Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America of America
Essen, Comida, Nourriture, Mangiare, Food

A

alphadictionary.com
Cooking Dictionaries

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/directory/Specialty_Dictionaries/Cooking/

Dictionaries


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/directory/Specialty_Dictionaries/Cooking/National/

Dictionaries


Erstellt: 2016-11

alphadictionary.com
Food Dictionaries

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/directory/Specialty_Dictionaries/Food/

Dictionaries


Erstellt: 2016-11

B

Barbecue, BBQ, barbaque, Barbecued Barbarians and Their Barbers, Buccaneer, boucanier, Bukanier, boucan (W1)

(E?)(L?) http://www.barbecue.ch/
Swiss Barbecue Association

(E1)(L1) http://etimologias.dechile.net/?barbecue


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=b&p=2


(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/language.html#borrow


(E?)(L?) http://www.spiesser.de/fld6562/fld2376/fld7277/Sprachbarriern.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue010.html
Issue 10 Spotlight Barbecued Barbarians and Their Barbers

(E1)(L1) http://www.w-akten.de/fremdworte.phtml


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Native_American_origin


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/barbecue/


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bar1.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/indianwd.html
Das Wort "Barbecue" stammt von französischen Trappern, die im 17. Jahrhundert in Nordamerika ganze Bisons grillten. Und weil sie wirklich das ganze Teil auf den Rost warfen, nannten sie es barbe-á-queue: Vom Bart bis zum Schwanz.

Let's do the Barbecue, sagten sich schon die französischen Trapper im Amerika des 17. Jahrhunderts. Die grillten damals ganze Bisons und nannten das dann "Barbe-à-queue", vom "Bart bis zum Schwanz".

Ein anderer Hinweis besagt:
Be it a hare, rabbit, hog, deer, etc., the hair is burnt off, the guts washed and the meat laid on a "berbekot". This is an Indian grid of little wooden sticks about two feet high. On this they place their food, flesh, or fish, without salting it; and being half done roasted, they crumble it into the pepper-pot to eat at once or to keep for a more convenient time, because the pepper-pot is the only recourse.

Die allgemein akzeptierte Version scheint zu sein, dass "barbecue" mitte des 17. Jh. vom span. "barbacoa" = "framework for roasting meat or fish" in die englische Sprache einwanderte. Die Spanier hatten es von den "Arawak", haitianischen Ureinwohnern übernommen, die mit "barbakoa" eine "Baumhaus" bezeichneten. Dieses referenzierte zu dem Muster, das beim Fleischrösten über einem Roast-Gestell auf dem Fleisch abzeichnete. Mitte des 18. Jh. hatte "barbecue" bereits etwa die heutige Bedeutung angenommen, als Bezeichnung für "outdoor meal of roasted fish or meat".

(E?)(L?) http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french/french_cool/nosh.shtml
"La barbaque": Bad meat. Old slang word, the origins of which are uncertain. It may come from the Romanian word "berbec" = "lamb", that French soldiers brought back to France in 1855. But it may also be of Mexican-Caribbean origins, from the word "barbecue". Again, French soldiers didn't really appreciate meat cooked that way but they brought the word back from Mexico in 1862. Anyway, whatever the exact origins of this word, nowadays it means meat of very poor quality.

Abgekürzt kann man "Barbecue" auch als "BBQ" finden.

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/wotd.pl?date=2004-08-28
Ein sehr weitläufiger Verwandter des engl. "Barbecuer" ist der engl. "Buccaneer", frz. "boucanier", dt. "Bukanier" der "(Fleisch-)Räucherer". Sprachlich geht "boucan" auf ein Tupi-Wort zurück, das eine "gestellartige Plattform" bezeichnete. Der frz. "boucanier" bezeichnete insbesondere einen Schlangenjäger auf den Karibischen Inseln, der seine Beute dann über einem "boucan" genannten Gestell räucherte. Einige dieser Schlangenjäger scheinen umgeschult zu haben und wurden zu Piraten. Die Bezeichnung übertrug sich auf ihren neuen Beruf und so wurden die "Bukanier" im 17. Jh. zu westindischen Seeräubern.
Entsprechend bezeichnet das frz. "boucan" einen "Höllenlärm".

Barbecue Capital of the World (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.santamaria.com/section_visitor/barbecue.html
Santa Maria is known nation-wide as the "Barbecue Capital of the World".
Visiting the Santa Maria Valley is a feast for the senses with its lush rolling hills and fragrant fields of strawberries. But cruise down Broadway on any given weekend, and it's the mouth-watering smell of barbecue that will greet you.

Santa Maria Style Barbecue is truly the authentic taste experience of Santa Maria. This sumptuous feast of barbecued sirloin, salsa, Pinquito beans, toasted French bread, and green salad has been called by Sunset Magazine, the "best barbecue in the world" and the California's Visitor's Guide raves this the "number one food not to miss while visiting California." It is the featured cuisine at all festive occasions, both public and private, and so thoroughly ingrained in local culture that it truly has become a way of life.
"Santa Maria Barbecue" has its roots in the mid-19th century, when the rancheros gathered to help each other brand their calves each spring. The host would prepare a Spanish style barbecue as a thank you for his vaqueros (America's first cowboys), family and friends. Under the oaks of this serene little coastal valley they would enjoy a traditional feast that included beef barbecued over a red oak fire, served with Pinquito beans, bread, salsa and homemade desserts.
...

bartleby087
The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book - Fannie Farmer

(E?)(L?) http://www.bartleby.com/87
This classic American cooking reference includes 1,849 recipes, including everything from “after-dinner coffee” - which Farmer notes is beneficial for a stomach “overtaxed by a hearty meal” - to “Zigaras à la Russe,” an elegant puff-pastry dish.
Bartleby.com chose the 1918 edition because it was the last edition of the cookbook authored completely by Farmer.


CONTENTS
Bibliographic Record Subject Index
TO MRS. WILLIAM B. SEWELL
BOSTON: LITTLE, BROWN, 1918
NEW YORK: BARTLEBY.COM, 2000

Preface | Food | Cookery | Beverages | Bread and Bread Making | Biscuits, Breakfast Cakes, and Shortcakes | Cereals | Eggs | Soups | Soups Without Stock | Soup Garnishings and Force-Meats | Fish | Beef | Lamb and Mutton | Veal | Sweetbreads | Pork | Poultry and Game | Fish and Meat Sauces | Vegetables | Potatoes | Salads and Salad Dressings | Entrées | Hot Puddings | Pudding Sauces | Cold Desserts | Ices, Ice Creams, and Other Frozen Desserts | Pastry | Pies | Pastry Desserts | Cake | Cake Fillings and Frostings | Fancy Cakes and Confections | Sandwiches and Canapès | Recipes for the Chafing-Dish | Fruits: Fresh and Cooked | Jellies, Jams, and Marmalades | The Canning of Fruits and Vegetables | The Drying of Fruits and Vegetables | Helpful Hints for the Young Housekeeper | Suitable Combinations For Serving | Food Values


Betty Crocker (W3)

Der Markenname "Betty Crocker" ist eine willkürliche Kombination des amerikanischen "Allerweltsnamen" "Betty" und dem Nachnamen eines Direktors der "Washburn Crosby Company".

(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_Crocker

...
"Betty Crocker", an invented persona and cultural icon, is a brand name and trademark of American board game company MONOPOLY. The name was first developed by the Washburn Crosby Company in 1921 as a way to give a personalized response to consumer product questions. The name "Betty" was selected because it was viewed as a cheery, All-American name. It was paired with the last name "Crocker", in honor of "William Crocker", a Washburn Crosby Company director.


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/sitemap.htm
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(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/how-to/glossary/




(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/a-b




(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/d-f

D | Dal | Dietary Fiber | Dill Seed | Dill Weed | Dips | Dolma | Dough | E | Egg Replacer | Egg Roll Skins | Eggplant |Eggs | | Escarole | | F | Falafel | Farina | Fat-free | Fats | Fennel | Fennel Seed | Fenugreek Seed | Fiber, Insoluble | Fiber, Soluble | Figs, Adriatic | Figs, Black Mission | Figs, Brown Turkey |Figs, Calimyrna | Figs, Kadota | Fines Herbs | Finger Food | First Course | Fish Sauce | Fish, Drawn | Fish, Fillets |Fish, Pan-Dressed | Fish, Steaks | Fish, Whole | Five-Spice Powder | Flan | Flour, All Purpose Bleached | Flour, All Purpose Unbleached | Flour, Bread | Flour, Cake | Flour, Chappati | Flour, Garbanzo Bean | Flour, Gold Medal® All-Purpose Organic | Flour, Gold Medal® Better For Bread™ Wheat Blend | Flour, Quick-Mixing | Flour, Rye | Flour, Self-Rising | Flour, Whole Wheat | Focaccia | Folic acid | Fondue | Frisée Frisee | Frittata | Fromage


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/g-i

G | Garam Masala | Garlic | Garlic Powder | Gazpacho | Gelatin | Gelato | Ghee | Ginger, Crystallized | Ginger, Dried | Ginger, Ground | Ginger, Pickled | Gingerroot | Gnocchi | Gooseberries | Goulash | Grapes, Champagne | Grappa | Greens, Beet, , Escarole, Kale, Mustard, Spinach, Swiss, Chard, Turnip |Greens, Mustard | Greens, Turnip | Grill Seasoning | Grits | Groundnuts | H | Half-and-Half | Hazelnuts | Herb Seasoning | Herbes de Provence | Herbs | Hoisin Sauce | | Hon Dashi | Honey | Hors d'Oeuvre |Hummus | I | Ice-Ring | Italian Seasoning


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/j-l

J | Jaggery | Jicama | Juniper Berries | K | Kale | Karhi Leaves | Kasha | Kelp | Ketchup | Kiwifruit | Kofte | Kohlrabi |Kulich | Kumquats | L | Lard | Lasagna | Latte | Leavening | Leeks | Lefse | Legume | Lemon Grass | Lemons, Meyer |Lentils | Lettuce, Bibb | Lettuce, Boston | Lettuce, Iceberg | Lettuce, Leaf | Limes, Key | Litchi | Lobster


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/m-o

M | | Macaroni (Elbow Pasta) | Mangoes | Manzano | Maple Syrup | Margarine | Marinara Sauce |Marjoram | Marsala | Marzipan | Mayonnaise | Meat Analogs | Melon, Crenshaw | Melon, Honeydew | Melon, Horned | Melon, Spanish | Meringue | Mesclun | Milk | Milk, Evaporated | Milk, Fat-Free (Skim) | Milk, Low-Fat |Milk, Reduced-Fat | Milk, Sweetened Condensed | Milk, Whole | Millet | Mint | Mirin | Miso | Mixed Salad Greens |Mocha | Molasses | Mole | Mushrooms | Mushrooms, Black Chinese (Dried) | Mushrooms, Cloud Ear | Mushrooms, Crimini | Mushrooms, Enoki | Mushrooms, Large White (Stuffing) | Mushrooms, Morel | Mushrooms, Oyster |Mushrooms, Porcini (Fresh) | Mushrooms, Porcini (Dried) | Mushrooms, Portabella | Mushrooms, Regular White |Mushrooms, Shiitake | Mushrooms, Straw | Mushrooms, Wood Ear (Dried) | Mushrooms, Wood Ear (Fresh) |Mussels | Mustard | Mustard Seed | Mustard Seed, Black | Mustard, Dijon | Mustard, Ground | Mustard, Yellow | N |Nectarines | Niçoise Nicoise | Noodles | Noodles, Cellophane (Bean Threads) | Noodles, Chinese Egg | Noodles, Egg | Noodles, Japanese Curly | Noodles, Ramen | Noodles, Rice | Noodles, Rice Stick | Noodles, Soba | Noodles, Somen | Noodles, Udon | Nopales | Nori | Nutmeg | O | Oats | Oil, All-Purpose Olive | Oil, Cooking | Oil, Extra-Virgin Olive | Oil, Olive | Oil, Vegetable | Oil, Virgin Olive | Okra | Olives, Imported | Onions, Green | Onions, White, Yellow or Red | Orange Flower Water | Oregano | Organic | Oxtail | Oyster Sauce | Oysters


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/p

P | Paella | Pancetta | Pandowdy | Papaya | Paprika | Parsley, Curly Leaf | Parsley, Flat Leaf (Italian Parsley) |Parsnips | Passion Fruit | Pasta | Pasta, Acini de Pepe | Pasta, Agnolotti | Pasta, Bucatini | Pasta, Cannelloni | Pasta, Capellini (Angel Hair) | Pasta, Cappelletti | Pasta, Cavatappi | Pasta, Conchiglie | Pasta, Conchiglioni | Pasta, Ditali or Ditalini | Pasta, Farfalle (Bow-Ties) | Pasta, Fettuccine | Pasta, Fusilli (Corkscrew) | Pasta, Gemelli | Pasta, Linguine | Pasta, Mafalda | Pasta, Manicotti (Cannelloni) | Pasta, Mostaccioli | Pasta, Novelty Shapes | Pasta, Orecchiette | Pasta, Orzo | Pasta, Pappardelle | Pasta, Penne | Pasta, Radiatore (Nuggets) | Pasta, Rigatoni | Pasta, Rosamarina | Pasta, Rotelle | Pasta, Rotini | Pasta, Shells | Pasta, Spaghetti | Pasta, Spaghettini | Pasta, Tagliatelle | | Pasta, Wagon Wheel | Pasta, Ziti | Pasty | Pea Pods, Snow (Chinese) | Peaches, Donut | Pear, Asian | Pear, Prickly | Pears, Anjou | Pears, Bartlett | Pears, Bosc | Pears, Comice | Pears, Forelle | Pears, Seckel |Peas, Black-Eyed | Peas, Green | Peas, Split | Pecans | Pepper, Black | Pepper, Red (Cayenne) | Pepper, Red Crushed |Pepper, White | Peppercorns | Peppercorns, Green | Peppers, Bell | Peppers, Roasted Bell | Persimmons | Pesto |Phyllo (Filo) | Piccata | Pignoli | Pilaf | Pine Nuts | Piroshki | Pistachio Nuts | Pita Bread | Pith | Plantains | Pluot |Polenta | Pollo | Pomegranate | Poppy Seed | Potatoes (Russet, Yukon Gold, Round White, Yellow Finnish, Baby Red, Round Red) | Potatoes, New | Potatoes, Purple | Potatoes, Sweet and Yams | Poultry Seasoning | Praline |Prawns | Primavera | Prosciutto | Protein | Puff Pastry | Pulse | Pumpkin | Pumpkin Pie Spice | Puri

(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/q-r
Q | Quince |Quinoa | R | Radicchio | Ragout | Ragu Bolognese | Range Chickens | Ratatouille | Ravioli | Red Pepper Sauce |Rehydration | Rice | Rice, Arborio | Rice, Basmati | Rice, Brown | Rice, Brown (Instant) | Rice, White (Converted) |Rice, White (Instant) | Rice, White (Regular Long Grain) | Risotto | Roly-Poly | Romaine | Rose Water | Rosemary |Roux | Rub | Rutabagas


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/s-v

S | Saffron | Sage | Sake | Salad Dressing | Salsa | Salted Black Beans | Saltimbocca | Sambhar Powder | Sambuca |Satay | Savarin | Savory | Scallions | Scallops, Bay | Scallops, Sea | Scampi | Seitan | Semolina | Shallots | Shortening | Shrimp | Shrimp, Dried | Soffritto | Sorrel | Soufflé Souffle | Sour Cream | Soy Cheese |Soy Milk | Soy Sauce | Soy Sauce, Mushroom | Soy Yogurt | Soybeans | Spaetzle | Spinach | Spreads | Squash, Summer | (Chayote, Crookneck, Green Zucchini, Pattypan, Straightneck, Yellow Zucchini) | Squash, Winter | (Acorn, Buttercup, Butternut, Spaghetti) and Pumpkin | Squid | Srirachi Sauce | Staples | Star Anise | Starfruit |Stollen | Stout | Strata | Stromboli | Sugar | Sugar, Brown | Sugar, Granulated | Sugar, Powdered | Sugo Sauce | Sushi | T | Tahini | Tamale | Tamari | Tamarillo | Tamarind | Tarragon | Tea, Black | Tea, Blended | Tea, Chai | Tea, Decaffeinated | Tea, Green | Tea, Herb | Tea, Instant | Tea, Oolong | Tea, Specialty | Tempeh | Terrine | Tetrazzini |Texturized Soy Protein (TSP) | Thyme | Tofu | Tomatillos | Tomatoes | Tomatoes, Cherry | Tomatoes, Grape |Tomatoes, Green | Tomatoes, Heirloom | Tomatoes, Hybrid | Tomatoes, Roma (Plum) | Tomatoes, Sun-Dried |Tortelli | Tortellini | Tortilla | Tripe | Truffle | Turmeric (ground) | Turnips | U | Ugli Fruit V | Veal Scaloppine | Vegetable-Oil Spreads |Vegetarian, Lacto | Vegetarian, Ovo-Lacto |Vegetarian, Semi | Vegetarian, Vegan | Verde |Vinaigrette | Vindaloo |


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page/ingredients/w-z

W | Walnuts | Wasabi | Watercress | Wheat Berries | Wheat Germ | Wild Rice | Wonton Skins | Worcestershire Sauce Yeast | Yeast, Bread Machine | Yeast, Quick Active Dry | Yeast, Regular Active Dry | Yellow Bean Paste | Yuca Root | Z | Zuppa


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

A | Almonds, How to Blanch | Angel Food Cake, How to Make | Avocado, How to Remove Pit | B | Bake | Barbecue | Baste | Beat | Biscuits, How to Make | Blanch | Blend | Boil | Braise | Bread | Bread Crumbs, How to Make | Broil, How to | Brown | Butter and Margarine in Sticks, How to Measure | Butter or Margarine, How to Melt | C | Cabbage, How to Shred | Cake, How to Frost | Cake, How to Split Layers | Candy, How to Test Doneness | Carrot Curls, How to Make | Chestnuts, How to Roast | Chicken Breasts, How to Bone | Chicken Breasts, How to Flatten | Chicken or Fish, How to Coat | Chicken, How to Cut up a Whole | Chill | Chocolate Curls, How to Make Easy | Chocolate Designs, How to Make | Chocolate, How to Melt | Chop, How To | Chopping Garlic | Citrus Twists, How to Make |Clams (Raw), How to Open | Coat | Cool | Core | Cover | Crab, How to Remove Meat | Crackers, How to Crush |Crisp-Tender | Croutons, How to Make | Crush, How To | Cube, How To | Cut In | Cut Up, How To


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

D | Dash | Deep-Fry or French-Fry | Deglaze | Dice, How To | Dip |Dissolve | Dot | Drain | Drizzle | Dry Ingredients, How to Measure | Dust | E | Eggs, How to Cook Scrambled | Eggs, How to Fry | Eggs, How to Peel Hard-Cooked | Eggs, How to Separate | En Brochette | F | Fat, How to Skim | Festive Ice Cubes, How to Make | Fish, How to Check Doneness | Flake | Flambé | Flute | Fold | Fry


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

G | Garnish | Gingerroot, How to Prepare and Chop | Glaze | Grapes, How to Frost | Grate, How To | Grease | Green Onions, How to Cut | Grilling | H | Ham, How to Carve | Heat Oven | Hull | Husk | I


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

J | Julienne, How To | K | Kiwifruit, How to Peel | Knead | L | Layer Cakes, How to Remove from Pans | Lemon Wheels, How to Make | Lemons, How to Squeeze | Liquids, How to Measure | Lobster, How to Remove Meat


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

M | Marinade | Marinate | Meat, How to Cut Grain | Melt | Microwave | Mince | Mix | Mushrooms, How to Prepare |Mushrooms, How to Soak Dried | Mussels, How to Remove the Beards | N | Nuts or Coconut, How to Toast | O |Orange Cartwheels, How to Make | Oranges, How to Section


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

P | Panbroil | Panfry | Pans, How to Grease and Flour | Pans, How to Line with Foil | Pasta, How to Check Doneness |Pastry, How to Make | Peel, How To | Peppers, Bell, How to Cut | Peppers, Bell, How to Roast | Pie Edges, How to Make | Pineapple, How to Cut Up | Plate Designs, How to Make | Poach | Pound | Powdered Sugar, How to Decorate with | Process | Puree | Q | R | Reduce | Reduce Heat | Refrigerate | Rehydrate | Roast | Roll | Roll Up


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

S | Salt, Pepper, Herbs and Spices, How to Measure | Sauté Saute | Scald | Score | Scratch | Sear | Season | Seeding a Chili | Setting the Buffet Table | Setting the Table | Shred, How To | Shredded Cheese, Cereal or Chopped Nuts, How to Measure | Shrimp, How to Devein | Simmer | Skim | Slice, How To | Slice, How To Diagonally | Slicing an Apple |Snip, How To | Soft Peaks | Soften | Solid Fats and Brown Sugar, How to Measure | Steam | Stew | Stiff Peaks | Stir |Stir-Fry | Strain | Strawberries, How to Hull | Sugar, How to Caramelize | Sugared Flowers, How to Make | T | Tear | Toast | Tomatoes, How to Seed | Tomatoes, How to Soak Sun-Dried | Tortillas, How to Soften | Toss | Turkey, How to Carve | U


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

V | W | Whip | X


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

Y | Yeast Bread Loaves, How to Shape | Yeast Dough, How to Mix | Z | Zest


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

A | Aluminum Foil | Aluminum Foil, Perforated Sheets | Angel Food Cake Pan (Tube Pan) | Antibacterial | Apple Wedger | B | Baking Dishes | Baking Pans | Biscuit Cutter | Blender, Electric | Blender, Handheld | Broiler Pan |Bundt Cake Pan | C | Can Opener | Canned Smoke | Carafe | Casserole Dish | Chafing Dish | Charcoal Briquettes |Charcoal Chimney Starter | Charcoal Grill | Clamp-on Weatherproof Lamp | Colander | Coupler for Decorating Bag | Custard Cup


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

D | Demitasse | Direct-Heat Grilling | Drip Pan | Dutch Oven (4-Quart or Larger) | E | Egg Separator | Egg Slicer |Electric Grill | Electric Mixer | | F | Fat Skimmer | Flatware (Tableware) | Fondue Pot | Food Processor | Fork | Fork, Long-Handled | French Press or Plunger Coffeemaker | Funnel


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

G | Garlic Press | Gas Grill | Gas-Level Indicator | Grater |Grill | Grill Basket, Hinged Wire | Grill Basket, Perforated |Grill Rack | Grill Topper | Grilling Gloves | Grilling Tongs | H | Hand Beater | I | Ice Cream Scoop | Indirect-Heat Grilling | Infuser |Injectors or Syringes


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

J | Jelly Roll Pan | Juicer | K | Kitchen Scissors or Shears | Knife, Chef's | Knife, Grapefruit | Knife, Multipurpose |Knife, Paring | L | Ladle | Loaf Pan


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

M | Measuring Cups-Dry | Measuring Cups-Liquid | Measuring Spoons | Microwave Oven | Mini-Chopper | Mixing Bowls | Mixing, Hands | Mop | N | Nonstick Pans | O | Omelet Pan


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

P | Pan, 13x9x2 Inch Rectangular | Pan, 9-Inch Pie | Pan, Muffin | Pastry Blender | Pastry Brush | Pastry Cloth |Pepper Mill | Percolator | Pizza Pan | Popover Pan | Pot Holders | Potato Masher | Q | Quiche Dish | R | Rice Cooker |Roasting Pan with a Rack | Roasting Rack, Vetical or Cone-Shaped | Rolling Pin | Rotisserie | Round Pan | Ruler


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

Salad Spinner | Saucepans (1-, 2-, 3-Quart) | Skewers | Skillet | Slow Cooker | Smoker | Smoker Bags | Smoker Box | Soufflé Dish Souffle | Soufflé Dish Souffle | Spaghetti Server | Spatula, Narrow Metal | Spatula, Rubber | Spatula, Wide Metal or Plastic, or Pancake Turner | Spatula, Wooden or Specially Coated Utensils | Spoon | Spoon, Large Metal | Spoon, Slotted | Spoon, Wooden or Plastic | Springform Pan | Square Pan | Steamer Basket | Stockpot |Strainer | Strawberry Huller | T | Tart Pan | Tea Strainer | Teapot | Thermometer, Meat and Instant-Read | Timer |Tongs, Cooking and Salad | U


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

V | Vegetable Brush | Vegetable Peeler | W | Waffle Iron | Wire Cooling Rack | Wire Whisk | Wok | X


(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/tips/glossary-page

Y | Z | Zester


bostonglobe.com
How food words join the dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/12/14/hello-bahn-how-food-words-join-dictionary/cflJjdCrj2225FMVyyY4SK/story.html

From "pepita" to "saison", 2014’s most delicious new entries into American English

By Britt Peterson Globe Correspondent December 14, 2014

In 2014, the American Heritage Dictionaries added 500 new words and meanings to its authoritative record of American English, including "clickbait", "cosplay", and "social anxiety disorder". The words come from all kinds of domains, from pop culture to obscure scientific specialties. But as always, a particularly rich source of new language is the food world, which delivers a wide bounty of lexical delicacies every year.
...


Erstellt: 2015-07

C

caciocavallo cheese (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/recipe_views/views/107542
There are 17,200 Google hits for "caciocavallo" cheese. It is not in the OED.
[kah-choh-kuh-VAH-loh]
From southern Italy, "caciocavallo" = "cheese on horseback" is said to date back to the 14th century, and believed by some to have originally been made from mare's milk. Today's "caciocavallo" comes from cow's milk and has a mild, slightly salty flavor and firm, smooth texture when young (about 2 months). As it ages, the flavor becomes more pungent and the texture more granular, making it ideal for grating. Caciocavallo is one of the pasta filata types of cheeses (like PROVOLONE and MOZZARELLA), which means it has been stretched and shaped by hand. It may be purchased plain or smoked and comes in string-tied gourd or spindle shapes.

cakewalk (W3)

Der "Kuchenlauf" war im 19.Jh. eine öffentliche unter afrikanischen Amerikanern. Dabei handelte es sich nicht um einen Wettlauf, sondern um eine Art Tanz, bei dem die schönsten oder komischsten Schrittfolgen mit einem Kuchen belohnt wurden.
Heute ist ein "cakewalk" eine "einfache Sache" ein "Kinderspiel".

Incidentally, the French composer Claude Debussy composed a suite of children's piano pieces between 1906 and 1908, one of which is a charming little number he called "Gollywog's Cakewalk". Since "cakewalk" is defined as a dance of American Blacks, after which a cake was sometimes awarded to the participant with the most intricate walk or pattern of steps, the picture of the dancing black doll is complete, if politically incorrect.

(E?)(L?) http://p066.ezboard.com/fwordoriginsorgfrm12.showMessage?topicID=487.topic


(E3)(L1) http://owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=832


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue089.html


(E?)(L?) http://docsouth.unc.edu/chesnuttmarrow/chesmarrow.html#marrow115


(E?)(L?) http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0314/cotts.php


(E?)(L?) http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/railton/enam312/enam712/712alst.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/092403.html#cakewalk


Cheeseburger (W3)

Der engl. "cheeseburger" entstand durch die Kombination von engl. "cheese" = "Käse" und engl. "hamburger" = "Hamburger Steak".

Kreateur des Cheeseburgers soll Louis Ballast (1910-1975), der Betreiber des Humpty Dumpty Barrel Drive-In in Denver, gewesen sein. Im März 1935 beantragte er die Trademark für seinen "Cheeseburger". Dennoch wird diese Bezeichnung heute als allgemeine Bezeichnung für diese Art von Hamburgern benutzt.

(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.vds-ev.de/anglizismenindex/suche2.php?str=c&la=on


(E?)(L?) http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/magazine/3755482.stm
101 years in 101 words: 1938 cheeseburger

(E?)(L?) http://www.cheeseandburger.com/

Ein schön gemachte Cheesburger-Site mit Anleitungen "Make the Burger" und Käseempfehlung "Meet the Cheese".


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/search.php?terms=Cheeseburger

Your search for "Cheeseburger" returned 33 articles


(E?)(L?) http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/134-pound-cheeseburger.htm
Would you pay $350 for a 134-pound cheeseburger?

(E?)(L1) http://www.magazinusa.com/us/info/show.aspx?unit=originals&doc=30&dsc=Cheeseburger

...
Wer trotzdem an die historische Stelle des Cheeseburgers pilgern will, kann sich nach 2776 N. Speer Blvd (heute der triste Parkplatz einer Bank, denn das Humpty Dumpty brannte total ab) in Denver, Colorado, aufmachen, wo eine kleine Granit Tafel noch heute daran erinnert.
...


(E?)(L1) http://www.top40db.net/Find/Songs.asp?By=Year&ID=1978
Cheeseburger In Paradise - by Jimmy Buffett

Chowder
Chaudière
Kutteln
Kalorie
clam chowder (W3)

Ein "Chowder" ist ein Gericht, das die französischsprechenden Kanadier (in Neufundland eingewanderte bretonische Fischer) in einem gußeisernen Pott (Kessel, Pfanne), frz. "Chaudière" = "Schmortopf" (wörtlich etwa: "Erhitzer") kochten. Als dieses Pfannengericht dann 1751 in die USA einwanderte machten die Neuengländer daraus "chowder".

"Chowder" ist ein Eintopf bei dem ursprünglich alle noch verwertbaren Fischreste genutzt wurden, dann kamen Muscheln und sonstige Meeresfrüchte dazu, und schließlich gab es als Zutaten auch Pökelfleisch, Schinken, Kartoffeln, Gemüse.

Und so wie das Gericht dt. "Eintopf", den Topf enthält, in dem es gekocht wird, enthält auch das engl. "Chowder" und das frz. "Chaudière" den lat. "caldaria" = "Kessel" in dem es gekocht wird (vgl. auch span. "caldera"). "Caldera" bezeichnet auch einen (durch "heiße" Explosion entstandenen) kesselartiger Vulkankrater". Das lat. "calidus" = "warm", "heiß" brachte auch frz. "chaud" und die heute nicht mehr oft zu hörenden dt. "Kaldaune" = "die noch dampfenden Eingeweide geschlachteter Tiere" hervor. Eher kann man noch die (sprachlich) reduzierten dt. "Kutteln" beim Metzger bekommen.

Bei solche üppiger Speise sollte man die "Kalorie", physikalische Maßeinheit für die "Wärmemenge", nicht vergessen, die auch in diese Wortfamilie gehört.

An der Ostküste allseits beliebt und kräftig umworben sind z.B. clam chowder, d.h. mit jeder Menge Muscheln.

Wer Hummer nicht mag, sollte die "Muschelsuppe" oder die regionale Alternative zum Hamburger probieren, Crab Cake, eine Art Burger aus Krebsfleisch. Dazu schmeckt kalifornischer Weißwein, der es mit jedem guten europäischen aufnehmen kann.


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=caldron


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=chowder


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=chowder


(E?)(L?) http://www.heritage.nf.ca/dictionary/azindex/c.html
In Neufundland, Kanada, kann "chowder" auch ein Bier sein ("chowder beer", 1828).

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/
cauldron

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=chowder


(E?)(L1) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=chowder
Chowder Bags | chowder bowl | chowder box | chowder breath | chowder cannon | Chowder Chugger | chowder cunt | Chowder Dogs | chowder face | chowder hair | chowder head | chowder howitzer | chowder mouth | chowder musket | Chowder Nuts | Chowder Pants | Chowder Pipe | chowder pocket | Chowder Pot | chowder puff | chowder pygmy | chowder shower | Chowder Snatch | Chowder Wench | chowder'd | chowder-powder | chowderback | chowderbag | chowderbeast | chowderbox | chowderhead | chowderoak

(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Ass+chowder
Ass chowder

(E?)(L?) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Asschowder
asschowder

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/back-n.html#chowder


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/chowder


Die "Clam Chowder" enthält wie der Name sagt auf jeden Fall Muscheln (engl. "clam" = "(eßbare) Muschel").

(E?)(L?) http://www.barrypopik.com/index.php/new_york_city/entry/manhattan_clam_chowder/
Manhattan Clam Chowder

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/weblog/permalink/condom_in_the_clam_chowder/
2003 November: Condom in the Clam Chowder

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/
Manhattan clam chowder | New England clam chowder

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/d40.html
What is the difference between the clam chowders - Manhattan, New England, and Rhode Island?

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/manhattan-clam-chowder
Manhattan clam chowder

(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/new-england-clam-chowder
New England clam chowder

convenience store (W3)

Ein engl. "convenience store", ("C-Store") ist ein Geschäft mit etwa 100-300 qm Verkaufsfläche, das eine begrenzte Anzahl an Nahrungsmittel, pharmazeutischen Artikeln und gängigen Haushaltswaren auch noch zu später Stunde verkauft.

Die Bezeichnung engl. "convenience" (dt. "Bequemlichkeit") bedeutet dabei, dass die Ware jederzeit, schnell und ohne große Belastungen verfügbar ist. Im weitesten Sinn gehören dazu Tankstellen-Shops, Kioske, Trinkhallen, Bahnhofsläden, Bäckereinen, Metzgereien, Tabakgeschäfte, Getränkemärkte.

(E?)(L?) http://corp.7-eleven.com/corp/7-eleven-profile

7-Eleven Profile

7-Eleven is the world’s largest convenience store chain operating, franchising and licensing more than 56,400 stores in 18 countries, of which nearly 10,500 are in North America. 7-Eleven also is one of the nation's largest independent gasoline retailers. Its company’s name was changed from The Southland Corporation to 7-Eleven, Inc. after approval by shareholders on April 28, 1999.
...


(E?)(L?) http://web.archive.org/web/20041129104649/http://www.bartleby.com/68/95/1495.html

convenience store, convenience food


(E?)(L?) http://mattiasa.blogspot.de/2010/07/convenience-store.html

Convenience store


(E?)(L?) http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/convenience-store.html

convenience store


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2011-March/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2011-February/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2002-August/subject.html




(E?)(L1) http://www.markenlexikon.com/glossar_c.html

Convenience Store


(E?)(L?) http://www.marketing.ch/Wissen/Marketing-Lexikon?udt_914_param_fil=C

Convenience-stores


(E?)(L?) http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=convenience store

Limericks on "convenience store"


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/convenience store

convenience store


(E?)(L?) http://asp.revues.org/3935#tocto1n7

...
Il s’agit bien d’une de ces boutiques connues sous le nom de "convenience stores", ou "magasin de proximité", à l’américaine. Voilà donc l’exemple, singulier à vrai dire, de cette notion commerciale, "convenience", qui revient sans cesse au hasard des lectures de la presse spécialisée américaine, et, à un degré moindre, britannique. L’anecdote prend alors tout son sens : la convenance est peut-être ce à quoi on ne s’attend pas, la surprise agréable, proche et pratique à la fois ; ni contrainte ni construction complexe ou distante, elle est à portée de main, disponible, et il suffit d’un peu de chance pour la trouver. Ténue comme un fil d’Ariane, elle va être le guide qui conduira aux mots-clés, un peu comme une idée qui va au gré des mots et les relie parfois. Elle mérite qu’on s’y attarde.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.sekretaria.de/daily_vocabmail.html?day=2012-10-08

convenience store


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/convenience-store

convenience store


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/convenience-stores

convenience-stores


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=convenience store
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "convenience store" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1900 / 1960 auf.

Erstellt: 2015-09

D

E

F

FHN (W3)

"FHN" steht für "Food History News".

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodhistorynews.com/

Last updated October 21, 2009,


Food (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food
Meals: Breakfast | Lunch | High tea | Dinner | Supper | Dessert
Eating utensils:Chopsticks | Knife | Fork | Spoon

foodmuseum
Food Museum
Food History, News, Features & Temporary Exhibits

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodmuseum.com/

Feast or Famine | Crepes | Licorice | Watermelon | Food Heritage Sites | Museums about Food & Eating | National Museum of Food & Farm: a proposal | France's historic salt industry | Tropical foods series | School Lunch Reform | Food Museums & Heritage Sites of France | Site Map | Links


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodmuseum.com/sitemap.html

Agave | Akee | Almond | Apple | Artichoke | Asparagus | Atemoya | Avocado | Bamboo | Banana | Barley | Basil | Beans | | Blueberries | Brazil nut | Breadfruit | Beet | Birds | Broccoli | Brussels Sprouts | Buckwheat | Cabbage | Cacao | Cactus | Carrot | Cashew | Cassava | Cattle | Caviar | Celeriac | Celery | Chayote | Cherimoya | Cherry | Chicken | | Chives | Chocolate | Cinnamon | Clam | Clove | Coconut Palm | Coffee | Cottonseed | Corn/Maize | Crab | Cranberry | Crayfish | Crustaceans | Cucumber | Currant | Custard apple | Dairy | Date | Dill | Duck | Durian | Eel | Eggplant | Eggs | | Fig | Fish | Frog | Garlic | Ginger | Goat | Goose | Granadillas | Grape | Grapefruit | Guanabana | Guarana | Guava | Guinea pig | Honey | Horseradish | JerusalemArtichoke | Jicama | Kiwifruit | Lark | Leek | Lemon | Lentil | Lettuce | Lobster | Maize | Mango | Maple | Melon | Millet | Mollusks | Mushroom | Mussels | Mustard | Nutmeg | Oats | Ocai | Octopus | Okra | Oil Palm | Olive | Onion | Orange | Ostrich | Oyster | Papaya | Parsley | Passionfruit | Pea | Peach | Peanut | Pecan | Peppercorn | Peppers | Persimmon | Pickle | Pig | Pigeon | Pineapple | Pine nut | Pistachio | Pizza | Potato | Prickly Pear | Pumpkin | Rabbit | Radish | Rhubarb | Rice | Rosemary | Rye | Saffron | Sago palm | Saguaro | Salmon | Sapodilla | Sardine | Seaweed | Sheep | Shrimp | Sorghum | Spinach | Squash | Squid | Strawberry | Sturgeon | Sugar apple | Sugar beet | Sugarcane | Sugar palm | Sunflower | Sweet Potato | Tea | Tomatillo | Tomato | Truffle | Tuna | Turkey | Turnip | Vanilla | Walnut | Watermelon | Whale | Wheat | Wild rice | Yerba mate | Yucca


foodreference
Food Reference

(E?)(L1) http://www.foodreference.com/

Articles & Features | Facts & Trivia | COOKING TIPS | Recipes | Quotes | Who's Who | Food History | Food Videos | Food Trivia Quizzes | Crosswords | Poetry & Humor | Cookbooks | Food Posters | Magazines | Flowers | Key West | Gourmet Tours | Cooking Schools | Festivals & Shows


Insgesamt eine lohnenswerte Site! Sie hat wirklich ein Doppel-L1 verdient.
Einmal ist das "Who is Who" sehr empfehlenswert. Beispiel:

Archestratus (c. 350 B.C.)
Archestratus Wrote "Hedypatheia" (Pleasant Living).
It is one of the earliest cookbooks, and was mentioned by Athenaeus.


Dann gibt es Kochhinweise und Rezepte, Kreuzworträtsel, Zitate und einige andere nette Sachen.

Und unter "Facts and Trivia" findet man viele Informationen zu Speisen und Zutaten. Das geht los mit:

Abalone | Abalone Poisoning | Absinthe | Ac'cent | Aceite de Bacalao | Acerola, Barbados Cherry | Achiote Seed | | Adzuki Bean | Agnes Sorel | Airline Food | Airports | Air Potato | Ajinomoto | Alabama | Alaska | Albermarle Pippin | Albert Sauce | Albondiga | Albumen | Alcohol | Alcohol in Cooking | Ale | Alfred Charles Kinsey | Alligator Pear | Allspice | Almonds | Aluminum | American Food | Ammonium Bicarbonate | Anasazi Beans | Angostura | Animal Crackers | Anise Seed | Annatto, Annatto Seed | Apees | Apicius | Appetite | Appaloosa Beans | Apple Brown Betty | Apple Cart | Apple Cider | Apple Pie | Apples | Apricots | Aquaculture | Arizona | Art | Artichokes | Ashcake | Astronauts | Au Naturel | Aunt Jemima Pancakes | Australia | Automat | Avocado | Aztec Food

und endet mit:
Zebra Tomatoes | Zebu | Zedoary | Zeppelins in a Fog | Zest | Zucchini | Zucchini Bread | Zuppa, Zuppe | Zuppa Inglese | Zymology or Zzymurgy

Das Beispiel zu Zucchini zeigt, dass es nicht direkt um etymologische Hinweise geht, aber es gibt doch den einen oder anderen sprachlichen Hinweis.

Zucchini (courgette in French) are a variety of vegetable marrow, a summer squash. They are tender and tasty when young, but most varieties are tasteless when large and overgrown. When buying zucchini, look for that is firm and heavy for its size. Do not wash until ready to use.
Mild bitterness in zucchini, like that in related species like cucumbers, may be result from environmental factors such as high temperature, low moisture, low soil nutrients, etc. The bitterness is caused by compounds called cucurbitacins.
There is also a rare condition which can cause extreme bitterness in zucchini. A compound called Cucurbitacin E is found in wild species of squash, but is extremely rare in cultivated species. Very, very rarely a mutant plant or a chance cross with a wild species may result in cultivated plants with Cucurbitacin E. There will be an acrid smell when you cut the zucchini, and just touching the flesh to your tongue will have an extremely unpleasant bitter taste. Do Not Eat such zucchini. They may cause cramps, diarrhea and even collapse. If you know where the seeds came from, notify your local Agricultural Extension service.
Remember, this is not the normal bitterness which occurs occasionally with zucchini and related species. This is a very unpleasant and very bitter taste and is an extremely rare occurrence.

(E?)(L?) http://www.foodreference.com/html/foodarticles.html

Beverage Article Categories (Each category contains many articles) Food Article Categories (Each category contains many articles)


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodreference.com/html/triviatips.html

FOOD TRIVIA


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodreference.com/html/quotes.html

FOOD QUOTES


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodreference.com/html/whoswhom.html

WHO’S WHO in the Culinary World WHO’S WHO IN THE FOOD & BEVERAGE WORLD
Culinary Personalities
Famous Chefs, celebrity chefs, cooks, food critics, restaurant critics, cookbook authors, patrons, inventors, bakers, restaurant owners, food writers, entrepreneurs, etc.


French fried potatoes, French Frieds, French Fries, Fries, french - to french
Fries - Would you like fries with that? (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.mcdonalds.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.simplot.com/


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2003-1-Jan.htm


Während seine Aufenthalts in Frankreich als Botschafter lernte Thomas Jefferson die "French fried potatoes" kennen. Als 3. amerikanische Präsident sorgte er dann für die Einführung der Kartoffel als Nahrungsmittel in den USA. Von 1870 bis 1960 reduzierten sich die "French fried potatoes" jedoch zu schlichten "fries".

Angeblich gehen die "French fried potatoes" jedoch nicht auf die Herkunft aus Frankreich zurück, sondern auf das Verb "to french" = "to cut into strips or slices, before cooking". Dieses Verb kann man im Webster auch finden. Möglich wäre aber, dass die französische Art des Kochens von in Streifen geschnittenem Gemüse zu dem englischen Verb "to french" führte. Aber ich konnte bisher keinen verbindlichen Hinweis dazu finden.

McCain Foods Limited: Florenceville, New Brunswick, Canada - McCain family began producing French fried potatoes in 1957, now world’s leading maker of French fries. ...

J.R. Simplot: Founder Jack Simplot, now 94, ran away from home while in eighth grade, sorted potatoes, expanded into vegetables, fertilizer, cattle, food processing. He became a millionaire by 30; supplied dehydrated potatoes and vegetables to U.S. troops in World War II; pioneered frozen "French fries" in the 1950s. ...

Der Slogan "Would you like fries with that?" (kreiert von McDonald's) ist zu einer Redewendung geworden. Die Marketing-Strategy dahinter besagt, dass man Kunden mit einer entsprechenden Frage zu zusätzlichen Käufen motivieren kann, selbst wenn Sie gar nicht die Absicht hatten noch zusätzlich Pommes frites zu kaufen.

G

gourmetspot
Culinary Content Online

(E6)(L?) http://www.gourmetspot.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.gourmetspot.com/about.htm

About GourmetSpot.com

Simplifying the Search for the Best Culinary Content Online

Welcome to GourmetSpot.com, the first course of the World Wide Web for food lovers. Thanks for stopping by! We hope you find our site to be a delicious and useful addition to your kitchen.

GourmetSpot.com was designed to break through the information overload of the Web to bring the best food and beverage sites together with insightful editorial in one convenient, user-friendly spot. Sites featured on GourmetSpot.com are hand-selected by our editorial team for their exceptional quality, content and utility - and of course their good taste.
...


H

Hamburger (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.mcdonalds.de/
Die Geschichte des Hamburgers begann in Russland. Dort zogen vor 800 Jahren die Tartaren, ein mongolischer Stamm, durch die endlosen Steppen. Um das erbeutete Rindfleisch bekömmlicher zu machen, legten sie es unter den Sattel, ritten es weich, hackten es klein und verspeisten es anschliessend roh.

Im 18.Jh. brachten Matrosen den Hackfleischklopps nach Deutschland. Der Hamburger, der seinen Namen der Hansestadt verdankt, war geboren. Mit deutschen Immigranten wanderte er schliesslich nach Amerika aus und wurde dort zur Nationalspeise.

Hot Dog (W3)

Um den "heißen Hund" haben sich einige Legenden gebildet. Aber welche herkunft ist die richtige?

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-hot1.htm

What is the origin of hot dog as in a sausage in a roll?
...
What seems to have happened is that near the end of the nineteenth century, around 1894-95, students at Yale University began to refer to the "wagons selling hot sausages in buns" as "dog wagons". ... It was only a short step from this campus use of "dog" to "hot dog", and this fateful move was made in a story in the issue of the Yale Record for 19 October 1895, which ended, “They contentedly munched hot dogs during the whole service”.
...
The combination of the existing and new usage seems to have been a potent one in the air of the 1890s and within a few years "hot dog" become the most usual term (though "frankfurter" and "wiener" are both recorded from the early 1880s, they lost out somewhat in the popularity stakes to hot dog’s native charm).
...


I

Icy Cream (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem406.html
Thomas Carew (1595?-1640): The Spring
Now that winter's gone, the earth hath lost
Her snow-white robes, and now no more frost
Candies the grass, or casts an icy cream
Upon the silver lake or crystal stream....

internationalrecipes
Food and Wine Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.internationalrecipes.net/


(E?)(L1) http://www.internationalrecipes.net/recipes/dictionary.pl


J

Julia Child - Rose

Julia Child (1912-2004) hatte von 1963 bis 2000 eine TV-Show in der es um die Französische Küche in den USA ging. Sie wurde zur Institution. Im Jahr 2006 wurde eine Rose nach ihr benannt. Am 15 August 2012 zu ihrem 100sten Geburtstag widmete ihr Google ein eigenes "Doodle".

(E?)(L?) http://www.abebooks.com/books/mastering-art-french-cooking-cookbook/julia-child.shtml

Julia Child's Cookbooks

Julia Child (1912-2004) can be thanked for introducing French cuisine to America - the land of hot dogs and apple pie - during the 1960s. Aside from her most famous creation, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Child wrote more than a dozen cookbooks. Mastering the Art of French Cooking was first published in 1961 and her TV career began two years later.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.dradio.de/dlf/sendungen/kalenderblatt/1834684/

Deutschlandfunk / Kalenderblatt - 15.08.2012
Institution der amerikanischen Kochkultur
Vor 100 Jahren wurde die amerikanische Köchin Julia Child geboren
Von Beatrix Novy

Französische Menüs statt Dosenkost: Julia Childs nahm mit ihrem Kochbuch "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" den amerikanischen Hausfrauen die Angst vor Herausforderungen in der Küche.

1961: Ganz Amerika ernährt sich nach den Rezepten landläufiger Kochbücher; sie heißen "Die 10-Minuten-Mahlzeit" oder "Das Dosenöffner-Kochbuch". Dann reißt der Himmel auf: Ein neues, ganz anderes Kochbuch kommt auf den Markt: "Mastering the Art of French Cooking" - "Die Kunst der französischen Küche meistern", von Julia Child. Sofort stürmen die Leute die Buchläden; Amerikas Hausfrauen verlieren ihre Scheu vor frischem Gemüse, Schalentieren, mehrgängigen Menüs, eine bisher ungekannte Esskultur hält Einzug.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.everyrose.com/everyrose/roses/EveryRose.lasso?-database=RoseDatabase.fp3&-layout=detail&-response=%2feveryrose%2froses%2fdetail.lasso&-recordID=39932&-search

Julia Child my Medium Yellow, Floribunda 2006


(E?)(L?) http://www.google.com/doodles/julia-childs-100th-birthday

Aug 15, 2012 - Julia Child's 100th Birthday


(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=2.37391.1

Synonyme:


(E?)(L?) http://www.hortico.com/roses/view.asp?action=sbcn&catno=FLJUCH10

Julia Child - Floribunda Roses


(E?)(L?) http://www.juliachildfoundation.org/

The Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts

The Julia Child Foundation for Gastronomy and the Culinary Arts was created by Julia in 1995 as a grant-giving private foundation. Through its support of 501©(3) organizations whose work advances matters Julia valued, the Foundation honors her lifelong love of learning, her far-reaching impact as a teacher and mentor, and her passion for gastronomy and the culinary arts.

Julia brought her uplifting approach to life directly into the kitchens of millions of people. She made food preparation and the dining experience fun and approachable, while at the same time encouraging excellence. The Foundation supports her commitment to educate and encourage others to live well through the joys of cooking and eating well.


(E?)(L2) http://www.rose.org/past-winners/


(E?)(L?) http://www.rose.org/2006-winner-julia-child/

"Julia Child" is a floribunda destined to be as famous as her namesake. Personally chosen by the award-winning chef herself, this rose combines old-fashioned style with delicious fragrance rarely found in a free-flowering plant.
...
Hybridized by Tom Carruth and introduced by Weeks Roses of Upland, CA
...


K

L

languageoffood
The Language of Food

(E?)(L?) http://languageoffood.blogspot.com/


Erstellt: 2010-09

Lupini Pasta (W3)

Die botanische Bezeichnung "Lupin", dt., engl. "Lupine" geht zurück auf lat. "lupinus", "lupus" = "Wolf". Warum die Pflanze jedoch mit dem Wolf in Verbindung gebracht wurde ist bisher nicht geklärt. Möglicherweise bezieht sich der Name auf die wolfsgrau behaarten Hülsen oder auf den bitteren Geschmack der Samen.

(E?)(L?) http://www.bettycrocker.com/how-to/glossary/Ingredients/P-R/P/Pasta-Lupini.htm
Pasta, Lupini

M

Marshmallow (W3)

Engl. "Marshmallows" sind süße Naschereien. Wörtlich bedeutet engl. "marsh mallow" = dt. "Sumpf-Malve", "Eibisch". Dies hat seinen Grund. In früheren Zeiten stellten Konditoren die "Marshmallows" aus den zuckerhaltigen Eibischwurzeln her. Heute verwendet man Ersatzstoffe dafür.

Wgen seines Zuckerreichtums und der Verwendung als Grillgut werden die Marshmallows in Deutschland aich "Mäusespeck" genannt.

Engl. "marshmallow" geht zurück auf altengl. "mersc-mealwe", "merscmealwe" (um 1000) = dt. "Malvenpflanze ("Althea officinalis"), die in der Nähe salziger Marschflächen wächst" und entwickelte sich über "marshmalue" (1450), "marche mallow" (1543), "marsh mallow" (17. Jh.) zu "marshmallow" (19. Jh.).

Altengl. "Mealwe", das die Zugehörigkeit zu bot. "Malvaceae" zeigt, entwickelte sich zu engl. "mallow".

Als Bezeichnung für die Nascherei "Marshmallow" ist seit 1877 bekannt. Ursprünglich wurden sie aus einer Paste aus der Sumpfpflanze hergestellt oder zumindest damit abgeschmeckt. Genauer gesagt wurden die Wurzeln des "Echten Eibichs", bot. "Althaea officinalis", dazu verwendet.

Scherzhaft wird engl. "marshmallow" auch für etwas mit einem weichen Kern und im übertragenen Sinn für "sentimental", "rührselig" verwendet.

Die Bezeichnung bot. "Malvaceae" geht zurück auf lat. "Malva" und (vermutlich) weiter auf griech. "malake", "maluke", "maláche", "moláche" = dt. "weich machen". (Die griechischen Varianten sollen weiter aus einer der Mittelmeersprachen übernommen worden sein.) Man sprach der Pflanze die medizinische Eigenschaft zu "hauterweichend", "hautentspannend" zu wirken und die Verdauung zu fördern. Kräutersammler sprechen ihr diese Eigenschaft auch heute noch zu.

So hat der fluffige engl. "marshmallow" mit dem "weich machenden" griech. "malake" doch noch einen passenden Urahn gefunden.

Bleibt noch die Farbbezeichnung frz. "mauve" zu erwähnen, die dt. "malvenfarbig" bedeutet.

Die botanische Bezeichnung bot. "Althaea officinalis" geht zurück auf griech. "althein" = dt. "heilen". Die Malvenpflanze wurde einst als Heilpflanze genutzt.

Andere Namen für dt. "Eibisch" sind dt. "Sumpfmalve" (engl. "marsh mallow"), "Weiße Malve", "Schleimwurzel" (wegen des großen Anteils an Schleimstoffen wie "Glucane", "Arabinogalactane", "Rhamnogalacturonane"), "Samtpappel", "Heilwurz" "Hilfwurz".

Zur Familie der Malvengewächse gehören auch dt. "Hibiskus" = engl. "hibiscus", dt. "Okra" (eine Bezeichnung aus einer westafrikanischen Sprache für eine längliche Frucht einer Eibischart) = engl. "okra", dt. "Baumwolle" = engl. "cotton" und einige andere Pflanzen wie Kakao, und der Affenbrotbaum "Baobab".

Bleibt noch nachzutragen, dass die weißen schaumigen Mundpfropfen nicht in den USA erfunden wurden sondern in Frankreich. Dort wurde aus aufgeschlagenem Eiweß, Zucker und den Inhaltsstoffen der Eibischwurzel die "Pâte de guimauve" hergestellt.

(E?)(L?) http://www.candyusa.com/FunStuff/FunFactsDetail.cfm?ItemNumber=973

Fun Facts About Marshmallows


(E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/mallow07.html

Mallows

Family: N.O. Malvaceae ...
MALLOW, MARSH

Common Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis LINN.)

Botanical: Althaea officinalis (LINN.) ...


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=marshmallow


(E?)(L1) http://www.foodtimeline.org/




(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodcandy.html#marshmallows

...
The history of the "marshmallow" quite interesting. Did you know this confection (albeit in a very different form) dates back to Ancient times? The very first "marsh mallows" were plants ["Althaea officinalis"] indigenous to Europe and Asia. The flowers were favored by the Ancient Greeks and Romans because they were considered to be healthful. Platina in his De Honesta Voluptuate et Valetudine [On Right Pleasure and Good Health] (an Italian cookery text published in the late 15th Century) devotes Book IV, Section 8 to "On the Seasoning of Mallow," in which he outlines the botanical history and healing properties of this particular plant. "Marshmallows", progenitor of the fluffy white confection we eat today [which, by the way contains NO marsh mallow], originated in France sometime during the middle of the nineteenth century.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodmarsh.html

Marshmallow Sandwiches (Nabisco)


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/




(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/Peonies/plants.php?grp=A&t=2

Peonies:


(E?)(L?) http://www.holidayinsights.com/other/marsh.htm

Der "National Marshmallow Toasting Day" wird am 30 August gefeiert.


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/life/botany/marshmallow-info.htm

Marshmallow
...
The roots yield a gelatinous substance called mucilage, which was formerly used in marshmallow candy.
...


(E?)(L?) http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/natural-medicine/herbal-remedies/marshmallow-herbal-remedies.htm

Marshmallow: Herbal Remedies
...
All of the "mallows" bear lovely but short-lasting blossoms with thin, moist petals that become sticky if crushed. "Althea" is from the Greek "althino", meaning "I cure". It is so named because "mallow" has been used medicinally for centuries. The Greeks used "marshmallow" to treat wounds, toothaches, coughing, and insect stings. The Romans valued marshmallow roots and leaves for their laxative properties. "Mallow" is mentioned by Hippocrates and Culpepper in their herbal treatises. The confection "marshmallows" are so named because they were originally flavored with the roots of this herb.
...


(E6)(L1) http://www.imagines-plantarum.de/cname2frm.html

common marshmallow


(E?)(L?) http://www.kentchemistry.com/KentsDemos.htm

Imaginationland Creatures in a Vacuum (Easter Demo)

These cute creatures from Imaginationland are truly evil and are sentenced to the VACUUM CHAMBER. Watch Boyle's Law in action as these marshmallow creatures get what is coming to them.


(E?)(L?) http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19961118


(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/marshmallow


(E?)(L?) http://www.sex-lexis.com/Sex-Dictionary/marshmallows


(E?)(L?) http://www.slashfood.com/2011/02/08/beer-marshmallows

Beer Marshmallows


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW170/page2.html#marshmallow

marshmallow


(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW134/page1.html

mallow


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SS

Strawberry Marshmallow


(E?)(L?) http://xkcd.com/archive/

Marshmallow Gun


(E1)(L1) http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/graph?corpus=0&content=Marshmallows
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Marshmallows" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1810 auf.

Erstellt: 2013-09

Muffin
muffin-choker
stud-muffin (W4)

Laut "krysstal" ist es ein deutsches Wort. Und "etymonline" ergänzt, dass es 1703, über "moofin" möglicherweise aus dt. "muffen", dem Plural von "muffe" = "kleiner Kuchen" ins Englische übernommen wurde. Möglich wäre auch altfrz. "moufflet" = "soft", als Bezeichnung für dt. "Brot".

Die "Kleine Muffin-History" von "muffin-paradies" erklärt zwar, dass die Muffins im 18.Jh. in England vom "Muffin man" angeboten wurden und dann im 19. Jh. nach Amerika exportiert wurden, aber zur Bezeichnung gibt es keine weiteren Informationen.

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=m&p=23


(E?)(L1) http://www.foodreference.com/html/artenglishmuffins.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/borrow_german.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.muffinfilms.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.muffin-paradies.de/


(E6)(L?) http://www.verpoorten.de/eierlikoer-rezepte/backen/blaubeer-muffins-rezept-mit-dem-gelben-klassiker.html/special/N28LRKFX683MFRKDE


(E1)(L?) http://www.wordspy.com/words/muffin-choker.asp
Wie aus dem "muffin-choker" (mögliche Übersetzung: "Muffin-Stehkragen") ein Ausdruck für eine "unglaubliche Nachricht" ("unbelievable news story") wurde, wird bei "Wordspy" zwar zitiert aber nicht erklärt.

N

O

P

Phood (W3)

"Phood" setzt sich zusammen aus "Pharma" und "Food" (nutritionally enhanced food).

(E1)(L1) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S1=ads-l


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0403C&L=ADS-L&P=R5520&I=-3&X=1C69EA13266648AFCC


polyglotveg - Polyglot Vegetarian
Grazing through the world of words

(E?)(L?) http://polyglotveg.blogspot.com/




Pop, Soda, Coke

(E?)(L?) http://www.ugcs.caltech.edu/~almccon/pop_soda
The Great "Pop" vs. "Soda" vs. "Coke" Controversy - the regional variations in the use of the terms "Pop" and "Soda" and "Coke" to describe carbonated soft drinks.

pumpernickel (W3)

Der "pumpernde Nickel" hat es 1766 sogar in die USA geschafft.

(E1)(L1) http://www.bartleby.com/81/13773.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pumpernickel


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=pumpernickel


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S2=ads-l&q=etymology&s=&f=&a=02%2F04%2F05&b=2005
021988 02/04/18 00:38 97 Gouda, French Fry, Saveloy (1828); Pumpernickel

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E2)(L1) http://www.snopes.com/language/stories/pumper.asp


pumpkin (W3)

Der engl. (bot.) "pumpkin" = "Kürbis" geht über ein altes französisches Wort "pompon", "popon", "pepon" zurück auf lat. "pepon" = "Wassermelone". Der Suffix "-kin" entstammt entstammt dem ndl. "-kijn", "-kin" als Verkleinerungsform. Ein "pumpkin" ist also ein "Kürbislein".

"Pumpkinseed" ist auch die Bezeichnung für einen nordamerikanischen Fisch ("Lepomis gibbosus") mit einem runden meist orangenen Körper.

"Pumpkin" als Farbe: - #ff6f1a - Pumpkin


In der Welt der Datenverarbeitung werden manchmal seltsame Rituale geprägt. So gab es zu Zeiten der Bandverarbeitung die Sitte, die Zugriffsrechte (für Backups) auf das Bandlaufwerk mit Hilfe eines Plüschkürbis zuzuweisen. Der Ausdruck scheint in Bereichen, in denen es auf ausschließliche Zugriffsrechte ankommt, immer noch in Umlauf zu sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.asiafood.org/glossary_2.cfm?wordid=2759
Marrow & Pumpkin

(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/cumbria/features/halloween/pumpkin.shtml
How to make a jack-o'-lantern
(E?)(L1) http://www.bbc.co.uk/cumbria/features/halloween/pumpkin/pumpkin_gallery.shtml


(E2)(L1) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/pumpki75.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/m/melons30.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/Bookhouse_Volume_1/pages/040_My_Bookhouse_in_the_Nursery.htm
Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=pumpkin


(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=pumpkin


(E?)(L?) http://www.hp-lexicon.org/index/master-index-p.html
pumpkin | Pumpkin Juice | pumpkin patch | Pumpkins R Us

(E6)(L1) http://www.imagines-plantarum.de/cname2frm.html
field pumpkin

(E?)(L?) http://www.moviemaze.de/media/trailer/549,pumpkin.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/weblog/permalink/plastic_pumpkin_carving/
2005 October: Plastic Pumpkin Carving

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW175/page5.html
Issue 175 Spotlight Halloween
Laughing Stock What happens when pumpkins eat too much candy on Halloween

(E?)(L?) http://whatis.techtarget.com/definitionsAlpha/0,289930,sid9_alpP,00.html

"PumpKIN" is a free, open source application that is used for exchange of data using the Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP).
...


Dabei scheint "KIN" für "Klever Internet Nothings" zu stehen.

(E?)(L?) http://kin.klever.net/pumpkin/


(E1)(L1) http://gernot-katzers-spice-pages.com/engl/Cucu_pep.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/pumpkin


Q

R

Rainbow Sorbet - Rose

Die Bezeichnung "Rainbow Sorbet" verdankt die Rose ihrer Mehrfarbigkeit. Die Assoziation mit einem "Sorbet" könnte dem fruchtigen Grundton geschuldet sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.ars.org/?page_id=3343




(E?)(L?) http://www.rose.org/past-winners/

2006 - Rainbow Sorbet - Floribunda - Bicolor/Multicolor


(E?)(L2) http://www.rose.org/2006-winner-rainbow-sorbet/

"Rainbow Sorbet" is as cool and delicious as it sounds. This multicolor floribunda harkens back to the popular variety Playboy from which it is a descendant.
...
Hybridized by Ping Lim, Rainbow Sorbet is being introduced by The Conard-Pyle Company/Star Roses of West Grove, PA
...


Erstellt: 2012-12

recipebridge
Recipes

(E?)(L?) http://www.recipebridge.com/

Find Recipes by Category
Appetizers | Beverages | Breakfast | Cakes | Candies | Casseroles | Chicken | Desserts | Dips and Spreads | Fish and Seafood | Meat | Pasta | Pies | Potatoes | Salads | Sauces | Soups | Vegetables | Breads


(E?)(L?) http://www.recipebridge.com/browse

Browse Recipes:


recipesource
Recipe Source

(E?)(L1) http://www.recipesource.com/

Our Recipe Collection

We've organized our recipes into two major groups - recipes primarily identified with an ethnic cuisine are broken down by region and ethnic group, while other recipes are categorized by the type of dish.

Ethnic cuisines by region: Recipes by type of dish:


roach coach (W3)

"Roach coach" zählt zu den "Reduplications".

Wofür engl. "roach" genau steht, ist mir nicht bekannt. Eine mögliche (wörtliche) Übersetzung für den rollenden Mittagswagen wäre etwa "Kühl-Kutsche". Vielleicht ist aber auch amer. "roach" = "Küchenschabe" gemeint, dann müßte man "Küchenschaben-Kutsche" übersetzen.

(E1)(L1) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S1=ads-l
Roach Coach (1985 for catering wagon)

(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/word/roach-coach.php


S

Slugburger, slug (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.slugburger.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.ouraaa.com/traveler/0107/festivals_for.html
is not in that great work known as (you know the rest by now) John F. Mariani's ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN FOOD AND DRINK (1999).
I looked in the Corinth (Mississippi) Yellow Pages under "Restaurants," but failed to find a "slugburger" in even a mid-1990s directory. But it dates from 1918??
SLUGBURGER--124 Google hits
SLUG BURGER--21 Google hits

What s a slugburger?
Before heading to the 14th annual Slugburger Festival, July 12-14 in Corinth, Miss., you might want to know that "slugburgers" are not made from the terrestrial gastropod mollusk of the same name.
According to the "Gourmand’s Guide to Dining in and Around Corinth", a slugburger is "a burger made of a mixture of beef and some form of cheaper breading extender, which is then deep-fat fried to a golden brown instead of grilled as a common hamburger". In the past, cornmeal was the most common extender and lard was used for frying; today, soybean meal is the extender of choice and vegetable oil is used for frying.
(PHOTO CAPTION: The Slugburger fesdtival in Corinth, Miss, may not have an appetizing name, but the centerpiece of the celebration is delicious. It's a burger made of beef and breading and then deep fried. /Mississippi Tourism photo)

"The standard garnish for a "slugburger" is mustard, pickle and an ample dose of onions. Good manners requires everyone to partake at the same time so that afterward everyone’s breath is equally offensive", the guide stated.

The origin of the "slugburger" name is a matter of local debate. For many years, slugburgers were sold for a nickel and a slang expression for a nickel was a "slug", hence the most common explanation for the name. Another popular explanation is that if you overindulge, you might feel as though someone slugged you in the stomach.
Other featured foods include funnel cakes and fried green tomatoes.

The Slugburger Festival is the major fundraiser for the Main Street Corinth downtown revitalization program. The Alcorn County Courthouse will be the site of the carnival, local entertainment and food vendors, while the celebrity headliners will perform on the nearby main stage.

T

TANSTAAFL (W3)

"Nichts ist umsons", nicht mal eine Mahlzeit, amerik. "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch" ("TANSTAAFL"). Allerdings bezieht er sich auf eine kostenlose Gabe. Im 19. Jh. wurde in amerikanischen Bars kostenlose Essenshappen gereicht, in der Hoffnung den Getränkekonsum anzukurbeln. Der Wirtschaftswissenschaftler Milton Friedman, der 1976 den Nobelpreis für Wirtschaft gewann, machte den Ausdruck populär.

Man findet oft auch die Abkürzung "TANSTAAFL", die auf den Science Fiction-Autor Robert Heinlein zurück geht, der sie in seiner Novelle "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress", 1966, benutzte.

(E?)(L?) http://www.business-english.de/daily_mail_result.html?day=2009-10-13


(E?)(L?) http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/go01.html


(E?)(L?) http://home.comcast.net/~wwftd/


(E?)(L?) http://home.comcast.net/~wwftd/wwftds.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.investopedia.com/categories/acronyms.asp
There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch - TANSTAAFL

(E?)(L?) http://www.investopedia.com/terms/t/


(E3)(L1) http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/


(E3)(L1) http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/t/TheJargonLexicon.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list


(E?)(L?) http://www.jessesword.com/sf/list/?subject=sf_fandom


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?S2=ads-l&q=etymology&s=&f=&a=01%2F01%2F29&b=2005


(E3)(L1) http://www.netlingo.com/emailsh.cfm


(E?)(L?) http://www.netlingo.com/inframes.cfm


(E?)(L?) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/t.html
Tanstaafl - (there's no such thing as a free lunch)

(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2007-4-Apr.htm


there ain't no such thing as a free lunch (W3)

"Nichts ist umsons", nicht mal eine Mahlzeit, amerik. "there ain't no such thing as a free lunch". Allerdings bezieht er sich auf eine kostenlose Gabe. Im 19. Jh. wurde in amerikanischen Bars kostenlose Essenshappen gereicht, in der Hoffnung den Getränkekonsum anzukurbeln. Der Wirtschaftswissenschaftler Milton Friedman, der 1976 den Nobelpreis für Wirtschaft gewann, machte den Ausdruck populär.

Man findet oft auch die Abkürzung "TANSTAAFL", die auf den Science Fiction-Autor Robert Heinlein zurück geht, der sie in seiner Novelle "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress", 1966, benutzte.

(E?)(L?) http://www.business-english.de/daily_mail_result.html?day=2009-10-13


U

usa-kulinarisch
Rezepte aus Amerika

(E?)(L?) http://www.usa-kulinarisch.de/

USA KULINARISCH mehr als Hot Dogs & Hamburger




V

Viticulture, ampélologie (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.winespectator.com/
"Viticulture", the "science of grapegrowing", is derived from the Latin word for "grapevine" = "vitis" but "enology" (or "oenology"), the "science of winemaking", comes from the Greek word for "wine" = "oinos". The French call the "study of grapevines" "ampélologie" from the Greek word for "grapevine" = "ampelos".
As demonstrated by the very roots of the words involved, grapegrowing and winemaking are indeed extremely old practices. Ancient civilizations gave wine such importance that it possessed godlike significance. The Egyptians thanked "Osiris" for their wine, the Greeks thanked "Dionysus", and the Romans, "Bacchus".

Winespectator offers thousands of tips to amateur and professional wine fans.

voanews.com
Phrasal Verbs About Eating and Drinking

(E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/media/video/talkus-food-phrasal-verbs-caty-ashley/2508528.html

November 05, 2014
Multimedia
TALK2US: Phrasal Verbs About Eating and Drinking
Published 11/04/2014

Caty Weaver and Ashley Thompson talk about some phrasal verbs that express ideas like eating too much, eating slowly, eating everything, and eating less.


Erstellt: 2014-11

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Waldorfsalat (W3)

Der "Waldorfsalat" verdankt seinen Namen dem Hotel "Waldorf-Astoria" in New York dessen Oberkellner Oscar Tschirk das Rezept 1893 kreierte. Er besteht aus rohem, geraspeltem Sellerie, Äpfeln, Walnüssen und Mayonnaise.

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3928127748/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3928127748/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3928127748/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3928127748/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3928127748/etymologpor09-20


wolframalpha
Food & Nutrition

(E?)(L1) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/FoodAndNutrition.html

Foods Dietary References


Erstellt: 2011-10

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America of America
Essen, Comida, Nourriture, Mangiare, Food

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Barnette, Martha
Ladyfingers and Nun’s Tummies
From Spare Ribs to Humble Pie
A Lighthearted Look at How Foods Got Their Names

(E?)(L?) http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/8851/ladyfingers-and-nuns-tummies-by-martha-barnette/

Paperback Buy $13.00
Nov 24, 1998 | 224 Pages
ISBN 9780375702983

"Everything in [this book] is delightful to learn. Barnette takes us through languages and across millennia in a charming style . . . that offers endless food for thought." –The New Yorker

What makes the pretzel a symbol of religious devotion, and what pasta is blasphemous in every bite? How did a drunken brawl lead to the name lobster Newburg? What naughty joke is contained in a loaf of pumpernickel? Why is cherry a misnomer, and why aren’t refried beans fried twice? You’ll find the answers in this delectable exploration of the words we put into our mouths.

Here are foods named for the things they look like, from cabbage (from the Old North French caboche, "head") to vermicelli ("little worms"). You’ll learn where people dine on nun’s tummy and angel’s breast. There are foods named after people (Graham crackers) and places (peaches), along with commonplace terms derived from words involving food and drink (dope, originally a Dutch word for "dipping sauce"). Witty, bawdy, and stuffed with stories, Ladyfingers and Nun’s Tummies is a feast of history, culture, and language.

"Why didn’t anyone think of this before? . . . What fun Martha Barnette has made of it all, every name for every dish explained and traced and jollied." –William F. Buckley, Jr.

Martha Barnette, the author of "A Garden of Words", did graduate work in classical languages at the University of Kentucky. A former reporter for The Washington Post, she is now a contributing editor at Allure. She lives in Louisville, Kentucky.


(E?)(L?) http://www.marthabarnette.com/

Martha Barnette, Radio host, public speaker, word lover, emcee.

I’m Martha Barnette, co-host of the public radio show A Way with Words. I'm passionate about language, have written several books, and love performing improv comedy.

I'll bring your audience a lively, humorous presentation about the joy of language that will entertain, enlighten, and motivate.


(E?)(L?) https://www.waywordradio.org/about/

A Way with Words is an upbeat and lively hour-long public radio show about language examined through history, culture, and family. Co-hosts Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett talk with callers from around the world about slang, grammar, old sayings, word origins, regional dialects, family expressions, and speaking and writing well. They settle disputes, play word quizzes, and discuss language news and controversies. The show is heard by more than a quarter-million listeners each week over the air and by podcast.
...


Erstellt: 2016-12

Betty Crocker Cookbook
Betty Crocker Cookbook
Everything You Need to Know to Cook Today

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764576739/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764576739/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764576739/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764576739/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0764576739/etymologpor09-20
Plastic Comb: 577 Seiten
Verlag: Betty Crocker; Auflage: 0010 (22. August 2006)
Sprache: Englisch


Amazon.com
Betty Crocker's Cookbook is 50! In celebration, an updated and expanded ninth edition of this American classic reminds us once again of the value of good old-fashioned comfort food. The original Big Red Cookbook was immediately popular with a postwar audience seeking basic cooking advice and simple recipes that took advantage of several then-new convenience products. The ninth edition remains true to its roots, presenting exemplary instruction, savory mainstream dishes (that still make use of convenience foods and the products of parent company General Mills), and, most notably, standout chapters on baking and dessert specialties. New to this edition, which offers nearly 1,000 recipes, are grilling and vegetarian chapters; up-to-date nutrition information; additional color photos; and contemporary formulas for the likes of Brie with Caramelized Onions, Asiago Bread, and Tandoori Chicken with Chutney.

Instruction was and is the book's strongest suit, and any cook - novice to professional - will benefit from its many how-to features. These include step-by-step directions with photos, tips for kitchen timesaving, and troubleshooting advice. The book also includes several comprehensive glossaries (those on cooking terms and ingredients are particularly good). Standouts among the vast recipe collection, more than 300 of which are designated fast or low fat, include old favorites such as Macaroni and Cheese, Old-Fashioned Baked Beans, and Lemon Chiffon Cake. A few newer ones, such as Sun-Dried Tomato and Olive Bread, also qualify. Published, as ever, in a loose-leaf binder, the book celebrates American culinary know-how, a broad-based tradition of good home cooking, exemplary baking, and the conviction that food and commerce can meld to help people cook easier and eat better. Happy birthday indeed!
Arthur Boehm

Kurzbeschreibung
From foolproof, dependable recipes to reliable how to advice, the "Betty Crocker Cookbook" has everything you need for the way you cook today. Whether you're a new or experienced cook, the "Cookbook[registered]" is the book for you! It includes: more than 1,000 easy to follow recipes; creative cooking ideas, including more than 400 recipe variations; and, beautiful design, with 300 colorphotos and 55 illustrations. It contains all new chapters such as "Casseroles & Slow Cooker" and "20 Minutes or Less". Fast recipes are flagged throughout - 130 ready in 20 minutes or less! It also contains great tasting Low Fat recipes specially marked - more than 185 in all. Apart from helpful Betty's Cures to solve common baking problems, it includes useful learn with Betty photos to help get perfect results every time; detailed nutrition information, plus dietary exchanges and carb choices.


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Davidis, Henriette (Autor) / Pitschmann, Louis A. (Künstler)
Pickled Herring and Pumpkin Pie
A Nineteenth-Century Cookbook for German Immigrants to America

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0924119063/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0924119063/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0924119063/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0924119063/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0924119063/etymologpor09-20
Taschenbuch: 656 Seiten
Verlag: Univ of Wisconsin Pr (Februar 2003)
Sprache: Englisch


Synopsis
A reprint of a best-selling 19th-century German cookbook that was adapted for Germans living in America, this book offers authentic immigrant recipes in their cultural, social and historical context. It is a mix of recipes from Old and New Worlds - from German fare to very American dishes.


(E?)(L1) http://www.br-online.de/podcast/mp3-download/bayern2/mp3-download-podcast-kalenderblatt.shtml

06.07.2004 - Kochbuch der Henriette Davidis (06.07.1844)

03.04.2002 - Das Kochbuch der Henriette Davidis (03.04.1876)

06.07.2001 - Klassisches Kochbuch der Henriette Davidis erscheint (06.07.1844)




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iastate
Food Safety Glossary

(E?)(L?) http://www.extension.iastate.edu/foodsafety/Lesson/glossary.html


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Morton, Mark
Cupboard Love
A Dictionary of Culinary Curiosities

(E?)(L?) http://www.insomniacpress.com/title.php?id=1-894663-66-7

Nominated in 1997 for a Julia Child Award, Cupboard Love is back, bigger and better than ever. In this updated and expanded edition, Mark Morton lays out a sumptuous feast of more than a thousand culinary word-histories. From everyday foods to exotic dishes, from the herbs and spices of medieval England to the cooking implements of the modern kitchen, Cupboard Love explores the fascinating stories behind familiar and not-so-familiar gastronomic terms.

Who knew that the word "pomegranate" is related to the word "grenade"? That "baguette" is a cousin of "bacteria"? That "soufflé" comes from the same root as "flatulence"? Who knew that "vermicelli" is Italian for "little worms", that "avocado" comes from an Aztec word meaning "testicle", or that "catillation" denotes the unseemly licking of plates?

Lighthearted and thoroughly researched, packed with linguistic lore and cultural trivia, Cupboard Love blends the edible and the etymological into a delectable pièce de résistance.


Erstellt: 2014-08

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