Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Linguistik, Lingüística, Linguistique, Linguistica, Linguistics

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about.com
Etymology-Suche

(E?)(L?) http://ancienthistory.about.com/sitesearch.htm?q=etymology

Displaying 1 - 10 of 5,080

A Little Etymology - Greek and Latin Roots and a Little Etymology ...
Greek and Latin Roots and a little etymology. A few tables to help make sense of compound words by looking at the etymology, Greek and Latin roots and the ...
http://ancienthistory.about.com/library/weekly/aa052698.htm

etymology - definition and examples of etymology
(1) The origin or derivation of a word. (2) The branch of linguistics concerned with the history of the forms and meanings of words.
http://grammar.about.com/od/e/g/etymologyterm.htm

Etymology - English Word Histories - Stories of Words - Definition of ...
The etymology of a word refers to its origin and historical development: that is, its earliest known use, its transmission from one language to another, and its ...
http://grammar.about.com/od/words/a/Etymologywords.htm

Definition of 'Etymology' - Grammar Glossary for Spanish and English
Definition: The branch of linguistics that studies the origin and development of words and other linguistic forms. Examples of areas that are studied include the ...
http://spanish.about.com/cs/historyofspanish/g/glosetymology.htm

Huracán - Hurricane - Words We Share in Spanish and English
Etymology: Unlike most words that ... References: American Heritage Dictionary, Diccionario de la Real Academia Española, Online Etymology Dictionary ...
http://spanish.about.com/od/wordsweshare/p/huracan.htm

Math Terms - The Etymology of Geometry Terms
What do those math terms mean? Here you can read about geometry terms. Knowing the etymology of these terms helps in understanding geometry.
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/mathematics/a/061210EtymologyGeometryTerms.htm

Etymology of Italia - What Is the Etymology of Italia Italy?
I am taking the email as an explicit request that I include an article addressing the question "what is the etymology of Italia (Italy)?" I hadn't done so because ...
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/romanempire/f/080910-What-Is-The-Etymology-Of-Italia-Italy.htm

Etymology - Roots of Words - Etymology
Etymology is the study of the meanings and roots of words. This etymology page focuses mainly on Latin and Greek origins of words, based on the parts and ...
http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/roots/

Etymology Exercise - Exploring Word Origins
In this exercise, you will explore the origins of 10 words that have experienced some interesting changes in meaning over the centuries.
http://grammar.about.com/od/words/a/Etymology-Exercise.htm

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Erstellt: 2012-06

academia.edu
Etymologie-Papers
Etymology-Papers

(E?)(L?) http://academia.edu/FindPapers




Erstellt: 2013-01

alphadictionary.com
Dr. Goodword's Office

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/

Dr. Goodword's Office is where we will keep articles about the nature of language, correct usage, and other fascinating linguistic tidbits. We will focus on the questions that Dr. Goodword (AKA Robert Beard, PhD, Linguistics) has been asked over the past 10 years: from the days of his Web of Online Dictionaries, through his stint as "Dr. Language" at "yourDictionary", and up until now. If you have a question that is not covered here, simply send it to him via our contact page.

Dr. Goodword Linguistics Minicourse Dictionaries, Glossaries, and Lists Language Quizzes & Games Dr. Goodword's Words on English Words, Words, Words, Words, Words English Grammar & Style Common Questions about Language and Grammar


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/about/robert_beard.html

Robert E. Beard (1938- ) is a linguist whose specialty is morphology (the study of words). He was born and raised in Fayetteville, NC, the son of Kathleen and LaVerne Beard. He completed his undergraduate studies at the University of North Carolina and received his PhD in Slavic Linguistics at the University of Michigan in 1966. Beard served as head of the Russian and Linguistics Programs at Bucknell University, where he taught for 35 years (1965-2000), holding the Ruth Everett Sziezega Chair in Linguistics for two terms.
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After retiring from Bucknell, Beard became one of the founders of the popular linguistic website, "yourDictionary.com", writing under the pseudonym "Dr. Language". He now owns and heads The Lexiteria, a language product and services company that operates "alphaDictionary.com". He writes there under the pseudonym "Dr. Goodword".


Erstellt: 2014-12

alphadictionary.com
Folk etymology

(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/folk_etymology.html

Funny Word Histories

One of the funniest and most fascinating aspects of etymology (word history) is folk etymology. Folk etymology isn't real etymology, which is determined by rules of language change over time; it does not reflect natural historical changes in words. Rather, it represents "erroneous" changes made by people who mishear words, usually foreign words, and try to make these words more "English".
...


Erstellt: 2016-11

alt-usage-english.org
What is the language term for...?
by Mark Israel

(E?)(L?) http://alt-usage-english.org/excerpts/fxwhatis.html

It may be one of:

"ablaut", "accidence", "acrolect", "adianoeta", "adnominal", "adnominatio", "adynaton", "agnosia", "agrammatism", "alexia", "alliteration", "alphabetism", "amblysia", "amphibol(og)y", "anacolouthon", "anacrusis", "anadiplosis", "anaphora", "anaptyxis", "anastrophe", "antiphrasis", "antisthecon", "anthimeria", "antonomasia", "aphaeresis", "aphasia", "aphesis", "apocope", "apocrisis", "aporia", "apophasis", "aposiopesis", "apostrophe", "aptronym", "asyndeton", "Aufhebung", "banausic", "bisociation", "brachylogy", "cacoetheses scribendi", "cacophemism", "calque", "catenative", "cheville", "chiasmus", "chronogram", "cledonism", "commoratio", "consonance", "constative", "coprolalia", "copulative", "crasis", "cruciverbalist", "cryptophasia", "deictic", "dilogy", "disjunctive", "dissimilation", "dittograph", "dontopedalogy", "dysgraphia", "dyslalia", "dyslexia", "dysphemism", "dysprosody", "dysrhythmia", "echolalia", "embo(lo)lalia", "enallage", "enclitic", "endophoric", "epanalepsis", "epanorthosis", "epexegetic", "epenthesis", "epitrope", "epizeuxis", "eponym", "equivoque", "etymon", "eusystolism", "exergasia", "exonym", "exophoric", "extraposition", "eye-word", "factitive", "festination", "fis phenomenon", "Fog Index", "frequentative", "glossogenetics", "glossolalia", "glottochronology", "glyph", "graphospasm", "hapax legomenon", "haplograph", "haplology", "hendiadys", "heteric", "heterogenium", "heterography", "heteronym", "heterophemy", "heterotopy", "hobson-jobson", "holophrasis", "honorific", "hypallage", "hyperbaton", "hyperbole", "hypocoristic", "hypophora", "hyponymy", "hypostatize", "hypotaxis", "idioglossa", "idiolect", "illeism", "ingressive", "isocolon", "isogloss", "klang association", "koine", "langue", "Lautgesetz", "ligature", "lipogram", "litotes", "logogram", "logogriph", "logomisia", "lucus a non lucendo", "macaronic", "macrology", "meiosis", "(a)melioration", "mendaciloquence", "merism", "metalepsis", "metallage", "metanalysis", "metaplasm", "metathesis", "metonymy", "Mischsprache", "mogigraphia", "mondegreen", "monepic", "monologophobia", "Mummerset", "mumpsimus", "mussitation", "mytheme", "noa word", "nomic", "nosism", "nothosonomia", "objective correlative", "obviative", "omphalopsychites", "onomasiology", "onomastic", "onomatopoeia", "oratio obliqua", "oxytone", "palindrome", "palinode", "pangram", "paradiastole", "paragoge", "paragram", "paralinguistic", "paraph", "paraphasia", "paraplasm", "parasynesis", "parataxis", "parechesis", "parelcon", "parimion", "parole", "paronomasia", "paronym", "paroxytone", "parrhesia", "pasigraphy", "patavinity", "patronymic", "pejoration", "periphrasis", "perpilocutionist", "phatic", "philophronesis", "phonaesthesia", "phonocentrism", "pleonasm", "ploce", "polyptoton", "polysemy", "polysyndeton", "privative", "proclitic", "prolepsis", "proparalepsis", "prosonomasia", "prosopopoeia", "prosthesis", "provection", "psittacism", "purr-word", "quadriliteralism", "quaesitio", "quote fact", "rebus", "reification", "rheme", "rhopalic", "sandhi", "scesis onomaton", "Schlimmbesserung", "semiotics", "sigmatism", "simile", "Sprachgef"uhl", "Stammbaumtheorie", "stichomythia", "subreption", "sumpsimus", "superordinate", "suprasegmental", "syllepsis", "symploce", "synaeresis", "synaesthesia", "synaloepha", "synchysis", "syncope", "synecdoche", "synesis", "systole", "tachygraphy", "tautology", "theophoric", "tmesis", "traduttori traditori", "trope", "univocalic", "Ursprache", "Wanderwort", "Wellentheorie", "Witzelsucht", "wordfact", "xenoepist", or "zeugma".


Erstellt: 2016-02

Amerikanistik (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.abc-der-menschheit.de/coremedia/generator/wj/de/03__Geisteswissenschaften/01__Vermitteln/Anglistik_2C_20Amerikanistik.html

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Dabei geht der Blick der "Anglistik" über England hinaus. Den Gegenstand des Faches bildet die englische Sprache in ihrer heutigen weltweiten Verbreitung, die Anglistik interessiert sich für Shakespeare ebenso wie für literarische Produktionen aus Amerika oder dem Commonwealth - etwa aus Indien. Dieses breit angelegte Interessengebiet führt an vielen Universitäten zu einer Aufteilung des Faches. So hat sich die "Amerikanistik", die sich mit Sprache und Kultur Nordamerikas auseinandersetzt, an manchen Hochschulen als eigenständige Disziplin etabliert.
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Antanaclasis, Antanaklase (W3)

(E2)(L1) http://rhetoric.byu.edu/Figures/A/antanaclasis.htm


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2002-8-Aug.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAnAntanaclasis.htm


(E?)(L?) http://linguistik.uni-regensburg.de:8080/lido/Lido

Linguistic Documentation
Terminological und bibliographical database


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1200


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0305


(E?)(L?) http://www.google.de/search?hl=de&q=Antanaclasis&meta=
"Antanaclasis" is a pun in which a word is repeated with a different meaning each time.
(Your argument is sound, nothing but sound.)

"Antanaclasis", dt. "Antanaklase" setzt sich zusammen aus griech. "anti" = "gegen", "zurück", "ana" = "auf" und "klasis" = "Brechung", also etwa "Rückbeziehung", "auf etwas zurückweisen".

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eleaston
Etymology-Links

(E?)(L?) http://www.eleaston.com/etymology.html




Escher sentences (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/%7Emyl/languagelog/archives/000862.html

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These sentences remind me of the pictures of stairways that spiral up endlessly within a finite space, and ...
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eserver
Languages and Linguistics

(E6)(L1) http://www.eserver.org/langs/


(E?)(L?) http://langs.eserver.org/
This area holds works on language, linguistic theory and structural linguistics.
Hier findet man Links zu folgenden linguistischen Themen:





Etymology (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://xkcd.com/890/


(E?)(L?) http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/etymology.png


Erstellt: 2013-05

Etymology-Man (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://xkcd.com/1010/


(E?)(L?) http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/etymology_man.png


Erstellt: 2013-05

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google.com
Google Ngram Viewer

(E?)(L?) http://aclweb.org/anthology/P/P12/P12-3029.pdf

Syntactic Annotations for the Google Books Ngram Corpus

Yuri Lin, Jean-Baptiste Michel, Erez Lieberman Aiden, Jon Orwant, Will Brockman and Slav Petrov

Google Inc.

{yurilin, jbmichel, drerez, orwant, brockman, slav}@google.com

Abstract

We present a new edition of the Google Books Ngram Corpus, which describes how often words and phrases were used over a period of five centuries, in eight languages; it reflects 6% of all books ever published. This new edition introduces syntactic annotations: words are tagged with their part-of-speech, and headmodifier relationships are recorded. The annotations are produced automatically with statistical models that are specifically adapted to historical text. The corpus will facilitate the study of linguistic trends, especially those related to the evolution of syntax.
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(E?)(L?) https://books.google.com/ngrams/info

What does the Ngram Viewer do?

When you enter phrases into the Google Books Ngram Viewer, it displays a graph showing how those phrases have occurred in a corpus of books (e.g., "British English", "English Fiction", "French") over the selected years. Let's look at a sample graph:
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(E?)(L?) http://storage.googleapis.com/books/ngrams/books/datasetsv2.html

The Google Books Ngram Viewer is optimized for quick inquiries into the usage of small sets of phrases. If you're interested in performing a large scale analysis on the underlying data, you might prefer to download a portion of the corpora yourself. Or all of it, if you have the bandwidth and space. We're happy to oblige.

These datasets were generated in July 2012 (Version 2) and July 2009 (Version 1); we will update these datasets as our book scanning continues, and the updated versions will have distinct and persistent version identifiers (20120701 and 20090715 for the current sets).
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Ngram
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Ngram" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1963 auf.





(E?)(L?) https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=Wikipedia%2CLexikon%2C+Nachschlagewerk&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=8&smoothing=2&direct_url=t1%3B%2CWikipedia%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CLexikon%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2CNachschlagewerk%3B%2Cc0

Google-NGram-Viewer am Beispiel »Wikipedia, Lexikon, Nachschlagewerk«


(E?)(L?) http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/N-Gramm

"N-Gramme" sind das Ergebnis der Zerlegung eines Textes in Fragmente. Der Text wird dabei zerlegt und jeweils N aufeinanderfolgende Fragmente als N-Gramm zusammengefasst. Die Fragmente können Buchstaben, Phoneme, Wörter und Ähnliches sein. N-Gramme finden Anwendung in der Kryptologie und Linguistik, speziell auch in der Computerlinguistik, Computerforensik und Quantitativen Linguistik. Einzelne Wörter, ganze Sätze oder komplette Texte werden hierbei zur Analyse oder statistischen Auswertung in N-Gramme zerlegt.
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(E?)(L?) http://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/N-Gramm

N-Gramm


Erstellt: 2015-05

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Linguistic Landscape (W3)

Engl. "Linguistic Landscape" soll im Jahr 1997 von Rodrigue Landry und Richard Y. Bourhis geprägt worden sein. Google findet die Bezeichnung allerdings schon im Jahr 1973. In dem Werk "Essays on Linguistic Themes" von Yakov Malkiel, findet man es sogar schon im Jahr 1968.

(E?)(L?) https://books.google.de/books?id=R-8W0B5CDCkC&pg=PR5&dq=%22linguistic+landscape%22&hl=de&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiuhrKalO_KAhWmNJoKHVKFCHkQ6AEIODAD#v=onepage&q=%22linguistic%20landscape%22&f=false

University of California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1968, Seite V: "... linguistic landscape ..."


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/teachersatwork/

Teachers at Work - A column about teaching
Learning English from Your Linguistic Landscape
June 12, 2015
By Fitch O'Connell
Beadazzled is the name of a shop in a small town in the UK. A church in a city in Australia encourages passersby to "Prevent Truth Decay – Brush up on you Bible." These signs create something linguists Rodrigue Landry and Richard Y. Bourhis defined as "the linguistic landscape of a given territory, region or urban agglomeration" and they are all useful tools in the teaching of English to non-native speakers. Continue reading...


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/teachersatwork/learning-english-from-your-linguistic-landscape/

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Language occurring on public signs and notices in this way was first referred to as "linguistic landscapes" in 1997 by Rodrigue Landry and Richard Y. Bourhis. These landscapes can be used in many different ways in the language classroom, both passively (exploring signage that has been photographed) or actively (projects which include students collecting examples themselves).
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(E1)(L1) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/


(E?)(L?) http://www.visualthesaurus.com/cm/wordroutes/heres-to-your-wellness/

Here's to Your Wellness
April 16, 2010
For this Sunday's "Health and Wellness" issue of The New York Times Magazine, I've contributed an "On Language" column looking at how we all started talking about "wellness" (as opposed to health) in the first place. The word has had an odd trajectory: from an occasional "antonym" of "illness" dating back to the 17th century, to an uneasy label for preventive and holistic approaches to health in the '70s and '80s, to an established element of our "linguistic landscape" in the '90s and beyond.
Article Topics: Vocabulary, Words, Usage


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Linguistic Landscape
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Linguistic Landscape" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1973 auf.

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Linguistic Landscape

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-02

Linguistic profiling

(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/


(E2)(L1) http://www.wordspy.com/archives/L.asp


linguistics (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.cal.org/resources/faqs/linguisticsfaq.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/linguistics
Diese Bezeichnung (dt. "Linguistik") für die moderne Sprachwissenschaft wurde von dem Schweizer Sprachwissenschaftler F. de Saussure (1857-1913) eingeführt.

linguistlist
Linguistlist

(E1)(L?) http://www.linguistlist.org/
The Linguist List - Fachleute antworten zu Fragen - It's available in Deutsch, Español, Français, Italiano, Português, to boot. There are seemingly endless resources here, plus the Ask a Linguist service. It's not strictly etymology, but it certainly deserves to be in The Hall of Fame.


LISTSERV Archives

This LISTSERV server is located at LISTSERV.LINGUISTLIST.ORG. Below you will find all lists that have been configured for public archiving. To access a specific list, simply click on the name of the list in the table. To find confidential or unlisted lists, type in the list name in the search box to the right. For lists that have been configured with an HTML description, you can get more information about the list by hovering the mouse over the list name.




Erstellt: 2012-02

LSA (W3)

"LSA" steht für "Linguistic Society of America".

(E?)(L?) http://www.lsadc.org/
The "Linguistic Society of America" ("LSA") was founded in 1924 to advance the scientific study of language. Linguistics has developed dramatically in the intervening years, greatly expanding the understanding of human language.

LSA is the largest linguistic society in the world and welcomes linguists of all kinds. It is the only umbrella professional linguistics organization in the US, with over 5,000 individual and library members. LANGUAGE, official journal of the LSA, continues to publish across the subfields, and LSA's annual meetings (2005-San Francisco), biennial summer institutes (2005-Cambridge, MA), and other activities promote linguistic studies from many different perspectives.

Erstellt: 2010-02

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merriam-webster.com
Etymology
Where do new words come from?
How do you figure out their histories?

(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/faq/etymology.htm




(E?)(L?) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/etymology


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NLP
computational linguistics

(E?)(L?) http://www.webopedia.com/totd.asp
Short for "Natural Language Processing", a branch of artificial intelligence that deals with analyzing, understanding and generating the languages that humans use naturally in order to interface with computers in both written and spoken contexts using natural human languages instead of computer languages.
One of the challenges inherent in natural language processing is teaching computers to understand the way humans learn and use language. Take, for example, the sentence "Baby swallows fly." This simple sentence has multiple meanings, depending on whether the word "swallows" or the word "fly" is used as the verb, which also determines whether "baby" is used as a noun or an adjective. In the course of human communication, the meaning of the sentence depends on both the context in which it was communicated and each person's understanding of the ambiguity in human languages. This sentence poses problems for software that must first be programmed to understand context and linguistic structures.
NLP is also referred to as computational linguistics.

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odlt.org
ODLT
The Online Dictionary of Language Terminology

(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

The ODLT contains concise explanations of the words English speakers use to talk about language

| adjective | adverb | affix | aspect | case | clause | compound | concord | conjunction | consonant | ellipsis | etymology | gender | grammar | grammatical category | grammatical number | language | modality | mood | morphology | name | noun | object | orthography | passive | particle | preposition | processes | pronoun | parts of speech | punctuation | rhetoric | semantics | sentence | sound | syllable | tense | typology | verb | vowel |

Other Topics: All People | All terms | Branches of Study | Chomskyan Linguistics | Confusables | Figures of Speech | Lexicography | Linguistics | Mavens | Medical | Miscellaneous | Obsolete | Origins of Language | Pragmatics | Semiotics | Speech | Style | Structural Linguistics | Texts | Usage | Word Play | Word Types |


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| abbreviation | abbreviature | abessive case | abjad | ablative case | ablaut | absent referent | absolute clause | absolute construction | absolute modifier | absolute tense | abstract noun | abugida | abusage | accent (phonology) | accent aigu (´) | accent bar | accent grave (`) | accidence | accidental gap | accusative case | acoustic phonetics | acrolect | acronym | acrophony | ACS | active participle | active voice | acute accent (´) | acyrology | adfix | adianoeta | adjectival clause | adjective | adjective pronoun | adjunct | adnominal | adnominal adjunct | adnominatio | adnoun | adposition | adverb | adverbial | adverbial adjunct | adverbial clause | adverbial complement | adverbial conjunction | adverbial connective | adverbial disjunct | adverbial function | adverbial genitive | adverbial particle | adverbial phrase | adverb preposing | adversative passive | adverse | averse | advise | advice | Aelfric’s Grammar | affect | effect | affectum | affinal taboo index | affix | affricate | agentless passive | agent noun | agglomerese | agglutinating language | agglutination | agrammatism | agraphia | agreement | air quotes | Airspeak | Aktionsart | alethic modality | alexia | alinea (¶) | allative case | alliteration | allograph | allomorph | allophone | allude | mention | allusion | illusion | alot | a lot | alphabet | alphabetic principle | alright | all right | alternately | alternatively | alveolar margin | alveolar ridge | alveolar sound | amalgam | amalgamation | ambigram | ambiposition | ambisyllabicity | ambitransitive verb | amelioration | American Style of punctuation | amoral | immoral | | amphibology | amphiboly | amredita compound | anachorism | anacoluthon | anacronym | anacrusis | anadiplosis | anagram | anagrammatism | anagram pair | analogical change | analogy | analytic language | anapest | anaphor | anaphora (linguistics) | anaphora (rhetoric) | anaphoric pronoun | anaptyxis | anastrophe | Anglian | Anglo-French | Anglo-Latin | Anglo-Norman | Anglo-Saxon | Anglosphere | anisomorphism | answer ellipsis | antagonym | antanaclasis | antecedent | antecedent-contained deletion | antecedent-contained ellipsis | anthimeria | anthroponomastics | anthroponym | anthroponymy | anthroposemiotics | anticipatory "it" | anti-cliché | anti-language | antimetabole | antiphrasis | antisthecon | antistrophe | antonomasia | antonym | aphaeresis | aphasia | aphesis | aphetic forms | aphorism | apical | apocopate | apocopation | apocope | apodosis | apo koinou | apophasis | apophony | aporia | aposiopesis | apostrophe (') | apostrophe (rhetoric) | apothegm | apposition | appositional object | appositive clause | appraise | apprise | approximative case | | arbitrariness | arbitrary gender | archaism | argot | argument-contained ellipsis | Aristophanes of Byzantium | Ars Rhetorica | article | articulatory phonetics | artificial language | Art of Grammar | Aryan | ascriptive sentence | ash | Ashtadhyayi | aspect | asperand (@) | assimilation | associative case | assonance | asteism | asterisk (*) | asterisk (etymology) | asterism | asyndetic coordination | asyndeton | atelicity | atomic unit | at sign (@) | attested form | attested language | atticism | attic salt | attribute | attributive | attributive adjective | attributive expletive | attributive noun | auditory phonetics | augmentative | augur | auger | aureate term | author | co-author | autoantonym | auto-antonymy | autological word | autonym | auxesis | auxiliary verb | aversive case | Avestan


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| baby talk | back-channelling | back-clipping | back-formation | backhanded compliment | backronym | backshift | back slang | backslash (\) | backward pronominalization | bahuvribi | Bailey, Nathan | barbarism | bare argument ellipsis | bare infinitive | bare plural | barred i | base | base form | Basic English | basic word order | basilect | begging the question | benefactive | beside | besides | bicameral alphabet | Bickerton, Derek | bilabial | billingsgate | bimonthly | semi-monthly | binary antonyms | binomials | bioprogram theory | blend | blending | blind agreement | blocking | Bloomfield, Leonard | Blount, Thomas | BNC | Boas, Franz | Boasian view of language | body language | Bopp, Franz | bouletic modality | boulomaic modality | bound morpheme | boustrophedon | bow-wow theory | Boxhorn, Marcus van | braces ({ }) | brachygraphy | brachylogy | brackets {}[]()«»< > | break hyphen (-) | breve | British National Corpus | British Style of punctuation | broad reference | Broca’s aphasia | brogue | broken English | Brown Corpus | Brythonic | Bullokar, William | bureaucratese | burr | buzzword


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| cacography | cacology | caconym | cacophemism | cacozelia | Caesar, Julius | caesura | calque | CamelCase | canonical form | canonical order | cant | capital | Capitol | capitalization | capitonym | cardinal vowels | caret (^) | caritive case | Carny | case | casus generalis | | | catchword | causative suffix | causative verb | Caxton, William | cedilla | Celtic Hypothesis | censure | censor | cerilla | chain of nouns | character | charactonym | charientismus | Charisius, Flavius Sosipater | chiasmus | child-directed speech | ChilDes | Chomsky, Noam | chrestomathy | chroneme | chuchotage | Ciardi, John | circumfix | circumflex (ˆ) | circumlocution (linguistics) | circumlocution (rhetoric) | circumposition | circumpositional phrase | circumstantial adverb | circumstantial modality | citation | citation form | cite | site | clang association | clanging | Classical Hebrew | Classical Latin | classifier | clausal complement | clause | clear L [|] | cledonism | cleft infinitive | cleft sentence | cliché | click consonant [!] | climactic | climatic | climax | clipping | clitic | clitic pronoun | closed-class item | closed word class | close pair | CNL | coda | code-switching | code word | cognate accusative | cognate object | cognates | cognate verb | cohortative | cohyponymic transfer | coin | Coleridge, Herbert | collateral form | collective noun | collocation | collocational restriction | colon (:) | colon (rhetoric) | colonial lag | combining form | comitative case | comma (,) | comma splice | commercial at (@) | common adjective | common gender | common name | common noun | comparative | comparative deletion | comparative ellipsis | compare to | compare with | competence mistake | complacent | complaisant | complement | complement | compliment | completive marker | complex-compound sentence | complex preposition | complex sentence | compound | compound adjective | compound adverb | compound-complex sentence | compounding | compound modifier | compound noun | compound sentence | compound split infinitive | compound subject | compound tense | compound verb | comprise | compose | conative | concord | concrete noun | conditional | conditional conjunction | conditional mood | conditional perfect | confusables | confusage | congeries | conjugate | conjugation | conjunct | conjunction | conjunctive adverb | conjunctive conjunction | | connotation | connotation | denotation | consonance | consonant | consonantal alphabet | consonantal drift | consonantary | consonant cluster | construe | contextual spell-checking | continuity theories | continuous | continual | continuous aspect | contraction | contranym | contrast | contrived acronym | controlled language | conventional haplography | conversion | conversion (etymology) | coordinate adjectives | coordinate clause | coordinating conjunction | coordinating connective | coordination | coordinator | coprolalia | copula | copular sentence | copulative conjunction | corpus | corpus linguistics | correlative | correlative conjunction | correlative coordination | council | counsel | councillor | counsellor | countable noun | counterterm | covering word | CPH | cranberry morpheme | cranberry word | crasis | credible | credulous | creole | crescendo | climax | Critical Age Hypothesis | Critical Period Hypothesis | cruciverbalist | cryptolect | Crystal, David | cuckoo theory | cumulative adjectives | cumulative genitive | cumulative reference | cumulative sentence | cumulativity | cuneiform


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| dactyl | daffynition | dagger (†) | dangling gerund phrase | dangling modifier | dangling participle | Daniels, Peter T. | DARE | dark L [?] | dash (– and —) | dative case | dead metaphor | declarative content clause | declension | deep structure | defective verb | deference index | deferred reference | defining relative clause | definite | definitive | definite article | defuse | diffuse | degeneration | degree | degree (°) | deictic pronoun | deixis | delative case | demonstrative adjective | demonstrative pronoun | demonstrative root | demonym | demonymic | demotic | denotation | denotatum | dental consonant | dental preterite | deontic modality | dependent clause | dependent marker word | derivation | derivational affix | derivational morphology | derivational suffix | derived adverb | derived noun | descriptive compound | descriptivism | desert | dessert | designatum | design features of language | desinence | determinative | determinative compound | determiner | Devanagari | deverbal noun | diachronic linguistics | diachronic paragoge | diacope | diacritic | dialect | dialogue | diastole | diction | dictionary | didactic grammar | dieresis(¨) | dieresis (linguistics) | different from | different to | diglossia | digraph | diminution (diminutive) | diminution (litotes) | diminutive | dingbat | diphone | diphthong | diphthongization | direct object | direct speech | discontinuity theories | discourse particle | discreet | discrete | disinterested | uninterested | disjunct | disjunctive conjunction | disjunctive pronoun | dis legomenon | displacement | dissimilation | distal demonstrative | distinctive features | distributive adjective | distributive pronoun | disyllable | ditransitive verb | dittogram | dittograph | dittography | dogberryism | DO insertion | don't-levelling | Donatus | donkey pronoun | donkey sentence | dorsal | DO support | double "is" | double copula | double dactyl | double dagger (‡) | double genitive | double negative | double obelisk (‡) | double passive | double plural | doublespeak | doublet (etymology) | doublet (game) | d-structure | dual | dual alphabet | duality of patterning | dubitative mood | dummy | dummy auxiliary DO | dummy pronoun | duplifix | durative aspect | dvandva | dyad | dynamic modality | dynamic passive | dynamic verb | dysarthria | Dyscolus, Apollonius | dysgraphia | dyslalia | dyslexia | dysphemism | dysphonia | dysprosody | dystmesis


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Early English | Early Middle English | Early Modern English | echoism | echolalia | echo tag | ecphoneme (!) | ecthlipsis | editorial "we" | editorial doubt | Edwards, Jonathan | effectum | | egoism | egotism | either | elative | elegant variation | Elementarie | elevation | elision | ellipsis (grammar) | ellipsis (rhetoric) | ellipsis (…) | elliptical clause | elliptical infinitive | elocution | Elyot, Thomas | em | embedding | embolalia | em dash (—) | eme | emic | emigrant | immigrant | EModE | emoticon | emphatic pronoun | em quad | enallage (grammar) | enallage (rhetoric) | Enchorial Egyptian | enclave | exclave | enclitic | en dash (–) | endocentric | endocentric compound | endonym | endophora | engma | enjambment | envelop | envelope | epanadiplosis | epanados | epanalepsis | epanastrophe | epanorthosis | epenthesis | epeolatry | epergesis | epexegesis | epicene gender | epicene pronoun | epiphora | epistemic modality | epistrophe | episynaloephe | epithet | epizeuxis | eponym | eponymy | E-Prime | equational sentence | equative | ergative–absolutive language | ergative case | ergative verb | erotema | eroteme (?) | Erse | escape character (\) | esoteric language | Esperanto | etc. | et cetera | ethnonym | ethnonymics | etic | etymological fallacy | etymological twins | etymology | etymon | euphemism | euphemism treadmill | eusystolism | evidential language | exact synonyms | exceptionable | exceptional | exclamation mark (!) | exegesis | exemplification | existential "it" | existential "there" | existential sentence | exocentric | exocentric compound | exonym | exoteric language | expletive | expletive pronoun | extension | external sandhi | extranuclear


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| factitive object | false cognates | false friends | false passive | false splitting | fatalism | pessimism | faulty coordination | faulty parallelism | faulty subordination | fawn | faun | fewer | less | figurative | figurative | literal | figurative extension | figure | figure dash (?) | figure of speech | finger quotes | finite clause | finite verb | fixed phrase | flammable | inflammable | flat adverb | flaunt | flout | FLB | FLN | flounder | founder | focus | folk etymology | Follett, Wilson | font | fore-and-aft-clipping | fore-clipping | foreignism | foreword | forward | Forkhead box protein P2 | fortition | forward slash (/) | fossilized term | fossil word | fourth person | Fowler, Henry Watson | Fowler's Modern English Usage | FOXP2 | frame semantics | Frankish | free morpheme | freezes | Fremdvort | French spacing | frequentative | fricative | full infinitive | full stop | Furnivall, Frederick | fused participle | fused relative clause | fused sentence | fusional language | Futhork | future continuous | future inceptive | future past | future perfect | future perfect continuous | future perfect progressive | future progressive | future simple | future subordinate | future tense


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| gallicism | Gallo-Roman | gapping (clauses) | gapping ellipsis | garden path sentence | Garg, Anu | Gaswort | gemination (orthography) | gemination (phonetics) | gemination (rhetoric) | gender | gender concord | genderlect | gender marking | General American | generalization | General Purpose Dictionary | generative grammar | generic "he" | generic "one" | generic "you" | genericide | generic mood | generification | generonym | genitive case | genteelism | gentilic | gentleman's agreement | gerund | gerundive | gestural theory of language origins | get-passive | ghost word | gibberish | glide | gloss | glossary | Glossographia | glossolalia | glossopoeia | glottal catch | glottal stop | glottis | glottochronology | glyph | gnomic | gnomic aorist | gobbledygook | Goidelic | got and gotten | govern | Gowers, Ernest | GPD | gradability | gradable antonyms | gradation | grammar | grammar explosion | grammarian | grammatical | grammatical aspect | grammatical category | grammatical concord | grammatical gender | grammaticalisation | grammaticality | grammatical morpheme | grammatical number | grammatical voice | grammaticisation | Grammaticus, Diomedes | grammeme | grapheme | graphology | graphospasm | Great Eskimo Vocabulary Hoax | Great Vowel Shift | Greenberg, Joseph | greengrocer's apostrophe | Grimm, Jacob | Grimm's Law | grisly | grizzly | group noun | group possessive | guillemets (« ») | Gunning Fog Index


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| hanged | hung | Hangul | hapax legomenon | haplography | haplology | hard hyphen (-) | hard-word dictionary | Harper, Douglas | Harris, Zellig | Harvard comma | Hausa | h-dropping | head | head directionality parameter | head final | head initial | headword | Heavy Metal Umlaut | hedge | helping verb | hendiadys | hendiatris | heritage language | heterogloss | heterographs | heterography | heterological word | heteronym | heterophone | hiatus | hieratic | hieronym | High German | High Rising Intonation (HRI) | High Rising terminal (HRT) | Hiragana | historic | historical | historical linguistics | historical present | historical principles | historical semantics | hoard | horde | Hobson-Jobsonism | hole in the pattern | holonymy | homeoteleuton (literary) | homeoteleuton (palaeography) | homograph | homography | homonym | homophone | honorific | hopefully | Horace | hortative | howler | Humboldt, Wilhelm von | hybrid | hypallage | hyperbaton | hyperbole | hypercorrect | hyperforeign | hyperglot | hypernasality | hyperonym | hyphen (-) | hypocorism | hypocoristic | hypogegrammeni | hyponym | hypotaxis | hysterologia | hysteron proteron


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| i.e. | e.g. | iamb | iambic pentameter | Ibn Abi Ishaq | iconic sign | ideogram | ideograph | ideophone | idiolect | idiom | idiomatic passive | idiotism | if | whether | when | illative case | illative particle | illeism | illocutionary act | imperative mood | imperative particle | imperfect participle | imperfect tense | impersonal verb | implicational universal | implied conditional | imply | infer | inceptive future | inceptive verb | inchoative aspect | inchoative verb | inclusive/exclusive "we" pronouns | indefinite article | indefinite numeral | indefinite pronoun | independent clause | independent marker word | indexical sign | indicative mood | indirect object | indirect passive | indirect speech | Indo-European | Indo-Germanic | inductive antonomasia | infinitival particle | infinitive | infix | inflection | inflectional affix | inflectional morphology | inflectional root | inflectional suffix | initialism | inkhornism | inkhorn term | inkpot term | instrumental case | intensifier | intensive pronoun | interchangeability | interdental consonant | interfix | interjection | internal sandhi | | interpunct (·) | interrogation point (?) | interrogative adverb | interrogative clause | interrogative content clause | interrogative pronoun | intonation | intonation contour | intonation curve | intonation language | intonation phoneme | intonation turn | intoneme | intransitive verb | introductory complement | intrusive R | invariant noun | iota | iota subscript | IPA | ipsissima verba | irony | irony mark | irrealis moods | irregular verb | isocolon | isogloss | isogram | isolating language | it-cleft | iterated genitive determiner | iterative compound


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Jakobson, Roman | Janus word | jargon | Jespersen, Otto | Jespersen's cycle | jocular formation | joey | Johnson, Samuel | Johnson's Dictionary Preface | Jones, William | jot | juncture | juncture loss


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| kadigan | kangaroo word | karmadharaya | Katakana | kenning | Kentish | kinesics | koine | koinon | Kudos for the ODLT | Kussmaul, Adolph


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| label name | labial | labiodental | laconism | Lakoff, George | Lakoff, Robin | lallation | lambdacism | laminal | language | language bioprogram hypothesis | language faculty | language instinct | langue | langue d'oc | langue d'oïl | Late Latin | lateral | Latin | lative case | lavender language | lavender linguistics | lax vowel | lect | lemma | lemmatize | lenition | Lenvort | letter | lexeme | lexical | lexical aspect | lexical category | lexical class | lexical gap | lexical item | lexical meaning | lexical morphology | lexical priming | lexical root | lexical unit | lexical verb | lexicographer | lexicography | lexicology | lexicon | lexifer language | liaison | ligature | light verb | limiting adjective | limiting clause | lingua franca | Lingua Tertii Imperii | linguist | linguistic determinism | linguistic nativism | linguistic relativity | linguistics | Linguistics Wars | linguistic turn | linguistic typology | link hyphen (-) | linking verb | lipogram | lipography | listeme | literal | literary onomastics | litotes | loan blend | loanshift | loan translation | loanword | loath | loathe | localism | locative case | logatome | logical punctuation | logogram | logograph | logographic principle | logomachy | logonomy | logorrhea | long passive | long vowel | loose | lose | loose sentence | Low German | Lowth, Robert | luxuriant | luxurious


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| macaronic | macrolinguistics | macron | main clause | main entry | majestic plural | major sentence | majuscule | | manner adverb | manner of articulation | Manutius, Aldus (the Elder) | Manutius, Aldus (the Younger) | marker | mass noun | mass-word | matronym | meaningless DO | measure word | Medieval Latin | meiosis | Mei Ying-tso | Mentalese | Mercian | Merge | merism | merismus | meronymy | Mesha Stele | mesolect | metacronym | metagrammatism | metalanguage | metalepsis | metalinguistics | metallage | metanalysis | metanoia | metaphor | metaphoric extension | metaplasm (linguistics) | metaplasm (rhetoric) | metastasis | metathesis | metonym | metonymy | metronymic | metronymy | microlinguistics | Middle English | Middle French | Middle High German | Middle Low German | militate | mitigate | minced oath | minimal free form | Minimalist Program | minimal pair | minor sentence | minuscule | mirative mood | misdivision | misplaced modifier | Mitchell, Richard | mixed metaphor | modal auxiliary verb | modality | modal verb | Modern English | Modern Language Association (MLA) | Modern Latin | modifier | mondegreen | monepic | monogenesis | mononym | monophthong | monophthongization | monospaced font | monosyllabic language | monosyllable | Montfaucon, Bernard de | mood | morph | morpheme | morphemics | morphology | morphophonology | motherese | multiple negation | mumpsimus | Muphry's law | Murray, James | mutated plural | mycterismus


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| narrowing | nasal | natural gender | natural language | Natural Language Toolkit | near rhyme | negative concord | negative particle | negative pronoun | n-ellipsis | Neogrammarian Hypothesis | Neogrammarians | neologism | neology | New English Dictionary | New High German | new information marker | Newspeak | nice-nellyism | Nirukta | NLTK | nobiliary particle | Nomenclaturism | nominalization (etymology) | nominalization (grammar) | nominal relative clause | nominative absolute | nominative case | nominative pronoun | nonce word | non-defining relative clause | non-finite verb | non-gradability | non-restrictive relative clause | non-rhotic speech | nonword | Norman | normative grammar | North Germanic | North Sea Germanic | Northumbrian | nosism | Nostratic | note of admiration (!) | notional agreement | notional concord | notional verb | not-stripping ellipsis | noun | noun adjunct | nounal | nounal clause | nounally | noun chain | noun clause | noun-incorporation | nouning | noun of assemblage | noun phrase | nucleus | null-A | null comparative | null complement anaphora | null subject language | null subject parameter | number


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| obelisk (†) | obelism | object | object complement | object pronoun | oblique (/) | oblique case | occlusive | OED | officialese | officious | official | of-genitive | Ogden, C.K. | Ogham | Oh | O | Old Church Slavonic | Old English | Old French | Old High German | Old Low German | Old North French | Old Saxon | oligosynthetic language | onomasiology | onomasticon | onomastics | onomatechny | onomatology | onomatopoeia | onomatopoeic coinage | onomatotechny | onset | open-class item | open word class | optative mood | ordinance | ordnance | oronyms | orthoepy | orthographic depth | orthographic principle | orthography | ostensive definition | OV language | | Oxford English Dictionary | oxymoron


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| palaeography | palarie | palatal | palate | palate | palette | palindrome | Palsgrave, John | Panini | parachesis | paradigm | paragoge | paragraph | paragraphos | paralanguage | paralexia | paralinguistics | paralipsis | parallelism | parameter | paraph | paraphasia | paraphrasia | paraphrasis | paraprosdokian | parasitic -t | parataxis | parelcon (etymology) | parelcon (rhetoric) | parentheses () | parimion | Parlyaree | paroemion | parole | paromoiosis | paronomasia | paronyms | parse | pars pro toto | participial adjective | participial clause | participial phrase | participle | participle clause | particle | particle verb | partitive | partitive article | partitive genitive case | Partridge, Eric | parts of speech | passive progressive voice | passive voice | Passy, Paul | past continuous | past future | past participle | past perfect | past perfect continuous | past perfect progressive | past progressive | past simple | past tense | pathos | patois | patronymic | paucal | peak | pejoration | penultimate | ultimate | perfective aspect | perfective auxiliary | perfect participle | performance mistake | performative verb | period (.) | periodic sentence | periphrasis | periphrasis (linguistics) | periphrast | periphrastic DO | perlocutionary act | perlocutionary effect | perquisite | prerequisite | perseveration | person | personal pronoun | perspicuous | perspicacious | petitio principii | pharynx | phatic communion | philology | phonation | phone | phoneme | phonemic inventory | phonesthemes | phonesthesia | phonetic | phonetics | phonogram | phonology | phonotactics | phrasal adverb | phrasal indefinite pronoun | phrasal verb | phrase | phrase structure grammar | pictogram | pictograph | pidgin | PIE | pilcrow (¶) | Pinker, Steven | Pinyin | pitch | Pitman, Isaac | place adverb | placeholder name | place of articulation | Plato's problem | pleonasm | pleonastic genitive | pleonastic pronoun | pleonastic subject | ploce | plosive | pluperfect | plural | plurale tantum | pluralis auctoris | pluralis maiestatis | pluralis modestiae | plural of majesty | pointed u | pointing | point-virgule (;) | pojmanym | Polari | Politics and the English Language | polyepic | polygenesis | polyglot | polyonym | polyptote | polyptoton | polyseme | polysemous | polysemy | polysyllable | polysyndetic coordination | polysyndeton | polysynthetic language | polyword | pooh-pooh theory | popular etymology | portmanteau morph | portmanteau word | positive | possessive | possessive adjective | possessive apostrophe (') | possessive case | possessive pronoun | possessive recursion | postfix | post genitive | postmodifier | postposition | postpositive preposition | potential mood | POTS | poverty of the stimulus | practice | practise | pragmatic competence | pragmatic particle | pragmatics | predicate | predicate nominative | predicate objective | predicative | predicative adjective | prefix | premiss | premise | premodifier | prep "it" | preposition | prepositional phrase | prepositional pronoun | prepositional verb | preposition stranding | prescriptivism | present continuous | present participle | present perfect | present perfect continuous | present perfect progressive | present progressive | present simple | present tense | preterite | preventive | preventative | primary orality | primings | principal | principle | principal parts of a verb | principal verb | principle | Principles and Parameters | Principles of Newspeak | Priscian | privative | privative alpha | privative case | privy nippe | Probus, Marcus Valerius | proclitic | pro-drop language | pro-drop parameter | productivity | pro-form | progressive aspect | progressive auxiliary | progressive future | progressive future perfect | progressive participle | progressive past | progressive past perfect | progressive present | progressive present perfect | prolepsis | pronominal adjective | pronoun | pronoun inventory | prop "it" | proper adjective | proper name | proper noun | proprietary name | proprietary term | pro-sentence | proslepsis | prosody | prosopopeia | prosthesis | Protagoras | protasis | prothesis | Proto-Germanic | protogram | Proto-Indo-European | proto-language | Proto Language | protologism | proto-world-language | pro-verb | proximal demonstrative | proximity concord | pseudo-acronym | pseudogapping | pseudoword | Pullum, Geoffrey | punctuation | punctuation mark | punctum | punctus | punctus interrogativus | punctus percontativus | Pupillus, Orbilius | pure infinitive | pure vowel


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| quantifier | quasi-auxiliary verb | quasi-periodic vibration voicing | Queen's English | question mark (?) | question tag | Quintilian | quotation dash (—) | quotation marks (' ')(" ") | quotation quadrats (' ')(" ")


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Rask, Rasmus | rational gender | r-dropping | realis moods | rebracketing | Rebus Principle | Received Pronunciation | recipient noun | reciprocal pronoun | recursion | recursive acronym | recursive syntactic subordination | redundant verb | reduplicated plural | reduplication | Reed-Kellogg diagrams | refactorization | referent | reflexive pronoun | reflexive verb | regiolect | register | regretful | regrettable | regular verb | reinforcement tag | relative clause | relative pronoun | relative tense | relativizer | Renaissance English | resolved tense | restrictive relative clause | resultant object | resultative adjective | retained object | retronym | reversed wh-cleft | reverse solidus (\) | rhetoral elocution | rhetoric | rhetorical device | rhetorical question | rhetorical question mark | rhopalic | rhotacism | rhotacism (etymology) | rhotic speech | rhyming compound | rhyming slang | Richards, I. A. | rime | Robert Cawdrey | Roget, Peter | root | rootless | Rosetta Project | royal "we" | RP | rune | run-on sentence


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| SAE | Safire, William | sandhi | Sanskrit | sans-serif | Sapir, Edward | Sapir–Whorf hypothesis | sarcasm | Saussure, Ferdinand de | Saxon genitive | Saxonism | Scandinavian | scare quotes | scheme | Schlegel, Friedrich | schwa | Scoticism | Scots | Scottish | Scottism | Scouse | scrambling language | scratch comma (/) | script | scriptio continua | secondary object | secondary orality | section (§) | segment | semagram | semalfactive | semantic drift | semanticity | semantic loan | semantics | semantic spoonerism | semaphore | semasiology | sememe | semicolon (;) | semiotics | semiphonotypy | Semi-Saxon | semivowel | senone | sentence | sentence adverb | sentence case | sentence element | sentence fragment | separatrix (|) | serial comma | serif | sesquipedalian | s-genitive | shall | will | shear | sheer | shibboleth | shorthand | short passive | short vowel | Siamese twins | sibilant | sideroxylon | sigmatism | sign | sign (Saussure) | signifier | silent letter | SIL International Ethnologue | simile | Simon, John | simple adverb | simple future | simple past | simple present | simple sentence | simple tense | simple verb | simulfix | singular | singular "they" | singulare tantum | situational agreement | Skeat, Walter | skeuomorphism | slang | SLI | sluicing | sniglet | sociolect | soft hyphen (-) | soft palate | solecism | solidus (/) | soraismus | sortal | sound symbolism | SOV language | Spanish N | SPE | speaking in tongues | specialization | specific language impairment | speech | spelling numbers | spelling pronunciation | spiritus asper | spiritus lenis | spliced idiom | split infinitive | split modifier | split verb | Spooner, William | spoonerism | spot-plague | Sprachraum | square brackets ([ ]) | squinting modifier | s-structure | Standard American English | stationary | stationery | stative passive | stative verb | Steeves, Jon | stem | stenography | stop | stop consonant | stress | stripping ellipsis | strong verb | structural linguistics | Strunk, William Jr. | StudlyCaps | stunt word | stylistics | subject | subject complement | subjective pronoun | subject-prominent language | subject pronoun | subjunctive | subordinate clause | subordinate conjunction | subordinate future | subordinating conjunction | subordinating connective | subordination | subordinator | subreption | substantive | substantive adjective | substantive participle | substrate | such as | suffix | superfix | superlative | superlative of two | superordinate | superstrate | supine | suppletion | suppletive form | suprafix | suprasegmental | surface form | surface structure | Survey Corpus | Survey of English Usage | suspended compound adjective | suspended hyphen (-) | suspension point (…) |suspension sign | SVO language | Sweet, Henry | swung dash (~) | syllabary | syllabification | syllable | syllable word | syllabogram | syllepsis | symbolic sign | synaeresis | synaesthesia (literary) | synaesthesia (medical) | synaloepha | synchysis | syncopation | syncope | syncretism | syndetic coordination | synecdoche | synesis | synonym | synonymia | synonymicon | synonymy | synopsis | syntactic expletive | syntax | synthetic language | systole | systrophe


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Table Alphabeticall | tachygraphy | tag | tag question | tail question | tapinosis | tatpurusha | tautology | taxogram | tayl'd i | technobabble | technospeak | teleological modality | telicity | Temherte slaq (¡) | tense | tense vowel | terminology | tetrakis legomenon | text messaging | T-form | that-clause | the indefinite vowel | The King's English | The New World of Words | theophoric | theronym | thesaurus | the substantive verb | thetatismus | thorn | Thrax, Dionysius | tilde (~) | time adverb | Tironian notes | titillate | titivate | Title case | tittle | tmesis | to-infinitive | tonal sandhi | tone | tone language | toneme | topic-prominent language | topolect | toponomastics | toponym | toponymy | tortuous | torturous | totum pro parte | traditional grammar | transferred epithet | transformation | transformational grammar | transitive verb | translation fallacy | transliterate | transnumeral | Trench, Richard | trial | tricolon | tri-consonantal root | trinomials | Tripartite motto | triphone | triphthong | triplets | tris legomenon | trisyllable | trope | troponymy | Truss, Lynn | tuism | turbid | turgid | tushery | T–V distinction | T-V pronouns | typeface | typography | typology


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| umlaut(¨) | umlaut (process) | uncial | uncountable noun | Underground Grammarian | underlying form | unexceptionable | unexceptional | unicameral alphabet | unique morpheme | universal | universal grammar | universal tendency | univocalic | unpaired word | unreal past | upspeak | uptalk | Urheimat | Ursprache | uvula | uvular r | uvular trill


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| vague word | valency | variety | Varro | velar | velopharyngeal insufficiency | venal | venial | verb | verbal | verbal false limb | verbicide | verbigeration | verbless clause | verb-noun | verb phrase ellipsis | verbum sap | vernacular | Verner's Law | V-form | virgule (/) | vocabulary | vocal cords | vocal folds | vocal fry | vocalic | vocative case | vogue word | voice (phonology) | voiced consonant | voiceless consonant | voice onset time | VO language | volition | VOT | vowel | vowel gradation | vowel quantity | vowel shift | VPE | VPI | VSO language | vulgarism | Vulgar Latin


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Wallis, John | Wanderwort | wanna-contraction | Wardour Street English | weak pronoun | weak verb | weasel word | weather "it" | Webster, Noah | well-formed | Wernicke’s aphasia | West Germanic | West Saxon | wh-cleft | Whewell, William | White, Elwyn Brooks (E. B.) | Whorf, Benjamin | wh-question | widening | Witzelsucht | word | word blindness | word boundary | word class | word magic | wordmark | word salad | wordsmith | word vision | writer's cramp | Wug test | wug word


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| xenoglossia | xenoglossy


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Yaska | yo-he-ho theory | Young, Thomas


(E?)(L?) http://www.odlt.org/

| Zamenhof, Ludvic | zero | zero article | zero conditional | zero copula | zero derivation | zero-derivation nominalization | zeugma | Zipf's law


Erstellt: 2015-10

P

Paronomasia
Paronomasie (W3)

(E2)(L1) http://rhetoric.byu.edu/Figures/P/paronomasia.htm


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2002-8-Aug.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsParonomasia.htm


(E?)(L?) http://linguistik.uni-regensburg.de:8080/lido/Lido

Linguistic Documentation
Terminological und bibliographical database


(E?)(L?) http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#paronomasia


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0301


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/1196
"Paronomasia" (syllepsis) is the use of words that sound similar to other words, but have different meanings.
("plain", "plane", "explained")

"Paronomasie, lat. "paronomasia", griech. "paronomasía" ist die Zusammenstellung gleichlautender Wörter.

"Paronomasia", dt. "Paronomasie" setzt sich zusammen aus griech "para" = "daneben", "längsseits" und "onomos" = "Name"; zusammen also "Nebenname".

pmpkn
Bowie, David
Linguistics & English Language

(E?)(L?) http://www.pmpkn.net/lx/papers.html
David Bowie hat hier einige seiner Vorlesungen und Werke zur Verfügung gestellt:

Q

R

reference.com
Etymology / Origins

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/index.html#Etymology

Etymology / Origins


Erstellt: 2014-06

reference.com
Etymology Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://dictionary.reference.com/etymology

Browse our Etymology Dictionary Alphabetically

Word origins not only shed light on their current meaning, but offer clues to their usage. Dictionary.com uses the comprehensive and authoritative etymologies from the Online Etymology Dictionary. This resource synthesizes some of most authentic documents of word history available, offering succinct and incisive information.




Erstellt: 2011-01

Remember B.F.Skinner (W3)

Noam Chomsky hatte das Werk "Verbal Behaviour" von B.F.Skinner kritisch besprochen. Seit 1959 wurde in entsprechenden Kreisen der Ausspruch "Remember B.F.Skinner" zur gefürchteten Floskel.

S

sil
Glossary of linguistic terms

(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/linguistics/


(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/




Syllepsis, Syllepse, syllepsis semantica, syllepsis syntactica (W3)

(E2)(L1) http://rhetoric.byu.edu/Figures/S/syllepsis.htm


(E?)(L?) http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2002-8-Aug.htm


(E?)(L?) http://www.sil.org/linguistics/GlossaryOfLinguisticTerms/WhatIsAPun.htm


(E?)(L?) http://linguistik.uni-regensburg.de:8080/lido/Lido

Linguistic Documentation
Terminological und bibliographical database


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0999
syllepsis Sep 99

"Syllepsis" is use of a single word so that it ties to two (or more) other words of the sentence, but has a different meaning for each of them.
(There is a certain type of woman who'd rather "press grapes" than "clothes".)

"Syllepsis" oder "Syllepse", lat. "syllepsis", griech. "sýllepsis" = "Zusammennehmen".

Eine "Syllepse" ist eine Ellipse, bei der ein Satzteil anderen in Person, Numerus oder Genus verschiedenen Satzteilen zugeordnet wird (z.B. ich gehe meinen Weg, ihr den eurigen).


"Syllepsis", dt. "Syllepse" setzt sich zusammen aus griech. "syn" = "zusammen" und "lepsis" = "nehmen".

syr
Linguistics-Sites for Students
Mary D. Taffet

(E?)(L?) http://web.syr.edu/~mdtaffet/student_sites.html
General Resources | Classification | Dialects | Dictionaries | Ebonics | Endangered Languages (new category) | English Language Legislation | FAQs | Glossaries | Language Catalogs and Guides | Phrase Collections | Specific Languages | Writing Systems

T

translationdirectory
Linguists Of The Year

(E?)(L?) http://www.translationdirectory.com/article318.htm

The Inttranet ™ nominees as Linguists of the Year for 2004 were:


U

Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans États-Unis
Langues dans États-Unis

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/usaacc.htm

(anglais)


Uni Laval
Histoire sociolinguistique des États-Unis

(E2)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/usa_6histoire.htm

Cette «Histoire sociolinguistique des États-Unis» se veut avant tout d'ordre démolinguistique et sociologique plutôt que politique. Elle ne prétend donc pas résumer toute l'histoire politique et économique fort complexe de ce grand pays. Il a semblé préférable de nous en tenir aux principaux faits qui ont eu des incidences sur les plans linguistique et social: la provenance des premiers colons, l'expansion territoriale, certains grands événements politiques et sociaux tels la Révolution américaine, l'avènement de l'industrialisation et de la diversité culturelle, la mondialisation et le statut de superpuissance.

Plan d'ensemble

1) Les premiers habitants : les autochtones 2) La colonisation européenne (XVIe - XVIIIe siècles) 3) La révolution américaine (1776-1783) 4) L'expansion territoriale (1803-1867) 5) L'Amérique anglocentrique (1790-1865) 6) L'Amérique eurocentrique (1865-1960) 7) L'Amérique multiculturelle (1960 jusqu'à nos jours) 8 ) La superpuissance et l'expansion de l'anglais Les États-Unis d'Amérique


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Alabama
Langues dans Alabama

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/alabama.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Alaska
Langues dans Alaska

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/alaska.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Arizona
Langues dans Arizona

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/arizona.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Arkansas
Langues dans Arkansas

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/arkansas.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Californie
Langues dans Californie

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/californie.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Caroline du Nord
Langues dans Caroline du Nord

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/caroline-nord.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Colorado
Langues dans Colorado

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/colorado.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Connecticut
Langues dans Connecticut

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/connecticut.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Dakota du Nord
Langues dans Dakota du Nord

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/dakota-nord.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Dakota du Sud
Langues dans Dakota du Sud

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/dakota-sud.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Delaware
Langues dans Delaware

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/delaware.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Floride
Langues dans Floride

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/floride.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Géorgie
Langues dans Géorgie

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/georgie.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Hawaï
Langues dans Hawaï

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/hawai.htm

(anglais-hawaïen) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Idaho
Langues dans Idaho

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/idaho.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Illinois
Langues dans Illinois

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/illinois.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Indiana
Langues dans Indiana

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/Indiana.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Iowa
Langues dans Iowa

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/iowa.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Kansas
Langues dans Kansas

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/kansas.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Kentucky
Langues dans Kentucky

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/kentucky.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Louisiane
Langues dans Louisiane

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/louisiane.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Maine
Langues dans Maine

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/maine.htm

(anglais) = USA


(E?)(L?) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/francophonie/Acadie-HST.htm
Dt. "Akadien", frz. "l'Acadie", engl. "Acadia" ist die Bezeichnung für ehemaligen französischen Besitzungen in Kanada südöstlich der Mündung des Sankt-Lorenz-Stromes. Dazu gehören die heutigen Provinzen Nova Scotia (CA), New Brunswick (CA), Teile Quebecs (CA) und Maine (US).


Histoire des Acadiens


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Maryland
Langues dans Maryland

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/maryland.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Massachusetts
Langues dans Massachusetts

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/amnordacc.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Michigan
Langues dans Michigan

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/michigan.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Minnesota
Langues dans Minnesota

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/minnesota.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Mississippi
Langues dans Mississippi

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/Mississippi.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Missouri
Langues dans Missouri

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/missouri.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Montana
Langues dans Montana

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/montana.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Nebraska
Langues dans Nebraska

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/nebraska.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Nevada
Langues dans Nevada

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/nevada.htm

(anglais)


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans New Hampshire
Langues dans New Hampshire

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/newhampshire.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans New York
Langues dans New York

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/newyork.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans New Jersey
Langues dans New Jersey

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/new_jersey.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Nouveau-Mexique
Langues dans Nouveau-Mexique

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E?)(L?) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/new_mexico.htm




Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Ohio
Langues dans Ohio

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/ohio.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Oklahoma
Langues dans Oklahoma

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/oklahoma.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Oregon
Langues dans Oregon

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/oregon.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Pennsylvanie
Langues dans Pennsylvanie

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/pennsylvanie.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Rhode Island
Langues dans Rhode Island

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/Rhode_Island.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Tennessee
Langues dans Tennessee

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/tennessee.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Texas
Langues dans Texas

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/texas.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Utah
Langues dans Utah

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/utah.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Vermont
Langues dans Vermont

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/vermont.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Virginie
Langues dans Virginie

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/virginie.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Virginie occidentale
Langues dans Virginie occidentale

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/virginie-ouest.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Washington
Langues dans Washington

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/washington.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Wisconsin
Langues dans Wisconsin

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/wisconsin.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Laval
L'aménagement linguistique dans Wyoming
Langues dans Wyoming

(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/


(E1)(L1) http://www.tlfq.ulaval.ca/axl/amnord/wyoming.htm

(anglais) = USA


Uni Stanford
Zwicky, Arnold M.
Sadock, Jerrold M.
Ambiguity Tests and how to fail them

(E?)(L?) http://www.stanford.edu/~zwicky/ambiguity-tests-and-how-to-fail-them.pdf


Erstellt: 2013-01

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wolframalpha
Words & Linguistics

(E?)(L1) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/WordsAndLinguistics.html

Document Length Transliterations Morse Code Soundex


Erstellt: 2011-10

wolframalpha
Writing

(E?)(L1) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/CultureMedia.html

Writing


Erstellt: 2011-10

word sense disambiguation (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Word%20sense%20disambiguation

In computational linguistics, "word sense disambiguation" (WSD) is the problem of determining in which sense a word having a number of distinct senses is used in a given sentence. For example, consider the word "bass", two distinct senses of which are: and the sentences "The bass part of the song is very moving" and "I went fishing for some sea bass". To a human it is obvious the first sentence is using the word "bass" in sense 2 above, and in the second sentence it is being used in sense 1. But although this seems obvious to a human, developing algorithms to replicate this human ability is a difficult task.

Computational Linguistics is a subfield of Linguistics in which logical modeling of natural language from a computational perspective is central. This modeling is not limited to a particular field of linguistics. It is quite an interdisciplinary field, drawing the involvement of linguists, computer scientists, experts in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychologists and logicians, amongst others.

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wordpress.com
Literal-Minded
Linguistic commentary from a guy who takes things too literally

(E?)(L?) https://literalminded.wordpress.com/

Linguistic commentary from a guy who takes things too literally


Erstellt: 2016-02

wordways
Word Ways: The Journal of Recreational Linguistics

(E?)(L1) http://www.wordways.com/

For nearly forty years, Word Ways has explored the many facets of logology (an old word resurrected by the late Dmitri Borgmann to describe recreational linguistics). Dmitri wrote the classic book on this topic -- Language on Vacation (Scribner's, 1965), now out of print -- and was the first Word Ways editor in 1968.

Word Ways is published in an 80-page format four times a year (February, May, August, November). The journal is currently edited by Jeremiah Farrell.


wyzant.com
Etymology

(E?)(L?) https://www.wyzant.com/resources/lessons/english/etymology

Most vocabulary words are derived from Latin or Greek etymologies. Here you will find access to phobias (fears, terrors, dreads), manias, and many other words listed in thematic units of English vocabulary words.

Why learn about word origins or etymologies?

The etymology of a word traces its existence and development throughout history and usually through multiple languages. Simply put, etymology can be seen as the study of word origins. You can study word origins to gain a better understanding of language in general. When you know the meaning of a Latin or Greek root, prefix, or suffix, you can better understand, and more easily remember, all of the vocabulary words built on this Latin or Greek element that exist in English words. Knowing etymologies will also help you decipher the meanings of newly encountered words.

Learn one root and you have the key that will unlock the meanings of up to ten, twenty, or even hundreds of English words in which that Latin and/or Greek element (prefix, root, and suffix) appears; for example, learn "ego" (from Latin, meaning "I") and you will immediately have a grasp of the meanings of "egocentric", "egomaniac", "egoist", "egotist", and "alter ego", all of which will expand your vocabulary.

Again, learn "anthropos" (from Greek, meaning "mankind") and you will quickly understand "anthropology", "misanthropy", "anthropoid", "anthropocentric", "anthropomorphic", "anthropophobia", and "philanthropy". Meet any word with "-anthropo-" in it and you will have at least some idea of its meaning when presented in a vocabulary list.

In the etymological approach to building vocabulary words: Learn how to deal with etymologies of English words and you will feel comfortable with such words — you will use new words with self-assurance, you will be able to figure out the meanings of the English vocabulary words you hear or read, even if you have never heard or seen these words before.

That is why the best approach to learning new vocabulary words is through their etymologies. You can discover this for yourself, as soon as you start to work with the lists of Latin and Greek Cross References available for your use on this website.

Etymology Index

If you really want to have a better understanding of some well-known words that you think you know and some important, but not so commonly known words, take the time to read and experience the wonder of each of the words shown in the lists below. We live in an age of constant oral and written expressions. In a time when our knowledge is increasing with breathless speed, particularly in specialized areas, it is important that we understand each other by having a better comprehension of some “old” words, “new” words, most of which are “borrowed”, but always with every possible effort to present the “true” origins and current usages of those words. This is what Words for Our Modern Age is all about.

English-Latin-Greek Cross References - Completed lists of word units.


Erstellt: 2016-12

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Zipf'sches Gesetz (W2)

(E3)(L1) http://soziologie.uni-duisburg.de/forschung/DuBei_0405.pdf

Untersuchungen zu demographischen Gleichgewichtsverteilungen nach dem Zipfschen Gesetz von Wolfgang und Joachim Gerß

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Zu den Modellen, die besondere Aufmerksamkeit erregten, gehört das sog. "Zipfsche Gesetz". Dr. "George Kingsley Zipf" war Professor für Linguistik an der Harvard University in Cambridge/Mass. ... im Jahr 1949 erschienenen Hauptwerk ... In diesem auf einigen früheren Arbeiten aufbauenden 573 Seiten starken Band stellte Zipf umfassend und detailliert sein - von ihm selbst nicht so bezeichnetes - "Gesetz" und dessen vielfältige Anwendungsmöglichkeiten dar. Er ging dabei von quantitativen Untersuchungen der Struktur von Sprachen aus - Zipf wird daher als "Vater der statistischen Linguistik" (Alexejew, Kalinin und Piotrowski 1973, S.10) angesehen - und verallgemeinerte seine Aussagen dann auf biologische, soziologische und ökonomische Fragestellungen.
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In der Linguistik - Zipfs eigenem Forschungsgebiet - treten alle Elemente seines Gesetzes besonders deutlich in Erscheinung. Die Entstehung und Fortentwicklung der Sprache war in der Frühzeit des homo sapiens (oder bereits seiner Vorfahren) mit außerordentlich großem geistigen Input verbunden; dasselbe gilt für das Sprechenlernen eines Kleinkindes. Daher ist es nahe liegend, der Sprachbildung das Prinzip der geringsten Anstrengung zugrunde zu legen.
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Außerhalb der Linguistik hat das Zipfsche Gesetz am häufigsten zur Darstellung und Analyse der Verteilung der Bevölkerung eines Landes auf Siedlungen verschiedener Größe Anwendung gefunden.
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zompist
Linguistics

(E?)(L?) http://www.zompist.com/

Linguistics Language Construction Particular Languages


Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Linguistik, Lingüística, Linguistique, Linguistica, Linguistics

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Harley, Heidi
English Words: A Linguistic Introduction

(E?)(L?) http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0631230327.html

ISBN: 978-0-631-23032-8
320 pages
April 2006, ©2006, Wiley-Blackwell

English Words is a comprehensive and accessible introduction to the study of English words from a theoretically informed linguistic perspective. Table of Contents Heidi Harley is Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Arizona. She specializes in lexical semantics and morphology, and has published in a wide variety of books and journals, including Linguistic Inquiry, Language, and American Speech.


Erstellt: 2016-02

Hock, Hans Henrich / Joseph, Brian D. (Autoren)
Language History, Language Change, and Language Relationship

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3110218429/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3110218429/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3110218429/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3110218429/etymologety0d-21


(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3110218429/etymologpor09-20
(Trends in Linguistics. Studies and Monographs [Tilsm])
Gebundene Ausgabe: 586 Seiten
Verlag: Gruyter; Auflage: 2 Revised (1. August 2009)
Sprache: Englisch


Kurzbeschreibung
Diese Einführung in die faszinierende Thematik von Sprachwandel und -verwandschaft betrachtet nicht allein den historischen Wandel von Sprachen, sondern zeigt zugleich, wie unser Verständnis von Sprachwandel es erlaubt, das Schicksal sowohl einzelner Worte als auch ganzer Sprachen in ihrer Geschichte nachzuzeichnen; wie sich erklären läßt, daß so verschiedene Sprachen wie Englisch, Deutsch, Latein oder auch Hindi und Bengali miteinander verwandt sind; oder ob es möglich ist, einen Nachweis für die Verwandtschaft aller Sprachen zu erbringen.

Das Buch richtet sich an Leser ohne linguistische Vorkenntnisse und enthält eine Vielzahl von veranschaulichenden Beispielen aus bekannten wie exotischen Sprachen.

Über den Autor
Hans Henrich Hock, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA; Brian D. Joseph, Ohio State University, USA.


(E?)(L?) http://www.degruyter.de/cont/fb/sk/detail.cfm?id=IS-9783110218428-2

Produktinfo
Why does language change? Why can we speak to and understand our parents but have trouble reading Shakespeare? Why is Chaucer's English of the fourteenth century so different from Modern English of the late twentieth century that the two are essentially different languages? Why are Americans and English 'one people divided by a common language'? And how can the language of Chaucer and Modern English - or Modern British and American English - still be called the same language? The present book provides answers to questions like these in a straightforward way, aimed at the non-specialist, with ample illustrations from both familiar and more exotic languages.

Most chapters in this new edition have been reworked, with some difficult passages removed, other passages thoroughly rewritten, and several new sections added, e.g. on language and race and on Indian writing systems. Further, the chapter notes and bibliography have all been updated.

The content is engaging, focusing on topics and issues that spark student interest. Its goals are broadly pedagogical and the level and presentation are appropriate for interested beginners with little or no background in linguistics. The language coverage for examples goes well beyond what is usual for books of this kind, with a considerable amount of data from various languages of India.


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Jacobson, I. Jacobson
Linguistics and Philosophy

(E?)(L?) http://www.springer.com/linguistics/semantics/journal/10988?cm_mmc=AD-_-FTA-_-HSS1929-_-0

Editor-in-Chief: Pauline I. Jacobson
ISSN: 0165-0157 (print version)
ISSN: 1573-0549 (electronic version)
Journal no. 10988
Springer Netherlands
Online version available

Description
Linguistics and Philosophy focuses on issues related to structure and meaning in natural language, as addressed in the philosophy of language, linguistic semantics, syntax and related disciplines, in particular the following areas: It publishes articles, replies, book reviews and review articles.


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McWhorter, John - LSaC
Linguistic Simplicity and Complexity
Why Do Languages Undress?

(E?)(L?) https://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/128134

Reihe: Language Contact and Bilingualism [LCB] 1
DE GRUYTER MOUTON


(E?)(L?) http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?author=12

Posts by John McWhorter:

On American r-lessness

June 11, 2015 @ 8:56 am· Filed by John McWhorter under Sociolinguistics

James Fallows has been superintending an interesting discussion at the Atlantic about how strange early twentieth century American announcers sound to us today (There are five articles in the series so far, listed with links here). The comments on his articles suggest that we need make certain distinctions.

Read the rest of this entry »

John McWhorter responds

January 29, 2015 @ 12:48 pm· Filed by John McWhorter under Linguistic history

Some clarifications about my Wall Street Journal article, which seems to have led to some misunderstandings among Language Log’s readers (as well as over at Languagehat). Since the readers here are the most well-informed audience that piece will ever reach outside of professional linguists, I thought it’d be useful to clarify what I based the observations in that piece on.

Read the rest of this entry »

What did Joe Louis have to tell us about Tina Fey?

December 10, 2008 @ 3:02 am· Filed by John McWhorter under Language and the media, Variation

Watching the new DVD release of the patriotic World War II musical This is the Army recently, when listening to champion boxer Joe Louis in a cameo delivering his one line, I found myself thinking of, of all people, Tina Fey.

Specifically, what came to mind was her movie of earlier this year, Baby Mama, whose title was one of assorted indications of late that baby mama, the black American inner-city term referring to a woman one has had children with but is not married to, has become mainstream. Further evidence was when Fox News used the term in a teaser graphic last summer in reference to Michelle Obama ("Outraged liberals: stop picking on Obama’s baby mama"). Graceless, but in its assumption that viewers were familiar with the term, indicative.

Hunt up the derivation of the term these days and even the OED has fallen for a tasty but mistaken idea that the source is Jamaican Creole ("patois"), in which there is a term "baby-mother". However, the chance that a random locution from Jamaican Creole becomes common coin across all of black America is small—a fluent speaker of Black English could go several years without uttering a single word born in Jamaican Creole. Plus, usually the Jamaican term doesn’t really mean what baby mama does, referring more generally to a pregnant woman.

Read the rest of this entry »


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-September/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-January/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-November/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://www.linguisticsociety.org/content/july-2016-member-spotlight-john-mcwhorter

July 2016 Member Spotlight: John McWhorter

John McWhorter is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. He previously was Associate Professor of Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He earned his B.A. from Rutgers University, his M.A. from New York University, and his Ph.D. in Linguistics from Stanford University. Professor McWhorter specializes in language change and language contact. He is the author of nine books on language issues intended for a general audience, and is a frequent contributor to prominent publications and media outlets.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.nndb.com/people/747/000131354/

John McWhorter
AKA John Hamilton McWhorter V
Born: c. 1963
Gender: Male
Race or Ethnicity: Black
Sexual orientation: Straight
Occupation: Linguist, Critic
Nationality: United States
Executive summary: Linguist, social critic
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(E?)(L?) http://termcoord.eu/2014/10/texting-death-writing/

Texting is Not the Death of Writing

October 29, 2014 3:26 pm

Imagine for a second your life without texting – I bet it’s quite scary to even think of that! Texting, even though being quite recent, has already become a very natural habit in our lives. I believe the advantages it has on our daily communication are pretty evident and don’t require enumeration. Yet, there are quite a few people who are afraid that texting has negative impact on the way we use language. They claim that texting is the death of writing since we tend not to follow the usual grammar rules while, for example, chatting on Facebook. It might come as a surprise but it looks like these people are not quite right.

In this short but effective video John McWhorter, a linguist and political commentator, explains why texting should not be considered a threat to our (good) writing skills. He argues that, in fact, texting is not even writing and it should be rather understood as “fingered speech” with a grammar of its own.


Erstellt: 2016-12

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Ruhlen, Merritt
The Origin of Language
Tracing the Evolution of the Mother Tongue

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471159638/etymologporta-20


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471159638/etymologety0f-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471159638/etymologetymo-21


(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0471159638/etymologety0d-21
Sprache: Englisch
Taschenbuch - 256 Seiten - John Wiley & Sons
Erscheinungsdatum: August 1996
ISBN: 0471159638


Amazon.com
... Ruhlen's Origin of Language actually gets you involved in applying standard linguistic techniques to carefully chosen examples - by the end of the book, you will have constructed a family tree of the world's languages. And you needn't know any other than your mother tongue when you start, but you'll probably want to go out and learn several more languages by time you are done.
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