Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Oxymoron (schwarze Schimmel), Oxímoron, Oxymoron, Ossimoro, Oxymoron

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

Oxymoron
Oxymora (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.oxymoronlist.com/


(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxymoron


(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html


(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/


(E1)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/cgi-bin/wotdarch.cgi


(E?)(L?) http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/explore/oxymora.htm

An oxymoron is a literary figure of speech in which contradictory or opposite terms or ideas are combined to create a rhetorical effect by paradoxical means. The word is said to come from the Greek elements, "oxy-" = "sharp", "pointed" and "moros", "moron" = "dull", "foolish"; in other words, "pointedly foolish". An oxymoron is also said to be "a wittily paradoxical turn of phrase that appeals to 'unconscious responses instead of rational examinations'". Wow! Did you grasp all of that? Sometimes dictionaries can create more confusion than clarification. Well, I’m sure you’ve heard this before: "Look up the words if you don’t know what they mean!" That's one method that can be used to expand your vocabulary skills. Having a good dictionary, and using it, is one of the most important sources you can have for personal-word development.
...
"Oxymoron" is the singular form and "oxymora" is the plural form, despite the misuse of "oxymorons" as the plural form by those who should know better.
...


Es folgt eine lange Liste mit englischen Oxymora.

P

Q

R

S

T

thoughtco.com
100 Awfully Good Examples of Oxymorons
Compressed Paradoxes Found Missing

(E?)(L?) https://www.thoughtco.com/awfully-good-examples-of-oxymorons-1691814

by Richard Nordquist

Updated February 08, 2017

The rhetorical term oxymoron, made up of two Greek words meaning "sharp" and "dull," is itself oxymoronic.

As you probably remember from school, an oxymoron is a compressed paradox: a figure of speech in which seemingly contradictory terms appear side by side. British writer Thomas Gibbons characterized the figure as "sense in the masquerade of folly."

The oxymoron has also been called "the show-off" figure, one that gives voice to life's inherent conflicts and incongruities.

"The true beauty of oxymorons," says Richard Watson Todd, "is that, unless we sit back and really think, we happily accept them as normal English." Todd illustrates his point in the following passage:
...


Erstellt: 2017-03

U

V

W

X

Y

Z