Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Zitat, Cita, Citation, Citazione, Quotation

A

Ad-Slogans
Werbesprüche

(E?)(L?) http://www.adslogans.co.uk/hof/
Advertising Slogan Hall of Fame
ADSlogans Unlimited is a unique resource for advertisers and marketers. We have built a growing database of many thousands of advertising slogans, straplines, taglines, endlines and claims in the English language.
These lines have appeared mostly in the UK and USA, during the last ten-plus years. The resource also includes many historical lines and covers all brand categories in all media.

all mouth and trousers (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?&xml=/arts/2004/05/31/boquin.xml&page=2#all

This strange expression comes from the north of England and is used, mainly by women in my experience, as a sharp-tongued and effective putdown of a certain kind of pushy, over-confident male. Proverbial expressions like this are notoriously hard to pin down: we have no idea exactly where it comes from nor when it first appeared, although it is recorded from the latter part of the 19th century onwards. However, we're fairly sure that it is a pairing of "mouth'', meaning insolence or cheekiness, with "trousers'', a pushy sexual bravado. It's a wonderful example of metonymy ("a container for the thing contained'').
...


askoxford
Little Oxford Dictionary of Quotations

(E?)(L?) http://www.askoxford.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.askoxford.com/dictionaries/quotation_dict/

From Ambition to Youth, Health and Fitness to Technology, the "Little Oxford Dictionary of Quotations" is packed full of more than 4,000 quotations on over 250 subjects.


B

C

Curry favour (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?&xml=/arts/2004/05/31/boquin.xml&page=3#all

It's an odd phrase. Why should "curry" have anything to do with winning the favour of somebody or ingratiating oneself with him?
It becomes even weirder when you discover that the phrase really means "to stroke a fawn-coloured horse".
...


D

deproverbio

(E?)(L?) http://www.deproverbio.com/
Founded in January 1995 as the world's first refered electronic journal of international proverb studies, De Proverbio (Latin: About the Proverb) soon became a book publisher also, devoted to paremiology (study of proverbs) and paremiography (collection of proverbs).

Dressed to the nines (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?&xml=/arts/2004/05/31/boquin.xml&page=2#all

Somebody who is "dressed to the nines" or "dressed up to the nines" is dressed to perfection or superlatively dressed. Writers have run up a whole wardrobe-full of ideas about where the expression comes from, which indicates clearly enough that nobody really knows for sure.
...


E

Eine kluge Frage ist die Hälfte des Wissens
Prudens interrogatio quasi dimidium scientiae (W3)

Diese Erkenntnis verdanken wir dem englischen Philosophen und Staatsmann Francis Bacon (1561-1626), (De dignitate et augmentis scientiae V,3, englisch, 1605, deutsch 1783).

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/214/1400.html

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Vol. 4. Prose and Poetry: Sir Thomas North to Michael Drayton.
XIV. The Beginnings of English Philosophy.
Bibliography.
FRANCIS BACON
Philosophical Works (Spedding’s arrangement)
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.philoscience.unibe.ch/lehre/winter01/bacon/Einfhandout.pdf

Einführung Proseminar: Francis Bacon, Novum Organon
Dr. Timm Lampert, Universität Bern
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.textlog.de/3473.html

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
Bacon, Francis (lat. "Baco von Verulam"), geb. 22. Januar 1561 in London als Sohn eines hohen Beamten, studierte in Cambridge, widmete sich der Jurisprudenz, wurde Kronanwalt, Mitglied des Parlaments; 1618 wurde er Lordkanzler und "Baron von Verulam", dann "Viscount von St. Albans". Er wurde (1621) der Bestechlichkeit beschuldigt und (vom Parlament) zu einer großen Geldstrafe und zum Verlust seiner Ämter verurteilt. Vom König (Jacob) begnadigt, lebte er nur noch wissenschaftlichen Studien und starb am 9. April 1626 zu Highate bei London. Sein Charakter war, wenn auch bei weitem kein fleckenloser, doch nicht so schlimm, als es oft behauptet wurde.
...


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikiquote.org/wiki/Francis_Bacon
Zitate von Francis Bacon.

English (W3)

George Bernhard Shaw stellte fest: "English is the easiest language to speak badly."

F

Fluch der Pharaonen (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://www.geo.de/GEO/community/frage_der_woche
Tötet der "Fluch der Pharaonen" wirklich?

Es war ein Jubeltag für die Ägyptologie, als der englische Altertumsforscher Howard Carter 1922 die mehr als 3200 Jahre alte Ruhestätte des Pharaos Tutanchamun im Tal der Könige öffnete. Doch wenige Monate später waren fünf der Archäologen und Besucher, die das Grab betreten hatten, tot. "Der Fluch des Pharao" habe die Männer umgebracht, mutmaßten damals Zeitungsreporter. Eine glaubhafte Theorie über die Todesursache wurde erst sehr viel später publik. Demnach hieß der "Täter" Aspergillus Flavus - auf Deutsch: Gelber Gießkannenschimmelpilz. Der Theorie nach hatten die Forscher in der Grabkammer Schimmel-Sporen eingeatmet. Im Freien tummeln sich bis zu 1000 Keime in einem Kubikmeter Luft. In schimmelbefallenen Räumen können es bis zu 50 000 sein. Menschen mit schwacher Gesundheit erkranken an Atemnot, Husten, Fieber - und schlimmstenfalls sterben sie sogar.

G

goethesociety
Goethe-Zitate auf Englisch

(E?)(L?) http://www.goethesociety.org/pages/quotes.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/people/Goethe-J.html

WORKS


(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/100/751.html

John Bartlett (1820–1905). Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. 1919.
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. (1749–1832)


H

Head over heels (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?&xml=/arts/2004/05/31/boquin.xml&page=3#all

We are so conditioned by our knowledge of idioms that we rarely stop to think about what they really mean. This example is more than a little weird when you do so - what's so strange about having one's head over one's heels? We do, after all, spend most of our waking lives in that position.
...


I

isms
What is an ism?

Wörtlich würde dieser Link auf die Seite "UK Ismen, Anglizismen" passen" - inhaltlich handelt es sich jedoch um eine Art Zitatensammlung.

(E?)(L?) http://www.isms.org.uk/


(E?)(L?) http://www.isms.org.uk/what_is_an_ism.htm

"Isms" are the things the people really say when they open their mouths and speak without first engaging their brains .


Click here to visit The ISMS - the world's foremost authority on humorous isms

J

K

L

lettersofnote
Letters of Note

(E?)(L?) http://www.lettersofnote.com/

Letters of Note is an attempt to gather and sort fascinating letters, postcards, telegrams, faxes, and memos. Scans/photos where possible. Fakes will be sneered at. Updated as often as possible; usually each weekday.


(E?)(L?) http://www.lettersofnote.com/p/archive.html

Archive

Welcome to the Letters of Note archives. Current population: 661 letters. Here you'll find six ways to navigate the ever-growing collection. In addition, both a search function and list of popular entries can be found in the right-hand sidebar.

Please note: this page will be manually updated once per week, so bear with me should newer letters not appear.

Enjoy.

1. Browse by correspondence type:

Letter; Memo; Telegram; Fax

2. Browse by writing method:

Typewritten; Handwritten

3. Browse by date of correspondence:

2000+; 1990s; 1980s; 1970s; 1960s; 1950s; 1940s; 1930s; 1920s; 1910s; 1900-09; 1800s; 1700s; 1600s; Pre-1600

4. Browse the following categories of correspondence:

Advice; Anger; Animation; Apology; Art; Authors; Cinema; Coded Correspondence; Comics; Complaint; Controversial; Crime; Death; Disney; Fan Letters; Form Letters; Humorous; Illustrated Letters; Kids; Love; Music; Politics; Racism; Religion; Request; Sad; Science; Sexism; Sport; Star Trek; Suicide; Superman; Technology; Thank You; War

5. Browse correspondence written by, to, or about, the following notable people (listed alphabetically, by first name):



6. Finally, a list of all letters published so far, beginning with the most recently featured:

November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 August 2012 July 2012 June 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 December 2011 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011 December 2010 November 2010 October 2010 September 2010 August 2010 July 2010 June 2010 May 2010 April 2010 March 2010 February 2010 January 2010 December 2009 November 2009 October 2009 September 2009


Erstellt: 2012-02

Load of codswallop, codswallop (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/235250.html
Die Herkunft dieser engl. Redewendung für "Tand" oder "unbrauchbare Idee" ist zwar nicht bekannt, aber es gibt dennoch ein paar Geschichten dazu. Die meistzitierte besagt, dass "Hiram Codd" eine Getränkehersteller im Jahr 1870 eine Technik zur Abfüllung von Limonadeflaschen entwickelte. Dabei wurde eine Glasmurmel als Stopfen in den Flaschenhals eingeführt. Der Überdruck, der beim Schütteln der Flasche entstand, presste die Glaskugel in die Flaschenöffnung. Diese Flasche hiess entsprechend "Codd bottle".

"Wallop" ist ein Slang-Ausdruck für "Bier". Und dass einem echten Biertrinker "Codd's Beer" nicht allzusehr zusagt, kann man auch heute noch nachvollziehen.
Letztlich geht es also um eine Menge "süsses Wasser", das nun mal nicht jedem schmeckt.

M

N

O

ox
BNC - British National Corpus

(E?)(L?) http://www.hcu.ox.ac.uk/BNC
Zitate für jedes Wort
macht wirklich sehr viel her, aber wo ist die Suchmaske?

P

philosophers

(E?)(L?) http://www.philosophers.co.uk/quotations/quotations.htm
Philosophical Quotations

Q

Quotation (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quotation


R

S

sic (W3)

Im Englischen wird "sic" in der Form "[sic]" gerne benutzt, um dem Leser mitzuteilen, dass in Zitaten ein Fehler vorhanden ist, der aber korrekt übernommen wurde. D.h. der Fehler stammt vom Zitierten oder aus der Quelle - nicht vom Zitierenden. Dieses Hinweiswort stammt aus dem Lateinischen und lat. "sic" bedeutet dt. "so", "genau so", "also", "folglich", engl. "thus". Man kann es auch in deutschen Zitaten finden in der Form "(sic)" oder "(sic!)".

Als Wurzel wird ide. "*so-" = engl. "this", "that" postuliert, das man auch in altengl. "sio" = engl. "she" finden kann.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ablemedia.com/ctcweb/glossary/glossarys.html

"sic" - (Latin) literally “thus”; used in scholarly citation to indicate that a quoted word that appears misspelled or poorly punctuated is found that way in the original text; using "sic" means that the author who is citing the text will not be responsible for the misspelling or punctuation error.


(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/sic

SIC, adv.

Étymol. et Hist. 1771 (Diderot, Corresp., t. 2, p. 66). Mot lat. signifiant "ainsi"; cf. antérieurement en incise et sic de ceteris (1727, Montesquieu, Corresp., t. 1, p. 202).


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sic

sic (adv.)

insertion in printed quotation to call attention to error in the original; Latin, literally "so, thus, in this way", related to or emphatic of si "if", from PIE root "*so-" "this", "that" (cf. Old English "sio" "she"). Used regularly in English articles from 1876, perhaps by influence of similar use in French (1872).

[I]t amounts to Yes, he did say that, or Yes, I do mean that, in spite of your natural doubts. It should be used only when doubt is natural; but reviewers & controversialists are tempted to pretend that it is, because (sic) provides them with a neat & compendious form of sneer. [Fowler]

Sic passim is "generally so throughout."


Erstellt: 2014-03

signonsandiego
How strong is your knowledge of word origins?

(E?)(L?) http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/features/20030722-9999_mz1c22words.html
But where did this strange phrase we use everyday really come from?

T

The rest is silence
Der Rest ist Schweigen (W3)

(E2)(L2) http://www.blueprints.de/wortschatz/
Die letzten Worte des sterbenden Titelhelden in Shakespeares "Hamlet" sind: "The rest is silence".

Wenn wir heute sagen "Der Rest ist Schweigen" bzw. "The rest is silence", dann drücken wir so auch unsere Ratlosigkeit aus bzw. unser Unvermögen zu einer schwierigen Sache etwas zu sagen oder zu tun.

© blueprints Team

U

V

W

wikipedia - quote (W3)

(E?)(L1) http://quote.wikipedia.org/


X

Y

Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
UK Vereinigtes Königreich Großbritannien und Nordirland, Reino Unido de Gran Bretaña e Irlanda del Norte, Royaume-Uni de Grande-Bretagne et d'Irlande du Nord, Regno Unito di Gran Bretagna e Irlanda del Nord, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Zitat, Cita, Citation, Citazione, Quotation

A

B

Beck, Terry
Cats Out of the Bag

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/188765416X/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/188765416X/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/188765416X/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/188765416X/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/188765416X/etymologpor09-20
von Terry Beck, Ken Beck, Don Beck
Sprache: Englisch
Taschenbuch - 1 Seiten - Premium Press America
Erscheinungsdatum: Oktober 1996
ISBN: 188765416X

C

D

E

F

G

George, Norman (Autor)
Die perfekten englischen Zitate
Von Jane Austen bis Oscar Wilde

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3865391141/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3865391141/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3865391141/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3865391141/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3865391141/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 319 Seiten
Verlag: Marixverlag; Auflage: 1., Aufl. (Februar 2007)
Sprache: Englisch, Deutsch


Kurzbeschreibung
Über 1.000 Zitate / Zweisprachige Ausgabe: Englisch-Deutsch / Leichte Handhabung / Deutsches und Englisches Schlagwortregister
An der gegenwärtigen Weltsprache Nr. 1- Englisch - kommt kaum jemand vorbei, der um Verständigung bemüht ist, sei es privat oder beruflich. Sie ist gut zu erlernen, hat eine einfache grammatikalische Struktur und die Kompaktheit der Aussagen in ihr lassen Sentenzen entstehen, die sich leicht einprägen und oft auch nicht mehr vergessen werden.Die meisterhaften Zitate und Redewendungen aus Schriftstellerhand, aus Politiker - und Künstlermund sind in diesem Buch festgehalten sei es George Washington mit It s better to be alone than in bad company, dessen Aussage sich sowohl in der Übertragung auf das Private als auch auf den Beruf beziehen lassen kann, oder George Bernard Shaw, der mit jedem abrechnet, egal ob dieser uns beim Kaffee oder im Schulzimmer belehren will: He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.Das Register ermöglicht die Suche entweder nach dem Stichwort oder dem Autor der Leser kann sich aber auch einfach treiben lassen, nach dem Zitat von Nadine Gordimer "Truth isn't always beauty, but the hunger for it is".

Über den Autor
Norman George, geb. 1961 in London, studierte in Birmingham und Cambridge Germanistik und klassische Philologie; anschließend er war einige Jahre als Lehrer in Durham tätig. Seit 1996 lebt und arbeitet er als freier Publizist in London.


H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

Webber, Elizabeth
Feinsilber, Mike (Author)
Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Allusions

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877796289/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877796289/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877796289/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877796289/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0877796289/etymologpor09-20
Paperback: 592 pages
Publisher: Merriam-Webster; Ppk edition (September 1999)
Language: English


Amazon.com
New Yorker founding editor Harold Ross, according to this book's preface, is said to have asked writer James Thurber once, with bewilderment, "Is Moby Dick the man or the whale?" Well, even Homer nods (Horace). But, Harold! Thou shouldst be living at this hour (Wordsworth). Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Allusions is a Big Rock Candy Mountain (American folk song) for anyone who feels amid the alien corn (Keats) when it comes to understanding allusions everyone else seems to grok (Heinlein). Thanks to the blood, sweat, and tears (Churchill) of authors Elizabeth Webber and Mike Feinsilber--compiling this allusional Rosetta stone must have taken a Herculean, nay Brobdingnagian (Swift) effort - we can come in from the cold (popularized by le Carré) of the dark night of the soul (St. John of the Cross) and dine out on (G. Gordon Liddy and others) these allusions for years to come.
Jane Steinberg
...


X

Y

Z