Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Wetter, Tiempo, Temps, Tempo, Weather

A

adumbrate, umbrella (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn_a.html#adumbrate


(E2)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/wotd.pl?word=adumbrate
Das engl. "adumbrate" = "skizzieren" geht wie "umbrella" = "Schirm" (= "Schattenspender") zurück auf lat. "adumbrare" = "to shade", "shadow", lat. "umbra" = "Schatten".

B

brume (W3)

Engl. "brume" = "Nebel", "Dunst", "Dampf" geht zurück auf frz. "brume", das auf lat. "bruma" = "Winter", "kürzester Tag", "Wintersonnenwende", "Winterkälte", "Winterzeit" basiert.

Die verschieden hohen Luftfeuchtigkeiten sind übrigens folgendermaßen definiert:

C

Coriolis effect
Coriolis force (W3)

Die dt. "Corioliskraft", span. "Fuerza de Coriolis", frz. "Force de Coriolis", engl. "Coriolis effect", ist nach dem französischen Naturforscher "Gaspard Gustave de Coriolis" (1792-1843), der sie mathematisch hergeleitet hat, benannt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Coriolis+effect

1969 (earlier Coriolis force, 1923, and other references back to 1912), ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.fourmilab.ch/earthview/satellite.html
View Earth from CORIOLIS
840 km above 77°48'N 56°51'W

(E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/c.htm
Coriolis, Gaspard-Gustave de - French mathematician (1792-1843)

(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php


(E?)(L1) http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/~history/BiogIndex.html
Coriolis, Gustave de (805*)

(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/
Coriolis effect | Coriolis force

(E?)(L?) http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov/AlphaIndex.html
Coriolis E | Coriolis C E | Coriolis G E | Coriolis H E | Coriolis L E | Coriolis M E | Coriolis S E | Coriolis W E | Coriolis Y E | Coriolis Z E

(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms
Gaspard-Gustave Coriolis - Coriolis effect

(E?)(L?) http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/biography/Coriolis.html
Coriolis, Gaspard-Gustave

(E?)(L?) http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/physics/letters/C.html
| Coriolis Force | Coriolis Frequency | Coriolis Parameter

Erstellt: 2010-12

D

E

eumetcal
EuroMET Glossary

(E?)(L?) http://www.eumetcal.org/


(E?)(L?) http://www.eumetcal.org/Euromet


(E?)(L?) http://www.eumetcal.org/euromet/english/navig/glossf.htm




F

G

H

I

It's raining cats and dogs (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.w-akten.de/redenglisch.shtml
Diese englische Redewendung entspricht etwa dem dt. "Es regnet wie aus Eimern". Zu ihrer herkunft gibt es verschiedene Theorien: Der Audruck wir erstmalig von Jonathan Swift benutzt, in "A Complete Collection of Polite and Ingenious Conversation" von 1738. Allerdings kennt man die Version "It shall raine... Dogs and Polecats" schon von 1653, aus einem Werk von Richard Brome.

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

raining
It's raining cats and dogs

(E?)(L?) http://www.ancestry.com/
...the origin of [rain cats and dogs] is unknown. Its first recorded use is by Jonathan Swift in Polite Conversation, written circa 1708 and published thirty years later. This work of Swift's is a satire on the use of clichés, so the phrase was probably in use for a considerable period before this. RAW reports an earlier variant, "rain dogs and polecats," from Richard Brome's The City Witt of 1652.
...
Since the earliest English language variation starts with "polecat" as opposed to "cat," the idea that it descends from catdoupe is unlikely. Similarly, since polecats are not cats, but rather weasels or skunks, the connotation with mythological properties of felines is similarly unlikely. So, the mystery remains with no good explanations.

Izzy writes:

I had for some time suspected that rain "cats and dogs" is related to Semitic gimel-shin-mem shin-kuf-aiyin = rain descends. Giving the shin a dental sound and the aiyin a velar G sound produces GeDeM D'KiGa which is somewhat like KaT aNd DoKGa. [OE docga = dog.]
The weak point in the semantics (above) is the absence of an element indicating a "heavy" rain, that is PouRing rain, drenching rain, a downpour. The PoLe in polecat supplies this element. The customary phrase in modern Hebrew for a heavy rain is MaBooL GeSHeM. MaBooL means a flood or deluge.
So the Semitic phrase shin-kuf-aiyin mem-bet-oo-lamed gimel-shin mem meaning: descending deluge rain would have sounded like MaBooL GeDeM D'KiGa, or not unlike PoLe KaT aN DokGa
(A: izco)

S

Smog

'smoke' = 'Rauch' + 'fog' = 'Nebel' ===> 'smog' = Dunstschicht aus Rauch, Nebel und Abgasen

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z