considers the complexity of competition between native and borrowed forms. The author examines postclassical, medieval, and early modern Latin derivations, and demonstrates that Latin is still, and likely to remain, a productive source of English words. He traces the suffixes back to their Proto-Indo-European origins and provides copious examples for every aspect of his discussion. Professor Miller's innovative book makes an important contribution to the history of both English and Latin morphology and etymology, as well as to the history of suffixal derivation in Indo-European. It will interest scholars and students of comparative morphology, historical and comparative linguistics, etymology, and lexicography


Erstellt: 2011-06

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Quinion, Michael
Ologies and Isms
A Dictionary of Word Beginnings and Endings

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192806408/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192806408/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192806408/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192806408/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0192806408/etymologpor09-20
Sprache: Englisch
Broschiert - 288 Seiten - Oxford University Press
Erscheinungsdatum: 13. Oktober 2005
Auflage: Reissue
ISBN: 0192806408


Over 10,000 examples of word affixes to help you to decode word meanings.

This book covers topics such as Aquaculture, Haemophilia, Isochronous, Neuralgia, Polyunsaturated, and Rodenticide. How often do we see a technical word without quite knowing what it means? If we can decipher it - undo its language code - we can start to understand others of a similar kind. For example, if we know that words beginning with "aqua" are to do with "water", then we are half way to understanding the word "aquaculture". "Ologies and Isms" is about the building blocks of the English language - the beginnings and endings and sometimes the middles - that help form or adapt many of the words we use.

Whether you're a student or a practitioner, a teacher of English, an inveterate word-user, or just a seeker-out of linguistic trifles, the book should help you understand better the language of your workplace and the world around you. The text contains over 10,000 examples within 1250 entries and a selective thematic index breaks prefixes and suffixes down by theme, including biochemistry and drugs, living world, places and people.

We all have a childlike love of playing with words, adding bits, Lego-style, to create new ones. And we often wonder where words come from and how they are formed.

This book fills a gap we hardly knew existed. Ologies and Isms is about the building blocks of the English language—the beginnings and endings, sometimes the middles—that help create many of the words we use. How often do we see a common technical or medical word without quite knowing what it means? Does your blood run cold when you hear haemophilia; do you pale at paleobotany? If we can decipher such words, we can start to understand others of a similar kind.


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/ologies.htm
sample entries for Michael Quinions "Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and Endings"

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Sheehan, Michael
Word Parts Dictionary
Standard and Reverse Listings of Prefixes, Suffixes, and Combining Forms

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786408197/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786408197/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786408197/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786408197/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0786408197/etymologpor09-20
Bibliothekseinband: 235 Seiten
Verlag: McFarland & Company (30. März 2001)
Sprache: Englisch

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Urdang, Laurence
Suffixes and Other Word-Final Elements of English

(E?)(L?) http://www.verbatimbooks.com/verbatimbooks/page8.asp


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0930454081/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0930454081/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0930454081/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0930454081/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0930454081/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe
Verlag: Verbatim Books,U.S. (Dezember 1998)
Sprache: Englisch


Synopsis
Origins, history, meanings and applications of over 1500 common and technical free forms, bound forms, and roots that frequently occur at the ends of words, with an index in normal alphabetical order.


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