Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Ismus, Ismo, Isme, Ismo, Ism

Amerikanismen, Americanismes, Americanisms

4

401K, 401(k) Plan (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/
(FOUR-OH-ONE-KAY) = "an investment plan" = "Altersvorsorge"
A 401(k) is a optional retirement plan supported by many companies. This money is taken out and invested before the paycheck is taxed. Often there is a company matching plan where they will also contribute a percentage of the money contributed by the employee.
401k is a US financial instrument - expect to use this word with Americans, you'll probably need to explain it to the British.

(E?)(L?) http://money.howstuffworks.com/401k.htm
Most of us have heard of it, many of us participate in it and lots of us have no idea what it really is. The "401(k)" is a financial setup that makes saving for the golden years a lot easier than it used to be.
...

A

Amerikanismen

Da es für mich nicht immer nachvollziehbar ist, bei welchen Wörtern es sich um Amerikanismen und bei welchen es aich um Anglizismen handelt, habe ich alle Begriffe, die ich nicht eindeutig zuordnen konnte unter Anglizismen also bei "uk Ismen" eingeordnet.

B

C

D

E

economist.com
Americanisms

(E?)(L?) http://www.economist.com/style-guide/americanisms

Intro A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W .

Americanisms

If you use Americanisms just to show you know them, people may find you a tad tiresome, so be discriminating. Many American words and expressions have passed into the language; others have vigour, particularly if used sparingly. Some are short and to the point (so prefer lay off to make redundant). But many are unnecessarily long (so use and not additionally, car not automobile, company not corporation, court not courtroom or courthouse, transport not transportation, district not neighbourhood, oblige not obligate, rocket not skyrocket, stocks not inventories unless there is the risk of confusion with stocks and shares). Spat and scam, two words beloved by some journalists, have the merit of brevity, but so do row and fraud; squabble and swindle might sometimes be used instead. The military, used as a noun, is nearly always better put as the army. Normalcy and specialty have good English alternatives, normality and speciality (see Spellings). Gubernatorial is an ugly word that can almost always be avoided.
...


Erstellt: 2016-02

F

Full Monty

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/
Engl. "Full Monty" = "the whole thing", "everything" = "alles" has been popularized in America recently due to the movie of the same name. It has been common in Britain, however, since the 1980s.

The origin of the phrase, however, is unknown, but there are probably as many suggestions as to its origin as there are for its American equivalent "the whole nine yards".

There are a number of theories about the real origin of this phrase, take your pick:

(1.) It refers to Field Marshal Montgomery's habit of carefully planning his campaigns, including intensive and detailed artillery preparations;
(2.) It refers to Montgomery in full-dress uniform with all his medals;
(3.) It refers to Montgomery's habit of eating a large breakfast each morning;
(4.) It refers to the suit hire business of Sir Montague Burton. A complete dress suit, for a wedding etc, would be the Full Monty;
(5.) It refers to a Spanish card game where the pile of cards on the table is called a "monte".

G

goodlingos.com
AmeriSpeak

(E?)(L?) http://www.goodlingos.com/amerispeak/

Expressions of our American ancestors. The colorful slang of Americans of the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries.
Here’s a place to record those phrases that have been passed down through the generations in your family!


H

Humbug (W3)

Der "Humbug" ist eine engl. Entlehnung für "Unsinn", "dummes Zeug", "Schwindel". Die weitere Ableitung ist unsicher.

Wie man den zugänglichen Quellen entnehmen kann, wäre es Humbug die Herkunft von "Humbug" anzuführen.
Denkbar wäre immerhin die Anregung durch eine "summendes Insekt". Etwas "Unwichtiges" ist schliesslich nicht mehr wert als das "Summen" (engl. "hum") einer "Wanze" (engl. "bug").

Wenn man den Wörtern etwas weiter nachgeht - wie diese Küüer in seinem "Wörterbuch der deutschen Umgangssprache" tat - stößt man auf:

(E?)(L?) http://www.digitale-bibliothek.de/band36.htm

Humbug m
"unlautere Reklame"; "listige Übertölpelung"; "Lug und Trug". Die Herkunft ist ungeklärt. Um 1750 in Nordamerika aufgekommen im Zusammenhang mit "to hum" = "jn nasführen" und "bug-bear" = "Popanz", "Schreckbild". In Deutschland seit 1830 bekannt.


(E1)(L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=humbug
Dieses, wie man weiß, ist amerikanische Lebensart, und von dort ist auch das schöne Wort Humbug zu uns herübergekommen. Es entstammt dem englischen Slang, ist ziemlich neu - nämlich erst seit dem 18. Jahrhundert belegt - und liegt herkunftsmäßig im Dunkeln.

(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/5402

...
TO "HUM", or "HUMBUG". To deceive, or impose on one by some story or device. A "humbug"; a jocular imposition, or deception. To "hum" and "haw"; to hesitate in speech, also to delay, or be with difficulty brought to consent to any matter or business,
...
"HUMBUGS". The brethren of the venerable society of humbugs was held at brother Hallam's, in Goodman's Fields.
...


(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/012504.html#humbug

...
One explanation of "humbug" often heard is that it originally referred to a large bug known for the humming or buzzing noise it makes, perhaps such as a cicada or locust, making "humbug" a good metaphor for something very noisy and noticeable but of no real significance. Unfortunately, there isn't any evidence of any connection to an actual bug.

"Humbug" seems to have popped up in the popular vocabulary pretty much out of thin air around 1750, probably borrowed from underworld slang. In addition to meaning "sham," it has also been used as a synonym for "hoax" or "trick," as in P.T. Barnum's famous observation that "The people like to be humbugged."
...


(E1)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/ahd/h/h0320600.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/wotd/wotd.pl?word=humbug

...
Etymology: It appeared in the language sometimes before 1750 but attempts to establish its origin had already failed in 1751 according to the Oxford English Dictionary.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.kim-schmidt.de/cartoonlandkarten.php
Cartoon-Landkarte Hanslstadt Humbug

(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/humbug


(E?)(L?) http://www.musanim.com/mam/unknown.html
humbug (1751)

I

Impeachment (W3)

(zu "to impeach" = "anklagen").
Das vor allem in den USA praktizierte Verfahren Anklage gegen hohe Staatsbeamte wegen Amtsmissbrauch zu erheben, geht über das frz. "empêcher" = "(ver)hindern" zurück auf lat. "impedicare" = "fangen".

Ism (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/ism
The word ism was first used in 1680 and can be found in the works of such well-known writers as Thomas Carlyle, Julian Huxley and George Bernard Shaw. In the present day, it appears in the title of a standard survey of political thought, Today's ISMS by William Ebenstein, first published in the 1950s, and now in its 11th edition.

J

Jeep (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.ecars.com.au/Jeep/Jeep.History.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.ecars.com.au/Books/Rifkind.html
The first jeeps were made by more than one company.

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/site/comments/jeep/
Der Fahrzeugname leitet sich aus der Abkürzung von "general purpose vehicle" also Allzweck-Fahrzeug ab.


A perennial question concerns the origin of the term "Jeep".
Rifkind quotes the Quartermaster Corps Motor Transport Division as stating that the term had been commonly applied to a 1/2 ton 4x4, the 1/4 ton 4x4 initially being dubbed "peep", "baby jeep" and only later "jeep".
An alternative explanation is the abbreviation of "general purpose", or of Ford's "GP" (G: Government, P: 80" wheelbase), to "geep" and "jeep".


1940: Jeep specification issued and prototypes built by Bantam, Willys-Overland and later Ford; see the Rifkind report.
1941-1945: Jeep MB, built by Willys- Overland and Ford, Willys 2.2L 4cyl side-valve engine.
Pictured is a 1942 Jeep MB.
1942: Ford GPA - Amphibious Jeep or Seep.
Civilian Jeeps - CJ
CJ2A: 1945-1949, first civilian Jeep. . . . >> etc

K

krysstal
The English Language
Words Borrowed from Other Languages
American English

(E?)(L1) http://www.krysstal.com/borrow.html

American English is a version of the English language spoken in the United States of America (North America).
Many of these words began with journalist inventions, in films (movies) or slang.
...
blizzard | hangover | hindsight | joyride | OK | radio | raincoat | rattlesnake | stunt | teenager | typewriter
...


krysstal
English Usage in the UK and USA

(E?)(L?) http://www.krysstal.com/ukandusa.html
A light-hearted look at some differences between English as spoken on both sides of the Atlantic. Spelling and pronunciation differences are not included.

"The British and Americans are divided by a common language" - George Bernard Shaw



L

M

merrycoz
Dictionary of Americanisms, by John Russell Bartlett (1848)

(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/BARTLETT.HTM
DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN WORDS AND PHRASES


John Russell Bartlett (1805-1886) was well educated in history and literature before he and a partner opened a bookstore that became popular with scholars and literary figures. Bartlett also helped to found the American Ethnological Society. A stint as boundary commissioner wasn't as successful as his many years as Rhode Island's Secretary of State or his work as an historian and compiler of the Dictionary of Americanisms.

The Dictionary of Americanisms went through at least four editions between 1848 and 1877. As a record of the "colloquial language of the United States," it's a fascinating look at the words that actually came out of the mouths of early 19th-century Americans. It's also a window into U. S. history, with tiny essays on early political parties (the Democratic party, for example, was known as the "Loco-foco" after an incident of the kind which won't surprise observers of the political process), economics (how bears and bulls went to Wall Street), and culture (both strong drink and the Millerites); its collection of quotes offers later readers examples from a wide variety of early-19th-century works (everything from Congressional speeches to Sam Slick in England). And where else are you going to find discussions of words like "sanctimoniouslyfied" and "absquatulate"? or of phrases like "acknowledge the corn" and "red dog money"?



(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER01.HTM
INTRODUCTION

(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER02.HTM
A:
ABISSELFA | ABOVE-BOARD | ABOVE ONE'S BEND | ABSQUATULATE | ACKNOWLEDGE THE CORN | ACCOUNTABILITY | TO ADMIRE | ADOBIES | TO ADVOCATE | AFEARD | AFORE | AFOREHAND | AFTERCLAPS | AFTER NIGHT | AGY, for ague | AHEAD | ALBANY BEEF | ALEWIFE | ALIENAGE | ALIENISM | ALLEY | ALL-FIRED | ALL OVER | ALL-OVERISH | TO ALLOT UPON | TO ALLOW | ALL SORTS OF | ALL-STANDING | ALL-TO-SMASH | ALL-WINSOME | ALONE | TO AMALGAMATE | AMALGAMATION | AMAZING | AMAZINGLY | AMBITION | TO AMBITION | AMENABILITY | AMERICANISM | TO AMERICANIZE | AMOST | AMONG, for between | AMPERSAND | ANGELOLOGY | ANNULMENT | ANTAGONIZING | ANTI-FEDERALIST | ANTI-SLAVERY | ANTI-MASON | ANTI-MASONIC | ANY HOW | ANY HOW YOU CAN FIX IT | ANY MANNER OF MEANS | TO APE ONE'S BETTERS | APPELLATE | APPLE BUTTER | APPLE BRANDY | APPLE JACK | APPLE-PIE ORDER | APPLICANT | APPOINTABLE | TO APPRECIATE | APPRECIATION | TO APPROBATE | TO ARGUFY | ARK | ARY | AS GOOD AS GO | AS GOOD'S GO | ASH-HOPPER | ASSOCIATION | ASSOCIATIONAL | ASSOCIATIONIST | AT, for by | ATHENÆUM | ATOP | ATTACKTED, for attacked | ATTITUDINIZE | AUSPICATE | AUTHORESS | AUTHORITY | AVAILED | AVAILS | AVERSE | AWFUL | AWFUL | AWFULLY | TO AXE
B:
TO KNOW "b" FROM A bull's foot | BAA-LAMB | BACHELOR'S BUTTON | BACK, is often used for ago | BACK AND FORTH | BACKWOODS | BACKWOODSMAN | TO BACK OUT | BACK - Behind the Back | BAD, for Ill | BAD BOX | BACON | BAGGAGE | BAGGING | BAIL | TO BAIL, OR BALE | BALANCE | BALDERDASH | BALLYHACK--Go to Ballyhack | TO BAMBOOZLE | BANG | BANKER | BANKABLE | BANK-BILL | BANNOCK | BAR, for bear | BANQUETTE | BARBECUE | TO BARK ONE'S SHINS | TO BARK OFF SQUIRRELS | TO BARK UP THE WRONG TREE | BARRACLADE | BARN-DOOR FOWL | BARRENS | BASE | TO BASE | BAYOU | BARNBURNERS | BE | BEAD | BEAKER | TO BE AMONG THE MISSING | BEAR, for bar | BEAR | TO BEAR A HAND | BEAST | TO BEAT | TO BEAT ALL HOLLOW | BECASE, for because | BED-SPREAD | BEE | BEE-LINE | BEECH-LE-MAR | BEING | BELITTLE | BELLWORT

(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER03.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER04.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER05.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER06.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER07.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER08.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER09.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER10.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER11.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER12.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER13.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER14.HTM


(E?)(L?) http://www.merrycoz.org/voices/bartlett/AMER15.HTM


N

O

P

peak
British-American Dictionary
Smith's Dictionary of British-Americanisms

(E?)(L?) http://www.peak.org/~jeremy/dictionary


(E?)(L?) http://www.peak.org/~jeremy/dictionary/dict.html
A very detailed dictionary well worth checking out.

powwow

(E?)(L?) http://www.owad.de/
= "a conference or meeting" = "Konferenzgespräch", "Besprechung", "beratende Versammlung", "Sitzung", "Tagung"
A powwow is refers to any conference or meeting involving intense discussion. One of the few words coming from Narangansett, an American Indian language.

Synonms: buzz session, chat, colloquium, confab, confabulation, conference, converse, debate, dialogue, discourse, discussion, flap, groupthink, huddle, palaver, parley, rap, rap session, seminar, talk, talkfest...

Q

R

S

Seifenkiste (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.mrufer.ch/seifenkiste_d.html


(E?)(L?) http://seifenkistenrennen.de/historie.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.seifenkistenfreun.de/sk.htm
Diese Version gefällt mir am besten:
Der Name "Seifenkiste" (= engl. "soapbox") existiert erst seit den dreißiger Jahren. Damals hatte sich eine amerikanische Seifenfabrik einen besonderen Werbegag ausgedacht: Sie zeichnete auf stabile Verpackungskisten ihres Produktes den Grundriß für ein kleines, leicht herzustellendes Automobil und belieferte die jungen "Autobauer" auch gleich mit den notwendigen Metallteilen.

Sofakartoffel (W3)

Die "Sofakartoffel" dürfte eine Lehnübersetzung der engl. "couch-potato" sein.

(E1)(L1) http://www.wortwarte.de/


spiegel
Amerikanismen

(E?)(L?) Zwiebelfisch" ist der Hinweis auf "Amerikanismen
Interessant an diesem Artikel des "Zwiebelfisch" ist der Hinweis auf "Amerikanismen", die sich nicht in übernommenen Wörtern zeigen sondern in der Übernahme englischer/amerikanischer Formulierungen. Äusserlich sieht man diesen keinerlei Beeinflussung an, aber innerlich sind sie geprägt von englischer/amerikanischer Sprachkultur.

So lehnt sich das dt. "etwas erinnern" (statt "sich an etwas erinnern") an das engl. "I rememeber" an. Das engl. "to meet someone" wird zu dt. "jemanden treffen" statt dt. "sich mit jemandem treffen". Weiter Beispiele sind dt. "das macht Sinn" (statt dt. "das ist sinnvoll", "Ich denke" (statt "ich meine") oder "einmal mehr" (statt "noch einmal").

Schlimm wird es allerdings, wenn im Deutschen der Sinn verfälscht wird, wie in "Sind Sie bequem?", statt "Sitzen Sie bequem?". Oder "Ich rufe Sie zurück." statt "Ich rufe Sie wieder an.".

Weitere Beispiele schleichender Amerikanismen sind Ausdrücke wie "Halbzeit zwei", "Minute 68", Weltkrieg II" oder "in 2004".

Lesen Sie diesen Artikel und achten Sie zukünftig auf solche sprachlichen Unterwanderungen.

Erstellt: 2004-09

T

Truck, Trucker (W3)

(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.trucker.de/
Im Duden Fremdwörterbuch wird zwar auf die englische Herkunft von "Truck" und "Trucker" (dem Fahrer eines Trucks) hingewiesen, aber die weitere Herleitung als nicht nachvollziehbar angegeben. Auf den den zitierten Seiten wird jedoch auf die Herkunft von lat. "trochlea" = "Flaschenzug", "Winde" verwiesen.
Meiner Meinung nach könnte auch lat. "trochus" = "mit klirrenden Ringen besetzte und mit einem Stock getriebener Spielreifen" damit zusammenhängen. - Aber das müssen andere weiter erforschen.
Aus den verlinkten Seiten habe ich folgende Ausschnitte entnommen. Auf beiden Seiten wird auch noch eine zweite Bedeutung von "truck" erklärt, die von dieser vollkommen unabhängig sein soll.


The "truck" "vehicle for carrying goods" is from the early seventeenth century and is a back formation from truckle "a small wheel".



The vehicle sense of "truck" first appeared in English in the 17th century and was probably originally a shortened form of "truckle" (from the Latin "trochlea," pulley), meaning a small pulley, caster or wheel. The first "trucks" were the small wheels that allowed the carriages of shipboard cannons to roll back and forth, but by the 18th century "truck" meant any sort of vehicle designed to carry a heavy load.


Hinweis: Die "Trucker-Site" ist sehr ladeintensiv.

U

Uni Bonn
Amerikanismen in der britischen Lexikographie des Englischen

(E?)(L?) http://hss.ulb.uni-bonn.de/2005/0678/0678-1.pdf

Amerikanismen in der gegenwärtigen britischen Lexikographie des Englischen
Erfassung, Markierung und Datenbasis
(Band 1 von 2)
Inauguraldissertation zur Erlangung der Doktorwürde
der Philosophischen Fakultät der
Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität zu Bonn
vorgelegt von
Veronika Schilling
Bonn 2005
...
Inhaltsverzeichnis Abkürzungsverzeichnis
1. Wörterbücher, Grammatiken und andere Nachschlagewerke
(ausführliche Angaben zu den Werken befinden sich im Literaturverzeichnis) 2. Korpora/ Datenbanken 1. Einleitung

Wörterbücher sind mehr denn je von großer Bedeutung in einer Zeit, in der die internationale Staatengemeinschaft immer mehr zusammenwächst und die Notwendigkeit der Kommunikation zwischen Menschen verschiedenster Nationalitäten - durch den technologischen Fortschritt bedingt - mehr und mehr zunimmt. Wörterbücher sind eines der wichtigsten Hilfsmittel, eine fremde Sprache verstehen bzw. selber sprechen und schreiben zu können.

Unter den Sprachen kommt dem Englischen eine besondere Rolle zu. Das Englische ist die Sprache, die in der Welt am meisten verbreitet ist, denn sie wird auch von vielen hundert Millionen Menschen gesprochen, die eine andere Muttersprache haben. Die englische Sprache besteht heute aus vielen Varietäten, wobei aber die beiden ältesten, größten und weitverbreitesten, das Britische und Amerikanische Englisch, unbestreitbar als Bezugsnormen für andere Varietäten dienen und daher oft gegenübergestellt wurden und werden. Während das BrE, die Sprache des Britischen Empire, bis etwa gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts einen stärkeren Einfluß auf das AmE ausübte als umgekehrt, scheint sich das Verhältnis seit der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts gewendet zu haben. Die Vereinigten Staaten sind zu einer Welt- und Wirtschaftsmacht geworden, die die internationale Politik und den internationalen Handel in entscheidendem Maße beeinflußt. Auf der Kinoleinwand und im Fernsehen dominieren weltweit schon seit langem amerikanische Filme, und bestimmte Musikrichtungen, die in den Vereinigten Staaten entstanden, wie z.B. der Jazz, haben in vielen Ländern Anklang gefunden. Die amerikanische Computerindustrie ist führend auf dem Weltmarkt und nicht zuletzt in Fragen der Kleidung und Nahrungsmittel wird nicht nur Großbritannien schon seit vielen Jahrzehnten von den Vereinigten Staaten beeinflußt. Dies sind die Hauptgründe, warum das AmE weltweit Verbreitung gefunden hat.
...


Erstellt: 2013-08

V

W

Whoa, Nelly

(E?)(L?) http://www.whoa.org/
"Slow down!" - "Stop and think for a moment."
"Whoa!" is a command given to a horse to tell it stop.
"Nelly" is a nickname for "Ellen" and is an old-fashioned name for a horse.

X

Y

Z

Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Ismus, Ismo, Isme, Ismo, Ism

Amerikanismen, Americanisme, Americanism

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

Mathews, Mitford
Americanisms
A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles
American slang expressions

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510123/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510123/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510123/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510123/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510123/etymologpor09-20
Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1951.

Mathews, Mitford McLeod
Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510115/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510115/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510115/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510115/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0226510115/etymologpor09-20
Gebundene Ausgabe: 1962 Seiten
Verlag: Univ. Chicago P (1951)

N

O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z