Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretańa e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
TV, Televisión, Télévision, Televisione, Television

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Call My Bluff (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Call My Bluff
Limericks on "Call My Bluff"

(E?)(L?) http://www.ukgameshows.com/ukgs/Call_My_Bluff

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"Call My Bluff" was the second UK game show to be broadcast in colour, on 1 October 1967. The comparatively obscure Crossword on 2 beat it by two days.
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(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_My_Bluff_(UK_game_show)

"Call My Bluff" is a long-running British game show between two teams of three celebrity contestants. The point of the game is for the teams to take it in turn to provide three definitions of an obscure word, only one of which is correct. The other team then has to guess which is the correct definition, the other two being "bluffs". It was brought back to BBC TV by producer Richard L. Lewis.

Examples of words used in "Call My Bluff", taken from a book published in connection with the show in 1972, are "Queach", "Strongle", "Ablewhacket", "Hickboo", "Jargoon", "Zurf", "Morepork", and "Jirble". "Queach", for instance, was defined as "a malicious caricature", "a cross between a quince and a peach", or "a mini-jungle of mixed vegetation". The first and second of those particular definitions are bluffs.

In May 2014 the quirks of the show were lampooned by Harry Enfield and Paul Whitehouse in BBC Two's satirical Harry and Paul's Story of the Twos, where the show was given the name "Speech Impediment" and the word chosen for the panel was "paedophile".

The theme music for the show was Ciccolino by Norrie Paramor.
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Links:


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=Call My Bluff
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Call My Bluff" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 / 1960 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

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spitting image (W3)

Der Ausdruck engl. "spitting image", to be a spitting image" = dt. "Ebenbild", "große Ähnlichkeit", "Doppelgänger", "Abbild", "jemandes Ebenbild sein", "jemandem wie aus dem Gesicht geschnitten sein", "jemandem aufs Haar gleichen", "jemandem zum Verwechseln ähnlich sehen"geht auf einen eher unappetittlichen Vergleich zurück. Engl. "spit", das hier als dt. "Duplikat" verstanden wird, ist das Verb engl. "spit" = dt. "spucken". Das sprachliche Bild entwickelte sich aus der Vorstellung und einer Redewendung, wonach ein Kind dem Vater ähnelt, als sei es von ihm ausgespuckt worden. (Möglicherweise stand dabei die Vorstellung der Samen-Ejakulation Pate.) Zusammen ergab sich das engl. "spitting image" = wörtlich dt. "ausgespucktes Bild".

Es gibt jedoch auch die These (Harold Wentworth; "American Dialect Dictionary"), dass in dem Ausdruck engl. "He's the very spit of his father", engl. "spit" für engl. "spirit" steht. Die ursprüngliche Redewendung soll demnach engl. "He's the very spirit and image of his father." gelautet haben.

dt. "Die Zwillinge gleichen sich aufs Haar" = engl. "The twins are the spitting image of each other"

(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080718023146/http://www.bartleby.com/68/


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20080626202042/http://www.bartleby.com/68/73/5673.html

spit and image, spitten image, spittin' image, spitting image, very spit of


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/SpittingImage/

Spitting Image [anim]


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=S

Spitting Image (GB 1984-1996)


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/

Entry search results for: Spitting Image


(E?)(L?) http://www.hotforwords.com/words/


(E?)(L?) http://hotforwords.com/tag/spitting-image/

Spitting Image


(E?)(L?) http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/browse-eggcorns/

"spit and image" » "spitting image"


(E?)(L?) http://www.lib.ru/ENGLISH/american_idioms.txt

spitting image | spit and image


(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=2021


(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/spitting-image.html

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Toward the end of the 19th century we find 'spit and image'. In 1895, an author called E. Castle published Lt. of Searthey, containing the line:

"She's like the poor lady that's dead and gone, the spit an' image she is."

Finally, we get to the first known use of 'spitting image' - in A. H. Rice's Mrs. Wiggs, 1901:

"He's jes' like his pa - the very spittin' image of him!"


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/spitting image

spitting image


(E?)(L?) http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/sayingss.htm#Spitting image


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SS

Spitting Image


(E?)(L1) http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/spitting+image.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.word-detective.com/052598.html#spittin

Spitting Image


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/comments/spitting_image/

Spitting Image
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The metaphor appears as early as 1602 when Nicholas Breton writes in his book Wonders Worth Hearing, “twoo girles, [...] the one as like an Owle, the other as like an Urchin, as if they had beene spitte out of the mouthes of them.”
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(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-spi1.htm

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Several phrases have been used down the years to indicate that one person is the exact likeness of another: "spitten image", "spit and image", "the very spit of", and "dead spit for".


(E6)(L2) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/nonerrors.html

spitting image


(E?)(L?) http://www.youtube.com/user/hotforwords/videos?view=0


(E?)(L?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=314xb48jGCw

Spitting Image & Magibon


(E?)(L?) http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Spitting+Image

Spitting Image
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=spitting image
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "spitting image" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1850 / 1910 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-07

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Teletubbies (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/teletubbies/information/faq/q2.shtml
Q: Why do the Teletubbies have such strange names?
The Teletubbies live in a playful world, over the hills and far away. Their names are playful and fun to say. In our experience, children often give extraordinary names to their favourite toy characters. The names might seem 'strange' to some people, but to Teletubbies - or children - they feel just right.

TV (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television


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