Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Eponym, Epónimo, Éponymie, Eponimo, Eponym

A

alphadictionary.com
Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/eponyms/index.html

What is an Eponym?

An eponym as we will use the term here is an ordinary common noun derived from a proper noun, the name of a person or place. Words like "quisling", "sandwich", and "silhouette" are solid eponyms. Some eponymous words are still capitalized like a proper noun, so those not capitalized are most clearly eponyms. The important, defining property is that the word does not refer exclusively to the person or place named by the proper noun, as does "Marxism" or "Christian", but is used to refer to a general category, as do "quisling", "boycott" and "fuchsias". The ability to undergo inflection such as the plural ("Pullmans") is also an indication of the strict eponymous status of a word.

What isn't an Eponym?

Many lists on the Web contain phrases and words that are common phrases or ordinary derivations. While the term eponym is often extended to such constructions, their interpretation is usually more a matter of history than etymology, which is our focus. This list is not competing to be the longest list of eponyms but the most accurate in the strictest sense of the word. Beware those lists that include words created by means that apply to any noun, that refer exclusively to the eponymous person, or words that simply name one unique object. Pseudo-eponyms include the following:




Erstellt: 2010-02

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

infopop.cc
Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

578 entries

abigail | abishag | academy; academic | Achilles' heel | Adamite | adonis | alfonsin; alphonsin | algorism | algorithm | alice blue | Alice in Wonderland | Alphonse and Gaston | Alzheimer's disease | amazon | America | amethyst | ammonia | Amphitryon | Anacreontic | ananias | Annie Oakley | Antaean | aphrodisiac | Apician | apollonian | April | argus | argyle | aristarch | athenaeum | atlas | augean | August | aurora | axel | Babbitt | babbitt metal | Bacchanal | Baedeker | bakelite | balmy; barmy (crazy) | bant | Barmecide; Barmecide feast | barnumize | baroque | Bartlett pear | batty | beau brummell | béchamel sauce | bedlam | begonia | belcher | benedict | Benedict Arnold | Big Bertha | biro | bishop (verb) | black maria | bloody mary | bloomers | blucher | bluebeard | bobby | bob's your uncle | Bodoni | bogart | Bohr bug | bolivar | boniface | booze | Borachio | boreal | bork (verb) | bosie | Boswell | bougainvillea | bowdlerize | Bowie knife | bowler | boycott | braggadocio | braille | brodie | Bronx | Brother Jonathan | brougham | bruin | buckley's chance | bumbledom | Bunsen burner | burke | burnsides | busby | BVD | Cadillac | caesarean | calliope | calliopean | camellia | | cardigan | Casanova | Cassandra | castor oil | catherine wheel | ceasar salad | celsius | cereal | chanticleer | chauvanism | chesterfield | chicken à la king | chicken tetrazini | chimerical | chinchona | churrigueresque | cicerone | Cimmerian | cinderella | Circean | clerihew | cliometrics | cobb salad | codswallop | Colonel Blimp | colt | comstockery | cook's tour | crapper | crisscross | croesus | curry favor | cynic | czar, tsar | Daedal | daguerreotype | dahlia | Dandie Dinmont | davenport (desk) | davenport (sofa) | Delphic | derby | derrick | derringer | diddle | diesel | dionysian | Dives | Doberman | doily | Don Juan | doozy | doubting Thomas | Dr. Fell | draconian | draisine | Drawcansir | dryasdust | dunce | dundrearies | Egeria | eggs benedict | éminence grise | epicurian | eristic | erotic | euhemerism | euphuism | euterpean | Fabian | fagin | Fahrenheit | Fallopian tubes | fanny adams | fata morgana | Faustian | favonian | fedora | ferris wheel | filberts | fletcherism | foley | frangipani | Frankenstein | Freudian slip | frick and frack | Friday | frisbee | fuchsia | fudge | furphy | galvanize | gamp | gardenia | gargantuan | garibaldi | gatling gun | geiger counter | georgette | gerrymander | gibberish | gibson girl | gimlet | gladstone bag | goldilocks | Goliath | golliwog | goody two-shoes | goon | Gordian Knot | gorgon | gorilla | gradgrind | graham cracker | grand marnier | grangerize | granny smith apple | grimthorpe | grog (groggy) | grundyism; mrs. grundy | guillotine | guppy | guy | ham (a bad actor) | harlequin | harlot | havelock | hector | heisenbug | herculean | hermaphrodite | hermetic | Hobson's Choice | hooker | hooligan | hoover | Hooverville | Horatio Alger | hotspur | hoyle | huttoning | hyacinth | hypnosis | Icarian | ignoramus | jackanapes | Jacky Howe | jacuzi | January | jeep | jehu | jekell and hyde | jeremiad | jerry-built | jerry-can | jezebel | jim crow | jingoism | joe | John Bull | john dory | John Hancock | jonah | jorum | jovial | judas | juggernaut | July | jumbo | June | kaiser roll | kewpie doll | kir | klieg light | knickerbocker | knickers | labanotation | Lamarckism | lavaliere | leotard | levi's jeans; Levi's | lewisite | lobster newberg | loganberry | lothario | lucullan | Lucy Stoner | Luddite | lush | lutz | lynch | macabre | macadam | macadamia nut | Mach number | machiavellian | mackintosh | Mae West | magdalen | magnolia | | man Friday | mandelbug | marcel | March | Mardi gras | marigold | marmelade | marplot | martial | martinet | marzipan | masochism | mason jar | maudlin | mausoleum | maverick | May | mazarine | McCarthyism | medusa | mentor | mercurial | mesmerize | Methuselah | Micawber | mickey finn | Mickey Mouse | Midas touch | milquetoast | mint (as coins) | mithriditism | Molotov cocktail | money | monkey wrench | Montgolfier | morganite | morganize¹ | morganize² | morphine | munchkin | | | museum | myrmidon | namby-pamby | narcissism | nemesis | nestor | nicotine | nimrod | obsidian | odyssey | oedipal | onanism | orangeman | orrery | Orwellian | Oscar (the award) | ozymandian | Palladian¹ | Palladian² | pander; pandar | Panglossian | panic | panpipe | Pantagruelian | pants; pantaloons | pasquinade | pasteurize | pavlovian | pecksniffian | peeping Tom | peter pan | Peter Pan collar | phaeton | philander | philippic | Philomel | Pickwickian | pinchbeck | platonic | plimsoll | poinsettia | Pollyanna | pompadour | Ponzi scheme | pooh-bah | pooter | praline | Procrustean | protean | psyche; psychology | pullman | Punch | Punchinello | puritanical | pyrrhic victory | pyrrhonism | python | quassia | quisling | quixotic | Rabelaisian | rachmanism | ragamuffin | raglan | real McCoy | ritzy | robot | rodomontade; rhodomontade | roorback | roquelaure | roscian | Rosinante | rube goldberg | Rubenesque | sad sack | sadism | salisbury steak | Sally Lunn | salmonella | sandwich | sapphic | Sardanapalian | Sardoodledom | Saturday | saxophone | scaramouche | schroedinbug | scrooge | Scylla | sequoia | Shirley Temple | shrapnel | shylock | shyster | sibyl | sideburns | silhouette | Simon Legree | simony | siren | Sisyphean | smart aleck | Soapy Sam | solander | solomonic | solon | sousaphone | spencer | spinet | spoonerism | St. Elmo's fire | St. Martin's summer | St. Vitus dance | stentorian | Stetson | svengali | sword of Damocles | syphilis | syringe | tam-o'-shanter | tantalize | tartuffe | tawdry | teddy bear | termagant | terpsichorean | thalian | therblig | thersitical | thespian | thrasonical | Thursday | titan | titch; tich; titchy | titian | Tom and Jerry | Tom Collins | tommy gun | tontine | Topsy ("growed like topsy") | trilby | trudgen | Tuesday | tupperware | Turveydrop | Tweedledum & Tweedledee | Typhoid Mary | ucalegon | Uncle Sam | Uncle Tom | uranic | Uriah Heep | valentine | vamp | van dyck | van dyke | venereal | vernier | veronica | Victorian | volcano | volpone | vulcanization | Wednesday | welch | Wellerism | Wellington | Wheatstone bridge | wimpy | wisteria | Xanthippe | yapp (n. & v.) | yarborough | yegg | yellow journalism | Young Turk | zany | zephyr | zeppelin | zinnia | zoilist

UNITS OF MEASURE

| ampere | angstrom | baud | Baumé scale | Beaufort scale | becquerel | bel | celsius | coulomb | curie | dalton | fahrenheit | farad | faraday | fermi | gauss | gilbert | gray | henry | hertz | joule | Kelvin | lambert | langley | Mach number | maxwell | mho | Mohs scale | newton | oersted | ohm | pascal | poise | Réaumur | Richter scale | roentgen | rutherford | sabin | siemens | tesla | volt | watt | weber |

OVERSIZE CHAMPAGNE BOTTLES
| Jeroboam | Rehoboam | Methuselah | Salmanazar | Balthazar | Nebuchadnezzar | Melchior |


Erstellt: 2013-02

J

K

L

M

Murphy bed (W3)

"Murphy bed" (1925) wird auf einen amerikanischen Erfinder "William Lawrence Murphy" (1876-1959) zurück geführt. Die Bezeichnung wurde auch unterstützt durch die einst vorhandene Assoziation von engl. "Murphy" mit "Morpheus", dem griechischen Gott des Schlafes.

Bei dem "Murphy bed" handelt es sich um ein Bett das in einem Einbauschrank versteckt war und bei Bedarf herausgeklappt werden konnte.

(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Murphy bed

Murphy bed


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Murphy

"Murphy", Gaelic "Murchadh" "sea-warrior". The Celtic "sea" element is also in names "Muriel" (q.v.), "Murdoch" (Old Irish "Muireadhach", Old Welsh "Mordoc" "mariner"), etc. "Murphy bed" (1925) is named for U.S. inventor "William Lawrence Murphy" (1876-1959). By happy coincidence, "Murphy" was an illiterate 18c.-19c. perversion of Morpheus, god of sleep.


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2005-April/subject.html

antedating of "Murphy bed" (1913) Sam Clements


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/

Danish Pastry; Denver Sandwich; Murphy Bed Bapopik


(E?)(L?) http://mentalfloss.com/article/30266/who-was-murphy-and-why-there-bed-named-after-him

Who Was Murphy and Why Is There a Bed Named After Him?
...
The bed is named, no surprise, after a guy named Murphy—William L. Murphy.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A

"Murphy bed": a bed that can be folded or swung into a cabinet when not being used


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_eponyms_(L-Z)

William Lawrence Murphy — Murphy bed.


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/murphy-bed

Murphy bed


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Murphy bed
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Murphy bed" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1920 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Murphy bed

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-09

Murphy game (W3)

Engl. "Murphy game" ist die Bezeichnung für eine betrügerische Masche, bei der dem Opfer mit Versprechungen Geld aus der Tasche gezogen wird. Nach der Geldübergabe verschwindet der "Anbieter" unter verschiedenen Vorwänden. Das geld ist verschwunden. Oftmals geht es dabei auch um die Anbietung erotischer Dienstleistungen - aber auch Dienstleistungen oder "leere Pakete" können übergeben werden.

Die Herkunft der Bezeichnung ist nicht mehr nachvollziehbar. Man vermutet einen Bezug zu einem Hochstapler namens "Murphy" der im 19. Jh. sein Geld durch kleine trickreiche Betrügereien verdiente.

(E?)(L?) http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/murphy-game

"Murphy game": a confidence game in which the victim pays the swindler (Murphy Man) for something, as the services of a prostitute, which the swindler promises but the victim never receives.


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Murphy game

Murphy game


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2003-4-Apr.htm

Unusual Eponyms: burke | boycott | ucalegon | grimthorpe | heisenbug (Bohr bug, mandelbug, schroedinbug) | pooter | Murphy game


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"Murphy game": Miss Murphy, nonexistent prostitute used to lure victims - any of various confidence games, esp. one luring victim with prospect of sex


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/murphy-game

"Murphy game": a confidence game in which the victim pays the swindler (Murphy Man) for something, as the services of a prostitute, which the swindler promises but the victim never receives.


(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ULTgX7w7HUU

The Real Hustle - The Murphy Game


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Murphy game
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Murphy game" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1910 / 1960 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Murphy game

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-09

Murphy willing (W3)

Der Neologismus engl. "Murphy willing" wird als Ersatz für engl. "God willing" (15. Jh.) = dt. "so Gott will" benutzt.

Anscheinend um das Jahr 1999 wurde eine assoziative Verbindung von "Murphy’s Law" (in etwa: "was schief gehen kann, geht auch irgendwann schief") zu der alten Wendung hergestellt. Die alte Gottergebenheit wich einer Fügung ins unvermeidliche schlechte Ende.

(E2)(L1) http://www.wordspy.com/index.php?word=murphy-willing

Murphy willing


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Murphy willing
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Murphy willing" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr ???? / nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Murphy willing

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-09

Murphy's Law (W3)

Dt. "Murphys Gesetz", frz. "Loi de Murphy", ndl. "Wet van Murphy", engl. "Murphy's Law", wurde nach dem US-amerikanischen Ingenieur Edward Aloysius Murphy, jr., benannt, der es im Zusammenhang mit Raketentests ins Gespräch gebracht haben soll.

Captain Edward A. Murphy arbeitete 1949 als Techniker bei der Californian Wright Field-Aircrfat Laboratory. Ihm werden verschiedene Kommentare zugeschrieben, unter anderem die 1955 im "Aircraft Mechanics Bulletin" erschienene Aussage: "If an aircraft part can be installed incorrectly, somebody will install it that way."

Aber anscheinend gilt es nicht als gesichert, dass es jemals einen "Captain Edward Murphy" gab.

(E?)(L?) http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/Murphy-s-Law.html

Murphy's Law


(E?)(L?) http://catb.org/jargon/html/M/Murphys-Law.html

Murphy's Law: prov.

The correct, original Murphy's Law reads: “If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in a catastrophe, then someone will do it.” This is a principle of defensive design, cited here because it is usually given in mutant forms less descriptive of the challenges of design for lusers. For example, you don't make a two-pin plug symmetrical and then label it “THIS WAY UP”; if it matters which way it is plugged in, then you make the design asymmetrical (see also the anecdote under magic smoke).
...


(E2)(L1) http://www.dictionary.com/browse/Murphy's Law

Murphy's Law


(E?)(L?) http://epguides.com/menum/




(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Murphy's Law

Murphy's law 1958 [antedate 1956 (now antedated to 1955)], used of various pessimistic aphorisms. If there ever was a real Murphy his identity is lost to history. Said to be military originally, and probably pre-dates the earliest printed example (the 1958 citation calls it "an old military maxim").


(E?)(L?) http://userpage.chemie.fu-berlin.de/diverse/murphy/murphy.html

Murphys Gesetze (Deutsche Version)
...


(E?)(L?) http://userpage.chemie.fu-berlin.de/diverse/murphy/murphy_e.html

Murphy's Law (English version)
...


(E?)(L?) http://people.howstuffworks.com/murphys-law.htm

How Murphy's Law Works
...
But "Murphy's Law" is a relatively new concept, dating back to the middle of the last century. Magician Adam Hull Shirk wrote in the 1928 essay, "On Getting Out of Things," that in a magic act, nine out of 10 things that can go wrong usually will [source: American Dialect Society]. Even before this, it was called "Sod's Law", which states that any bad thing that can happen to some poor sod will. In fact, "Murphy's Law" is still referred to as "Sod's Law" in England [source: Murphy's Laws].
...
Believe it or not, there really was a "Murphy", and he lived in the United States until his death in 1990. "Captain Edward A. Murphy Jr." was an engineer in the Air Force. Although he took part in other engineering design tests throughout both his military and civilian careers, it was one test that he attended - almost as a fluke - that gave rise to "Murphy's Law".
...
Lots More Information

Related Articles More Great Links


(E?)(L?) http://www.improbable.com/airchives/paperair/volume9/v9i5/murphy/murphy0.html

Improbable Research

The Fastest Man on Earth (Overview and Index)

Why Everything You Know About Murphy’s Law is Wrong

by Nick T. Spark

This page is an overview (with an index) of the 4-part series.


(E3)(L1) http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/t/TheJargonLexicon.html

Murphy's Law


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2016-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2011-October/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2011-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2011-February/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-November/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-October/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-June/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-May/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2009-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2008-December/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2008-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-December/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-October/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-July/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-June/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-March/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-February/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2006-November/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2005-November/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2005-July/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-April/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2003-December/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2003-October/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2003-September/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2002-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-March/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2000-December/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/1999-November/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/1999-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/1999-July/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/1999-June/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://www.magazinusa.com/us/info/show.aspx?unit=originals&doc=50

Murphy's Law

U.S. Originale

Der Begriff Murphy's Law wurde 1949 geprägt

Murphy's Law - woher kommt das?

Der Ausdruck "Murphy's Law" ("If anything can go wrong, it will") wurde 1949 auf der Edwards Air Force Base, California, geprägt. Captain Edward A. Murphy, Ingenieur seines Zeichens, arbeite an einem Projekt, das die Auswirkung radikaler Abbremsung im Falle eines Unfalles auf den menschlichen Körper erforschen sollte. Eines Tages stellte er nach verschiedenen Problem Tests fest, dass ein Techniker verschiedene Kabel in einem Messwert-Gerät falsch angeschlossen hatte und er fluchte: "Wenn es irgend einen Weg gibt etwas falsch zu machen, dann wird er es schaffen."

Ein Teammitglied hatte bereits eine persönliche Liste mit allerlei Weisheiten und fügte diesen Spruch hinzu. Gleichzeitig nannte er seine Sammlung: Murphy's Law. Der Spruch an sich war sicherlich schon vorher in ähnlicher Form im Umlauf, aber es geht darum, dass es keine Bezeichnung gab.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.murphys-laws.com/

Murphy's laws site

All the laws of Murphy in one place

Murphy's laws site


(E?)(L?) http://www.murphys-laws.com/murphy/murphy-true.html

Murphy's laws origin


(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/word/murphys-laws-on-technology.php

Murphy's laws on technology


(E?)(L?) https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn4231-murphys-law-honoured-50-years-late/

New Scientist, Daily news, 3 October 2003

Murphy’s Law honoured – 50 years late

By Jeff Hecht, Cambridge, Massachusetts


(E?)(L?) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definitionsAlpha/0,289930,sid9_alpM,00.html

Murphy's Law

Part of the IT standards and organizations glossary:

The original Murphy's Law was "If there are two or more ways to do something, and one of those ways can result in a catastrophe, then someone will do it." The law's author was Edward A. Murphy, Jr., a U.S. Air Force engineer, who, in 1947, was involved in a rocket-sled experiment in which all 16 accelerator instruments were installed in the wrong way, resulting in Murphy's observation. Murphy's Law is sometimes expressed as "Anything that can go wrong, will -- at the worst possible moment." In that format, the Law was popularized by science-fiction writer Larry Niven as "Finagle's Law of Dynamic Negatives " (sometimes known as "Finagle's corollary to Murphy's Law").
...


(E?)(L1) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definitionsAlpha/0,289930,sid9_alpM,00.html

Murphy's Laws of Information Technology


(E?)(L?) http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/gswithenbank/sayingsm.htm#Murphy's Law

Murphy's Law (coined in 1949)


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1982

Murphy's Law - by Cheri


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SM

Murphy's Law | Murphys Gesetz


(E?)(L?) http://www.scq.ubc.ca/the-murphys-law-equation/

The Science Creative Quarterly. September 07-April 08.

THE MURPHY’S LAW EQUATION

Pel, Joel

There are many laws in the physical sciences, most of which have mathematical equations that govern them. Widely know laws such as the laws of electricity and magnetism, have Maxwell’s equations. Fluid-flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, and of course everyone is familiar with Einstein’s energy to mass relation, E=mc2. Why then does an equally relevant and useful law, Murphy’s Law, have no such foundational equation? In what follows I present an equation to predict the outcome of Murphy’s Law.
...


(E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/a-23-a-2003-11-20-5-1-83116522/118325.html

November 20, 2003 - Listener Mail
...
AA: Nick Spark says the history of Murphy's Law is, in effect, a victim of Murphy's Law. We know it came out of a test of a rocket sled in the 1940s. The test involved a famous Air Force colonel, John Paul Stapp, and, among others, an engineer named Ed Murphy. A simple wiring mistake caused an acceleration meter to fail.
...

The editor of an aviation history magazine adds to our recent segment on the origin of Murphy's Law. And a listener who heard our report on hand gestures explains the connection between horns and infidelity.


(E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/a-23-a-2003-10-30-2-1-83116502/118316.html

It's one of life's little truths: "If anything can go wrong, it will." Bill Sloat (pictured) of the Plain Dealer newspaper in Ohio tells about the history of this popular saying. And, yes, there really was a Murphy.

October 30, 2003 - Origin of 'Murphy's Law'

Rosanne Skirble, the story of one of life's little AA

AA: I'm Avi Arditti with Rosanne Skirble, and this week on Wordmaster -- the story of one of life's little truths.

RS: It's a law we all live under, and it goes this way: "If anything can go wrong, it will." It's known as Murphy's Law.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/phylum#word=A

"Murphy's Law": humorous axiom stating that anything that can go wrong will go wrong


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/murphys-law-and-melvins-too/

Murphy’s Law and Melvin’s, Too

Posted by Grant Barrett on March 8, 2011


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/a-murphy-a-melvin-and-a-wedgie/

A Murphy, a Melvin, and a Wedgie

Posted by Grant Barrett on March 26, 2011


(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/eponymous-laws/

Eponymous Laws

Posted by grantbarrett on October 31, 2014

An eponymous law is a joking bit of wisdom named after someone, like "Murphy’s Law", which states “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.” This is part of a complete episode.


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murphy%27s_law

...
Association with Murphy

According to the book "A History of Murphy's Law" by author Nick T. Spark, differing recollections years later by various participants make it impossible to pinpoint who first coined the saying "Murphy's law". The law's name supposedly stems from an attempt to use new measurement devices developed by the eponymous "Edward Murphy". The phrase was coined in adverse reaction to something Murphy said when his devices failed to perform and was eventually cast into its present form prior to a press conference some months later — the first ever (of many) given by Dr. John Stapp, a U.S. Air Force colonel and Flight Surgeon in the 1950s. These conflicts (a long running interpersonal feud) were unreported until Spark researched the matter. His book expands upon and documents an original four part article published in 2003 (Annals of Improbable Research (AIR)[19]) on the controversy: Why Everything You Know About Murphy's Law is Wrong.
...


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2007-4-Apr.htm

Laws, Principles, and Rules: Murphy’s Law, Morton’s Fork, Parkinson's Law, Gresham’s law, Pareto Principle (80/20 rule), GIGO, Peter Principle


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm

"Murphy's Law": apparently in the 1940s, Capt. Ed Murphy, aircraft engineer and Air Force officer, said of a technician, "If there is any way to do it wrong, he will."


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/2011/12/murphys-law/

Murphy’s Law

Gosh, I thought that was the motto of the U.S. Postal Service.
...
As the luck of language columnists dictates, it seems that no one knows exactly who, if anyone, the Murphy of “Murphy’s Law” was, although the “law” seems to have been discovered during or just after World War Two.
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/murphys_law/

"If anything can go wrong, it will.” That is Murphy’s Law. But who was Murphy?

The standard story is that the term was coined in 1949. The Murphy in question is Captain Ed Murphy, a development engineer assigned to Colonel J.P. Stapp’s research on the rocket sleds that tested the limits of human endurance to acceleration and deceleration at Muroc Field, California (later renamed Edwards AFB). Murphy was referring to a particular technician, whose name has been lost to history, who had wired a piece of equipment incorrectly when he remarked, “if there is any way to do things wrong, he will.” A few weeks later in a press conference, Stapp allegedly credited his program’s safety record to planning for Murphy’s Law. The rest was history.

Read the rest of the article...


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/murphys_law.html

Murphy's Law

The facetious proposition that if something can go wrong, it will.

[Americanism, after a fictitious Murphy, allegedly the name of a bungling mechanic in U.S. Navy educational cartoons of the 1950s.]
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/topicalwords/tw-mur2.htm

Murphy's Law
...
The doubt of the experts has since been justified, since in November 2006 researcher Bill Mullins reported the discovery of several examples in conjurors’ magazines long before Mr Murphy had even been thought of, in one case attributed to the famous magician David Devant. The earliest case is from The Magic Wand, published in London in May 1913: “There is an old saying among conjurers that it is impossible for a performer to know a trick thoroughly well until everything that can possibly go wrong with it has gone wrong — in front of an audience.”
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.www-kurs.de/gloss_m.htm

Murphys Gesetz (Murphy's Law)

Orginalausspruch von Edward A. Murphy Jr.:

"Wenn es zwei oder mehr Möglichkeiten gibt, etwas zu tun, und wenn eine dieser Möglichkeiten zu einer Katastrophe führt, dann wird sich irgend jemand für genau diese Möglichkeit entscheiden."

Populäre Version: "Alles, was schiefgehen kann, geht schief."
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/murphy-s-law

Murphy's Law


(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2T5xYlsw-c

HotForWords - Murphy's Law! … to request words. Murphy's Law! Just who was this Murphy guy anyway?


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Murphy's Law
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Murphy's Law" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 / 1950 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Murphy's Law

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-09

Murphy's Law - Rose


Auszeichnungen / Awards
Blätter, Laub / Feuillage / Foliage Medium, matte, dark green foliage
Blüheigenschaften / Flowering Habit
Blütenblätter-Anzahl 35 petals
Blütenfarbe / Bloemkleur / Flower Colour Medium pink, Pink, lighter reverse
Blütenform / Forme de la fleur / Bloemvorm / Bloom Shape Large, full (26-40 petals) bloom form
Blütengröße / Bloem / Bloom Size
Blütentyp / Bloom Type
Blütezeit / Floraison / Bloeitijd / Flowering Period Blooms in flushes throughout the season
Bodenansprüche / Cultivation
Dornen / Stacheln / Thornyness
Duft / Fragrance / Geurend / Scent Strength Mild fragrance
Elternrosen / Herkunft / Parentage
Erkrankungen / Disease resistance
Erscheinungsjahr / DOB (Date of Birth) 1982
Exhibition Name Murphy's Law
Genealogie / Parentage seed: Fragrant Cloud (Hybrid Tea, Tantau, 1963)
pollen: Prima Ballerina ® (hybrid tea, Tantau, 1957) × Gavotte
Hagebutten / Hips / Hip Colour / Hip Shape
Knospen / Buds
Ordnungskriterien / Klasse / Genre / Famille de rosiers / Type de rosier / Groep / Class / Family / Group Hybrid Tea, Modern Rose
Registration Name SEAmurp
Schädlinge
Schwächen / Weaknesses
Sports / Mutationen
Standort / Shade Tolerance
Stärken / Strengths
Stiele / Stems
Synonyme Murphy's Law, SEAmurp
Verwendung / Utilisation / Gebruik / Use
Winterhärte / Hardiness
Wuchsabstand / Dist. de plantation
Wuchsform / Vorm / Growth Habit Bushy
Wuchshöhe / Taille / Height / Hauteur
Wuchsweite / Width
Züchter / Entdecker / Breeder / Hybridizer Bred by Sean McCann (Ireland, 1982)



(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/plant/plants.php

Murphy's Law


Erstellt: 2016-09

N

O

P

Q

R

S

searstower.org
American Proprietary Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://www.searstower.org/rkrause/brands.html

INTRODUCTION

An eponym is a general term used to describe from what or whom something derived its name. Therefore, a proprietary eponym could be considered a brand name (trademark or service mark) which has fallen into general use.

We've all seen it happen. The commonplace products and services of today become the household word of tomorrow. Well, some might say ’tis the price companies pay for a popular product.
...
—Randall E. Krause




Erstellt: 2013-02

snopes.com
Eponyms

(E?)(L?) http://www.snopes.com/language/eponyms/eponyms.asp


Erstellt: 2013-02

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z