Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Tier, Animal, Animal, Animale, Animal

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Animal (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal


amnh
The World Spider Catalog

(E?)(L?) http://research.amnh.org/entomology/
(E?)(L?) http://research.amnh.org/iz/spiders/catalog/
(E?)(L?) http://research.amnh.org/iz/spiders/catalog/INTRO3.html

The World Spider Catalog, Version 9.0
by Norman I. Platnick
© Copyright 2000 - 2008 by The American Museum of Natural History. All Rights Reserved.
Edited by Peter Merrett, British Arachnological Society, and H. Don Cameron, University of Michigan

Title Page | Introduction | Families | Counts | Bibliography | Generic List | Fossils

Families: Order Taxonomic Alphabetic


Ashy storm-petrel (W3)

Der engl. "Ashy storm-petrel" (Oceanodroma homochroa) verdankt seinen Namen seinem rauchgrauen Gefieder.

Sein Familienname "Petrel" könnte eine Verkleinerungsform von "Petrus" sein, da auch der Apostel "Petrus" ähnlich den Sturmvögel über das Wasser gegangen sein soll.

(E?)(L?) http://www.arkive.org/ashy-storm-petrel/oceanodroma-homochroa/
(E?)(L?) http://www.arkive.org/ashy-storm-petrel/oceanodroma-homochroa/description.html

...
The ashy storm-petrel is so named for its smoky-grey plumage, barely discernible amidst the dense fog that frequently shrouds California's coastal waters.
...


(E?)(L?) http://www.birdpost.com/taxonomies/228-ashy_storm_petrel
Ashy Storm-Petrel

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Beaver, Biber (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://lloyd.emich.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0004&L=indology&D=1&O=A&F=&S=&P=20359
(E?)(L1) http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/castor/c._canadensis
Der amerik. "beaver", dt. "Biber", pers. "beber" gehen auf einen Stamm "*bhebhru" zurück, der "a wild, cat-like, tail-less animal whose skins are used" referenziert. (Horn, Grundriss der neupersischen Etymologie p. 42; Steingass, Pers. dict., similarly.)
Vermutlich waren, vor der modernen Namensfestleung, die Bezeichnungen nicht eindeutig zugeordnet. Möglicherweise bezeichnete "*bhebhru" allgemein ein braunes Tier. Der "Biber" könnte demnach eng mit dem "Bär" verwandt sein, dessen Bezeichnung auch auf einen Stamm zurück gehen könnte, der "braun" bedeutete.
"Beaver" - north american species castor canadensis.

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cnn - Designer mutts cost big bucks

(E?)(L?) http://edition.cnn.com/2004/US/South/01/22/doodle.dogs.reut/
Unter anderem findet man hier die folgende Liste spezieller Bezeichnung für Hunderassen:

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eleaston - Animal Names - Pet Names

(E?)(L?) http://www.eleaston.com/ety-name.html#an


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hair of the dog (that bit me) (W3)

(E?)(L?) http://www.businessballs.com/clichesorigins.htm
(E?)(L?) http://www.sciforums.com/archive/19/2002/12/4/14634
(E?)(L?) http://perso.wanadoo.fr/noel.bertel/homepage07-fun-vegemite.htm
(E?)(L?) http://www.ilovemarmite.com/marmite/archive.asp
(E?)(L?) http://www.businessballs.com/clichesorigins.htm
Someone asked: Why do we say "hair of the dog (that bit me)" when when referring to a remedy for a hangover?
Yes. Why not tooth of the dog that bit me?
hair of the dog - a small drink of alcohol to cure a hangover - and very old
expression; the full expression is 'a hair of the dog that bit you', and originates from a poem credited to Aristophanes, Greek comic dramatist (448-387 BC):
'Take the hair, it's well written, of the dog by which you're bitten, work off one wine by his brother, and one labour with another...'
Compare When one gives the ancient aiyin [3] a G/K sound, the Hebrew words for "hair" and for "beer", "ale" are nearly homonyms. BTW, the Hebrew sin and shin are the same letter. When using "pointed" script, the shin has a dot on the top right (2 o'clock) and the sin has a dot on the top left (10 o'clock).
The Hebrew words for "beer, ale, and drunk" are related to yeast of the genus Saccharomyces used in brewing alcoholic beverages (including wine), primarily Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Compare CeReVisiae, Greek Cerberus = the 3-headed dog that guards the entrance to the underworld, and Hebrew KeLeV = dog. R and L are phonetically close. For example, Hebrew peh-resh-het = FLoWer.

http://www.sciforums.com/archive/19/2002/12/4/14634
Captain_Crunch: Anyone got any hangover cures? - Bowser: Drink water and and take brewer's yeast.

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/noel.bertel/homepage07-fun-vegemite.htm
But you really appreciate [VEGEMITE] the morning after a hangover... the basic ingredient in Marmite and Vegemite is spent brewer's yeast - which happens to be a by-product of the brewing industry ...

http://www.ilovemarmite.com/marmite/archive.asp
The basic raw material used in the manufacture of MARMITE is spent brewer's yeast, a substance whose original and only use was to ferment sugars into alcohol. ... It is also one of the best hangover cures.

So, there you have it. "Hair of the Dog" is the English translation of a Hebrew phrase that is a homonym for (that is, it sounds like) the Latin term for Brewer's yeast, a hangover remedy. (A: izco)

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kick the bucket (W3)

"To kick the bucket" = "to die". ...
To kick the bucket, according to most of the sources I checked, has its origins in the act of slaughtering a pig. The unfortunate swine would be suspended head down from a beam and then dispatched by having its throat cut. In its death throes, the animal would kick its little piggy feet against the beam.
...

Eine andere Deutung besagt, dass Selbstmörder, die sich erhängen wollen, den Eimer, auf dem sie stehen, wegstossen.

Am 06.09.2004 erhielt ich folgenden Hinweis:

In my opinion, the current explanation for "kick the bucket" on this website is a "folk etymology".

I think "kick the bucket" is the transliteration (into English words), not the translation, of a Semitic euphemism for death: to make (physical) love in Paradise.

The Hebrew equivalent is aiyin-gimel-vet bet-aiyin-dalet-nun. Using 3 for aiyin, 3aGaV B'3a:DeN. Giving the aiyin a G/K velar sound, as in 3aZa = Gaza, and letting gimel become K, as in GaMeL => camel, this phrase sounded like: KaKav B'Ka:Den which sounds quite like "kick bucket" in English.

In other words, in a Semitic language, "kick bucket" sounds like a well-known euphemism for dying.
Israel "izzy" Cohen

Irgenwie passt hier ja auch der Ausdruck "im Eimer sein". Dabei handelt es sich allerdings um den "Abfalleimer".

(E3)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.net/etext04/dcvgr10.txt
(E3)(L1) http://owad.de/check.php4?wordid=483&choice=1
(E?)(L1) http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/218800.html
(E1)(L1) http://www.w-akten.de/redenglisch.phtml
(E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/122099.html#kickbucket
(E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/wordork.htm#kickbuck
(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-kic1.htm


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macaulaylibrary.org
Animal Behavior Archive
Library of Bird and Animal Sounds Available
Animal Videos

(E?)(L1) http://www.macaulaylibrary.org/

Birds

The earth hosts approximately 10,000 species of birds, 75% of which are represented in this archive. From your common feeder birds, including jays, chickadees and sparrows to the exotic birds-of-paradise, toucans and flamingos you can browse families and explore their diversity. You’ll discover some exceptions in the bird world, such as penguins and emus that are unable to fly, however, all birds have feathers and lay eggs, even if they are not masters of flight.

Mammals

About 5,500 species of mammals roam the earth today. They are an incredibly diverse group from whales and dolphins, to bats, big cats, shrews and elephants. One trait they all have in common—hair. Listen to the astounding vocalizations of the nearly 70 marine mammal species in the archive or watch Polar Bears hunt in the high arctic. Explore recordings for the more than 600 mammal species in the archive!

Reptiles

Despite being among the very first animals to travel this earth, reptiles are still very successful today. With nearly 8,200 species described these scaly, cold-blooded creatures survive in some of the toughest climates on earth. Like birds, most species lay eggs, but many snakes and lizards give birth to live young. Check out some videos of a Galapagos Tortoise or listen to an American Alligator!

Amphibians

Frogs and toads, newts and salamanders, and snake-like caecilians comprise the diverse class, Amphibia. Many species begin their life as aquatic juveniles and transform into terrestrial adults. Amphibians are of particular conservation concern. Of the ~6,300 amphibians, one in three are threatened with extinction. Take a listen to any of the nearly 200 species in the archive!

Arthropods

Invertebrates with an exoskeleton, segmented body and jointed appendages are classified as arthropods. This includes insects, centipedes and millipedes, and crustaceans—shrimp, lobsters and crabs. Take a listen to the Snowy Tree-Cricket that varies how fast it delivers each note depending on the temperature.

Fishes

This group takes the prize as the most diverse group of vertebrates, with nearly 32,000 species represented. Fish were the first vertebrates to radiate the earth, dating back 500 million years. The group includes the bony fish, sharks and rays, lungfish and coelacanths, hagfish, and lampreys. Watch videos of a Whale Shark feeding or hear what a squirrelfish sounds like!


Erstellt: 2013-03

m-w - Merriam-Webster - The Testudine and the Leporine - animal words - Tier-Wörter (engl.)

(E1)(L1) http://www.m-w.com/mw/textonly/lighter/cool/testudin.htm
A collection of those "ine" words that turn animals into adjectives. You know, like "dog" = "canine", "cat" = "feline", and "tortoise" = "testudine".

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nationalgeographic - Your Shot Animals

keine Etymologie - aber schöne Tierphotographien

(E?)(L1) http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/your-shot/animals/

Your Photo in National Geographic
Every month, readers send us thousands of animal photos. See the latest picks in our new photo gallery. Plus: Solve animal puzzles and download Your Shot wallpaper.


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petrix
Catnames

(E?)(L?) http://www.petrix.com/catnames/

The name you choose says as much about you as it does about your cat. It shows how you view your cat and your relationship with it. Some names can cause people to judge a cat and react positively or negatively/fearfully when meeting it. For these reasons it is important to use a name that conveys the proper image. Happy searching!


Erstellt: 2011-06

petrix
Dognames

(E?)(L?) http://www.petrix.com/dognames/

Image:
The name you choose says as much about you as it does about your dog. It shows how you view your dog and your relationship with it. Some names can cause people to judge a dog and react positively or negatively/fearfully when meeting it. Depending on whether the dog is a pet, therapy dog, search & rescue dog, tracking dog or any other dog that works with the public, it is important to use a name that conveys the proper image. Happy searching!

Popularity:
The most popular dog name in North America is Sam, Sammie or Samantha (which means "listener"). The second most popular is Max, Maxie, Maxwell or Maxine (which means "the greatest" in Latin). Third is Lady, followed by Bear, Maggie, Buddy, Tasha, Chelsea (or Chelsie), Holly and Shasta. Other very popular names are Brandy, Ginger and Taffy.

Trend in Canine Names Reflects the Times: Article from the San Francisco Examiner.


Erstellt: 2011-06

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rareearthtones - Tierstimmen als Klingeltöne

Hier kann man sich Tierstimmen als Klingeltöne fürs Handy herunterladen um damit auf die Tierwelt und insbesondere auf bedrohte Tierarten aufmerksam zu machen.
Die Tierstimmen(-Klingeltöne) kann man sich auch schon vorab am PC anhören.

(E?)(L?) http://www.rareearthtones.org/

MoRE THAN 200,000 RINGTONES HEARD

The Center for Biological Diversity offers you free endangered species ringtones and phone wallpapers - a collection of high-quality, authentic sounds and images of some of the world’s most threatened birds, owls, frogs, toads and marine mammals.

Whether the cry of the Mexican gray wolf or the underwater warbles of the beluga whale, our ringtones provide a great starting point for talking about the plight of threatened species worldwide. In fact, they've been downloaded by thousands of people in more than 150 countries around the globe, including the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Japan, Iran, India, Poland, Germany, France, Brazil, Australia, and the United States. Make a statement with your cell phone and download free endangered species ringtones now.

23.01.2009

BROWSE WILDLIFE RINGTONES ALPHABETICALLY
African elephant | American pika | American pika | Arroyo toad | Ash-breasted tit-tyrant | Bald eagle | Band-bellied owl | Bare-shanked screech owl | Barn owl | Barred owl | Bell's vireo | Beluga whale | Black toad | Black-crowned night heron | Blakiston's fish owl | Blue-throated macaw | Bobcat | Boreal owl | Buff-fronted owl | Cactus ferruginous pygmy owl | California black rail | California condor | California red-legged frog | California spotted owl | Cascades frog | Cheetah | Chiricahua leopard frog | Colombian screech owl | Common loon | Coqui guajon | Cory's shearwater | Coyote | Crawfish frog | Eastern screech owl | Elegant trogon | Elephant seal | Elf owl | Elk | Emperor penguin | Eurasian scops owl | Flammulated owl | Florida panther | Foothill yellow-legged frog | Fringe-backed fire-eye | Giant panda | Gila monster | Gila woodpecker | Gopher frog | Gray hawk | Great Basin rattlesnake | Grizzly bear | Gunnison sage grouse | Gunnison's prairie dog | Harpy eagle | Houston toad | Humpback whale | Long-eared owl | Marbled murrelet | Mexican spotted owl | Mexican gray wolf | Northern goshawk | Orca | Oregon spotted frog | Peregrine falcon | Peruvian plantcutter | Phainopepla | Pine barrens tree frog | Polar bear | Powerful owl | Puerto Rican screech owl | Red poison dart frog | Rio Grande leopard frog | Rockhopper penguin | Rufescent screech owl | Rufous owl | Rufous-banded owl | Rufous-legged owl | Short-eared owl | Sierra Nevada mountain yellow-legged frog | Southwestern willow flycatcher | Swainson's hawk | Tawny-browed owl | Tricolored blackbird | Vermiculated screech owl | Western burrowing owl | Western toad | Western yellow-billed cuckoo | White-faced ibis | White-tailed kite | Whooping crane | Yosemite toad | Yuma clapper rail


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Uni Michigan
About Animal Names

(E?)(L?) http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/animal_names/


Uni Michigan
University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Animal Diversity Web

(E?)(L1) http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/
(E?)(L1) http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Animalia.html
(E?)(L1) http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/glossary/

| Allee effect | Antarctic convergence | Antarctica | Arctic Ocean | Atlantic Ocean | Australian | abiotic | aboral | abyssal | acoelomate | acoustic | adhesion | adult | aestivate | agonistic | agricultural | allele | alloparent | allopatric | alluvial | alpha diversity | alpine | altricial | ambulacral | ambulacral grooves | amniotic egg | amoebocyte | amphibious | amphidromous | ampullae | anadromous | anterior | anti-predator behavior | aposematic | appendage | aquatic | arboreal | archeocyte | archipelago | arid | arthropod | articulate | artiodactyl | asexual | attachment stage | auricularia larva | autotomize | ...


Erstellt: 2010-12

Uni Michigan
University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Bird Division

(E?)(L?) http://www.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/birds/

The University of Michigan Museum of Zoology Bird Division is a collection of resources for people who conduct research on or need information about birds. ... We actively maintain a collection of about 200,000 preserved specimens available for study by systematists and other scientists. We have a sound laboratory for analysis of bird vocalizations. Since 1930 the Bird Division has been the headquarters and provided space for the library of the Wilson Ornithological Society, an international organization devoted to the study of birds.


Erstellt: 2010-12

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whatsthatbug
Bug-Info
Käfer-Info

(E?)(L1) http://www.whatsthatbug.com/

Lisa Anne and Daniel both have Master of Fine Arts degrees from Art Center College of Design. Daniel is the Chairman of Media Arts at Los Angeles City College. Lisa Anne and Daniel both teach Photography at Los Angeles City College. Daniel teaches Design for Film and Advertising at Art Center College of Design. Lisa Anne teaches Photography at University of Southern California. The truth is, the site is an art project.

Bug Info:
Administrative (19) | Amphibians (3) | Ants (31) | Aphids, Scale Insects, Leafhoppers, and Tree Hoppers (147) | aquarium (22) | attack of the fungus (10) | Bees (111) | oValley Carpenter Bee (27) | Beetles (1687) | oBess Beetles (10) | oBlister Beetles (77) | oCarrion Beetles (29) | oCheckered Beetles (6) | oClick Beetles (19) | oDarkling and Ironclad Beetles (23) | oFireflies and Glowworms (6) | oGround Beetles (32) | oTiger Beetles (15) | oLady Bug (56) | oLeaf Beetles (45) | oLonghorn Beetles (304) | oMetallic Borer Beetles (46) | oNet-Winged Beetles (3) | oPantry Beetles, Grain Weevils, Spider Beetles, Meal Worms and Carpet Beetles (73) | oPleasing Fungus Beetles (11) | oRain Beetles (7) | oRove Beetles (8) | oScarab Beetles (189) | oSoldier Beetles (7) | oStag Beetles (42) | oWater Beetles (4) | oWeevils (71) | Booklice and Barklice (20) | Butterflies and Skippers (404) | oBrush Footed Butterflies (52) | oGossamer Wings (10) | oMetalmarks (1) | oSkippers (3) | oswallowtails (28) | oWhites and Sulfurs (9) | Caddisflies (13) | Caterpillars and Pupa (882) | obutterfly caterpillars (201) | obrush footed butterfly caterpillars (79) | oSkipper Caterpillars (4) | oSulphur and White Caterpillars (2) | oswallowtail caterpillars (97) | omoth caterpillars (667) | oAsps (14) | oBagworm (20) | oHornworms (208) | oInchworms (13) | oOwlet Caterpillars (42) | oProminent Moth Caterpillars (33) | oSilkworms (164) | oHickory Horned Devil (2) | oStinging Slug Caterpillars (55) | oTent Caterpillars and Kin (10) | oTussock Moth Caterpillars (35) | oWoolly Bears (31) | Centipedes and Millipedes (130) | oCentipedes (99) | oMillipedes (29) | Cicadas (92) | Cockroaches (50) | Crickets, Camel Crickets and Mole Crickets (104) | Crustaceans (23) | Dobsonflies and Fishflies (146) | oHellgrammite (25) | Dragonflies and Damselflies (124) | Earwigs (18) | Eggs (63) | Embioptera (2) | Fleas (1) | Flies (437) | oBathroom Flies (3) | oBee Flies (9) | oblow flies (2) | oBot Flies (5) | oCrane Fly (54) | oFruit Flies (2) | oGnats (13) | oHorse Flies and Deer Flies (4) | oLouse Flies (2) | oMaggots (22) | oMarch Flies and Lovebugs (9) | oMidges (3) | oMosquito (6) | oMydas Flies (2) | oPicture Winged Flies (1) | oRobber Flies (68) | oSignal Flies (1) | oStilt Legged Flies (3) | oSyrphid Flies (14) | oTachinid Flies (14) | Galls (19) | Grasshoppers (131) | Grubs (20) | Hornets and Wasps (593) | oCIcada Killer Wasps (53) | oGall Wasps (1) | oHorntails, Wood Wasps and Sawflies (101) | oPaper Wasps (17) | oParasitic Hymenopterans (119) | oIchneumons (107) | | oSand Wasps (1) | oScoliid Wasps (8) | ospider wasps (12) | oThread Waisted Wasps (10) | oTiphiid Wasps (1) | oVelvet Ants (59) | Hump Winged Crickets (5) | Iguanas and Lizards (6) | Katydids (134) | Louse (3) | Mayflies (19) | Mites (62) | Moths (1302) | oBlack Witch (13) | oClearwings (12) | oFairy Moths (1) | oGeometrid Moths (10) | oGiant Silk Moths (404) | oLuna Moth - Rare Specimen (113) | oHummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths (427) | oLappet Moths (1) | oMicrolepidoptera (1) | oOwlet Moths (7) | oPantry Moths, Clothes Moths, Case-Bearers and Meal Moths (23) | oPlume Moths (10) | oProminent Moths (1) | oPuss Moths (1) | oTiger Moths and Arctiids (36) | oUnderwing Moths (3) | Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies (117) | Opiliones and Harvestmen (23) | Orthoptera (2) | Potato Bugs (78) | Praying Mantis (120) | Pseudoscorpions (50) | Salamanders (1) | Scabies (2) | Scorpionflies (11) | Scorpions, Whipscorpions and Vinegaroons (73) | Silverfish, Bristletails and Firebrats (31) | Snails, Slugs and other Molluscs (16) | Snakeflies (5) | Solpugids and Camel Spiders (50) | Sow Bugs, Pill Bugs, Isopods, Lawn Shrimp and Amphipods (31) | Spiders (729) | oBite of the Brown Recluse (5) | oBlack Widow (24) | oCrab Spiders (8) | oGreen Lynx (9) | oHuntsman Spiders (12) | oJumping Spiders (12) | oNursery Web Spiders (15) | oOrb Weavers (65) | oRed Legged Purseweb Spider (16) | oSac Spiders (1) | oSow Bug Killers (1) | oTarantulas and Trapdoor Spiders (9) | oWolf Spiders (8) | Springtails! (37) | Stoneflies and Snowflies (24) | Termites (14) | Thrips (4) | Ticks (16) | Tomato Bugs (10) | True Bugs (898) | oAssassin Bugs (233) | oAmbush Bugs (6) | oBedbugs (15) | oLace Bugs (1) | oLeaf Footed Bugs (58) | oPlant Bugs (19) | oBox Elder Bugs (16) | oRed Bugs (4) | oSeed Bugs (7) | oStink Bugs and Shield Bugs (109) | oToe Biters (131) | oWater Striders (2) | Velvet Worms (2) | Walkingsticks (58) | Whiteflies (5) | Worms (32)


wolframalpha
Animals & Plants

(E?)(L1) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/LifeSciences.html

Animals & Plants


Erstellt: 2011-10

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Bücher zur Kategorie:

Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Tier, Animal, Animal, Animale, Animal

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Barnette, Martha
Dog Days and Dandelions
A Lively Guide to the Animal Meanings Behind Everday Words

(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312280726/etymologporta-20
(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312280726/etymologety0f-21
(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312280726/etymologetymo-21
(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312280726/etymologety0d-21
(E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0312280726/etymologpor09-20


(E1)(L1) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn.html
Sprache: Englisch
Gebundene Ausgabe - 256 Seiten - St. Martin's Press
Erscheinungsdatum: Februar 2003
Auflage: 1st
ISBN: 0312280726

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Stangl, Frederick B. (Author)
Abbreviated guide to pronunciation and etymology of scientific names for North American land mammals north of Mexico

(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006OYEQQ/etymologporta-20
(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006OYEQQ/etymologety0f-21
(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006OYEQQ/etymologetymo-21
(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006OYEQQ/etymologety0d-21
(E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0006OYEQQ/etymologpor09-20
(Occasional papers / The Museum, Texas Tech University) (Unknown Binding)
Unknown Binding: 28 pages
Publisher: Texas Tech University Press (1993)
Language: English

(E?)(L?) http://www.nhbs.com/title.php?tefno=72

Abbreviated Guide to Pronunciation and Etymology of Scientific Names for North American Land Mammals North of Mexico
Series: OCCASIONAL PAPERS OF THE MUSEUM, TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY 154
FB Stangl, PG Christiansen and EJ Galbraith
28 pages
Texas Tech University Press
Softcover | 1993 | £3.50 | approx. $6/€5
#28763


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