Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Rose, Rosa, Rose, Rosa, Rose
Grandiflora Rosen, Rosas Grandifloras, Grandifloras, Grandiflora Rosen, Grandifloras - Rosa grandiflora

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edmundsroses.com
Grandiflora Roses

(E?)(L?) http://www.edmundsroses.com/dc.asp?c1=Grandiflora+Roses&c=14

Grandiflora Roses

Grandifloras are some of the favorites of rose gardeners who love to cut bouquets of long stemmed large flowers. Grandifloras typically have many petals, usually grow tall and upright, and present their blooms one-per-stem or in clusters of a few blooms. Many have great fragrance. Being versatile plants, they work as well in formal gardens as they do in casual plantings.




Erstellt: 2016-03

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Grandiflora Roses (W3)

Bei der Klasse der engl. "Grandiflora Roses", der "Großblütigen Rosen", handelt es sich um eine in den USA geschaffene Rosenklasse, die sich jedoch in Europa kaum durchsetzen konnte.

1865 schickte Robert Fortune "Rosa multiflora" (vielblütige Rose) nach Europa. Durch Kreuzung zwischen ihr und den "Teehybriden" entstanden die "Polyantha-Rosen" (= "vielblütige Rosen"). Es sind niedrige Buschrosen. Um die Frosthärte zu steigern und in den kurzen, europäischen Sommern viele Blüten zu produzieren, kreuzte Sven Poulsen frosthärtere Sorten ein. Als Ergebnis entstanden um 1900 die "Floribunda-Rosen".

Die nächste Entwicklung zur "Grandiflora-Rose" vollzog sich 1950 bei Lammerts. Aus der Kreuzung der Teehybride "Charlotte Armstrong" mit der Floribundarose "Floradora" entstand "Queen Elizabeth".

When the hybrid beauty "Queen Elizabeth" was introduced in 1955, there had never been a rose like it, and a whole new category was created. They're bigger and hardier than "Hybrid Teas", sometimes 8 to 10 feet tall, and bear flowers, usually double, on long stems, singularly or some in clusters.

Arizona | Camelot | Candelabra | Caribbean | Cherry Vanilla | Crimson Bouquet | Designer's Choice | Fame | Fragrant Plum | Gold Medal | Granada | Kaleidoscope | Lagerfeld | Love | Octoberfest | Ole | Oranges 'N Lemons | Quaker Star | Queen Elizabeth | Scarlett Queen Elizabeth | Seashell | Solitude | Sonia | Waiheke | Winning Colors

(E?)(L?) http://davesgarden.com/guides/terms/go/3417/

"Grandiflora roses" are a modern hybrid with high-centered blooms and similar to the "hybrid tea rose". Generally the blooms are larger than "floribundas", but some classifications equate "grandiflora roses" with those in the cluster-flowered rose class.


(E6)(L1) http://www.hortico.com/info/glossary1.htm

Grandiflora Roses (See Modern Roses)

The Grandiflora is a "manufactured" class - the class was invented for the rose "Queen Elizabeth", introduced in 1954 by Germain's Nursery in the USA. This rose was a cross of "Charlotte Armstrong", a Hybrid Tea, and "Floradora", a Floribunda. This rose is representative of the attempts at that time to produce a "different" rose (a mere 100 years after the first Hybrid Tea appeared) that would have the characteristic long stems, large beautiful blooms and pointed buds of the Hybrid Teas with the hardiness and flower clusters of the shrubbier Floribundas.

Grandifloras have a tendency to grow quite tall and produce full, large flowers. They come one to a stem as well as in clusters. The gangly growth habit is remniscent of their Tea heritage. The individual florets are larger than the standrad for Floribundas yet not usually as large as the huge blooms of the Hybrid Teas.

The United States recognizes this type of rose as a separate class in rose competitions while the International rose community lumps them in with the Hybrid Teas and often refer to the whole bunch of them as "large-flowered modern roses".

Grandifloras: "Shining Hour", "Queen Elizabeth", "Sundowner", "Prima Donna", "John S. Armstrong", "Lady Luck", "Tournament of Roses", "Gold Medal", "Camelot", "Ole", "Sonia", "Love".


(E?)(L?) http://home.howstuffworks.com/grandiflora-roses.htm

Grandiflora Roses

Grandifloras combine the vigor and blooming ability of floribundas with the beautiful blooms and long stems of hybrid teas. This is not a surprising combination since they resulted from crosses between the two groups. Their vigorous growth habit makes them more satisfactory garden subjects than hybrid teas.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/polyanthas-rose.htm

Polyanthas Rose

Polyantha roses were popular around 1900, but they have been losing ground to more modern rose classes in recent years. They are the parents of the popular floribunda class and thus, indirectly, of the grandifloras. They are still actively used in breeding.
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(E?)(L?) http://urbanext.illinois.edu/roses/kinds.cfm

Species Roses ...
Modern Roses

The modern age of rose growing began officially when a new class of rose was developed from a tea/hybrid perpetual cross. The year was 1867, the hybridzer was Jean-Baptiste Guillot, the rose was "La France", and the class that was born was the hybrid tea. The most popular roses sold and the ones that have the most name recognition in the modern rose class are the "hybrid tea", "floribunda", and "grandiflora".
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(E?)(L?) http://www.rkdn.org/roses/Classes.asp?ID=(7)

Class: Grandiflora

If any class of roses can be considered an enigma, "Grandiflora" is certainly one. In 1954, a rose was created from a cross between a "floribunda" and "hybrid tea". The tall, strong plant with beautiful blooms of pink, was so new and unusual that the class "Grandiflora" was created to accommodate the stately pink "Queen Elizabeth". While very few roses have met the standard first set by her majesty, there are some outstanding Grandifloras offered today. A typical grandiflora has the flower quality of the classic hybrid tea (long-stemmed, high-centered bloom), but produced in clusters like a Floribunda. Growth is normally tall and vigorous and therefore Grandifloras are often most valuable as background plants.

The "Grandiflora class" is not recognized in Great Britain, which is ironic since the first rose to be classified as a "Grandiflora" was "Queen Elizabeth". In England, roses which bear the "Grandiflora" designation in America are placed into the "Floribunda class".


(E?)(L?) http://www.rosegardenstore.org/about-roses.cfm

The "grandiflora roses" are long-slemmed, hardy plants. Growing tall, the grandiflora makes a nice background plant.


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Grandiflora Roses
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Grandiflora Roses" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordmap.co/#Grandiflora Roses

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Erstellt: 2016-03

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helpmefind.com
Grandiflora Roses

(E?)(L?) http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/roses.php




Erstellt: 2016-03

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Rose, Rosa, Rose, Rosa, Rose
Grandiflora Rosen, Rosas Grandifloras, Grandifloras, Grandiflora Rosen, Grandifloras - Rosa grandiflora

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