Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Falsche Freunde, Falsos amigos, Faux Amis, False amiche, False Friend

A

America's Cup
Louis Vuitton Cup (W3)

Obwohl die Bezeichnung auf 'Amerika' schliessen lässt, wurde die Trophäe von der englischen Königin Viktoria in auftrag gegeben und von dem englischen Juwelier R&G Garrard in London gefertigt. Den Namen erhielt sie allerdings nach der Yacht ersten Manschaft, die das Segelrennen rund um die Insel Isle of Wight 1851 gewann. Es war die Yacht "America" des New Yorkers Yacht Club.

Mit der Zeit wuchs die Zahl der Anmeldungen trotz der hohen Startgebühr. Mitte der 80er Jahre führte Louis Vuitton deshalb ein System von Ausscheidungsrennen ein, die vor dem eigentlichen America's Cup ausgetragen werden. Diese wurden entsprechend auch "Louis Vuitton Cup" genannt.

jeff560
Some Common Misspellings

(E?)(L1) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words9.html


B

bull, bullshit (W3)

Anscheinend hat das erst Anfang des 20. Jh. aufgekommene engl. "bullshit" = "Scheißdreck", nichts mit dem "Bullen" zu tun, sondern geht auf altfrz. "boul" zurück, das mit Icel. "bull" = "nonsense" zusammenhängt. Es gibt auch ein Verb "bull" = "täuschen", "narren", "beschwindeln", "betrüge", das seit 1532 bekannt ist.

(E6)(L1) http://www.anglizismenindex.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.buzzwordbingogame.com/cards/bullshit/
Bullshit Bingo

(E?)(L?) http://www.crookedtimber.org/archives/003235.html

...
JR 02.14.05 at 6:36 pm

Unfortunately, Frankfurt’s amusing essay seems to contain a bit of "bullshit" of its own. Frankfurt pontificates that the word "bull" is a sanitized version of "bullsit" and quotes extensively about "bull" from older British sources such as the OED. Undoubtedly modern Americans believe that "bull" is short for "bullshit", but this is a folk etymology that shouldn’t be read back into historical sources.

"Bull" meaning "nonsense" or "misinformation" is hundreds of years old, while "bullshit" is perhaps 90 years old and became popular only during WWII.

The etymology of "bull" has nothing to do with cattle and appears to be from Latin "boiling", "bubbling" - so the original meaning would have been something like "froth". (Think of "ebullient", from the same root. Teddy Roosevelt’s "bully", meaning "terrific" or "brilliant", is related.) The "nonsense" meaning may have been influenced by- or may itself have influenced- the expression "cock-and-bull story", meaning a tall tale. (The origin of that phrase is likely from an Aesop’s fable-type of story.) "To bull" as a verb came to mean "to push up the price of a stock", and is related to the phrase "bull market". (Here "bull" nonsense and "bull" an aggressive herd animal intersect.) The idea of spreading overly optimistic information about a stock could have influenced the more general meaning of "bull" as intentional misinformation.

Lastly, I’ve found a couple of intriguing but inconclusive websites that state that "bull" in modern Icelandic means "nonsense" - this would point to a Germanic root. Anyone out there speak Icelandic? "Bullshit" may have started out as an intensifier of "bull", or it may have been independent. Paul Fussell in his book "Wartime" writes of what he and his fellow soldiers called "chickenshit" - demeaning and pointless army procedures. Frankfurt quotes British soldiers who called this sort of thing "bull" - so perhaps Americans conflated the two. Or perhaps not. In any event "bull" in 19th and early 20th century English sources is not a sanitized version of "bullshit" and Frankfurt is in error when he tries to draw conclusions about "bullshit" from these sources.
...


(E?)(L1) http://www.dack.com/web/bullshit.html
Web Economy Bullshit Generator

(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=bullshit


(E?)(L?) http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=P
Penn & Teller: Bullshit! (USA 2003)

(E?)(L?) http://www.hirschbeutel.de/bullshit_bingo.html
Bullshit Bingo

(E?)(L?) http://www.jelks.nu/misc/articles/bs.html

Harry Frankfurt, Princeton University
One of the most salient features of our culture is that there is so much "bullshit". Everyone knows this. Each of us contributes his share. But we tend to take the situation for granted. Most people are rather confident of their ability to recognize "bullshit" and to avoid being taken in by it. So the phenomenon has not aroused much deliberate concern, or attracted much sustained inquiry.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.lib.ru/ENGLISH/american_idioms.txt


(E2)(L1) http://www.mundmische.de/


(E?)(L?) http://www.tv-kult.de/index.php?site=sendungen&m=SP
Penn & Teller: Bullshit!

(E?)(L1) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bullshit


(E?)(L?) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullshit

...
"Bull", meaning nonsense, dates from the 17th century, while the term "bullshit" has been used as early as 1915 in American slang,[2] and came into popular usage only during World War II. The word "bull" itself may have derived from the Old French boul meaning "fraud, deceit" (Oxford English Dictionary). The term "horseshit" is a near synonym.

The earliest attestation mentioned by the Concise Oxford English Dictionary is in fact T. S. Eliot, who between 1910 and 1916 wrote an early poem to which he gave the title "The Triumph of Bullshit", written in the form of a ballade. The first stanza goes:
...
(E1)(L1) http://www.wortwarte.de/
Bullshit-Detector | Bullshitfrage | Bullshitting

C

D

Desktop, Laptop (W2)

(E6)(L?) http://www.at-mix.de/laptop.htm


(E6)(L?) http://www.handelsblatt.com/pshb/fn/relhbi/sfn/buildhbi/cn/GoArt!200104,300458,988666/SH/0/depot/0/
Stand-PCs werden ünlicherweise "Desktop" genannt und tragbare PCs "Laptop". Beide Begriffe sind eigentlich irreführend.

Zum Einen bedeutet engl. "Desktop" genaugenommen "(Schreib-)Tischplatte". Der "Desktop" müsste also "Desktop-PC" oder "desktop computer" heissen, was wohl ursprünglich auch der Fall war. Der "Desktop" ist also eher der Schnellsprach zuzuschreiben.

Aber der "Desktop Computer" ist auch insofern irreführend, als er schon seit einigen jahren nicht mehr "auf" sondern "unter" dem Schreibtisch, (genauer:) unter der Schreibtischplatte zu finden ist.

Zum Anderen bedeutet "Laptop" genaugenommen "auf dem Schoß". Der "Laptop" heisst dementsprechend genau genommen auch "laptop computer", also der "Computer zum auf den Schoß stellen". Aber habe Sie schon einmal einen Laptop auf dem Schoß gesehen? - Ja es gibt sie wirklich, aber arbeiten kann man so nicht. Und mit externer Maus, externen Laufwerken und Druckern ist man auf jeden fall auf einen Tisch angewiesen. Und diese Laptops stehen nun tatsächlich "auf" dem Tisch.

Um die Sprache den aktuellen Gegebenheiten anzupassen, müsste man also die "desktop computer" in "under desktop computer" oder "deskunder computer" heißen, oder wie wäre es mit "subdesk computer".
Ja und dann wäre der Begriff "desktop computer" ja wieder frei für den "laptop computer".


...
But, just as the "laptop" is nipping at the heels of the "desktop computer", another smaller, more mobile computing product is nipping at the heels of the laptop. It's the "hand-held digital device", including top-of-the-line "cellphones" and "portable media players", notably Apple's "iPods".
...


E

etymythology
mythetymology (W3)

Diese Kombinationen fand ich in einem Beitrag zur Mailingliste der ADS (American Dialect Society).

Damit wurde die etymologische Rückführung auf ungesicherte (also sozusagen mythologische) Quellen bezeichnet.

F

false friends (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/false_friends
am 16.07.2003 war jedoch noch kein Eintrag im Wikipedia vorhanden.

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

museumofhoaxes
Museum of Hoaxes
Irrtümer der Geschichte

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/
Hier sind die Irrtümer der Geschichte versammelt.

Sicherlich geht es hier nicht um Wortgeschichten sondern um die falschen Geschichten der Geschichte. Aber viele Geschichten bieten auch interessante Hinweise zu damit zusammenhängenden Bezeichnungen.

Um mit dem Begriff "Hoax" zu beginnen: dieser soll eine Zusammenziehung von "hocus pocus" sein.

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/bio.html
Oder der "hoaxpert", eine Zusammenziehung von "hoax expert".

A hoax is a deceptive act or scheme that plays upon the credulity of others. Great hoaxes, like the moon hoax of 1835 and the Cardiff Giant, manage to create a sense of mystery and astonishment. They force people to question their assumptions, to wonder what is real and what is not. Not so great hoaxes usually manage to be, at the very least, amusing. The worst kind of hoaxes can actually cause serious damage to people's lives and finances.

In terms of deciding what to include in this site, I have relied upon a narrower, 1808 definition, taken from the Oxford English Dictionary, that describes hoaxing as "Contriving wonderful stories for the publick." The phrase 'for the publick' is the key part of this definition. Hoaxes, unlike mere practical jokes, are deceptive acts that are played out before a public audience. The larger the audience, the better.


Famous Hoaxes Throughout History | Top 100 April Fool's Day Hoaxes | Tall-Tale Creatures | Top 10 College Pranks | Hoax Photo Tests | Top 10 Worst April Fools | | Gullibility Tests | Hoax Website Gallery | Hoax Photo Gallery | Birth Hoaxes | About the Museum | About Me | About My Books | Contact | Register | Login | Home

BLOG CATEGORIES:
| Animals | Art | Birth/Babies | Body Manipulation | Business/Finance | Celebrities | Con Artists | Conspiracy Theories | Crop Circles | Death | eBay | Email Hoaxes | Entertainment | Exploration/Travel | Extraterrestrial Life | Food | Free Energy | Future/Time | Gnomes | Gross | Hate Crimes/Terror | Health/Medicine | History | Hoax Websites | Identity/Imposters | Journalism | Law/Police/Crime | Literature/Language | Mass Delusion | Military | Miscellaneous | Photos/Videos | Places | Politics | Polls | Pranks | Psychology | Radio | Religion | Science | Sex/Romance | Sports | Supernatural | Tall Tales | Technology | Urban Legends


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/weblog/archiveindex
28.12.2006:

(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/before_1700
In der "Main Gallery: Before 1700" findet man z.B.:


BEFORE 1700: FEMALE POPES AND VEGETABLE LAMBS | Forgeries of the Medieval Church | Donation of Constantine | History of Crowland | Pope Joan | Medieval Travel Lies | Prester John | Marco Polo | Sir John Mandeville | Hi-Brazil | The Medieval Relic Trade | The Shroud of Turin | Waiting for the Apocalypse | Mother Shipton | Medieval Pranks and Tricks | The Ghostly Drummer of Tedworth | Renaissance Forgeries | Early Modern Museums of Hoaxes | The Cerne Abbas Giant


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/18century

1700-1799: RABBIT BABIES AND LYING STONES | The Native of Formosa | The Hoaxes of Jonathan Swift | Mary Toft and the Rabbit Babies | The Hoaxes of Benjamin Franklin | Silence Dogood | The Witch Trial at Mount Holly | The Death of Titan Leeds | Poor Richard's Enigmatical Prophecies | The Polly Baker Case | A Supplement to the Boston Independent Chronicle | Eighteenth-Century Literary Hoaxes | James Macpherson and the Ossianic Controversy | Thomas Chatterton and the Rowley Poems | De Situ Brittaniae | William Henry Ireland's Shakespeare Forgeries | The Great Chess Automaton | The Mystery of Madagascar | | Graham's Celestial Bed | The Patagonian Giants | The Blue Laws of Connecticut | The Duckbilled Platypus


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoaxes1800.html

1800-1868: LUNAR BISON AND SOLAR ARMOR | The Berners Street Hoax | The Journal of Charles LeRaye | Redheffer's Perpetual Motion Machine | Princess Caraboo | The Great Stock Exchange Hoax of 1814 | Symzonia | Sawing the Island Off | The Nondescript | The Journal of a British Spy | Hoaxes of Edgar Allan Poe | Joice Heth | The Great Moon Hoax | Maria Monk | The Fortsas Bibliohoax | The Feejee Mermaid | The Southern Conspiracy to Confederate with Mexico | The Pictographs of Abbe Emmanuel Domenech | The Hopkins Hoax | A Petrified Man | The Miscegenation Hoax | The origins of the word 'miscegenation' | The Orgueil Meteorite | The Great Civil War Gold Hoax | The Calaveras Skull


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoaxes19.html

1869-1913: STONE GIANTS AND ANTLERED RABBITS | Index Hoaxorum: 1869-1913 | Spirit Photography | The Cardiff Giant | The Case of the Miraculous Bullet | The Central Park Zoo Escape | The Materialization of John Newbegin | "Leonainie" | Dr. Egerton Yorrick Davis | Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography | The Winsted Wild Man | The Great Duck Egg Fake | Sympsychography | The Great Wall of China Hoax | The Great Mammoth Hoax | First to the Pole | The Ghosts of Versailles | The Piltdown Man


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoaxes1930s.html

1914-1949: NEW JERSEY MARTIANS AND VAN GOGH'S EAR | A Tale of a Tub | The Cottingley Fairies | The Disumbrationist School of Art | The Ponzi Scheme | The Case of the Midwife Toad | Hugh Troy | Hugo N. Frye | Death in the Air | Theft of the Sacred Cod | Loch Ness Monster Hoaxes | The Surgeon's Photo | Fritz Kreisler | The Brown Lady of Raynham | Veterans of Future Wars | The Perambulating Skull | "The War of the Worlds" | Hitler Hoaxes


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoaxes1950s.html

1950-1976: NAKED ANIMALS AND SWISS SPAGHETTI TREES | The Great Monkey Hoax | Society for Indecency to Naked Animals | Bigfoot Hoaxes | The Third Eye | The Olympic Underwear Relay | The Swiss Spaghetti Harvest | The Virginia City Camel Race | Dick Tuck | Paul Is Dead | "Subways Are For Sleeping" | Report from Iron Mountain | Naked Came the Stranger | The Stone Age Tasaday


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoaxes1980s.html

1977-1989: AUSTRALIAN ICEBERGS AND COCKROACH PILLS | Alternative Three | The Sydney Iceberg | The Cloning of a Man | Lady Liberty on Lake Mendota | Rosie Ruiz | The Prediction of Tamara Rand | Jimmy's World | The Interfering Brassieres | The Hitler Diaries


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/1990_1999

1990-1999: CROP CIRCLES AND CROSS-DRESSING KEN | Crop Circle Hoaxes | Doug and Dave | Operation Blackbird | The Cambridge Mandelbrot Set | The BMW Crop Circle | Milli Vanilli | Whatever Happened to Buckwheat? | Russia Sells Body of Lenin | Ghostwatch | Grungegate | Microsoft Buys the Catholic Church | Cross-Dressing Ken | The Sibuxiang Beast | Web Hoaxes of the 1990s | ourfirsttime.com | Ron's Angels | eBay auctions | Mahir Madness | Allegra Coleman | The Sokal Hoax |


(E?)(L?) http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/hoax/history/index

AFTER 2000: MONSTER CATS | The Top 10 Hoaxes of 2004 | The Rathergate memos, the Mini Cooper Autonomous Robot, Andy Kaufman Returns, and more! | The Onion Capitol-Dome Hoax | Post-9/11 Hoaxes | Touristguy | The Wingdings Prophecies | The NASA Satellite Photo | The Predictions of Nostradamus | The Lovenstein Institute IQ Report | Monkey Fishing | | Manbeef.com | Spud Server | Final Curtain | MalePregnancy.com | David Manning Film Critic | Snowball the Monster Cat | Kaycee Nicole Swenson | The Religion of the Jedi Knights | The Stone-Age Discoveries of Shinichi Fujimura | The Emulex Stockmarket Hoax | Death Hoaxes | The Final Farewell of Gabriel Garcia Marquez | Dead Pop Stars | Phony 9/11 Deaths | The Piltdown Chicken






N

O

P

Q

R

S

Sic (W3)

Das lat. "sic!" = "so", "ebenso", "wirklich so!" wird benutzt, um auf "falsche oder missverständliche Zitate" hinzuweisen. In manchen Texten erscheint es auch, als "erweitertes Ausrufezeichen", um auf besondere Textstellen hinzuweisen.

The Latin term "sic" is used to indicate that something written is intentionally left in the original form, which may be incorrect.
Example: She wrote, "They made there [sic] beds."

Die Wurzel ist ide. "*so-" = "this", "that" = "dies", "das".

Als Abkürzung kann "sic", "SIC", "S.I.C." für "specific inductive capacitance" oder auch für "Standard Industrial Classification" stehen.

Einige Webseiten im Netz tragen "Sic" als Überschrift für Sammlungen (sprachlicher) Kuriositäten. Eine davon ist "Verbatim - The Language Quarterly".

SIC! SIC! SIC! is a regular feature of every issue, in which we rely on readers to send us funny errors made in (thank goodness) other publications. (And those on signs, in form letters, etc., etc. We're capable of finding the funny errors in our own publication without help!) If you find a howler that you'd like to share, send it to either mailing address below or click here.

Die 77-seitige Sammlung von (sprachlichen) Fehlern enthält einige interessante Zitate aus Publikationen. Allerdings muss ich gestehen, dass ich bei vielen Beiträgen die Problematik nicht erkennen kann. Aber für Leser, die die englische Sprache gut beherrschen und die US-amerikanische Kultur besser kennen, dürften sich einige Aha-Effekte einstellen.
Etymologische Beiträge konnte ich jedoch keine entdecken.

Ein paar der Beispiele, die ich verstanden habe:

"See where the Pilgrims landed by bus." - Da hatten die ersten Siedler sicherlich eine anstrengende Busreise hinter sich, als Sie die amerikanische Küste erreichten.

"Berliner Park is the biggest park of its size in Central Ohio." - Es ist sicherlich schwierig, einen grösseren Park mit der gleichen Fläche zu finden - und dann auch noch ebenfalls mitten in Ohio.

"We consider pornography to be a public problem, and we feel it is an issue that demands a second look." - Da schaut man doch gerne genauer hin.

"Asked about social needs, Burdette said, 'Our safety net has a lot of holes in it.'" - Das haben Netze nun 'mal so an sich, auch wenn ich denke, dass das soziale Netz in den USA wirklich viele Löcher hat.

"We're going to pay now, or pay later. Now, we're paying later." - Will er nun wirklich später oder später gleich bezahlen?

"The Southeastern Georgia Alzheimer's Chapter presents a dinner cabaret, "A Night to Remember'" - Nun ja, ein schlechtes Gedächtnis hilft auch über vieles hinweg.

"There'll be plenty to eat: hot dogs, hamburgers, children under twelve, only a dollar." - Na denn guten Appetit.

"'No one expected it to be that high, but it's lower than what we expected,' ...". - Ja, auch die Erwartungen unterliegen einem ständigen Auf und Ab.

(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?l=s&p=20


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/112897.html#sic


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/


spelling bee, bee
oder:
Was macht die Buchstabierbiene? (W1)

(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.spellingbee.com/terminology.shtml


(E?)(L?) http://www.cinescene.com/howard/spellit.htm


(E?)(L1) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spelling%20bee


(E?)(L?) http://www.voanews.com/english/AmericanLife/2005-06-13-voa45.cfm


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-spe2.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.zdaily.com/words.shtml
Das Logo des seit 1925 jährlich durchgeführten Buchstabierwettbewerbs in den USA spielt bewusst auf die fleissige Biene an. Aber der Ursprung des Wortes hat nichts mit dem Honigsammler zu tun. Jedenfalls bedeutet dieses amerikanische "bee" etwa "Nachbarschaftshilfe", "Nähkränzchen" und seit 1925 nahm es auch die Bedeutung von "Wettbewerb" im Besonderen und im Allgemeinen an.

Ursprünglich bezeichnete es die gegenseitige Hilfe in den Pionierzeiten Amerikas. Dabei ging es um Nähen oder sonstige gemeinsam ausführbare Hausarbeiten, aber auch insbesondere um Erntehilfe, bei der man innerhalb kurzer Zeit eine allein nicht zu bewältigende Arbeit vollbringen musste. Für das Jahr 1769 ist der Begriff "spinning bee" nachweisbar, im Jahr 1816 "husking bee" (wobei es vermutlich ums (gesellige) Maisschälen ging), 1827 "apple bee" und 1836 "logging bee". Mit der Zeit wurde es zunehmend im Sinne einer geselligen Zusammnkunft verstanden. Dabei kam es dann makabrerweise auch zu "hanging bee" (1873) und "lynching bee" (1879).

Nachdem das Buchstabieren der (auch sprachlich) zusammenwachsenden Nation im 19. Jh. zu einer Art Volkssport wurde (auf Basis eines Werks von "Noah Webster") erschien auch der Begriff "Spelling bee" 1875 zum ersten mal gedruckt. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt hatten die amerikanischen Zeitungen das Thema "Buchstabieren" aufgegriffen. Da das ursprüngliche "bee" schon in Vergessenheit geriet bezog man es schon auf die fleissige Biene. Erst spätere Nachforschungen förderten wieder das alte engl. "bee" zu Tage. Dabei ist bis heute nicht ganz geklärt, wo dieses herkommt.

Als Bezug vermutet man ein mengl. "bene" = "prayer" = "Andacht", "favor" = "Begünstigung". Damit höngt es mit dem noch zu findenden engl. "boon" = "Wohltat", "Segen", "Gefälligkeit" zusammen. Varianten davon sind engl. "been", "bean" = "voluntary help given by neighbors toward the accomplishment of a particular task".

Das amerik. "spelling bee" bedeutet also etwa "gemeinsames Buchstabieren zur gegenseitigen Stärkung der Sprachkompetenz".

Michael Quinion, der "weltweit Worten" nachspürt, führt noch weitere Beispiele für "bees" an:


There were many sorts of "bees" during the year. Several acquired their own fixed and standard names, such as "apple-bee" (picking and storing apples), "paring-bee" (peeling apples), "husking-bee" (husking ears of corn, later also a shucking bee or a corn-shucking bee), "knitting bee", "quilting-bee", and "raising-bee" (for barn raisings). These start to appear in print from the 1820s and are common by the middle of the century. Others handled sheep shearing, haymaking, threshing corn, and spinning wool.



Auf der "spellingbee-Site" kann man unter anderm erfahren:


The National Spelling Bee was launched by the Louisville, Kentucky, Courier-Journal in 1925. With competitions, cash prizes, and a trip to the nation's capital, it was hoped the Bee would stimulate "general interest among pupils in a dull subject.” The Scripps Howard News Service took over the Bee in 1941. Over the years the national finals have grown from a mere 9 contestants to about 270. In 2005, 13-year-old Poway, Calif., eighth-grader Anurag Kashyap took home more than $28,000 in cash and prizes for correctly spelling appoggiatura. Here are the winning words that made past spellers into national champions.

(E?)(L?) http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0862710.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.infoplease.com/cgi-bin/spelling
Und bei "infoplease" kann man die Liste der Favoriten seit 1925 finden:

1925 gladiolus | 1926 abrogate | 1927 luxuriance | 1928 albumen | 1929 asceticism | 1930 fracas | 1931 foulard | 1932 knack | 1933 propitiatory | 1934 deteriorating | 1935 intelligible | 1936 interning | 1937 promiscuous | 1938 sanitarium | 1939 canonical | 1940 therapy | 1941 initials | 1942 sacrilegious | 1943 NO BEE | 1944 NO BEE | 1945 NO BEE | 1946 semaphore | 1947 chlorophyll | 1948 psychiatry | 1949 dulcimer | 1950 haruspex | 1951 insouciant | 1952 vignette | 1953 soubrette | 1954 transept | 1955 custaceology | 1956 condominium | 1958 syllepsis | 1959 cacolet | 1960 troche | 1961 smaragdine | 1962 esquamulose | 1963 equipage | 1964 sycophant | 1965 eczema | 1966 ratoon | 1967 chihuahua | 1968 abalone | 1969 interlocutory | 1970 croissant | 1971 shalloon | 1972 macerate | 1973 vouchsafe | 1974 hydrophyte | 1975 incisor | 1976 narcolepsy | 1977 cambist | 1978 deification | 1979 maculature | 1980 elucubrate | 1981 sarcophagus | 1982 psoriasis | 1983 Purim | 1984 luge | 1985 milieu | 1986 odontalgia | 1987 staphylococci | 1988 elegiacal | 1989 spoliator | 1990 fibranne | 1991 antipyretic | 1992 lyceum | 1993 kamikaze | 1994 antediluvian | 1995 xanthosis | 1996 vivisepulture | 1997 euonym | 1998 chiaroscurist | 1999 logorrhea | 2000 demarche | 2001 succedaneum | 2002 prospicience | 2003 pococurante | 2004 autochthonous | 2005 appoggiatura


T

U

V

voanews.com
Common English Mistakes: A, An or The?

(E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/media/video/1918448.html

Published 05/20/2014
Do you know when to use "a," "an" or "the" in a sentence? Watch this video and find out.


Erstellt: 2014-05

W

wsu
Common Errors in English
Problem Words
American English Errors and Non-Errors
Fehler im amerikanischen Englisch

(E6)(L?) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html
Paul Brians' Huge listing of common errors as well as a collection of links to related resources.
(University of Indiana)

What is an error in English?
The concept of language errors is a fuzzy one. I’ll leave to linguists the technical definitions. Here we’re concerned only with deviations from the standard use of English as judged by sophisticated users such as professional writers, editors, teachers, and literate executives and personnel officers. The aim of this site is to help you avoid low grades, lost employment opportunities, lost business, and titters of amusement at the way you write or speak.

(Die Erklärungen enthalten teilweise auch etymologische Hinweise.)
Am 13.12.2004 waren folgende Begriffe zu finden:

AM/PM * abject * about * absorbtion * accede/exceed * accent marks * access * accessory * accept/except * accidently * acronyms and apostrophes * acrossed * actual fact/actually * ad/add * adapt/adopt * administer/minister * adultry * advance/advanced * adverse/averse * advice/advise * adviser/advisor * affect/effect * affluence/effluence * agreeance/agreement * ahold/hold * ain’t * all * all goes well/augurs well * alliterate/illiterate * alls * allude/elude * allude/refer * allusion/illusion * almost * alot * already/all ready * alright * altar/alter * alterior * alternate/alternative * altogether/ all together * alumnus/alumni * amature * ambiguous/ambivalent * ambivalent/indifferent * American * amongst/among * amoral/immoral * amount/number * an historic * and also * anecdote/antidote * angel/angle * anxious/eager * any more * anytime * anyways * apart/a part * apostrophes * as far as * as follow * as per * aspect/respect * appraise/apprise * apropos/appropriate * artic * as time progressed * assure/ensure/insure * asterick * as of yet * ATM machine * athlete * athiest * aural/oral * auger/augur * avocation/vocation * awhile/a while * ax * axel/axle * backslash/slash * backward/backwards * barb wire, bob wire * bare/bear * basicly * bazaar/bizarre * beaurocracy * begs the question * behaviors * bemuse * beside/besides * better * between * between you and I * beyond the pail * bias/biased * bible * biweekly/semiweekly * blatant * bonafied * born out of * borrow/loan * both/each * boughten * bourgeois * bouyant * brand names * brang, brung * breath/breathe * bring/take * build off of * bumrush * butt naked * by/’bye/buy * cache/cachet * call the question * callous/callused * calm, cool, and collective * Calvary/cavalry * cannot/can not * canon/cannon * capital/capitol * caramel/carmel * carat/caret/carrot/karat * caring * CD-ROM disk * ceasar * celibate/chaste * celtic * cement/concrete * center around * cents * chai tea * chaise longue * chemicals * Chicano/Latino/Hispanic * chuck/chunk * Church * cite/site/sight * cleanup/clean up * cliché/clichéd * click/clique * close/clothes * close proximity * coarse/course * collaborate/corroborate * Colombia/Columbia * colons/semicolons * commas * compare and contrast * compare to/compare with * complement/compliment * complementary/complimentary * comprised of * concensus * concerted effort * conflicted/conflicting feelings * confusionism * congradulations * continual/continuous * contrasts/contrasts with * conversate * core/corps/corpse * could care less * could of/should of/would of * council/counsel/consul * couple/couple of * credible/credulous * criteria/criterion * criticism * critique/criticize * crucifiction * currant/current * cut and dry * cut and paste/copy and paste * damped/dampened * data * decimate * deep-seeded * definate * defuse/diffuse * degrade/denigrate/downgrade * deja vu * democrat/democratic * depends * depreciate/deprecate * desert/dessert * device/devise * dialogue/discuss * dieties * differ/vary * different than * dilemma/difficulty * dire straights * disburse/disperse * disc/disk * discreet/discrete * discussed/disgust * disinterested/uninterested * disrespect * doctorial/doctoral * dominate/dominant * done/did * double negatives * doubt that/doubt whether/doubt if * doubtlessly/doubtless * dove/dived * downfall/drawback * drank/drunk * drastic/dramatic * drier/dryer * dribble/drivel * drive/disk * drug/dragged * dual/duel * duck tape * due to the fact that * dyeing/dying * e.g./i.e. * each * earth, moon * ecology/environment * ecstatic * ect. * -ed/-t * -ed/-ing * ei/ie * either * either are/either is * eighteen hundreds/nineteenth century * electrocute * elicit/illicit * ellipses * embaress * emergent/emergency * emigrate/immigrate * eminent/imminent/immanent * empathy/sympathy * emphasize on * end result * enormity/enormousness * enquire/inquire * ensure/insure * enthuse * envelop/envelope * envious/jealous * enviroment * * epitomy * ethnic * every * everyday * everytime * evidence to * exact same * exalt/exult * excape/escape * exceptional/exceptionable * exhileration * exponential * expresso * expresses that/says that * factoid * fair/fare * farther/further * fastly * fatal/fateful * faze/phase * fearful/fearsome * febuary * 50’s * firey * first annual * fiscal/physical * fit the bill * flammable/inflammable * flaunt/flout * flesh out/flush out * floppy disk/hard disk * flounder/founder * foot/feet * footnotes/endnotes * for/fore/four * for all intensive purposes * for free * for one/for one thing * for sale/on sale * forbidding/foreboding/formidable * forceful/forcible/forced * forego/forgo * foresee/forsee * formally/formerly * forward * fortuitous/fortunate * foul/fowl * frankly * French dip with au jus * from . . . to * from the beginning of time * fulsome * -fuls/-ful * gaff/gaffe * gamut/gauntlet * gaurd * gender * Ghandi * gibe/jibe/jive * gig/jig * gild/guild * god * goes * gone/went * good/well * got/gotten * government * graduate * grammer * gratis/gratuitous * greatful * grevious * grisly/grizzly * group (singular vs. plural) * grow * gyp * had ought * hairbrained * hangar/hanger * hanged/hung * hanging indents * hardly * hardly never * hardy/hearty * HIV virus * he don’t * heading/bound * hear/here * hearing-impaired * heighth * help the problem * hero/protagonist * heroin/heroine * highly looked upon/highly regarded * him, her/he, she * * hisself * historic/historical * an historic * hoi polloi * hold your peace/say your piece * homophobic * home page * hone in * hors d’oeuvres * hyphenation * hyphens & dashes * hypocritical * hysterical/hilarious * I me myself * -ic * idea/ideal * if/whether * if I was/if I were * ignorant * immaculate conception/virgin birth * impact * impertinent/irrelevant * imply/infer * in regards to * in the fact that * incredible * incidences/incidents/instances * indepth * Indian/Native American * individual * infact * infamous/notorious * infinite * inflammable * input * install/instill * instances/instants * intense/intensive * intensifiers * interment/internment * Internet/intranet * interface * interpretate * into/in to * intrigue * ironically * irregardless * is, is * islams * Isreal * issues * itch/scratch * it’s/its * jerry-built/jury-rigged * Jew/Jewish * jewelry * John Henry * judgement * kick-start * koala bear * laissez-faire * large * late/former * later/latter * laundry mat * lay/lie * leach/leech * lead/led * leave/let * legend/myth * lense * less/fewer * liable, libel * libary * light-year * lighted/lit * like * like/as if * like for * likker * listserv * “lite” spelling * literally * lived * loose/lose * lustful/lusty * mantle/mantel * marital/martial * marshmellow * mass * masseuse/masseur * mauve * may/might * maybe/may be * medal/metal/meddle/mettle * media * Medieval Ages * mediocre * medium/median * memorium * mic * might could * mischievious * misnomer * moral/morale * more importantly * moreso * most always * motion/move * Mount Fujiyama * much differently * muchly * music/singing * mute point * * myself * nauseated/nauseous * neice * Nevada * next store * nieve * no sooner when * nonplussed * noone * not all that * not hardly * notorious * nuclear * number of verb * numbers * nuptual * of * of ___’s * offense * often * OK * old fashion * old-timer’s disease * on accident * once and a while * one of the (singular) * one-dimensional * one in the same * one of the only * only * onto/on to * oppress/repress * orders of magnitude * ordinance/ordnance * Oregon * organic * oriental * orientate * ostensively * over-exaggerated * oversee/overlook * pair (number) * palate/palette/pallet * parallel * parallelled/paralleled * parallelism in a series * paralyzation * parameters/perimeters * parentheses * parliment * passed/past * past time * passive voice * pawn off/palm off * peace/piece * peak/peek/pique * peasant/pheasant * penultimate/next to last * peoples * per * percent decrease * pernickety/persnickety * perogative/prerogative * perse * persecute/prosecute * personal/personnel * personality * perspective/prospective * peruse * phenomena/phenomenon * Philippines/Filipinos * physical * picaresque/picturesque * picture * PIN number * playwrite * plead innocent * please RSVP * plug-in * podium/lectern * pole/poll * point being is that * point in time * pompom/pompon * populace/populous * pore/pour * possessed of, by, with * practice/practise * practicle * pray/prey * precede/proceed * precedence/precedents * precipitate/precipitous * predominant/predominate * predominately * preemptory * preferably * prejudice/prejudiced * premier/premiere * premise/premises * prepone * prepositions (repeated) * prepositions (wrong) * prescribe/proscribe * presently * pretty * primer * principal/principle * prioritize * priority * proactive * probably * prone * pronounciation * prophecy/prophesy * protray * proved/proven * purposely/purposefully * Q/G * quantum leap * queue * quiet/quite * quote * quotation marks * racism * rack/wrack * ran/run * rapport * ratio * rationale/rationalization * ravaging/ravishing/ravenous * recreate * reactionary/reactive * real/really * realtor * reason because * rebelling/revolting * rebut/refute * recent/resent * redundancies * reeking havoc * regard/regards * regretfully/regrettably * reign/rein * religion * religion believes * reluctant/reticent * remuneration/renumeration * repel/repulse * resister/resistor * retch/wretch * reticent/hesitant * return back * revelant * revue/review * right of passage * Rio Grande River * risky/risqué * road to hoe * rob/steal * role/roll * root/rout/route * sacred/scared * sacreligious * safety deposit box * sail/sale/sell * salsa sauce * same difference * sarcastic/ironic * satellite * say/tell * schizophrenic * sci-fi * sea change * seam/seem * second of all * seen/saw * select/selected * self-worth * sense/since * sensual/sensuous * * service/serve * set/sit * setup/set up * shall/will * sherbert * Sierra Nevada Mountains * silicon/silicone * simplistic * single quotes * slight of hand * sluff off * snuck * so/very * so fun * social/societal * sojourn/journey * sometime/some time * somewhat of a * sooner * soup du jour of the day * sour grapes * spaded/spayed * * stationary/stationery * stereo * stomp * straightjacket * straight-laced * substance-free * substitute with * suffer with * suit/suite * summary/summery * supercede * supposably, supposingly * suppose to * surfing the Internet * take a different tact * taken back/taken aback * taught/taut * taunt/taut/tout * tenant/tenet * tender hooks * tentative * than/then * that/which * that kind * theirselves * them * they’re/their/there * therefor/therefore * there’s * these are them * these kind * these ones * they/their (singular) * think on * though/thought/through * throne/thrown * thusly * time period * times smaller * to/too/two * to home * today’s modern society * tolled/told * tongue and cheek * toward/towards * track home * tradegy * troop/troupe * try and * UFO * unconscience * unrest * upmost * use to * vague reference * various * vary/very * veil of tears * verb tense * verbage * verses/versus * very unique * vicious/viscous circle/cycle * video * vinegarette * viola/voila * vitae * volumptuous * warrantee/warranty * wary/weary/leery * wash * way * ways * weather/wether/whether * weather forecast calls for * Wensday * went/gone * were/where * wet your appetite * what * wheat * whereabouts are * where it’s at * whether/whether or not * whilst/while * whim and a prayer * whimp * whisky/whiskey * who/whom * who’s/whose * a whole ’nother * -wise * woman/women * worse comes to worse * wreckless * writting * ya’ll * ye * yea/yeah/yay * yoke/yolk * your/you * your/you’re * you’ve got another thing coming

Supplementary Pages

(E6)(L2) http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/nonerrors.html
Non-Errors Those usages people keep telling you are wrong but which are actually standard in English.

split infinitives * ending a sentence with a preposition * beginning a sentence with a conjunction * between vs. among * over vs. more than * forward vs. forwards * gender vs. sex * who vs. that * since vs. because * hopefully * momentarily * lend vs. loan * near miss * “none” singular vs. plural * scan vs. skim * regime vs. regimen * off of * gotten vs. got * till’ vs. ’til * teenage vs. teenaged * reference vs. cite * endquote vs. unquote * feeling bad * persuade vs. convince * preventive vs. preventative * entitled vs. titled * People are healthy; vegetables are healthful. * Dinner is done; people are finished. * Crops are raised; children are reared. * “You’ve got mail” should be “you have mail.” * it’s “cut the muster,” not “cut the mustard.” * it’s “carrot on a stick,” not “carrot or stick.” * * connoisseur

More errors Other strange and amusing word confusions
Commonly misspelled words.
The whole site on one page (ASCII text; the easiest option if you’re reading through all the entries in order)
List of commonly made suggestions. Check this before writing.
Sean Igo’s "Garbage In, Garbage Out: Errors Caused by Over-Reliance on Spelling Checkers"
Other Good Resources
American Heritage Book of English Usage
Worldwide Words: Investigating International English from a British Viewpoint
Daniel Kies’ Modern English Grammar
Jack Lynch’s Grammar and Style Notes
Charles Darling’s Guide to Grammar and Writing
Dr. NAD’s Prig Page
Ronald B. Standler’s Technical Writing Guide
Garbl’s Writing Resources On-Line
English as a Second Language Help Desk at Washington State University
Non-Sexist Language
WWWebster Dictionary (Merriam Webster)
Heteronyms
Hazel Tank’s Word Lists - The Way Doctors Talk
Mindy McAdams’s Spelling Test
William Safire’s self-violating “Rules for Writers”
Paul Brians’ home page

X

Y

Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Falsche Freunde, Falsos amigos, Faux Amis, False amiche, False Friend

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

Miller, Frederic P.
Vandome, Agnes F.
McBrewster, John
False etymology
Etymology, Folk science, Folk psychology, Historical linguistics
Backronym, Back-formation, Chinese word for "crisis", Eggcorn, Johannes Goropius Becanus

(E?)(L?) http://www.derclub.de/p/1/buecher/fremdsprachigebuecher/englischebuecher/1973215-false-etymology

Broschur
Sprache: Englisch

A false etymology is any assumed or postulated etymology that is incorrect. Folk etymology, in its basic sense, refers to popularly held (and often false) beliefs about the origins of specific words, especially where these originate in "common-sense" assumptions rather than serious research (compare folk science, folk psychology etc.). In historical linguistics, the term is most often used in a more technical sense, to refer to a change in the pronunciation, meaning, or spelling of a word under the influence of such folk beliefs about its origins. The two terms have not always been clearly distinguished, however, even by linguists.


Erstellt: 2014-06

Miller, Frederic P.
Vandome, Agnes F.
McBrewster, John
Mondegreen, Homophone, Soramimi, Ambiguity, A Monk Swimming, Double entendre, Eggcorn, False etymology, Holorime

(E?)(L?) http://www.beck-shop.de/Miller-Vandome-McBrewster-Mondegreen/productview.aspx?product=4835646

2010. Buch. ca. 80 S. Kartoniert / Broschiert
Alphascript Publishing ISBN 9786130274269
Format (B x L): 15 x 22 cm
Gewicht: 136 g
In englischer Sprache

A "mondegreen" is the mishearing or misinterpretation of a phrase, typically a standardized phrase such as a line in a poem or a lyric in a song, due to near homophony, in a way that yields a new meaning to the phrase. It should not be confused with "soramimi", which are songs that produce different meanings from those originally intended, when interpreted in another language.


Erstellt: 2014-06

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

Toseland, Martin
The Ants Are My Friends
Misheard Lyrics, Malapropisms, Eggcorns, and Other Linguistic Gaffes

(E?)(L?) http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-ants-are-my-friends-martin-toseland/1014568737?ean=9781906032067

Overview

Do you take things for granite? Do you need a secretary at your beckoned call? In "The Ants Are My Friends" — delightfully misheard from Bob Dylan's "Blowing in the Wind" — Martin Toseland has collected the very best, and very worst, linguistic gifts of the gaffe. Examples have been plucked gleefully from three categories of blunders: "malapropisms" — named after "Mrs. Malaprop" in Sheridan's play The Rivals where the wrong word pops out to bizarre results; "eggcorns" — where a new word is created from misheard real one (the name comes from someone misunderstanding "acorn" as "eggcorn", as it has the same shape); and of course "mondegreens", or misheard lyrics, a rich vein of accidental invention. Such classic mondegreens are collected as Ray Parker Jr.'s "Who Ya Gonna Call, Gus Foster", Eurythmics' "Sweet Dreams are Made of Cheese", Roy Orbison's "Only Baloney", AC/DC's "Dirty Deeds Done with Sheep", and Bob Dylan's "Mr. Tangerine Man".

ISBN-13: 9781906032067


Erstellt: 2014-06

U

V

W

Wilton, David
Word Myths

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195172841/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195172841/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195172841/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195172841/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0195172841/etymologpor09-20
Sprache: Englisch
Gebundene Ausgabe - 224 Seiten - Oxford University Press
Erscheinungsdatum: 2. Dezember 2004
ISBN: 0195172841

Do you know that "posh" comes from an acronym meaning "port out, starboard home"? That "the whole nine yards" comes from (pick one) the length of a WWII gunner's belt; the amount of fabric needed to make a kilt; a sarcastic football expression? That Chicago is called "The Windy City" because of the bloviating habits of its politicians, and not the breeze off the lake?

If so, you need this book. David Wilton debunks the most persistently wrong word histories, and gives, to the best of our actual knowledge, the real stories behind these perennially mis-etymologized words. In addition, he explains why these wrong stories are created, disseminated, and persist, even after being corrected time and time again. What makes us cling to these stories, when the truth behind these words and phrases is available, for the most part, at any library or on the Internet?

Arranged by chapters, this book avoids a dry A-Z format. Chapters separate misetymologies by kind, including The Perils of Political Correctness (picnics have nothing to do with lynchings), Posh, Phat Pommies (the problems of bacronyming-the desire to make every word into an acronym), and CANOE (which stands for the Conspiracy to Attribute Nautical Origins to Everything). Word Myths corrects long-held and far-flung examples of wrong etymologies, without taking the fun out of etymology itself. It's the best of both worlds: not only do you learn the many wrong stories behind these words, you also learn why and how they are created-and what the real story is.


Oxford University Press, October 2004

Did you ever think that "Ring Around The Rosie" makes reference to the Black Death of the Middle Ages? Or that "the whole nine yards" refers to the length of a machinegun ammo belt on a WWII fighter plane? Or perhaps that Eskimos have 500 words for snow?

If so, then you have been taken in by a linguistic urban legend. Like classic urban legends, these linguistic legends are popular and pervasive. But instead of propagating cautionary tales about the dangers of modern life, linguistic urban folklore propagates stories and "facts" about language and words. These "facts" are usually false, but the legends contain an element of truth that reflect on us and our society.

Word Myths takes on these linguistic urban legends, not just debunking them, but also examining why they are told and what they tell us about ourselves. The book examines the patterns underlying these legends and comes to conclusions about such things as why we attach morbid tales to children's rhymes, why newspapers keep promulgating false origins for terms like the Windy City, or why so many words have false nautical origins. Word Myths is an entertaining, yet authoritative, look at these and other linguistic legends.

"Most everything you know about word and phrase origins is likely to be wrong, and David Wilton proves it with a light touch and a wealth of fascinating case histories. Absolutely everyone with an interest in language will love this book."

-- J.E. Lighter, Editor, Historical Dictionary of American Slang


X

Y

Z