Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Wörterbuch, Diccionario, Dictionnaire, Vocabolario, Dictionary

A

about.com
Etymological word lists

(E?)(L?) http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/wordlists/index.htm?terms=etymology
Etymological word lists, such as origins of names, legal etymology, professional etymology, Greco-Latin etymology, veterinary etymology, dinosaur etymology, archives of etymologies, and more.

B

blogspot.de
Take Our Word For It

(E?)(L?) http://takeourword.blogspot.de/

Blog Archive

2014 (5)

February (2)

2014 January (3) 2009 (1)

2009 October (1) 2008 (4)

2008 September (1) 2008 August (2) 2008 July (1)


(E?)(L?) https://www.facebook.com/pages/Take-Our-Word-For-It/


(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/Etymomel


Erstellt: 2014-01

C

compuserve
WarrenAllen's Curious Words Page
Word List
Wort-Liste

(E?)(L?) http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/WarrenAllen/words.htm
Strange words and/or words with good stories behind them.

die Sammlung vom 20.10.2002:
Anaheim | Bell, book and candle | boogie | carking | chickenhead | defenestration | dudgeon | epicene | euonym | frisson | funky | gallimaufry | Generation X | hipster | iridescence | juke | katzenjammer | kipple | le dernier cri | lumpen | meatspace | mojo | pentimenti | pieces of eight / bits | roman à clef | skunk works | tchotchke / tchatchke / tsatske | trepanation | warren

corsinet
English Language Trivia
Brain Candy
Trivia about the English language and word origins

(E?)(L?) http://www.corsinet.com/trivia/j-triv.html
Die "(64 facts)" enthalten nicht nur aber auch Hinweise zur Herkunft von Worten.

D

dictionary
Hot Word

(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/2013/12/




(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/2013/11/




(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/2013/10/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/09/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/08/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/07/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/06/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/05/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/04/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/03/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/02/

Lexical Investigations: Balaclava
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.) CONTINUE READING »

When the language of life meets the language of literature: encoding Shakespeare into DNA
From the birth of the sign to the development of new words, we’ve investigated many facets of our living language here at the Hot Word, but rarely do we have the opportunity to look at the language of life itself—DNA. As you might remember from 7th-grade science, DNA stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, the molecular structure that stores the genetic code for all life forms. CONTINUE READING »

Lexical Investigations: Mazel Tov
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.) CONTINUE READING »

How do you say “basketball” in Latin? And what does it have to do with the retiring pope?
News of Pope Benedict XVI’s retirement has brought the Latin language to the front and center of minds worldwide. For one thing, the Pope announced his retirement in Latin. Giovanna Chirri, an Italian journalist assigned to the Vatican beat, was able to break the story before her peers thanks to her knowledge of the dead language. CONTINUE READING »

Lexical Investigations: Holistic
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. CONTINUE READING »

The Value of Signs: Saussure’s rebuttal
We’ve reached the final installment of our series on Ferdinand de Saussure and the scintillating study of semiology. In our last post we left our friend Saussure in a rather unflattering light, when we explored the first scientific evidence against his hypothesis: that the relationship between the sign (a word) and the signified (the concept a word represents) might not be as arbitrary as Saussure posited. CONTINUE READING »

Are Scrabble tile values in need of an overhaul?
Invented by out-of-work architect Alfred Butts during the Great Depression, Scrabble is a staple of word lovers’ lives. The popularity of this beloved game took off in the mid-1950s and has been an essential part of the canon of classic board games ever since.

Lexical Investigations: Art
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.)CONTINUE READING »

When dictionaries are a matter of life or death…
Two recent events have raised the complicated question of whether or not dictionaries belong in courtrooms. A murder trial in Virginia was disrupted because the jurors illicitly consulted two dictionaries and a thesaurus. (The defense is currently seeking a mistrial.) And even on the Supreme Court it seems dictionaries are being misused. CONTINUE READING »

Baltimore Ravens: The only football team named after a poem!
A lot of football teams are named after birds (e.g., the Philadelphia Eagles, the Atlanta Falcons), but of all our feathered mascots only one comes from a poem: The Baltimore Ravens.


(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2013/01/

Why is the San Francisco football team called the 49ers?
When the California Gold Rush began in 1848, American football didn’t exist. But those aggressive gold miners would give their nickname to a football team one hundred years later.
Gold was first found in Northern California in January 1848, and it took about a year for the news to travel and inspire thousands of fortune seekers to head west. CONTINUE READING »

Lexical Investigations: Appendix
A motley combination of Anglo-Saxon, Latin, and Germanic dialects, the English language (more or less as we know it) coalesced between the 9th and 13th centuries. Since then, it has continued to import and borrow words and expressions from around the world, and the meanings have mutated. (Awesome and awful once meant nearly the same thing.) CONTINUE READING »

Was Saussure wrong?
Welcome to the second installment in our series on Ferdinand de Saussure and the linguistic science of semiology. Now where were we?
In the last post we discussed Saussure’s theory of the “sign” as a combination of the “signified” (the concept represented by a word) and the “signifier” (the spoken or written word doing the representing). CONTINUE READING »

Where do words come from? Do they really mean anything?
How do we use language? We use it to express ourselves through speech, to record our experiences or to invent and tell stories in writing. But before all that begins, before a word leaves our lips or a pen hits the page, we use language in our heads. This code we share is more than a “simple naming process.” It’s the means by which we form our thoughts and interpret the world around us. CONTINUE READING »

The words you want to banish in 2013
Last week, we discussed the Worst Words of 2012. We were originally inspired by past lists from Lake Superior State University in Michigan. Every year they compile words that were misused, overused, and abused, and this week they released their list for 2013, which included some choice words that we had overlooked: CONTINUE READING »


(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2012/12/




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(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2012/01/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/2011/12/




(E?)(L?) http://hotword.dictionary.com/page/1/
12.10.2012





Erstellt: 2011-12

E

eleaston
Individual Words Etymology

(E?)(L?) http://www.eleaston.com/ety-site.html


F

facebook.com
Take Our Word For It

(E?)(L?) https://www.facebook.com/pages/Take-Our-Word-For-It/


(E?)(L?) http://takeourword.blogspot.de/


(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/Etymomel


Erstellt: 2014-01

freerice
Play and feed hungry people
Reisspende per Wörterlernen

(E?)(L1) http://www.freerice.com/
Help end world hunger

For each word you get right, we donate 20 grains of rice to the United Nations World Food Program.


(E?)(L1) http://www.freerice.com/about.html

About FreeRice
FreeRice is a sister site of the world poverty site, Poverty.com.
FreeRice has two goals: This is made possible by the sponsors who advertise on this site.
Whether you are CEO of a large corporation or a street child in a poor country, improving your vocabulary can improve your life. It is a great investment in yourself.
Perhaps even greater is the investment your donated rice makes in hungry human beings, enabling them to function and be productive. Somewhere in the world, a person is eating rice that you helped provide. Thank you.


(E?)(L1) http://www.freerice.com/subjects.php
Subjects:




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H

I

inkyfool.com
On Words, Phrases, Grammar, Rhetoric and Prose

(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/

Labels

Etymology (215) Useful Words (193) Poetry (86) Shakespeare (78) Journalese (68) Food and Drink (65) Animals (49) Phrases (45) Novels (36) Technique (34) Song Lyrics (30) sex and sexism (30) semantic shifts (29) Bible (25) Place names (25) Politics (23) Medical (21) Religion (21) Eliot (20) Auden (18) Rhetoric (17) Chaucer (15) Mythology (15) dictionary (15) Military (14) Milton (14) commonly confused words (14) Anglo Saxon (13) Dickens (13) Swearing (13) Ambiguity (12) Tennyson (12) Verse Form (11) punctuation (11) French (10) London (10) Cinema (9) Peoples (9) Pope (9) awkward words (9) Americanisms (8) Dr Johnson (8) Grammar (8) Thomas Browne (8) plural (8) spelling (8) Acronyms (7) Keats (7) Lewis Carroll (7) Weather (7) Wodehouse (7) business (7) Metaphor (6) Translation (6) Cliches (5) Pejorative (5) Urquhart (5) puns (5) Beckett (4) Business-Speak (4) Internet Terms (4) Lists (4) Phrasal Verbs (4) Wordplay (4) nonsense words (4) Chandler (3) German (3) Marvell (3) Palindromes (3) Railway-speak (3) estate agent-speak (3) singular (3) Blake (2) Plagiarism (2) attributive nouns (2) class (2) compound nouns (2) loan words (2)


Erstellt: 2013-09

itools
Wörterbücher
Look up words
Translate Language

(E?)(L?) http://www.itools.com/lang/
Wörterbücher - Thesauri - Übersetzungstools - z.B. auch für Computerenglisch


Look up words

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Learn the meaning of any word, its correct spelling, how to pronounce it and where it originated look up:

Dictionaries:
Dictionary (M-Webster) Thesaurus (Rogets) Thesaurus (M-Webster) Acronym Dictionary (UCC) Acronym Dictionary (Stands4) Medical Dictionary (OMD) Law Dictionary (law.com)

Terminology
Gain understanding of a technical or industry-specific term look up this term:

English Thesauruses
Find other words that mean the same/opposite or are spelled similarly/sound like your word look up:

Crossword Solver »
Use Merriam-Webster's dictionary as a crossword solver, by entering a ? in place of the letters you don't know. Use a ? in place of missing letters

Unscramber SCRABBLE Solver »
Find all of the words that can be formed from a given set of letters and ? characters letters to unscramble (? = any letter):

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Translate text from English into Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Italian and Norwegian or the other way around
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J

K

kith
Words and Stuff

(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/words.html
Jed Hartman’s language columns, on a great variety of subjects.

(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/indexes/index.html




L

M

magswordfinder
Mag's Word Finder

(E?)(L?) http://www.magswordfinder.com/
Eine kleine Spielerei am Rande:

Hier kann man ein Wort (z.B. den eigenen Namen) eingeben und erhält alle Wörter, die man mit diesen Buchstaben bilden kann.

marthabarnette (mar)
Martha Barnette's Favorite Words and their Origins

(E1)(L1) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn.html

A few hundred of my favorite words and their origins. (18.08.2007)




Martha Barnette is author of "Ladyfingers & Nun's Tummies" and "A Garden of Words".

mentalfloss.com
13 Fascinating Word Origin Stories (That Are Completely Untrue)

(E?)(L?) http://mentalfloss.com/article/57421/13-fascinating-word-origin-stories-are-completely-untrue

Sometimes when the true origin of a word isn’t known (and sometimes even when it is), entirely fictitious theories and tall tales emerge to try to fill in the gap. These so-called folk etymologies often provide neater, cleverer, and wittier explanations than any genuine etymology ever could, all of which fuels their popularity and makes them all the more likely to be passed around — but sadly, there’s just no escaping the fact that they’re not true. Thirteen of these etymological tall-tales, taken from word origins guide Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons, are explained and debunked here.

1. BUG

According to the story, back in the days when computers were vast room-filling machines containing hundreds of moving parts, one of the earliest recorded malfunctions was caused by an insect making its home on one of the delicate mechanisms inside—and hence, all computer malfunctions since have been known as bugs.

This well-known tale apparently has its roots in an incident recorded in London’s Pall Mall Gazette in 1889, which described how Thomas Edison spent two consecutive nights trying to identify "a bug in his phonograph"—"an expression," the article explained, "for solving a difficulty, and implying that some imaginary insect has secreted itself inside and is causing all the trouble." All in all, it appears the original computer bug was sadly a metaphorical one.

2. CABAL

A cabal is a group or sect of like-minded people, often with the implication that those involved are conspiring or working together for some clandestine purpose. In 17th century England, the Cabal Ministry was precisely that: An exclusive group of the five closest and most important members of King Charles II’s Parliament, who, in 1670, signed a treaty allying England and France in a potential war against the Netherlands. The five signatories were Sir Thomas Clifford, Lord Arlington, the Duke of Buckingham, Lord Ashley, and Lord Lauderdale, and it’s the first letters of their five names and titles that formed the cabal itself.

Except, of course, it wasn’t. Cabal is actually a derivative of caballa, the Latin spelling of kabbalah (the Jewish interpretation of the Old Testament), and the fact that these five signatories’ names could be manipulated to spell out the word "cabal" is a complete coincidence.

3. GOLF

Golf doesn’t stand for "gentlemen only ladies forbidden," nor for "gentlemen only, ladies fly-away-home," and nor, for that matter, for any other means of telling someone to go away that begins with the letter F. Instead, it’s thought to be a derivative of an old Scots word for a cudgel or a blow to the head, gouf, which in turn is probably derived from Dutch. The earliest known reference to golf in English? An Act of the Scottish Parliament, passed on March 6, 1457, that demanded that "football and golf should be utterly condemned and stopped," because they interfered with the military’s archery practice.

4. KANGAROO

A popular story claims that when the English explorer Captain Cook first arrived in Australia in the late 18th century, he spotted a peculiar-looking animal bounding about in the distance and asked a native Aborigine what it was called. The Aborigine, having no idea what Cook had just said, replied, "I don’t understand"—which, in his native language, apparently sounded something like "kangaroo." Cook then returned to his ship and wrote in his journal on 4 August 1770 that, "the animals which I have before mentioned [are] called by the Natives kangooroo." The fact that Cook’s journals give us the earliest written reference to the word kangaroo is true, but sadly the story of the oblivious Aborigine is not.

5. MARMALADE

When Mary I of Scotland fell ill while on a trip to France in the mid-1500s, she was served a sweet jelly-like concoction made from stewed fruit. At the same time, she overheard the French maids and nurses who were caring for her muttering that "Madame est malade," ("ma’am is unwell"), and in her confusion she muddled the two things up—and marmalade as we know it today gained its name. As neat a story as this is, it’s unsurprisingly completely untrue—not least because the earliest reference to marmalade in English dates from 60 years before Mary was even born.

6. NASTY

Thomas Nast was a 19th century artist and caricaturist probably best known today for creating the Republican Party’s elephant logo. In the mid-1800s, however, Nast was America’s foremost satirical cartoonist, known across the country for his cutting and derisive caricatures of political figures. Anything described as nasty was ultimately said to be as scathing or as cruel as his drawings. Nast eventually became known as the "Father of the American Cartoon," but he certainly wasn’t the father of the word nasty—although its true origins are unknown, its earliest record dates from as far back as the 14th century.

7. POSH

In the early 1900s, the wealthiest passengers on cruise ships and liners could afford to pay for a port-side cabin on the outward journey and a starboard cabin on the homeward journey, thereby ensuring that they either had the best uninterrupted views of the passing coastlines, or else had a cabin that avoided the most intense heat of the sun. These "port out starboard home" passengers are often claimed to have been the first posh people—but a far more likely explanation is that posh was originally simply a slang name for cash.

8. PUMPERNICKEL

The bogus story behind pumpernickel is that it comes from the French phrase pain pour Nicol, a quote attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte that essentially means "bread only good enough for horses." In fact, the true origin of pumpernickel is even more peculiar: pumper is the German equivalent of "fart" and nickel is an old nickname for a devil or imp, literally making pumpernickel something along the lines of "fart-goblin." Why? Well, no one is really sure—but one theory states that the bread might have originally been, shall we say, hard to digest.

9. SH*T

Back when horse manure (and everything else, for that matter) used to be transported by ship, the methane gas it gives off tended to collect in the lowest parts of the vessel—until a passing crewman carrying a lantern had the misfortune to walk by and blow the ship to pieces. Did this ever happen? Who knows. But one thing we do know is that sh*t is certainly not an acronym of "ship high in transit," a motto often mistakenly said to have been printed on crates of manure to ensure that they were stored high and dry while being moved from port to port. In fact, sh*t—like most of our best cursewords—is an ancient Anglo-Saxon word dating from at least 1000 years ago.

10. SINCERE

Sincere is derived from the Latin sincerus, meaning "pure" or "genuine." Despite this relatively straightforward history, however, a myth has since emerged that claims sincere is actually a derivative of the Latin sine cera, meaning "without wax," and supposed to refer to cracks or chips in sculptures being filled in with wax; to Ancient Greeks giving statues made of wax rather than stone to their enemies; or to documents or wine bottles without wax seals being potentially tampered or tainted. None of these stories, of course, is true.

11. SIRLOIN

Sirloin steak takes its name from sur, the French word for "above" (as in surname), and so literally refers to the fact that it is the cut of meat found "above the loin" of a cow. When sur– began to be spelled sir– in English in the early 1600s, however, a popular etymology emerged claiming that this cut of meat was so delicious that it had been knighted by King Charles II.

12. SNOB

Different theories claim that on lists of ferry passengers, lists of university students, and even on lists of guests at royal weddings, the word snob would once have been written beside the names of all those individuals who had been born sine nobilitate, or "without nobility." The Oxford English Dictionary rightly calls this theory "ingenious but highly unlikely," and instead suggests that snob was probably originally a slang nickname for a shoemaker’s apprentice, then a general word for someone of poor background, and finally a nickname for a pretentious or snobbish social climber.

13. SWORD

In the New Testament, "the word of God" is described as "sharper than any two-edged sword" (Hebrews 4:12 . This quote is apparently the origin of a popular misconception that sword is derived from a corruption of "God’s word." Admittedly, this kind of formation is not without precedent (the old exclamations gadzooks! and zounds! are corruptions of "God’s hooks" and "God’s wounds," respectively) but sword is actually a straightforward Anglo-Saxon word, sweord, which is probably ultimately derived from an even earlier Germanic word meaning "cut" or "pierce."


Erstellt: 2014-07

musanim
Words of unknown origin
Word List
Wort-Liste

(E?)(L?) http://www.musanim.com/mam/unknown.html
Where do words come from? Most words are variations or combinations of words we knew already. This makes them easy to recognize and remember (and makes it easy to figure out where they came from). Some words created from scratch are coined by writers, which aids their popularization (and likewise makes it easier to determine the etymology). But most words of unknown origin have managed to make it into our vocabulary without either of these advantages.

What kind of word can make it against such odds? As you'll see in the list below, many have the advantage of onomatopoeia. But more than that, these are words that you love to know, love to hear, love to say.
I've given the dates of these words -- some from the Oxford English Dictionary, and some from the Merriam-Webster online dictionary (which is where you go if you click the "definition" button); these two sources don't always agree. Some of the dates are obvious, for example, that moola, pizzazz, snazzy, jazz and tizzy are all from the early 20th century.
But there are some surprises. Who'd've guessed that things were nifty as early as 1868? Or that nobody had zits before 1966? Or that you could have taken a brief jaunt as long ago as 1570?
Or that people were nincompoops back in 1676? Actually, I can kind of believe that one ... some things never change ...
---Stephen Malinowski

Folgende Begriffe waren am 04.02.2004 zu finden:

askance (1530) - ballyhoo (1914) - bamboozle (1703) - banter (1702) - bash (1790) - bet (1460) - blight (1669) - bloke (1851) - bludgeon (1868) - bozo (1920) - buggy (1773) - burlap (1695) - cagey (1893) - chad (1947) - clobber (1879) - codswallop (1963) - condom (1706) - conniption (1833) - conundrum (1596) - copacetic (1919) - cub (1530) - cuddle (1520) - culvert (1773) - curmudgeon (1577) - dandle (1530) - dildo (1610) - dippy (1922) - dodge (1575) - dogie (1903) - dowse (1691) - dude (1883) - dweeb (1983) - dyke (1942) - euchre (1846) - fink (1928) - fipple (1626) - flabbergast (1772) - flare (1814) - - flivver (1915) - floozy (1911) - flub (1904) - flubdub (1888) - flue (1582) - freak (1563) - fribble (1664) - frowzy (1681) - fuddle (1588) - fuddy-duddy (1904) - fuss (1701) - gadget (1886) - galoot (1812) - gandy dancer (1923) - garish (1545) - gink (1911) - gizmo (1943) - gopher (1812) - gorp (1968) - grungy (1965) - G-string (1878) - guzzle (1583) - hazy (1625) - higgledy-piggledy (1598) - hobbledehoy (1540) - hobo (1891) - hooey (1924) - hootenanny (1929) - hornswoggle (1829) - hugger-mugger (1529) - hunch (1598) - jake (1924) - jalopy (1928) - jam (1806) - jamboree (1872) - jaunt (1570) - jazz (1918) - jeer (1625) - jerkin (1519) - jib (1661) - jiffy (1785) - jimmies (1947) - jink (1786) - jitney (1915) - jive (1928) - joey (1839) - josh (1891) - jumble (1529) - kibble (1790) - kilter (1643) - lollapalooza (?) - lollygag (1868) - lummox (1825) - malarkey (1929) - moola (1939) - mosey (1838) - mound (1551) - nifty (1868) - nincompoop (1676) - nitty-gritty (1963) - noggin (1630) - oodles (1869) - palooka (1924) - palter (1538) - pang (1526) - pernickety (1818) - peter (1812) - piddle (1545) - pimp (1607) - pixie (1630) - pizzazz (1937) - placket (1626) - pod (1688) - pokey (1919) - pother (1627) - privet (1542) - prod (1535) - punk (1596) - puzzle (1607) - quaff (1529) - qualm (1530) - quandary (1579) - quirk (1565) - quiz (1782) - raunchy (1939) - rickets (1645) - rinky-dink (1913) - rogue (1561) - roil (1693) - rollick (1826) - rumpus (1764) - runt (1549) - scad (1856) - scag (1874) - scalawag (1848) - scam (1963) - schooner (1716) - scoundrel (1589) - scrim (1792) - scrimshander (1851) - shebang (1867) - shenanigan (1871) - shim (1723) - shoddy (1832) - shrivel (1612) - shuck (1674) - simoleon (1903) - skedaddle (1861) - skit (1572) - slang (1756) - slather (1818) - sleazy (1644) - slouch (1515) - slum (1812) - snazzy (1932) - snide (1862) - snit (1939) - snitch (1785) - snooker (1889) - snooze (1789) - spline (1756) - sprain (1601) - sprocket (1536) - squander (1596) - squelch (1620) - squid (1613) - squirm (1839) - stash (1811) - stooge (1913) - surf (1685) - swatch (1512) - swig (1548) - swizzle (1813) - taffy (1817) - tantrum (1748) - tiff (1727) - tizzy (1935) - toddle (1825) - toggle (1769) - tootsie (1905) - tot (1725) - transmogrify (1656) - trinket (1536) - trounce (1551) - trudge (1547) - turmoil (1526) - twerp (1923) - wheedle (1668) - willies (1900) - williwaw (1842) - wingding (1944) - wonk (1918) - yank (1818) - zit (1966)

N

nausetnewcomers
Origin of Words

(E?)(L?) http://www.nausetnewcomers.org/JustFor%20Fun/origin_of_words.htm
Here are some new Phrase Origins. How many do you know!

FEATHER IN YOUR CAP | CALLED ON THE CARPET | KING OF THE HILL | THE WRITING IS ON THE WALL | BARBECUE | PORT SIDE | CURFEW | BLURB | BOONDOCKS | BOONDOGGLE | BOOZE | BRASS TACKS | BROTHEL | BUCK | BULLS AND BEARS | BUNK | BY AND LARGE | CHARLEY HORSE | DOLLAR | DOPE | DAGO | DRAG RACE | DUNCE | EAVESDROP | Field Day | Five-By-Five | April Fools | GLITCH | FORTHNIGHT | Fore | acre | G.I. | Goody Two-Shoes

O

oreilly
On Interesting Words

(E?)(L?) http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2005/05/on_interesting.html

...
But music isn't the only interest that a lot of top nerds have: I think a lot of us are word nerds too.
I blogged earlier about "feague". Glenn Vanderburg recognized Mrs Byrne's and came back with one of his favourites:

"groak", which is the definition I remember word-for-word: "to stand watching someone eat, in the hopes they will ask you to join them."

I know Damian and Tom are classics nuts, as capable of emitting Latin as English. Damian even ported "Perl" to Latin. My favourite Tim O'Reilly story involves the day, many years ago, the dumb terminals got stuck on the Greek character set. Tim was the only one not to throw up his hands in disgust. He was quite happy putting his classics degree to good use by editing a computer book in "vi" with every letter transliterated into the Greek character set.
...
"feck" (FEK) n.
We often use negative words, quite common ones, without stopping to think that they are based on positive words that are uncommon and unfamiliar. Everyday examples are words like "impeccable", "untoward", "ruthless", "uncouth", and "disgruntled". We almost never give a thought to the positive terms in the senses that form the basis of the familiar negatives: "peccable" ("liable to error"), "toward" ("propitious"), "ruthful" ("compassionate"). So it is with "feckless", meaning "ineffective", "incompetent", "feeble", "helpless".

It must be obvious that there would be no such word unless there were also the word "feck", and there is such a word, as unfamiliar or obscure as it may be. "Feck", a mainly Scottish term that is also heard in the north of England, has a number of meanings, including "efficacy", "efficiency", and by extension, "energy", "vigor". It is deemed to be an aphetic form of "effect" ("aphetic" being the adjective from "aphesis", the linguistic phenomenon of the loss of an unstressed initial vowel or syllable). "Feck" gives rise to the adjective "feckful", meaning "vigorous", "efficient", "powerful".

In Robert Willan's List of Ancient Words at Present Used in the Mountainous District of the West Riding of Yorkshire (1811), "feckful" is defined as "strong and brawny". Hence our word "feckless"; and it all goes back to "feck". This is a different term from the slang "feck" (origin unknown) used by James Joyce in the sense of "swipe" or "pinch". In Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) he describes persons who "... fecked cash out of the rector's room," and in Ulysses (1922) he writes of "fecking matches from counters." Nothing to do with the "feck" we've been discussing.

A word about "aphesis" (AF uh sis) and "aphetic" (uh FET ik):
"Aphesis" comes from the Greek, meaning "letting go", based on the verb "aphienai" ("to set free"), built of the preposition "ap-", a variant of "apo-" ("away") plus "hienai" ("to send"); cf. "aph(a)eresis" in my 1000 Most Challenging Words.

And from The Meaning of Liff: As you might have guessed, there's no etymology in "Meaning of Liff" because they've taken all those things we needed names for (like the baked-on dishwasher nastiness) and applied them to placenames (which, after all, were just sitting around not doing much).
...


P

phrontistery
Phrontistery
English Word Lists and Language Resources

(E?)(L?) http://www.phrontistery.info/
Forthright, aka Steve Chrisomalis, runs this site devoted to the enjoyment of English words and wordplay.


"phrontistery" FRON-tis-te-ri, n a "thinking-place" [Gr "phrontisterion" from "phrontistes" a "thinker", from "phroneein" "to think"; applied by Aristophanes to the school of Socrates


(griech. "phronein" = "denken", "empfinden")

(E?)(L?) http://www.phrontistery.info/

Welcome to the Phrontistery! I'm your host, Forthright. Since 1996, I have compiled word lists in order to spread the joy of the English language. Here, you will find the International House of Logorrhea (an online dictionary of obscure and rare words), the Compendium of Lost Words (a compilation of ultra-rare forgotten words), and many other glossaries, word lists, essays, and other language and etymology resources. If you have a question, comment, addition, or suggestion, feel free to e-mail me. Happy word-hunting!

Language Resources Numerals Glossaries Bookstore Other


Erstellt: 2010-02

princeton
WordNet
Lexical Database for the English Language
Wordnet reference system
Cognitive Science Laboratory Princeton University

(E?)(L?) http://wordnet.princeton.edu/

About WordNet | Use WordNet online | Download | Frequently Asked Questions | Related projects | WordNet documentation | WordNet statistics | Publications | License and commercial use | Contact, Report

About WordNet
WordNet® is a large lexical database of English, developed under the direction of George A. Miller. Nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs are grouped into sets of cognitive synonyms (synsets), each expressing a distinct concept. Synsets are interlinked by means of conceptual-semantic and lexical relations. The resulting network of meaningfully related words and concepts can be navigated with the browser. WordNet is also freely and publicly available for download. WordNet's structure makes it a useful tool for computational linguistics and natural language processing.
...




(E?)(L?) http://wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn


Q

questia
English Words and Their Background

(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/
(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=59505424
BY GEORGE H. MCKNIGHT, PH. D. PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH IN THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY NEW YORK : : 1923 : : LONDON
Contributors: George H. McKnight - author. Publisher: D. Appleton. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1923.
449 Seiten online.

Zu jedem Kapitel gibt es kleine Appetithäppchen.

Questia offers free access to the first page of every chapter in a book and the first paragraph of each article for your review.
Unter "This Week's FREE Books - Click below to read the entire book" findet man jede Woche ein Werk, zum kostenlosen Zugriff.

Click on a chapter to start reading.

questia
The Wonder of Words

(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/
(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=16234663
An Introduction to Language for Everyman
by ISAAC GOLDBERG, Ph.D.
D. APPLETON-CENTURY COMPANY INCORPORATED NEW YORK 1938 LONDON
Contributors: Isaac Goldberg - author. Publisher: D. Appleton & Company. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1938.
485 Seiten online.

Zu jedem Kapitel gibt es kleine Appetithäppchen.

Questia offers free access to the first page of every chapter in a book and the first paragraph of each article for your review.
Unter "This Week's FREE Books - Click below to read the entire book" findet man jede Woche ein Werk, zum kostenlosen Zugriff.

Click on a chapter to start reading.

questia
Unusual Words and How They Came About

(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/
(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8948096
By EDWIN RADFORD
PHILOSOPHICAL LIBRARY New York
Contributors: Edwin Radford - author. Publisher: Philosophical Library. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1946. Page Number: *.
318 Seiten online. - Allerdings sind zu allen Wörtern Hinweise zur Herkunft zu finden.

Zu jedem Kapitel gibt es kleine Appetithäppchen.

Questia offers free access to the first page of every chapter in a book and the first paragraph of each article for your review.
Unter "This Week's FREE Books - Click below to read the entire book" findet man jede Woche ein Werk, zum kostenlosen Zugriff.

Click on a chapter to start reading.

questia
Word Origins

(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/
(E?)(L?) http://www.questia.com/Index.jsp?CRID=word_origins&OFFID=se1&KEY=etymology
Your search on word origins has brought you to Questia, the world's largest online academic library. The Questia online library offers reliable books, journals, and articles that you can trust on word origins. With Questia you can quickly research, cite, and quote with complete confidence.

Zu jedem Kapitel gibt es kleine Appetithäppchen.

Questia offers free access to the first page of every chapter in a book and the first paragraph of each article for your review.
Unter "This Week's FREE Books - Click below to read the entire book" findet man jede Woche ein Werk, zum kostenlosen Zugriff.

R

rlongman1
About Some Words
Bob Longman

(E?)(L?) http://members.aol.com/rlongman1/longman.html

ver.: 20 February 2004

One of my many fun ventures has been to see if I could find certain non-standard words that I remember knowing as a child. I was not raised on anything but standard English (the only English my parents, neighbors and grandparents knew). Yet for some reason I took for granted that certain words were standard when in fact they were not, and despite the fact I had not heard anyone use them. As I got older, I went looking for where those words came from. Even the Oxford Dictionary didn't have most of them. I still haven't found about a third of them, but the others proved to be related to various Scandinavian, Lowland-Scot, East Anglian, Yorkshire and Lowland-Germanic languages or dialects. (My suspicion is that so are the others, but I haven't found them yet.) And I still have no idea where I got them from.

While I was out looking, I gathered some other words that sounded great, had a rich heritage, or had a special unique meaning. This includes words with certain letters or combinations. Such as

'qu-', (with origins)
'kn-', 'gn-' (with origins)
'tw-' (with origins)
S + consonant, and (with origins)
'-imp', (with origins)

A few of these are commonly understood but rarely used; most are rarely understood. Feel free to use them; none are my own inventions. (That would defeat my original childhood purpose.) A larger battery of words are also available for you to look through :

A through O (with origins)
P through Z (with origins)
a proto-Germanic wordlist (quite preliminary)


S

snappywords.com
Snappy Words
Free Visual Online Dictionary

(E?)(L?) http://www.snappywords.com/

What is Snappy Words visual English dictionary?

It’s an online interactive English dictionary and thesaurus that helps you find the meanings of words and draw connections to associated words. You can easily see the meaning of each by simply placing the mouse cursor over it.

Why use Snappy Words visual dictionary?


(E?)(L?) http://www.snappywords.com/add-dictionary-to-your-site.php

Free Visual Dictionary and Thesaurus

Enter a word here




Erstellt: 2013-11

T

takeourword (tak)
Take Our Word for It
Word List
Wort-Liste

(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/
Am 03.09.2005 war die Site (nach längerer Unterbrechung) gediehen bis zur Ausgabe 197:

Außerdem gibt es eine Bibliographie, einige theoretische Hinweise zur Etymologie und eine Mailingliste.

(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 190 Spotlight Life in the 1500s Revisited
  • Words to the Wise fraught, jimmy, you have your work cut out for you, boss
  • 9/11/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Guestmudgeon
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Good Eating


  • Issue 189 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise pit, Totley, no holds barred, Moor
  • 8/12/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner This Guestmudgeon is a potentially dangerous pedant
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Mating on the House Floor?


  • Issue 188 Spotlight California Placenames
  • Words to the Wise step-, Beijing, cold (illness), twiddle (your thumbs), worrywart
  • 7/15/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A Guestmudgeon may show her might
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock How to get a ticket


  • Issue 187 Spotlight Animal groups
  • Words to the Wise pup tent, poop deck, goggles, itch, pallbearer
  • 7/2/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A Jeopardy Fan?
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Fun with Excision!


  • Issue 186 Spotlight book
  • Words to the Wise the penny dropped, grabbling, thin as a rail, take a gander, quarter horse
  • 6/17/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Frying beans twice?
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The Perfect Computer and Software


  • Issue 185 Spotlight swell words
  • Words to the Wise: spider, corny, sham, ceremony, blonde
  • 6/3/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Everyday Usage
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The Cowboy's Ten Commandments


  • Issue 184 Spotlight opera and manure, the facts at last
  • Words to the Wise: cracket, bazooka, ornery, leeward, ticked off, digs
  • 5/20/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Validation
  • Letters to the Editors various


  • Issue 183 Spotlight vets
  • Words to the Wise: ass, widdershins, jacuzzi, jar, hoar-frost, hear a pin drop
  • 5/6/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Loose usage
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The First Time's Always the Worst


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 182 Spotlight consonant shifts
  • Words to the Wise: separate/apart, acorn/oak
  • 4/22/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Barb Dwyer is a friend of mine
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The First Time's Always the Worst


  • Issue 181 Spotlight cups, coops, hoops and heaps
  • Words to the Wise: mullet (hairdo), Alabama, sorrow, villain, Parthian/parting shot
  • 4/8/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Guestmudgeon Jake Cuttler isn't notorious - yet
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Comments on Iraq by Late Nighters


  • Issue 180 Spotlight shocking, awful use of words
  • Words to the Wise: harbinger, tea towel, holy mackerel, doc, frog
  • 3/24/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Guestmudgeon Roland Bogush got out of the wrong side of the bed today
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Slow Children at Play


  • Issue 179 Spotlight charge
  • Words to the Wise: forgive, hail, propaganda, fly by night
  • 3/10/03
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Barb wants to serve herself better
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Hu's on First


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 178 Spotlight plural diseases
  • Words to the Wise: belay, gazebo, bedraggled
  • 12/9/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner between Scylla to Charybdis
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The Thermondynamics of Hell revisited


  • Issue 177 Spotlight going out of our gourds
  • Words to the Wise: casus belli, gone/fallen by the wayside, rendezvous, fire (sack)
  • 11/17/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner the I's don't have it
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock The Thermondynamics of Hell


  • Issue 176 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: shareware, where have all the _____ gone?, sweetbreads, shark
  • 11/10/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Suicide bombers
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock What happens when National Lampoon gets a hold of Desiderata


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues151-175.html
  • Issue 175 Spotlight Halloween
  • Words to the Wise: desire
  • 10/20/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Redundancy and repetition (and redundancy)
  • Letters to the Editors various


  • Issue 174 Spotlight More Bird Words
  • Words to the Wise: sniper, crab apple, cole slaw, bogey,
  • 10/13/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Our guestmudgeon just thinks
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Which is better?


  • Issue 173 Spotlight Bird Words
  • Words to the Wise: undead, murder of crows, moratorium, keep your eyes peeled, squiz, marquis, fishy/suspicious
  • 10/13/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Shirt and shoes required
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Perhaps these people should not be telling us about problems!


  • Issue 172 Spotlight intestinal fortitude
  • Words to the Wise: stream of consciousness, in/out of the loop, turmeric, asparagus, scissors
  • 10/6/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner "French" bread
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock A few silly (or scary) signs


  • Issue 171 Spotlight complexions and beauty
  • Words to the Wise: grits, jaded, business
  • 9/29/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner I wonder
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock If this were a real emergency...


  • Issue 170 Spotlight ants
  • Words to the Wise: liberal arts, browbeat, Mecca, cyclone
  • 9/14/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner who that?
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock a bunch of groaners


  • Issue 169 Spotlight plates
  • Words to the Wise: Brooklyn, land of nod, slum, née
  • 9/9/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner a suit in a suite
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Bigger Martini


  • Issue 168 Spotlight pipes
  • Words to the Wise: godown, adventure, flapjack, Phillips screw/screwdriver, by George
  • 9/2/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner a tack
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock I am called a Princess


  • Issue 167 Spotlight a mouthful
  • Words to the Wise: arrow, pirate, to boot, go ape/apesh*t, brickle, scrutinize
  • 8/24/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner disconcertion
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock the "Wisdom" of George Carlin


  • Issue 166 Spotlight brightness
  • Words to the Wise: togs, rummage sale, say uncle, I should cocoa, the jig is up
  • 8/16/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner up to one complaint or more!
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock fear of flying


  • Issue 165 Spotlight very little
  • Words to the Wise: the powers that be, skoal, trench coat, costs an arm and a leg, folderol, seaboard
  • 8/9/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner not available in all areas
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock smoked beef rectum


  • Issue 164 Spotlight carrying on
  • Words to the Wise: yikes, the birds and the bees, aficionado, daylight robbery, Malay/malaise
  • 8/2/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner quite literally
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Stoopid Peeple


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 163 Spotlight singletons
  • Words to the Wise: riled up, worry, hogwash, stick in the mud, agonist, gentleman
  • 7/26/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner critique
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock Slippery sheep!


  • Issue 162 Spotlight heat
  • Words to the Wise: gumshoe, syphilis, swan song, zit, nugget
  • 7/11/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner laxadaisical [sic]
  • Letters to the Editors various
  • Laughing Stock They've got a funny accent!


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/
  • Issue 161 Spotlight muses
  • Words to the Wise: pshaw, pot shots, garage, lagniappe
  • 6/28/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner longing for shorter words
  • Letters to the Editors Old Dart, qualifying absolutes, Latin plurals, dreckly (directly), to no end?, man words, alittle alot, ESL (and other) errors, Jewish haikus source, more quarters, more aggravation, more lambaste
  • Laughing Stock Decisions, decisions!


  • Issue 160 Spotlight quarters
  • Words to the Wise: on the lam, quarters, [death] throes, men in female terms, indigenous
  • 6/20/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner disembarking
  • Letters to the Editors curses, oaths, etc., dosh again, presently, irregardless and unique, more enfeebled verbs, America from the Templars?, different from, than or to?
  • Laughing Stock Striking faces (ouch!)


  • Issue 159 Spotlight swinging in the hammock
  • Words to the Wise: cult and occult, inventory and invent, Jesus Christ, fiddle sticks
  • 6/13/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner available to avail
  • Letters to the Editors TOWFI serendipity, fond memories, cockney, more doughnuts, actually about actually, unmentionables, terminology
  • Laughing Stock Jewish mothers' haiku


  • Issue 158 Spotlight getting lost in the dictionary
  • Words to the Wise: choad and qif, diaspora, brown nose, doughnut
  • 5/16/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner restaurant-speak
  • Letters to the Editors impacted, push-back, highway-speak, actually, Christopher Columbus Transcontinental Highway, fan mail
  • Laughing Stock More news


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 157 Spotlight now
  • Words to the Wise: anal retentive, bangs, diaper, jackdaw, best thing since sliced bread
  • 5/9/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner what was your name?
  • Letters to the Editors , back to boxty, yet more on highways and definite articles, Normans, nouns to verbs, Old English in the Bible, a link
  • Laughing Stock The News


  • Issue 156 Spotlight damn foreigners
  • Words to the Wise: reckless/wreck, English history, boxty, [what in] Sam Hill
  • 5/2/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner nouns as verbs
  • Letters to the Editors much more on definite articles and highway names, sign language, six ways from Sunday, we asked for it
  • Laughing Stock The $25 car


  • Issue 155 Spotlight Where the wild things are
  • Words to the Wise: buck/butt naked, purlieu, dogsbody,
  • 4/25/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner ten years ago...
  • Letters to the Editors Germans on "Berliner", hell bent for leather revisited, classical plurals again, to input or not, vending one's spleen, definite articles and highway names
  • Laughing Stock A hostile hostel?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues151-175.html
  • Issue 154 Spotlight h-e-double-hocky-sticks
  • Words to the Wise: hell bent for leather, philanderer, rathskeller
  • 4/18/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner input/inputted
  • Letters to the Editors love apples, tomatoes, garlic, road apples, lobscouse, blind scouse, alumni, classical plurals, more berliner, irony, the last words on eggplant
  • Laughing Stock Venting [one's] spleen


  • Issue 153 Spotlight apples
  • Words to the Wise: take to task, peruse, celestial, kiln
  • 4/11/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner the state of Classical education
  • Letters to the Editors New Zealand slang; more "shorten and add y"; speccy; poor Margaret, espresso, pommy, more terms for "u-turn", congradulations, more congradulations, yet more congradulations, Berliner, more inhabitant terms, scouse, Teeries, Ramsbottom
  • Laughing Stock A serious health hazard


  • Issue 152 Spotlight inhabitants
  • Words to the Wise: awhile, espresso, pom/pommy
  • 4/4/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner congradulate the gratuates
  • Letters to the Editors censorship and other stuff; Australian vernacular; Laughing Stock; clichés, dashboard, curmudgeon merge
  • Laughing Stock Another groaner


  • Issue 151 Spotlight Personal matters (oh me, oh my!)
  • Words to the Wise: renaissance, Virgin Islands
  • 3/29/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner expressing espresso
  • Letters to the Editors might could; shorten and add y; fubar revisited; boogers again, dashboard, phrase coinage, *skep-
  • Laughing Stock Aaaaack!


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues126-150.html
  • Issue 150 Spotlight cutting, hacking and scraping
  • Words to the Wise: charleyhorse, cloth, coined the phrase, spats, dashboard
  • 3/22/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner coining phrases
  • Letters to the Editors the N word; the N word again; orris root; more on The Women's Dictionary
  • Laughing Stock More groaners (puns)


  • Issue 149 Spotlight Middle Earth
  • Words to the Wise: hymen/hymn, booger/bogy, alewife, happy hour, snafu
  • 3/15/02
  • Letters to the Editors puns continue; enjoying TOWFI; sitar and guitar; thank you
  • Laughing Stock A woman's dictionary


  • Issue 148 Spotlight The fundamentals
  • Words to the Wise: America, shamus, radical, logphile/philologist, synecdoche
  • 3/7/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner What he said
  • Letters to the Editors crossing fingers; ID id; eurology; altar horns; corners; perch pun; punctuation, more IDs , words, in connection with
  • Laughing Stock very punny again!


  • Issue 147 Spotlight horns, corns and corners
  • Words to the Wise: Mrs., cross your fingers, divide and conquer, silkie
  • 1/23/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner those that
  • Letters to the Editors the; more au jus; various topics; Cretan/cretin; spicy; euronating, definitions
  • Laughing Stock very punny!


  • Issue 146 Spotlight Dwellings
  • Words to the Wise: bitch, pizza
  • 1/16/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner coulda been a contender
  • Letters to the Editors daemon's evolution; more au jus; more on rabbits; more misacronyms; golf again; more on peppers; huh?
  • Laughing Stock sounds increditable to us


  • Issue 145 Spotlight More Hot stuff
  • Words to the Wise: take the Mickey, whipping boy, Welsh rarebit/rabbit, seven seas
  • 1/9/02
  • Curmudgeons' Corner on a
  • Letters to the Editors hot words, giddy up; Gilbert and Sullivan; several points; misunderstood clichés; Aunty Curmudgeon; he's disorientated; golf again
  • Laughing Stock Where excellence is not an option


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues151-175.html
  • Issue 144 Spotlight Hot stuff
  • Words to the Wise: haw and gee, trauma
  • 1/2/02
  • Letters to the Editors intensive purposes, jigs; yogh; more on church; article abuse
  • Laughing Stock Camping in water


  • Holiday Issue Spotlight Holiday Words (from a previous issue)
  • Words to the Wise: rain check, pray/prayer, pagan, church, caribou
  • 12/19/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner for all intensive purposes?
  • Letters to the Editors Tagalog, Tagalog two; Tagalog three; an old octopus revisited; Richardsnary; Wynn
  • Laughing Stock No parking, indeed!


  • Issue 143 Spotlight cant
  • Words to the Wise: investment, consonant and vowel, -ber, get the hell out of Dodge
  • 12/12/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner flaunt vs. flount
  • Letters to the Editors corundum, Tagalog plurals; lost letters and Gaul; French/Welsh; more on Gaul; double laugh; Icelandic license plate; Websense makes sense; Russian in number
  • Laughing Stock Are they slow, or should we slow?


  • Issue 142 Spotlight lost letters
  • Words to the Wise: pornography, Gaul, aa, quenelle
  • 11/28/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner lay and lie
  • Letters to the Editors Websense, Apostrophe Protection Society, Tagalog plurals; animated curmudgeon, red and mimimum?, bad syntax, Mother Goose in French (sort of), human and earth in Hebrew
  • Laughing Stock large women and manual automatic doors


  • Issue 141 Spotlight gemstones again
  • Words to the Wise: called on the carpet, odds, sport, human
  • 11/14/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner who's at work
  • Letters to the Editors collective vs. plural nouns, please, keeping up with the back issues
  • Laughing Stock how is that supposed to work?


  • Issue 140 Spotlight gemstones
  • Words to the Wise: red letter day, Farsi, wave, pickle
  • 11/8/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner more better
  • Letters to the Editors collective nouns, more on mondegreens, death and the sickle, "better" dictionary, they're just wrong
  • Laughing Stock but how could he fit in there?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 139 Spotlight evil
  • Words to the Wise: goblin, cemetery, zombie, ectoplasm
  • 10/31/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner sentence adverbs
  • Letters to the Editors very punny, waffling about wlaffe, wl- pronunciantion, no, not more fonts!, spooling Miss Steaks, go slow and read it slowly, more merry malapropisms, Arabic anthrax
  • Laughing Stock How does one close a waterfall?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 138 Spotlight wl...
  • Words to the Wise: anthrax, afghan, midnight oil
  • 10/24/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Losing -ly
  • Letters to the Editors German bonza, curmudgeonly pride, renege spelling, bad or missing links, spell check verse, wl- words, malapropisms
  • Laughing Stock Well, which is it?


  • Issue 137 Spotlight Topical Items
  • Words to the Wise: renege/renegue, discombobulate, bonzer/bonza, midwife
  • 10/17/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Jive for jibe, tact for tack, etc.
  • Letters to the Editors Notarikon in Hebrew, language links, problems with page two, cats and dogs, Hebrew and Persian, Aunty Curmudgeon, hats and cattle, Ali quotation, how to fix font problems, browser environment and back issue snags, wl- words, quadratic help, mnemonics and a joke
  • Laughing Stock Must've been a very long tendon


  • Issue 136 Spotlight Arabs, Afghans, Muslims and Islan
  • Words to the Wise: muggles, notarikon, roster, all fur, no nickers
  • 10/3/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A regime of regimens
  • Letters to the Editors Peachy and more, more peaches, possessives, more data, Richard Lederer sez..., spelling stumpers, more on font problems, infamous Isabella, metonym?, mistakes, curmudgeons and anti-curmudgeons, we're ok
  • Laughing Stock How to give a pill to a cat


  • (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues126-150.html
  • Issue 135 Spotlight Dukes, and Eponyms
  • Words to the Wise: bank holiday, contractions, idiot


  • (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues126-150.html
  • 8/28/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner The data are in
  • Letters to the Editors It's not genitive, ginger peachy keen, tera, zetta and yotta, TOWFI display fonts, tough ones to spell, I/me usage
  • Laughing Stock Now how many doughnuts is that?


  • Issue 134 Spotlight Our Garden (again)
  • Words to the Wise: stock still, mortgage, minutes, wrong side of the tracks
  • 8/15/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Me me me or I I I?
  • Letters to the Editors A rhetorical question, a font of fonts, refreshing the site, Lucy, Utah's seagulls, Soylent Green/Soilent Green, difficult to spell
  • Laughing Stock See water. See water run!


  • Issue 133 Spotlight Notes from our garden
  • Words to the Wise: deep six, consulate/embassy, tapas, teenager, biscuit/bisquit
  • 8/8/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Insured assurance
  • Letters to the Editors Back issue issue, logic vs. evidence, hell in a handbasket I, hell in a handbasket II, gruntle
  • Laughing Stock Sweeney Todd redux


  • Issue 132 Spotlight On the Money
  • Words to the Wise: earshot/hark/hearken, midget/dwarf, Suffolk Punch, monk, meander
  • 8/1/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Looking forward
  • Letters to the Editors begging rhetoric, our search engine, Dutch correction
  • Laughing Stock Proofreed your ads


  • Issue 131 Spotlight Bad Etymologist! No Biscuit!
  • Words to the Wise: double dog dare, steward, g-string, (run) amok
  • 7/25/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Beg the question
  • Letters to the Editors Redundant redundancy, thanks, so punny, apostrophemania, Palm OS dictionaries
  • Laughing Stock Nobody cares about Mom?


  • (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues126-150.html
  • Issue 130 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: throw one's hat into the ring, mistletoe, Hip hip! Hurray!, hold (down) the fort, blue blood
  • 7/18/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Irritatingly redundant
  • Letters to the Editors Meanings vs. etymology, several comments, Kilkenny cats, Old Testament child-rearing, jazz revisited
  • Laughing Stock The true meaning of words (?!)
  • Issue 129 Spotlight Animation
  • Words to the Wise: rebel, daemon, cardinal
  • 7/10/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Digitally recorded error
  • Letters to the Editors New mailing list, southern hemisphere readers unite!, Peter Pan an etymologist?, all monds, ah-monds, Anglo-centric views?, cats is cats, jewfish no more, Persian in Hebrew
  • Laughing Stock A w(h)ine joke


  • Issue 128 Spotlight Cats
  • Words to the Wise: caught red-handed, factotum, scrod, crayon, on tenterhooks
  • 6/26/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner An L of a time
  • Letters to the Editors: more flies, Persian influence, uptalk, ichthyetymology, more eggs and plants
  • Laughing Stock The birth of a word


  • Issue 127 Spotlight Nightmares, death and monsters
  • Words to the Wise: jewfish, scoop, natty, fly (zipper), gestalt
  • 6/19/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner heighth?
  • Letters to the Editors eggplant in Hindi and German, more would, Texan for W, more for Macs, more on merkin, old oxenfree
  • Laughing Stock what happens when you use an online translator


  • Issue 126 Spotlight Merkins, grimalkins, and Maid Marians
  • Words to the Wise: attorney, joy, vice-/vise, aubergine, Mexico
  • 6/12/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Guess what?
  • Letters to the Editors fahrt, Getafix, dogleg, petard
  • Laughing Stock Ball removal


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 125 Spotlight Saturday
  • Words to the Wise: glamour, warlock, hysteria, yonder/iterations/reiterate, gams
  • 6/5/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Holded up?
  • Letters to the Editors Crisis in Language, fart, he found us!, Polish help, Wells Fargo
  • Laughing Stock Dumfart


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 124 Spotlight Frequentatives
  • Words to the Wise: Dough, fart, hiccup, moot, piggyback
  • 5/29/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Vegetarian chickens
  • Letters to the Editors Poetry for Cats, French knee cognates, trunks and boots, Wells Fargo, not exactly macaronic, false friends , fletcher flowers
  • Laughing Stock All Your Base Are Belong to Us


  • Issue 123 Spotlight Flow and fly
  • Words to the Wise: Trunk, smarmy, pay attention/ heed/ a visit, remote, knee
  • 5/22/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Free for $19.95
  • Letters to the Editors Loser, Latin poems, more Latin poems, yet more Latin poems, back issue format, Hindi and English


  • Issue 122 Spotlight Skirt, shirt, skit and shinola
  • Words to the Wise: pedigree, butter, green room, haywire, doula
  • 5/15/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Nuptual?
  • Letters to the Editors Latin poetry, more w, county, peppers and wolves, curmudgeoning in German
  • Laughing Stock Mary Jane in Idaho


  • Issue 121 Spotlight rank
  • Words to the Wise: cash, hullabaloo, titanic, the letter y, the letter w
  • 5/8/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner if I would have been
  • Letters to the Editors, UFO a ufo?, Dubyonics, Huxley and Darwin
  • Laughing Stock A true story (though not etymological)


  • Issue 120 Spotlight dictionaryisms
  • Words to the Wise: agnostic, loophole, best man, tantalize, several
  • 5/1/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Whatever and whenever
  • Letters to the Editors humdinger, a French home, censorship, translations, other others, George III
  • Laughing Stock Slow service?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 119 Spotlight the following...
  • Words to the Wise: humdinger, dumbbell, scut, bulletin board, bend over backwards
  • 4/24/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Who's ever
  • Letters to the Editors gild the lily, I tell ye, f*ck and fight?, a TOWFI fix, more about nine yards, back issue format, anatomy of a barrel
  • Laughing Stock Secrets Revealed


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 118 Spotlight Another one of those e-mails
  • Words to the Wise: lock, stock and barrel, high jinks, bun/hot cross bun
  • 4/17/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Ironic isn't ironic anymore
  • Letters to the Editors Ishtar, French gender, more Latin plurals, spurious etymology, pepperpot, Spanish, and New Amsterdam
  • Laughing Stock Yes + Yes = No?


  • Issue 117 Spotlight Compost
  • Words to the Wise: peter out, Buffalo, imp, sooterkin/zooterkins, lorry
  • 3/13/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Where have all the female words gone?
  • Letters to the Editors Monday in Japanese, crocs of saffron, I'll give you 40 does for that saddle, Colombian gestures, two cents for a stadia rod, Spanish linguist to the rescue, going to the circus with Kate, more cat skinning
  • Laughing Stock Don't call, it'll be gone by now


  • Issue 116 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: kudos, cobweb, conjugate, spring, more than one way to skin a cat
  • 3/6/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner He's an-al and an-noyed
  • Letters to the Editors Arabic Spanish, Honday in Mungarian, god words, dropping d's, broads, and broads again, evil apple pancakes, time travel, co-curmudgeons, battle-axitude, troopers and e-mail, Latin rules?, Christianity and Chinese
  • Laughing Stock what a shocker


  • Issue 115 Spotlight days of the week...Tuesday
  • Words to the Wise: in the doldrums, Adam's apple, trooper/trouper, battle-axe, broad
  • 2/27/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner It's a phenomena to myself
  • Letters to the Editors Hungarian Mondays, more Albuquerque, what about the dunce cap?, more on couln'nt and prescriptivism
  • Laughing Stock time travel


  • Issue 114 Spotlight days of the week...Monday
  • Words to the Wise: thalweg, Albuquerque, randy, josh, entree
  • 2/20/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner couln'nt
  • Letters to the Editors p's and q's, on curmudgeonry, whet your whistle?
  • Laughing Stock lethal rolling pins


  • Issue 113 Spotlight netymology
  • Words to the Wise: easy as pie, crud, handle, yum/yummy, geoduck
  • 2/13/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner a coal forecast
  • Letters to the Editors brass monkey skeptics, monkeys on cruise liners, Finnish, morning star deities
  • Laughing Stock Husbands and varmints


  • Issue 112 Spotlight table manners
  • Words to the Wise: cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey, bring home the bacon/chew the fat, catapult, Russia, lame duck
  • 2/6/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner piquing one's curiosity
  • Letters to the Editors we helped, Hebrew for "morning star", git, spell checkers, more gender vs. sex, the -orama craze, scab revisited
  • Laughing Stock What language does your dog speak?


  • Issue 111 Spotlight sticks and stones
  • Words to the Wise: quark, git, arrogant, alien, steal one's thunder
  • 1/30/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner taking a peek at pique
  • Letters to the Editors vegetarian derivation?, vegetarian joke, apt names, lingua franca, more eggnogs, Lucifer returns?, we can help, we can help Mac users, too
  • Laughing Stock What language does your dog speak?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 110 Spotlight whales
  • Words to the Wise: migraine, universe, eggnog, vegetarian, Torpenhow (hillhillhill)
  • 1/23/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner this or next weekend?
  • Letters to the Editors posh, this/next weekend, more on obfuscation, naked what?, welcome back, error policy


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue109.html
  • Issue 109 Spotlight hogmanay
  • Words to the Wise: ghetto, winter, wuss, gymnast
  • 1/16/01
  • Curmudgeons' Corner obfuscation
  • Letters to the Editors correction, betel and beetle, more on this/next weekend, chads again, the nature of our curmudgeons


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue108.html
  • Issue 108 Spotlight absolutely fabulous animals
  • Words to the Wise: beetling, manhandle, oyez oyez, horror
  • 12/18/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner this or next weekend?
  • Letters to the Editors chad, the OED, additions to our bibliography, dangling prepositions and British math
  • Laughing Stock Discretion Advised When Upgrading


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 107 Spotlight elections (or, from chads to ... in one letter)
  • Words to the Wise: spree, craven, dastardly, pusillanimous, o'clock, county, lickety-split
  • 11/21/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner more whining from Malcolm Tent
  • Letters to the Editors more second person plural and "W'all" - a double plural, a gracious apology, French etymology, final prepositions.
  • Laughing Stock a notice of revocation...


  • Issue 106 Spotlight the days of the week: Sunday
  • Words to the Wise: fob, quadratic, Gordon Bennett, mess, davenport, chaise longue/lounge
  • 11/14/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Suzanne Carpenter says it alls
  • Letters to the Editors more third person plural pronoun slang, Norse or Teutonic?, our letters policy, dingbat again, Italian divas
  • Laughing Stock Phunny photos


  • Issue 105 Spotlight the days of the week continued
  • Words to the Wise: housewarming, tongue in cheek, hero, diva, frig
  • 10/31/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Suzanne Carpenter attempts to sway us with her y'all pitch
  • Letters to the Editors Encyclopedia Britannica, avian literacy, drownded, dingbat, nor' by nor'west, you-uns
  • Laughing Stock Laws Concerning Food and Drink [by Ian Frazier]


  • Issue 104 Spotlight the days of the week
  • Words to the Wise: hunting pink, stool, foot, bereaved, cancer/Cancer
  • 10/9/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner hyperhyphenation
  • Letters to the Editors Issue 103's letters repeated [due to Mike being ill]
  • Laughing Stock How I Met My Wife [by Jack Winter]


  • Issue 103 Spotlight the in- words
  • Words to the Wise: dingbat, inning, wine, on the wagon, rock and roll, hip hop
  • 10/2/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner nemesis abuse
  • Letters to the Editors Gore-y details, en-compass-ed, drownded, letter order, second-person plural
  • Laughing Stock A Rhose By Any Other Name [by Matthew Sutherland]


  • Issue 102 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: letter order, loofah, dweomer, cobweb, pissant
  • 9/25/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner bureaucratese
  • Letters to the Editors youse, drownded, anyways
  • Laughing Stock a parking restriction we can live with


  • Issue 101 Spotlight English words from Romany
  • Words to the Wise: trivia, be there with bells on, France, profession
  • 9/18/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner anyways
  • Letters to the Editors Ks, Chicago Tribune, more on hokey-pokey, tumped, quibbles and compliments
  • Laughing Stock the doctor is in


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues76-100.html
  • Issue 100 Spotlight wee weighs of weight
  • Words to the Wise: hanky-panky and hokey-pokey, trot line, post haste, pompous, three sheets to the wind
  • 9/11/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner US spelling
  • Letters to the Editors More children's rhymes, hosey, Agent 99, braziers, sphagnum moss, heraldry,
  • Laughing Stock "No Man is an Ireland" - political boners


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues101-125.html
  • Issue 99 Spotlight swamp things
  • Words to the Wise: crony, bumbershoot, spank, bimbo, English from Basque
  • 8/28/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Nutritious vs. nutritional and others
  • Letters to the Editors Sexual slang in music, punny readers, sailing details, more dibs synonyms, commas revisited
  • Laughing Stock Dining in style


  • Issue 98 Spotlight the word-of-all-trades part II
  • Words to the Wise: dosh, creole, fair to middlin', squid, c*nt
  • 8/21/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Growing a minimum horn
  • Letters to the Editors 1500s is 16th century, commas, bagging, meddlin' in middlin', jackets are old, jacks, and eight a's!
  • Laughing Stock Spam from Russia with Love


  • Issue 97 Spotlight the word-of-all-trades
  • Words to the Wise: humongous, soda, dibbs, fugue, bees' knees
  • 8/14/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner from between
  • Letters to the Editors, fuzzy wuzzy, oronyms
  • Laughing Stock Re-re-re-translations


  • Issue 96 Spotlight Mother of all tongues
  • Words to the Wise: library, colony, sorcerer, ex
  • 8/7/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner wherefore
  • Letters to the Editors English pronuciation, oronyms
  • Laughing Stock Spam from Russia with Love


  • Issue 95 Spotlight Edible words
  • Words to the Wise: curmudgeon, fix, hootenanny, soul, milquetoast
  • 7/31/00
  • Letters to the Editors virgin, plurals, high tea, Lithuanian, injuries, Pali
  • Laughing Stock English as she are spoke


  • Issue 94 Spotlight The crippled creep
  • Words to the Wise: surgery/chirurgery, supper/dinner, dog days, washer, mischievous
  • 7/24/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner prepositions
  • Letters to the Editors virgin, more strange English, sexual slang, plurals
  • Laughing Stock Children's books


  • Issue 93 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: fork, pew, screaming meemies, preterist, troilism
  • 7/17/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner depluralization
  • Letters to the Editors honky, poont*ng, noise words, virgin
  • Laughing Stock English is a stupid language


  • Issue 92 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: siege, fell swoop, star (person), virgin, right track, poont*ng
  • 7/10/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner noise words
  • Letters to the Editors more Dutch, long lost friends, clapping, honky
  • Laughing Stock steamed children


  • Issue 91 Spotlight veg-edibles part II
  • Words to the Wise: loagy, sublime, clap, honky, crestfallen
  • 6/19/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner plural mispronunciation
  • Letters to the Editors more on product labels, belladonna returns, laughed so hard he flooded!
  • Laughing Stock George W. Bush, in his own words


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues76-100.html




  • Issue 90 Spotlight veg-edibles
  • Words to the Wise: thumb, eclipse, vitamin, to rare, scouse
  • 6/19/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner convincing and persuasive
  • Letters to the Editors more on product labels, to know you is to know you, Persian, not Arabic!, more on Azazel, it's a piece of cake, a name for the unnamed
  • Laughing Stock Reasons why the English language is so hard to learn


  • Issue 89 Spotlight wise acres
  • Words to the Wise: nadir, intact, panic, piece of cake
  • 6/5/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner the unnamed pet peeve
  • Letters to the Editors ollie ollie oxen free, Egypt, sending TOWFI to a friend
  • Laughing Stock Instruction (or is that DEstruction?) labels


  • Issue 88 Spotlight a little knowledge
  • Words to the Wise: chat, slavery
  • 5/30/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner role models
  • Letters to the Editors goats (Azazel), oxen (ollie ollie oxen free), mornings, Japanese, a fool's cap


  • Issue 87 Spotlight minced oaths
  • Words to the Wise: get one's goat, moonshine, naked as a jaybird, nihilism, ollie ollie oxen free, foolscap, Krishna, in the black/red
  • 5/22/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner hopefully it will not be momentarily
  • Letters to the Editors plural and not so plural possessive, back issues formula, reaching Indians, a suggested link


  • Issue 86 Spotlight Japanese words in English
  • Words to the Wise: Aryan, noodle (food), doozy
  • 5/15/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner feral insurance companies
  • Letters to the Editors sesquipedalianism, it's in the roasting, so is one Jones a Jone?, Surdez you jest


  • Issue 85 Spotlight beer
  • Words to the Wise: nag, (bill of) lading, cobbler, nit, jingoism
  • 5/8/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner epicentrism
  • Letters to the Editors brine whine, a bitter taste, a German churl, lemoned water, in-store free-for-all, quanta, reusing absent items, corponyms, language anarchy


  • Issue 84 Spotlight blood-sucking parasites
  • Words to the Wise: ectoplasm, quay, heinous, quirk, churlish
  • 5/1/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner bitter words
  • Letters to the Editors more bunnies, more quantum leaps, whither the sticky wicket?, Indiastan, an edible noggin, it's Odin Tew you


  • Issue 83 Spotlight promotional materials
  • Words to the Wise: Indian, deadbeat, noodle, destiny
  • 4/24/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner close to the edge
  • Letters to the Editors A disgruntled anti-commercialite, write about Dutch wife and get chastised re gender!, voilà - a viola, down on the Welsh


  • Issue 82 Spotlight Holy Spirit
  • Words to the Wise: due south, sticky wicket, wet nurse, fantastic, podzol and chernozem
  • 4/17/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Realty is reality
  • Letters to the Editors British pronunciation, more rabbits, French letters and cor anglaise, we're almost always right, and double Dutch alumni


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues76-100.html
  • Issue 81 Spotlight the Easter Bunny
  • Words to the Wise: asymptote, first/ third, [dog] pound, shepherd, poverty
  • 4/10/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner American as apple pie
  • Letters to the Editors Dutch terms, grim, and foundering citizens


  • Issue 80 Spotlight those darned foreigners
  • Words to the Wise: fusion and fission, nigh/near/next, along and belong, feudal, jewelry
  • 4/3/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner light years away
  • Letters to the Editors grim reaper returns, the etymology of Sahara, and comments on city words


  • Issue 79 Spotlight city words
  • Words to the Wise: brawl, puce, butt (heads), virtually
  • 3/27/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner associate
  • Letters to the Editors alfa?, more dudes, more African words, don't knock La Brea Tar Pits, a NASAism, redundancies return, the grim truth about the Grim Reaper, gorilla girls


  • Issue 78 Spotlight African words, part 2
  • Words to the Wise: agent, hearse and rehearse, Patagonia, ruthless, Grim Reaper
  • 3/20/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner literally
  • Letters to the Editors Tenses, phonetic alphabet, desert islands, more redundancies


  • Issue 77 Spotlight African words, part 1
  • Words to the Wise: stroke, a bone to pick, roger and wilco, cold feet, Teutonic
  • 3/13/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner can vs. may
  • Letters to the Editors Cowboy slang, more redundancies, dories, Thruber, and an old issue


  • Issue 76 Spotlight some phrases
  • Words to the Wise: ream (of paper), blue chip (stocks), dude, cowlick, hunky dory
  • 3/6/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner rice paddies
  • Letters to the Editors British hospitality; African roots; Diego clarification; spurious dago origin; thanks from Korea; more on waxy derivations


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues51-75.html
  • Issue 75 Spotlight metathesis
  • Words to the Wise: redneck, polecat, -ica, hospitality
  • 2/28/00
  • Letters to the Editors The path of kwent- to "path-"; snobbish vs. style; a glutinous definition; dago revisited;


  • Issue 74 Spotlight animals as food
  • Words to the Wise: agglutinate, tarnation, dago, gadget, -path/path-
  • 2/21/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner nuclear errors
  • Letters to the Editors a week of praise


  • Issue 73 Spotlight eros
  • Words to the Wise: page, ardent, brouhaha and hubbub, nemesis, money grubber
  • 2/14/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner early
  • Letters to the Editors more on fishmongers, Life in the 1500s, barristers, and refutation


  • Issue 72 Spotlight fishmonger
  • Words to the Wise: know all men by these presents, bar, history, prize and price, signature
  • 2/7/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner refute
  • Letters to the Editors kind words; metheglin; urband legends and burials in England; a fortnight of critical thinking


  • Issue 71 Spotlight honeymoon
  • Words to the Wise: you're welcome, grapefruit, how come, Spam, hypocrite
  • 1/31/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner supposably
  • Letters to the Editors phonemes; wala is a Tagalog word


  • Issue 70 Spotlight peacock
  • Words to the Wise: duck, metaphysics, limehouse, down the pike, turn over a new leaf
  • 1/24/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner wa-LA
  • Letters to the Editors Lots of "is, is that"; dream or mirth?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 69 Spotlight dances
  • Words to the Wise: dream, smart, shy, debt, on the ball
  • 1/17/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner the reason is, is that...
  • Letters to the Editors Eve length, Hebrew names, more maniacs


  • Issue 68 Spotlight Jesus
  • Words to the Wise: maniac, glitch, taxi cab, guy, autumn
  • 1/10/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner happy New Year's
  • Letters to the Editors revisionist history


  • Issue 67 Spotlight English words from Arabic
  • Words to the Wise: Limey, widow's peak, sallyport, cahoots, hobnob
  • 1/03/00
  • Curmudgeons' Corner definitely not definately
  • Letters to the Editors skinny-dipping of the century; brogue shoes and brogue speech


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues51-75.html
  • Issue 66 Spotlight handicap
  • Words to the Wise: spiffy, prostitute, sheriff, skinny, black
  • 12/27/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner a very special century
  • Letters to the Editors more Welsh stuff; the longest place name in Britain; Greek chi


  • Issue 65 Spotlight holiday words
  • Words to the Wise: chuckwagon and chuckhole, castle and chaste, deer, Jew
  • 12/20/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Imput and spayded
  • Letters to the Editors; a D.C. perspective; Etruscan has been deciphered; niger and the EEOC; Icelandic surnames; Welsh names; it's not the end of the millennium-yet


  • Issue 64 Spotlight fatidencies
  • Words to the Wise: grape; aisle, isle and island; tautology; snake oil, word
  • 12/13/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner various examples of misuse/abuse
  • Letters to the Editors words on television; Norwegian surnames; squaw; more on surnames


  • Issue 63 Spotlight acronyms
  • Words to the Wise: clean as a whistle, entertainment, marble, luck, surname
  • 12/6/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner more about acronyms
  • Letters to the Editors Macs; where to study etymology; title changes


  • Issue 62 Spotlight thanksgiving
  • Words to the Wise: swashbuckler, eavesdrop, secretary/secret, links, sarcasm
  • 11/22/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner lecterns and podiums
  • Letters to the Editors Latin declensions; Russian roulette and critical thinking; rave as an acronym


  • Issue 61 Spotlight Russian roulette
  • Words to the Wise: abracadabra, exotic, bulldozer, cheese, rave
  • 11/15/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner millenia/schmillenia
  • Letters to the Editors more on pluck you; John Locke and tabula rasa; bring vs. take


  • Issue 60 Spotlight Lynch
  • Words to the Wise: Amazon, red tape, tabula rasa, rube, bit (1/8 dollar), skid row
  • 11/8/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Bring vs. take
  • Letters to the Editors -gry, -gry, go away; monthly correction; egregious usage; Swedish cognates; wallpaper paste from Korea


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues51-75.html
  • Issue 59 Spotlight Guitar
  • Words to the Wise: watershed, jackass, crowbar, place, double whammy
  • 11/1/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Egregious
  • Letters to the Editors Latin grammar, the important people


  • Issue 58 Spotlight Months
  • Words to the Wise: caught between the devil and the deep blue sea, made from scratch, sky, dunning letter, waive, pardon my French
  • 10/25/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Enormity
  • Letters to the Editors Bizarre berserkers and paying our "dues"


  • Issue 57 Spotlight Hectic
  • Words to the Wise: bizarre, synergy, peccadillo, conundrum, wax [historical], ivy league
  • 10/19/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner About
  • Letters to the Editors Drunk skunks, our German, commas re-revisited, hobo histories, layout, praise, and barytons


  • Issue 56 Spotlight Some more musical instruments
  • Words to the Wise: mafia, mosaic, testify, drunk as a skunk, preponderance
  • 10/11/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Arctic in the attic
  • Letters to the Editors More on hobo and gaudy, our German, p's and q's, punctuation, and titans or not?


  • Issue 55 Spotlight Holding your breath (and your nose)
  • Words to the Wise: Golf, Generation X, gaudy, run the gauntlet, flair
  • 10/4/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A mere mirror
  • Letters to the Editors More on the -gry hoax and our new look


  • Issue 54 Spotlight Woodwind words
  • Words to the Wise: Ballpark (figure), bogus, catawampus, chicken pox
  • 9/20/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Gourmet delights
  • Letters to the Editors New site/look comments


  • Issue 53 Spotlight Etymology vs. real meanings
  • Words to the Wise: Mushroom, metaphor, moist, mind your p's and q's
  • 9/20/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Pronouncing -phth-
  • Letters to the Editors An OEDer and boobs again!


  • Issue 52 Spotlight Continental names
  • Words to the Wise: Dyed in the wool, atlas, boob, elite, electricity
  • 9/13/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Quantum leap


  • Issue 51 Spotlight Another internet hoax: hungry, angry, and ?
  • Words to the Wise: abecedarium, memorize by heart, plague and ague
  • 8/23/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner This is so different
  • Letters to the Editors Spurious obscenity etymologies, brogue and Mick


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues26-50.html
  • Issue 50 Spotlight Irish Gaelic words in English
  • Words to the Wise: Obscenities (censored), quiz, photographer, doily and antimacassar, gossip
  • 8/16/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner It's ET!
  • Letters to the Editors Hoosegow revisited, Melanie & Mike play Darwin, and pomposity


  • Issue 49 Spotlight Celtic words in English
  • Words to the Wise: Spinster, hot dog, hobbit, hoosegow
  • 8/9/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Lose the t or eltse!
  • Letters to the Editors Whence does "from whence" come?


  • Issue 48 Spotlight Wrought and wreaked havoc
  • Words to the Wise: Gutta-percha, Bolinas, zombie, jumbo, mumbo-jumbo
  • 8/3/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Racked with seaweed
  • Letters to the Editors Got vs. gotten


  • Issue 47 Spotlight The quick and the dead
  • Words to the Wise: Tow-head, woman, teller, they
  • 7/5/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner I wonder...?
  • Letters to the Editors entitled


  • Issue 46 Spotlight A campaign for camping
  • Words to the Wise: B silent, cynic and skeptic, and scuttlebutt
  • 6/29/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner ...And who, may I ask, is calling?
  • Letters to the Editors Reverse psychology revisited


  • Issue 45 Spotlight Yet more names of nations: Serendip
  • Words to the Wise: spick and span, agog
  • 6/21/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Reverse psychology
  • Letters to the Editors More names for Germany


  • Issue 44 Spotlight It's no mystery
  • Words to the Wise: Ta-da, pal, pee-yew, bias
  • 6/14/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Degrees of possibility
  • Letters to the Editors Traps and Hungarian


  • Issue 43 Spotlight More names of nations: Germany
  • Words to the Wise: Toodle-oo, rain check, pay the piper, hoodlum, traps, drumstick
  • 6/7/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Rank Ranking
  • Letters to the Editors School-marms and enfeebled verbs


  • Issue 42 Spotlight Names of nations
  • Words to the Wise: Calaveras, pray/prayer, dollar, visa, filibuster
  • 6/1/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Enfeebled verbs
  • Letters to the Editors More on misplaced modifiers and Native Americans


  • Issue 41 Spotlight Indian words
  • Words to the Wise: squaw, copycat, whore, tar (slang for sailor)
  • 5/24/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Misplaced Modifiers; Submit Yours!
  • Letters to the Editors More Fun With K


  • Issue 40 Spotlight Drug-language abuse
  • Words to the Wise: Cooties, jones, assassination
  • 5/17/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Accused In
  • Letters to the Editors Solanaceae, tomatoes, and three k's for Derek


  • Issue 39 Spotlight Internet Poppycock
  • Words to the Wise: Life in the 1500s, our feet!
  • 5/10/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Use of anxious for eager
  • Letters to the Editors Gestures


  • Issue 38 Spotlight Native American Words in English
  • Words to the Wise: coward/cowardice, hangar, crisp
  • 4/20/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Beg the question vs. raise the question
  • Letters to the Editors The Changing English Language


  • Issue 37 Spotlight Point-blank
  • Words to the Wise: pussy[cat], kitty, beluga, puppy, horse, stag/hen night
  • 4/20/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Momento vs. Memento
  • Letters to the Editors Turkey's "Original" Name


  • Issue 36 Spotlight Evil
  • Words to the Wise: fairy and fay, cemetery, chapel, pagan, heretic, church
  • 4/12/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Salt and Pepper Weather
  • Letters to the Editors Quotation marks revisited


  • Issue 35 Spotlight
  • Words to the Wise: beestings, Good Friday, Caucasian, ax versus ask, one another
  • 4/5/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Periods inside or outside of quotation marks


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues26-50.html
  • Issue 34
  • Words to the Wise: juke box, eureka, bone up, goblin, blah
  • 3/29/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner I Could[n't] Care Less
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Do Brits Flog Fags?


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues.html
  • Issue 33 Spotlight The Fabric of Words, Part III of III
  • Words to the Wise: titillating, babble, caput, faggot, drum (slang)
  • 3/22/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Quote Unquote revisited


  • Issue 32 Spotlight The Fabric of Words, Part II of III
  • Words to the Wise: earth, galoot, jitney, hackneyed
  • 3/15/99
  • Letters to the Editors
  • gender vs. sex, cul-de-sac


  • Issue 31 Spotlight The Fabric of Words, Part I of III
  • Words to the Wise: drivel, navigate, drag queen, cool, gender vs. sex
  • 3/8/99
  • Curmudgeon's Corner affect vs. effect
  • Letters to the Editors
  • etymological research


  • Issue 30 Spotlight Frenzied words
  • Words to the Wise: cul-de-sac, limousine, lukewarm
  • 3/2/99
  • Curmudgeon's Corner Quote Unquote
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Classical pronunciation


  • Issue 29 Spotlight February Feasts and Holidays
  • Words to the Wise: Whiddon Down (place name), shroff, churchkey, lumpkin, the f-word revisited, miracle
  • 2/22/99
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Horsey terms


  • Issue 28
  • Words to the Wise: to come to a head, lesbian and homosexual, romance
  • 2/15/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Classical Plurals
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Howdy Doody and the Peanut Gallery


  • Issue 27 Spotlight peanut gallery
  • Words to the Wise: weapon, campy, cretin, caribou, prophet, believe
  • 2/8/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A Whole Nother
  • Letters to the Editors
  • A Coincidence


  • Issue 26 Spotlight niggardly
  • Words to the Wise: waffle, radical, uppity, boredom, teetotaler, out of sorts
  • 1/31/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner epithets
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Update on the Death Valley treasure chest


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues1-25.html
  • Issue 25 Spotlight -tain/-ten words.
  • Words to the Wise: inculcate, mound and henge, and grub stake (the Death Valley treasure chest)
  • 1/25/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner American pronunciation
  • Letters to the Editors
  • Pluck yew


  • Issue 24 Spotlight Cowboy
  • Words to the Wise: cut and dried, luminescence, felony, Sumerology and Hungarian
  • 1/18/99
  • Letters to the Editors
  • More on qualified absolutes


  • Issue 23 Spotlight Corn
  • Words to the Wise: impeach, port and starboard, Dixie
  • 1/11/99
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Pronunciation, Men and Women versus People, Mischiev[i]ous, Irregardless, and W


  • Issue 22 Spotlight Solstice
  • Words to the Wise: technology, blue laws, cheapskate, majority whip, ragtime
  • 12/28/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Reasons Why


  • Issue 21 Spotlight Yule
  • Words to the Wise: pandemonium, I, [Spanish] main, sequence of the alphabet,
  • 12/21/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Iraq


  • Issue 20 Spotlight Souling
  • Words to the Wise: diabetes, lieutentant, observe
  • 12/14/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Obverse


  • Issue 19 Spotlight Lookalikes
  • Words to the Wise: the letter s, mister, narcotics
  • 12/07/98


  • Issue 18 Spotlight Bellwether
  • Words to the Wise: barbershop quartet, hoe-down and shindig, auspicious
  • 11/30/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner A Collection of Complaints


  • Issue 17 Spotlight Death Valley
  • Words to the Wise: Ku Klux Klan, dressed to the nines, horked/gorked, bazaar, gravity, noon, twit
  • 11/23/98


  • Issue 16 Spotlight Chocolate
  • Words to the Wise: goody two-shoes, theodolite, skedaddle,
  • 11/9/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Absolutely Unique


  • Issue 15 Spotlight Frown
  • Words to the Wise: yankee, faith, drugs, relax, oops, card shark/sharp
  • 11/2/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Number


  • Issue 14 Spotlight Obscure Slang
  • Words to the Wise: frump, -smith, kill, fascinate, scrap
  • 10/26/98


  • Issue 13 Spotlight nose words
  • Words to the Wise: sucker, hitch-hike, codswallop & toerag, -ish
  • 10/19/98


  • Issue 12 Spotlight Computer-related Words
  • Words to the Wise: cerebrum/cerebellum, gospel, moor, baklava, -guilt, indict, stat
  • 10/12/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Snobbery


  • Issue 11 Spotlight Treacle
  • Words to the Wise: lynch, hijack, for Pete's sake, dork, chafing dish, sin
  • 10/5/98


  • (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue010.html
  • Issue 10 Spotlight Barbecued Barbarians and Their Barbers
  • Words to the Wise: delta, ampersand, mock, disgruntled, up to snuff, input
  • 9/28/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Like, Why Do We Abuse Like?


  • Issue 9 Spotlight pub names
  • Words to the Wise: deadline, J, boilerplate, enclave, step-, in fine fettle
  • 9/28/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Singular and Plural


  • Issue 8 Spotlight justice
  • Words to the Wise: gringo, hi, rig(a)marole, diddly-squat, diamond
  • 9/14/98


  • Issue 7 Spotlight Minoan Words
  • Words to the Wise: ration, newfangled, privacy, savage
  • 8/31/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner Pristine Usage


  • Issue 6 Spotlight hotel
  • Words to the Wise: shortening, by and large, race, friendship, burrito, cartoon, post (mail), comfort
  • 8/24/98
  • Curmudgeons' Corner The Een Problem


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues1-25.html
  • Issue 5 Spotlight aesthetics
  • Words to the Wise: unction & anointing, handsome
  • 8/17/98


  • Issue 4 Spotlight suborn
  • Words to the Wise: cockeyed, cake, D-day, pipedream, hurrah
  • 8/10/98


  • Issue 3 Spotlight fiddle
  • Words to the Wise: fortnight, god, iota
  • 8/3/98


  • (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/backIssues1-25.html
  • Issue 2 Spotlight ilk
  • Words to the Wise: discipline, snob & nob, muggy
  • 7/27/98


  • Issue 1 Spotlight screed
  • Words to the Wise: earmark, crocodile tears, broker


  • (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/arc_logi.html

    Archive of Your Etymology Questions

    A - D
    abba | abecedarium | abuse | abusive | acre | afghan | ain't | alimony | Angela | answer | antebellum | apple of one's eye | apropos | archetype | aunt | awesome | awkward | barbecue | barber | barefaced lie | Benjamin | betray | Big Dipper | binge | bite the dust | bloody | blues | bodacious | boost (steal) | bootleg | boycott | break a leg | bridal | bride price | Bruce | buck | the buck stops here | bum | bus boy | butterfly | buy the farm | cable | campaign | cancel | cartwheel | Casey | celebrate | Celtic/Gaelic words in English | Chevrolet | Cheyenne | Christopher | chron- | cloud | cocktail | coffee | cold turkey | commitment | community | con- | contagion | coon | copacetic | cornucopia | cosmopolitan | country names | courage | crepuscular | custody | cyborg | Damien | dashboard | David | dawn | days of the week | dead as a doornail | deism | dendron | despair | divorce | doctor | domino | donate | doublet | downtown | dragoon | duck soup | Dudley | Dutch |


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_e-g.html

    E-G
    eating crow | Eden | educate | egregious | eleemosynary | engineer | epic | euphemism | evanescence | excursive | facetious | fluke | fool | foot | fore | forgive | frankfurter | fun | gaia/ge- | galleon | gallon | gay | George | gerrymander | gig | gild the lily | give | godseye | gook


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_h-j.html

    H - J
    hallowed | hamburger | hanged | heartstrings | hello | help | hem and haw | hero | hex | hobo | hocus pocus | hokum | holy | honky-tonk | hoodwinked | hoosegow | hope | horrible | horse of a different color | horseradish | humbug | hungry | hurricane | husband | hush puppy | illuminati | illusion | illustrate | impunity | inch | Indian | Indian summer | Isolde | it ain't over till the fat lady sings | jamboree | jaywalker | jazz | jeans | Jehovah | Jim dandy | John Doe | judgment | juryrigged


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_k-m.html

    K - M
    Kendall | ketchup | kick the bucket | kill the messenger | Kilroy was here | knight | knowledge | lam | lazy Susan | leader | league | learning the ropes | lemon | leviathan | life of Reilly | light fingered | like | lime | loaf | love | Luddite | lunatic | macrobiotic | malarkey | man | marriage | marry | mascara | master | matter | May Day | mediation | meter | Mexican standoff | mile | miscellaneous | mocha | mongoloid | monkey wrench | moonstone | more than one way to skin a cat | moron | mother | Ms. | Mulligan | muse


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_n-p.html

    N - P
    narcissistic | Native American words in English | neck of the woods | neighborhood | Nelly | nerd | New York minute | nightmare | nincompoop | notions | obedience | obfuscate | obscenities | obsess | off the cuff | okey dokey | Olga | -orama | orange | ordeal | other | paddy wagon | palooka | pancake/hotcake | paradigm | pariah | pass the buck | passion | peel | performance | persecution | physical fitness | physiognomy | picnic | pine tags | pink slip | pinkie | pint | plaintiff | politically correct (pc) | posh | priority | proactive | prodigious | propriety | psi- | pulling your leg | pundit


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_q-s.html

    Q - S
    quart | quash | quest | rage | raining cats and dogs | Randall | rank and file | reality | receipt | recipe | red cent | religion | representation | research | ride | (in one's own) right | road | ruddy | rule of thumb | run the gauntlet | run the gamut | Rupert | sabotage | sacred | salary | salivation/salvation | saponification | scab | scholar | science fiction | scrooge | scuttlebutt | sea change | segue | semen | Semitic | sesquicentennial | shanks' mare/pony | shenanigans | sialic | silver | singlet | sirloin | six ways to Sunday | skirt | skosh | skullduggery | skunk | slang dictionaries | so long | solder | soldier | son | sophomore southpaw | sow wild oats | sphygmomanometer |spirit | squash | story/storey | straight from the horse's mouth | stumped | success | suck | sugar | sun | surf | surprise | Sussex, Essex, Wessex, Middlesex


    (E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/et_t-z.html

    T - Z
    team | teamwork | teller | they | tidbit | tidy | tiffin | toe the line | tom foolery | tomboy | traipse | transform | trial by fire | trinitrotoluene | trombone | tumbrel |turkey | uncle | understand | vessel | veterinarian | virus | vowels in English | war | whole nine yards | which | wife | [on a] wild goose chase | window | wisdom | witch | woman | won't | wonder | xylophone | Yahweh | yard | yuck | zero | zymoscope


    topica
    brainemail
    Word List
    Wort-Liste

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read
    John Babina hat hier vom 06.02.2000 bis 30.08.2003 folgende Wörter vorgestellt:

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=0
    aphetic | Curfew | nadir | specie | decal | logo | towhead | Cinema | canary | tantalize | starboard | amethyst | gaggle | sainfoin | panache | riparian | nascent | sidereal | sponson | nabob | moniker | halcyon | timbre | salient

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=14
    sainfoin | panache | riparian | nascent | sidereal | sponson | nabob | moniker | halcyon | timbre | salient | extant | ribald | mawkish | leprechaun | bucolic | plethora | eclectic | exculpate | pejorative | whelp | succinct | systemic | holistic | cachet

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=39
    japan | cabal | pidgin | laconic | cogent | ephemeral | ethereal | abjure | arcane | pandemic | diaspora | paschal | pugilist | fetish | Bolshevik | foment | quintessential | quisling | synergy | vignette | indicia | oxymoron | proffer | canon | cabal | japan

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=64
    frieze | shard | Aphetic | Applique | Jitney | Argot | Moraine | Mitosis | Milieu | Ostracize | Fen | Fugue | Addle | Cortege | Ret | Incipient | Macerate | Insipid | Sentient | Cognition | Polemic | Lyceum | Perverse | Whet

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=89
    Nettle | Bung | Ratline | Pique | Sagacious | Dexter | adroit | Solstice | Sirenian | Dogma | Ennui | Lethargy | Karst | Nether | Slovenly | Winsome | Winnow | Dearth | Abject | Ascetic | Echoic | Stria | molt

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=114
    Blithe | Copious | Trundle | Glyph | Gaunt | Talus | Ream | Innate | Impung | Stickle | Maudlin | Quandary | Stint | Naught | Mansard | Rubric | Lilt | leanup | Legume | Impute | Panacea | Pariah | leanup

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=139
    Diurnal | Fetter | Ruminant | Noxious | Coulee | Frappe | Serif | Twain | Glib | Canard | Pith | Panoply | Guile | Gnostic | Freshet | Chichi | Denier | Frank | Connate | Aphelion | Eikon Icon Ikon | Weir | Antiphon | Escutcheon | Gauffaw

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=164
    Gossamer | Musk | Thespian | Slake | Dolman | Pistil Pestle Pistole | Codex | Frenetic | Greisen | Paucity | Pedantic | Postern | Calash | Epithet | Tenon | Suttee | Pyre | Clerestory | Hominy | Juke | Carboy | Bema | Lambaste | Pillory

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=189
    Unrequited | Foment | Unction | Deign | Splay | Gnome | Florid | Tine | Payola | Chalone | Mattock | Mimesis | Tocsin | Epicure | A" Colophon | Picot | Chad | Escheat | Succor | Shrift | Trunnion | Tuber | Turbid | Sanative

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=214
    Palter | Libation | Lath | Wizen | Scion | - zyzzyva | - cirque | Nonce | Addle | Ricin | Dower | Ret | Therm | Indolent | Pawky | Natty | Mien | Yule | Noel | Ewer | Evert | Finis | Eve | Snood | Loggia

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=239
    Diadem | Matin | Tachyon | Shrift | Gneiss | Bacca | Tenter | Scull | - savate | Stalag | Conn | Moil | Acrostic | Scarp | Yore | Massif | Opus | Pique | Hawser | Spoof | Coda | Collet | "ingle" | Risible | Diopter

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=264
    Bathyal | Luff | Styptic | Coot | Exiguous | Skein | rapine | Gristle | Grizzle | Scrim | Cilice | Platen | Yaws | Didactic | Tondo | Stentorian | Chub | Sagacious | Bijou | Penchant | Redolent | The fluents | Knurl | Sangar

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=289
    Nihilism | Chive | Emigre | Pica | Eutectic | Rancor | Boodle | Diatonic | Sluice | Flume | America! | Geode | Flux | Pyre | Putative | Oblate | Torpor | Symbiont | Amphora | Sone | Piton | Clochard | Moribund

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=314
    Argot | Fasces | Tithe | Fetid | Evince | Peal | Inchoate | Parse | Canto | Peccant | Fete | Perorate | Pinion | natty | Angst | Samizdat | Raptor | Cay | Vocoder | Pluvial | Acrostic | Redux | Thrall | Azimuth

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=339
    Imbue | Supine | Crasis | pintle | Empiric | Sinecure | Kern | Hematoma | Samovar | Simian | Navvy | Segue | Librate | Glyptic | Wellaway | Condole | Cony | Demarche | Calumny | Haboob | Swain | Baleen | Davit | Rille

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=364
    Prosaic | Penchant | Assignat | Arras | Trill | Tor | Ataxia | Nexus | Statute | Acumen | Gnomon | Bodega | Adroit | Gibbous | Pied | Caisson | Ides | Cabala | Emulous | Farfel | Cincture | Saprobe | Boreal

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=389
    Sardonic | Epithet | Trireme | Expiate | Nostrum | Impute | Erudite | Ocher | Behold | Polemic | Peonage | Facile | "New" words | Blithe | Soffit | Endemic | Ketch | Encomium | Lading | Obdurate | Acerbic | Penury | Augur | Fovea | Alacrity

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=414
    Prosaic | Gravid | Verity | Affusion | Peltry | Codicil | Cupidity | Avarice | Baluster | Couture | Cenobite | Fiat | Serif | Kestrel | Maquette | Abrogate | Spume | Crass | Nosegay | Parquet | Purvey | Flaccid | Detritus | Oblate | Palliate

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=439
    Redound | Epitome | Mortise | Lucre | Paroxysm | Epiphyte | Rive | Minikin | Roux | Mewl | Skeane Skein | Lotic | Fetid | Tephra | Teosinte | Loofah | Feign Feint | Gossamer | Loge | Dolor | Cloture | Nisei | Memorial

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=464
    Gnomon | Crofter | Cruet | Tripe | Platen | Bailie | Ternate | Marimba | Olio | Pandit Pundit | Skittle | Snell | cede | Neap | Caprice | Arroyo | Paean | Cwm | Weft | Holt | Boreal | For the birds! | Curio | Liquate | Juke

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=489
    Anathema | Rabbet | Detritus | Oleo | Exurb | Curtesy | Ocher | timorous | Ingle | Hubris | Palliate | Priory | Lithe | Kurtosis | Lumper | Quixotic | Sedulous | Petrify | Feck | | Errata | supine | Flaccid

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=514
    Addle | Sibilant | Cudgel | Troika | Pileated | Dulcimer | Folderol | Liquate | Culpa | Kris | Wry | Vertigo | Bally | Laic | Slattern | Facile | Pandect | Paludal | Auberge | Fusel | Denier | Spatial | Tyro | Pavan | Reeve

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=539
    Banal | Kibosh | Metonymy | Samovar | Esthete | Canton | Coxswain | Maw | Apnea | Visceral | Rale | Taxon | Solstice | Yule | Nave | stogy | Finis | Auld lang syne! | Abatis | Eschew | Tropism | Vizard | Vizier | Banderol

    (E?)(L?) http://lists.topica.com/lists/brainemail_word/read?sort=d&start=564
    Heinous | Trivet | Eolith | Whey | Sallow | Couture | Haute | Ort | Cinchona | Quietus | Ligate | Winnow | Chutzpah | Dichroic | shrove | Macadam | Dahlia | Snell | Claque | SPRUE | Roux | Sally | Elan | Parietal

    U

    Uni Princeton
    rose

    (E?)(L?) http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rose

    Noun Verb


    Erstellt: 2012-12

    V

    voanews.com
    Voice of America
    SpecialEnglish Word Book

    (E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/


    (E?)(L?) http://docs.voanews.eu/en-US-LEARN/2014/02/15/7f8de955-596b-437c-ba40-a68ed754c348.pdf

    A list of words used in Special English programs on radio, television and the Internet EDITION

    Table of Contents

    Foreword

    The Voice of America has been broadcasting programs in Special English since 1959. Special English is VOA’s method of communicating with English learners around the world in a way that is easy to understand. The vocabulary is limited to about 1,500 words. The sentences are short. The speed is slower than normal. Special English programs are broadcast on the Voice of America, on radio stations around the world, on satellite television and on the Internet. These programs present the latest world news as well as information about science, medicine, education, economics, American history and life in the United States.

    This book explains the meaning of the words used in our broadcasts and on our Web site. The first edition was published in 1962. The list of words has changed since then, as the language itself has changed. We thank all those people at VOA who started the process and who helped make this edition possible.

    You can download transcripts and audio files of our programs at our Web site, www.VOASpecialEnglish.com. You can also get details of where to find our programs on radio and television.

    ...

    Presidents of the United States


    Erstellt: 2014-03

    voanews.com
    Voice of America
    Words and Their Stories

    (E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/programindex.html
    (E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/archive/learningenglish-programs-radio-words-stories/latest/978/987.html

    Words and Their Stories each week explains idioms and expressions that many learners of American English find difficult to understand.

    Transcripts of radio broadcast


    Erstellt: 2014-05

    vocabula
    The Best Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.vocabula.com/

    Dear Friend of the English Language,
    Along with the evolution of language - the thousands of neologisms that new technologies and new thinking have brought about, for instance - there has been a concurrent, if perhaps less recognizable, devolution of language. The English language has become more precise for some users of it while becoming more plodding for others. Not a small part of this new cumbrousness is due to the loss of distinctions between words, the misuse of words, and other abuses of language.
    ...
    The Vocabula Review strives to combat the degradation of our language.

    Equally important, we celebrate its opulence and its elegance. The English language is wonderfully expressive and infinitely flexible. There are many thousands of words and many hundreds of ways in which to use them. The Vocabula Review seeks to promote the richness of our language.

    In sum, The Vocabula Review battles nonstandard, careless English and embraces clear, expressive English. We hope we can encourage our readers to do as much.
    ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.vocabula.com/VRbestwords.htm
    The Best Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.vocabula.com/VRworstwords.htm
    The Worst Words

    W

    WarrenAllen
    Curious Words Page

    (E?)(L?) http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/WarrenAllen/words.htm
    Strange words and/or words with good stories behind them.

    meatspace | bistro | euonym | trepanation | lumpen | warren | Generation X | tchotchke / tchatchke / tsatske | skunk works | pieces of eight / bits | roman à clef | hipster | pentimenti | Bell, book and candle | frisson | defenestration | gallimaufry | le dernier cri | epicene | dudgeon | Anaheim | iridescence | carking | kipple | chickenhead | katzenjammer | boogie | juke | mojo | funky

    westegg (wes)
    Etymologically Speaking (wes)

    (E1)(L1) http://www.westegg.com/etymology/

    What follows is list of some curious word origins. Some of these are English, but some are French and German words from which we get some English words.
    Newsletter:
    Also, I run a mailing list called RT where I send out some new, interesting etymologies that I discover every month (and other, non-philological items as well).
    For some of my favorites, see Companion, Kopf, Porcelain.
    ...


    Am 12.06.2004 waren auf der Seite folgende Begriffe mit einer kleinen Wörtgeschichte zu finden:

    Abacus | Allegory | Apple (Eng.)/ Pomme (Fr.) / Manzana (Sp.) | Apricot | Addict | Alarm | Alcohol | Algebra | Appendix | Assassin | Asthma | Ballot | Bead | Beserk | Biscuit | Boat | Boudoir | Broke (In the sense of having no money) | Bucolic | Bulimia | Butcher; Boucher (French); Beccaio (old Italian) | Cab (as in, Taxicab) | Cantelope | Cantar (Spanish) To Sing | Carnival | Catharsis | Candidate | Casarse (Spanish, to marry) | Cell | Cerveza (Spanish) Beer | Chapel | | Charlatan | Cheers | Chocolate | Cider | Claim | Coffee and Croissant | Conejo (Spanish) Rabbit | Coward | Companion; Compañero (Spanish); Copain (French) Companion | Cretin | Cup | Currant | Curfew | Daisy | Debonair | Deer | Demon (German and English) | Derive | Deutsch (German for German) | Dexterity | Dibbs | Dollar | Elite | Escape | Essay | Exchequer | Faro (Spanish) Lighthouse | Fegato (Italian) Liver | Feo (Spanish) Ugly | Forest | Fowl | Freedom | | Gehen (German) To go | Genuine | | Gift | Gin; Ginebra (Spanish); Genievre (French) | Gorilla | Gymnasium | Hablar (Spanish) To Speak | Hazard | Heresy | Hierarchy | Host, Hospital, Hostel, Hospice, Hospitable, Hospitality | Humor | Husband | Idea, Ideal, Idol | Kampf (German) Struggle | Kike -- a vulgar, offensive word for a Jew | Knave | Knight | Kopf (German) Head | Lemon (Eng.); Limón (Sp.); Citron (Fr.); Zitrone (Germ.); Cytryna (Pol.); Citrom (Hung.) | Lettuce; and Leche (Spanish) Milk | Liberty | Library | Liebe (German) Love | Light; and Licht (German) Light | Lindo (Spanish) Beautiful | Lobster | Lord | Lucifer | Lukewarm | Madera (Spanish) Wood | Malaria | Mayonnaise | Marcher (French) To Walk | Mark (German) The German unit of currency (pre-Euro) | Mistress | Money | Mound; and Monde (French), Mundo (Spanish) World | Muscle | Museum, Mosaic | Nacht (German) Night | Nauseau, Navigate | Nemesis | Noon | Nostril | Occasion | Office | Ojalá (Spanish) "I hope [that...]" | Old; and Alt (German) Old | Omlette | Opportunity | Orange (Eng.); Orange (Fr.); Naranja (Sp.); Arancia (It.) | Ostracize | Pagan | Pavilion | Pedigree | Peach | Pecuniary | Pearl | Pedestrian | Planet | Porcelain (French) Porcelaine | Prom | Propina (Spanish; Tip) | Pseudo- | Queen | Quintessential | Regret | Reise (German) Travel | Rich | Right | Robot | Rodent | Romance | Rum | Saffron | Sanction | Salary; Salt | Schlaf (German) Sleep | Scapegoat | Scream | Scruples | Search; Circus | Senator | Silly | Sinister | Sherry; and Jerez (Spanish) | Slave | Sleazy | Soup; Soupe (French); Sopa (Spanish); Zuppa (Italian) | Starve | Spill | Stool | Strawberry (Eng.); Fraise (Fr.); Fresa (Sp.)/ Fragola (It.); Erdbeer (Germ.--"earth berry"); Eper (Hung.) | Suede | | Sweet | Sycophant | Tag (German) Day | Tarjeta (Spanish) Card | Tête (French) Head | Thermostat | Third Degree | Thesis | Threshold | Tide and Time | Tomato (Eng.); Tomate (Sp.); Pomodoro (It.) | Trabajar (Spanish); Travailler (French); Trabalhar (Portugues) Work | Travel | Trivia | Tsar or Czar | Tyranny | Umpire | Usted (Spanish) You (formal) | Viande (French) Meat; and Vivir (Spanish) To Live | Victim | Villain | Vinegar | Walk | Wedding | Weird | Welt (German) World | Werewolf (German and English) | Window | Wine | Wit | Witness | Woman | Warm; Worm; and Wurst | Worm | Zeit (German) Time

    wolframalpha
    Words & Linguistics

    (E?)(L1) http://www.wolframalpha.com/examples/WordsAndLinguistics.html

    Word Properties Word Puzzles


    Erstellt: 2011-10

    wordfocus.com
    Focusing on Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordfocus.com/

    Our language is the primary tool we use to express our thoughts, ideas and opinions.

    Words are the building blocks of our communication. The more clearly we communicate, the easier it is to accomplish our goals. Having a formal education is not necessary to write well. In fact, most people improve their writing skills through reading and practice. It is our hope that this website will be a friendly guide to help you improve your wordsmithing skills.




    Erstellt: 2014-02

    wordle
    word clouds

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordle.net/

    Wordle is a toy for generating "word clouds" from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text. You can tweak your clouds with different fonts, layouts, and color schemes. The images you create with Wordle are yours to use however you like. You can print them out, or save them to the Wordle gallery to share with your friends.




    word-detective (wde)
    The Word Detective
    by Evan Morris
    Word List
    Wort-Liste

    Word Detective, a newspaper column by Evan Morris answering people's questions about words and language.
    The Word Detective on the Web is the online version of The Word Detective, a newspaper column answering readers' questions about words and language.

    (E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/
    (E?)(L?) http://www.word-detective.com/0807A.html
    Aus Krankheitsgründen mußte der Autor seine wortdetektivische Arbeit mit "Issue of August 1, 2007" einstellen.

    (E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/bibliography.html

    The Word Detective - An indexed archive (by word and date) of the monthly newspaper column on "word and phrase origins" by Evan Morris, son of William Morris, original author of the print column when it was known as "Words, Wit and Wisdom" (since 1953), and the useful reference book, The Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins. Several hundred words and phrases included.


    (E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/backidx.html
    This Index contains more than 1,300 columns posted since this site went online in 1995. For the past TEN YEARS, this index has remained a FREE resource for the net community and has been used by nearly two million readers.


    Hundreds of words and phrases indexed in alphabetical order are lurking in our archive. (01.09.2005)


    Erstellt: 2010-09

    wordnik
    Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/
    (E?)(L?) http://blog.wordnik.com/

    Wordnik Blog, from the online dictionary that aims to collect all the words in English and everything about them.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/words/Etymology
    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/zeitgeist

    Wordnik is billions of words, 423 million example sentences, 4.7 million unique words, and over 185,000 comments, 95,000 tags, 74,000 pronunciations, 24,518 favorites and 728,464 words in 23,583 lists created by 39,849 Wordniks.


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/about

    What is Wordnik?

    Wordnik is a place for all the words, and everything known about them.
    Our goal is to show you as much information as possible, as fast as we can find it, for every word in English, and to give you a place where you can make your own opinions about words known.

    Traditional dictionaries make you wait until they've found what they consider to be "enough" information about a word before they will show it to you. Wordnik knows you don't want to wait—if you're interested in a word, we're interested too!

    By "information," we don't just mean traditional definitions (although we have plenty of those)! This information could be: ...


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/word-of-the-day




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/word-of-the-day

    The Archive


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/a




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/b




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/c




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/d




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/e




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/f




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/g




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/h




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/i




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/j




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/k




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/l




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/m




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/n




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/o




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/p




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/q




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/r




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/s




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/t




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/u




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/v




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/w




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/x




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/y




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordnik.com/letters/z




    Erstellt: 2010-03

    wordorigins (wor)
    Origins of Words and Phrases
    by David Wilton
    Word & Phrase Origins
    A Way With Words
    Etymology of common words and phrases
    History of the English language
    Word List
    Wort-Liste

    (E1)(L1) http://www.wordorigins.org/
    16.03.2007:


    Wordorigins.org is devoted to the origins of words and phrases, or as a linguist would put it, to etymology. Etymology is the study of word origins. (It is not the study of insects; that is entomology.) Where words come from is a fascinating subject, full of folklore and historical lessons. Often, popular tales of a word’s origin arise. Sometimes these are true; more often they are not. While it can be disappointing when a neat little tale turns out to be untrue, almost invariably the true origin is just as interesting.


    A Way With Words is our weekly electronic newsletter. It's free. A Way With Words addresses the topics of language and linguistics for the lay person. It's not just about word and phrase origins, but slang, grammar, writing style, puns, book reviews, names, and anything to do with words and language.

    Last Updated 10 June 2005

    This is the list, some 400 words and phrase origins. The words and phrases are selected because their origins are inherently interesting or because some bit of folklore, sometimes true and sometimes false, is associated with the origin. The etymologies of common words with straightforward explanations can be found in any good dictionary and I do not attempt to reproduce them here. Many, if not most, of the words have been added as a result of questions or suggestions from readers of the site.

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/big_list/

    The Big List (16.03.2007)
    This is the list, some 400 word and phrase origins. The words and phrases are selected because their origins are inherently interesting or because some bit of folklore, sometimes true and sometimes false, is associated with the origin. The etymologies of common words with straightforward explanations can be found in any good dictionary and I do not attempt to reproduce them here. Many, if not most, of the words have been added as a result of questions or suggestions from readers of the site.

    The Big List (01.09.2005)




    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/blog/

    Archives
    March 2007 | February 2007 | January 2007 | December 2006 | November 2006 | October 2006 | September 2006 | August 2006 | July 2006 | June 2006 | May 2006 | April 2006 | March 2006 | February 2006 | January 2006 | December 2005 | November 2005 | October 2005 | September 2005 | August 2005 | July 2005 | June 2005 | May 2005 | April 2005 | March 2005 | February 2001 | January 2001


    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/resources/
    (Auf der Seite sind alle Empfehlungen verlinkt.)


    Etymological Sources & Links

    General Dictionaries
    These are general, all-purpose dictionaries that contain excellent etymological information. Specialty Dictionaries
    These are dictionaries specializing in particular aspects of the English language and etymology. Out-of-Date Sources
    These sources are dated and don't reflect current scholarship, but they can often provide useful or historical insight into the development of the English language. General Language References
    These works do not specialize in etymology, although they often contain useful etymological information. Historical Linguistic Sources
    These are sources, other than dictionaries, that address etymology, historical linguistics, and the history of the English language. Oft-Used Sources
    These are the sources habitually consulted in the creation of the words on "The Big List." The sources in this category are also listed in the other resources categories, as appropriate. Online Databases
    These are links to online databases of literature, journalism, and other writing; useful for etymological research Grammar & Style Manuals
    Books and sources on style and usage. Popular Press Language Books
    These are intended for a mass audience and are generally not useful for research. The quality of the scholarship is variable: excellent in some cases; less than admirable in others. Language Web Sites & Blogs
    The following are links to web-based general language sources and blogs about language. Online sources that fall into other categories, such as online dictionaries, are listed in those categories. Powered by ExpressionEngine
    Copyright 1997-2007, by David Wilton


    words-l
    Words-L mailing list

    (E?)(L?) http://www.words-l.net/
    (E?)(L?) http://www.words-l.org/
    Welcome to http://www.words-l.net/, the alternate Words-L Web site. This is a temporary site supporting the electronic mailing list Words-L. This site will self-destruct upon completion of the rehabilitation of the permanent Words-L Web site at http://www.words-l.org/. Inasmuch as this is an interim site, one should not expect much in the way of polish, style, completeness, or timeliness.

    The Words-L mailing list was created in 1989 to facilitate network discussions related to the English language. Famed on the Internet as a bog of self-reference, it nevertheless still attempts to serve its original purpose, but day-to-day discussions range over many topics and embrace many points of view.

    wordweb

    (E?)(L?) http://www.wordweb.co.uk/free
    is a an excellent free utility that displays definitions, synonyms, antonyms, for any word that you highlight when typing.

    wordwithyou
    A Word with You
    Word List
    Wort-Liste

    (E1)(L1) http://www.wordwithyou.com/
    Bei meinem Versuch am 03.09.2005 war diese Site nicht erreichbar. Ich kann nur hoffen, dass sie lediglich temporär nicht verfügbar ist.

    (E?)(L?) http://alt-usage-english.org/wossnew.shtml
    Auf dieser Seite ist zu erfahren, dass "Word with You" leider eingestellt wurde. - Schade.


    30 Jun 2005
    Lawrence Paros and Dave Middleton's A Word With You site (www.wordwithyou.com) no longer exists.


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    Bücher zur Kategorie:

    Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
    US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
    Wörterbuch, Diccionario, Dictionnaire, Vocabolario, Dictionary

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    ahdictionary
    American Heritage Dictionary
    100 Words Series

    (E?)(L?) http://ahdictionary.com/word/hundredwords.html




    Erstellt: 2012-07

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    Bertram, Anne
    In Other Words
    Making Better Word Choices in American English

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0844209031/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0844209031/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0844209031/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0844209031/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0844209031/etymologpor09-20
    Artful Wordsmith Series
    Taschenbuch: 480 Seiten
    Verlag: Ntc Pub Group (September 1996)
    Sprache: Englisch


    Synopsis
    This is a 5,000-word thesaurus of everyday American English logically organised for users of all levels. Each word comes with a complete definition and example sentences to illustrate meaning.


    C

    Crystal, David
    Words, Words, Words
    Quotations about Language and Languages

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198614446/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198614446/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198614446/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198614446/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0198614446/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Gebundene Ausgabe - 192 Seiten - Oxford University Press
    Erscheinungsdatum: 19. Januar 2006
    ISBN: 0198614446


    Synopsis
    "Words, Words, Words" is all about the wonder of words. Drawing on a lifetime's experience, David Crystal explores language in all its rich varieties through words: the very building blocks of our communication. Language has no life of its own: it only exists in the mouths and ears, hands, eyes and brains of its users. As we are guided expertly and passionately through the mysteries and delights of word origins, histories, spellings, regional and social variations, taboo words, jargon, and wordplay, the contribution we all play in shaping the linguistic world around us becomes evident. "Words, Words, Words" is a celebration of what we say and how we say it. It invites us to engage linguistically with who we are: to understand what words tell us about where we come from and what we do. And as they continually shape our lives, it suggests ways that we can look at words anew and get involved with collecting and coining words ourselves.


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    Forsyth, Mark (Author)
    The Etymologicon
    A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language

    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.it/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologporta-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0425260798/etymologpor09-20
    Paperback: 304 pages
    Publisher: Berkley Trade; Reprint edition (October 2, 2012)
    Language: English


    Über den Autor

    Mark Forsyth is a writer, journalist, proofreader, ghostwriter, and pedant. He was given a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary as a christening present and has never looked back. He is the creator of The Inky Fool, a blog about words, phrases, grammar, rhetoric, and prose.


    Erstellt: 2013-09

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    Kleinedler, Steve
    100 Words Every High School Graduate Should Know

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618374124/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618374124/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618374124/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618374124/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0618374124/etymologpor09-20
    von Steve Kleinedler (Vorwort)
    Sprache: Englisch
    Taschenbuch - 96 Seiten - Houghton Mifflin Company
    Erscheinungsdatum: Mai 2003
    ISBN: 0618374124

    (E?)(L?) http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/booksellers/press_release/100words/

    The following is the entire list of 100 words:
    abjure | abrogate | abstemious | acumen | antebellum | auspicious | belie | bellicose | bowdlerize | chicanery | chromosome | churlish | circumlocution | circumnavigate | deciduous | deleterious | diffident | enervate | enfranchise | epiphany | equinox | euro | evanescent | expurgate | facetious | fatuous | feckless | fiduciary | filibuster | gamete | gauche | gerrymander | hegemony | hemoglobin | homogeneous | hubris | hypotenuse | impeach | incognito | incontrovertible | inculcate | infrastructure | interpolate | irony | jejune | kinetic | kowtow | laissez faire | lexicon | loquacious | lugubrious | metamorphosis | mitosis | moiety | nihilism | nomenclature | nonsectarian | notarize | obsequious | oligarchy | omnipotent | orthography | oxidize | parabola | paradigm | parameter | pecuniary | photosynthesis | plagiarize | plasma | polymer | precipitous | quasar | quotidian | recapitulate | reciprocal | reparation | respiration | sanguine | soliloquy | subjugate | suffragist | supercilious | tautology | taxonomy | tectonic | tempestuous | thermodynamics | totalitarian | unctuous | usurp | vacuous | vehement | vortex | winnow | wrought | xenophobe | yeoman | ziggurat


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    Langenscheidt - Uwb
    Langenscheidt - Universal-Wörterbuch
    Byrd, Erick P.
    Amerikanisches Englisch

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologpor09-20
    Gebundene Ausgabe: 528 Seiten
    Verlag: Langenscheidt, Mchn.; Auflage: Neuaufl. (Dezember 1998)
    Sprache: Deutsch


    Kurzbeschreibung
    * Rund 30.000 Stichwörter und Wendungen
    * alle Haupteinträge in Blau
    * sehr praktisch für alle USA-Reisenden: Bei Unterschieden zwischen dem britischen und amerikanischen Englisch ist nur der amerikanische Ausdruck angegeben, z.B. Wohnmobil/RV (recreational vehicle), Bagatellunfall/fender-bender, Spiegelei/fried egg sunny-side up, Rechnung (im Lokal)/check


    LaRocque, Paula
    On Words
    Insight Into How Our Words Work - and Don't

    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1933338202/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1933338202/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1933338202/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1933338202/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L1) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1933338202/etymologpor09-20
    Gebundene Ausgabe: 224 Seiten
    Verlag: Marion St Pr Inc (30. Oktober 2007)
    Sprache: Englisch

    (E?)(L?) http://www.voanews.com/specialenglish/archive/2007-08/2007-08-21-voa3.cfm
    Wise Writing Instead of '-Wise' Writing: Looking for Beauty in Words - Advice from longtime writing coach Paula LaRocque, author of the new book "On Words: Insight Into How Our Words Work -- and Don't"

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    Morris, Evan
    The Word Detective
    A hardback collection of The Word Detective columns

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565122399/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565122399/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565122399/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565122399/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1565122399/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Gebundene Ausgabe - 228 Seiten - Workman Publishing
    Erscheinungsdatum: 7. Juni 2001
    Auflage: 1st
    ISBN: 1565122399


    "Here's a delightful romp through the English language that will remind word buffs of Bill Bryson's The Mother Tongue and William Safire's collections of his On Language columns. ... Oh boy, is it fun! ... Morris not only solves his word mysteries but displays his laugh-out-loud sense of humor at full throttle. (Fans of humorist Dave Barry's "Mr. Language Person" will be on very familiar ground here, except that Morris isn't making anything up.) Morris does what few writers on language can manage: he informs and entertains at the same time." -- Booklist


    (E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/


    Morris, Evan
    The Word Detective
    Solving the Mysteries Behind Those Pesky Words and Phrases

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0452282640/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0452282640/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0452282640/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0452282640/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0452282640/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Taschenbuch - 256 Seiten - Plume Books
    Erscheinungsdatum: 1. Oktober 2001
    Auflage: Reissue
    ISBN: 0452282640


    Amazon.com
    Who needs Sherlock Holmes when you've got a word detective? Evan Morris, whose Web site and syndicated column solve more mysteries than even Scotland Yard could manage, has assembled a book of entertaining questions and answers that will amuse, educate, and resolve arguments all at once. From "amok" to "zarf", the definitions and origins of words are explained with a delightful combination of wit and research that will leave curious readers delighted.

    Each entry begins with the original question asked of Morris, complete with the writer's misspellings and misinformation, and a few of these may result in cringes from the serious wordsmiths out there. One query incorrectly remembers the metaphor "hair of the dog that bit you" as "Something like bite the dog's tail or the dog that bit you last night," and Morris makes plenty of entertaining suggestions regarding these incorrect versions before finally explaining that the phrase have been around since about 1546, and specifically refers to a hangover remedy. The author is in especially fine form while explaining the phrase "passing the bar"--who knew that it dates back to a requirement that lawyers wrestle a grizzly "bar" before entering into practice? The correct explanation follows Morris's whimsical tale, but 16th-century England just doesn't have quite the same entertainment value. Several special sections cover larger topics, such as food- and animal-based phrases (easy as pie, dog days), onomatopoeia, euphemisms, diner slang, and Yiddish expressions. While not as detailed as the alphabetical entries, words like "wreck", "mensch," and "throb" are given satisfying, if short, descriptions.
    Jill Lightner

    Synopsis
    This work is a collection of 150 of Evan Morris's language columns, which have appeared in newspapers throughout America and on his popular Web site.


    (E1)(L1) http://www.word-detective.com/


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    Novak, Alex
    Tawdry Knickers
    And Other Unfortunate Ways to Be Remembered

    (E?)(L?) http://www.tawdryknickers.com/2008/09/who-is-mesmerizing-pompadour.html

    April 01, 2010
    About the Book and Author

    Tawdry Knickers and Other Unfortunate Ways to be Remembered: A Saucy and Spirited History of Ninety Notorious Namesakes is written by Alex Novak, published by Penguin/Perigee, and available from all of your favorite on-line booksellers.

    Here is what others are saying about Tawdry Knickers:

    "This is an absolute delight and I'm vexed that I didn't think of the idea, though I doubt I'd have written it up with the wit and verve that Alex has. It's a pleasure to read from start to finish and even the words I knew the origins of are explained with fresh vision and amusing anecdotes. Among old friends like Rachman, Masoch, and Mae West there are the unexpected shockers of people who gave their names to nicotine, knickers, and Listerine. Pleasingly light in tone and engagingly written, this is a very lovely and enjoyable thing."
    —Chris Roberts, author of Heavy Words Lightly Thrown
    ...
    Then of course, there's the title itself, a combination of two words found herein — "tawdry" (from "St. Audrey") and "knickers" (after "Harmen Knickerbocker"), ...
    ...


    Erstellt: 2014-01

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    Paros, Lawrence
    Bawdy Language
    Everything You Always Wanted To Do But Were Afraid To Say

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1931275505/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/1931275505/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/1931275505/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1931275505/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1931275505/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Gebundene Ausgabe - 264 Seiten - Chenault and Gray
    Erscheinungsdatum: 15. August 2005

    Paperback: 264 pages
    Publisher: Kvetch Press (June 2003)
    Language: English


    Synopsis
    When you come right down to it, sex is easier done than said; so too with matters of the toilette. Limited to a few choice four-letter slang words? Know little of the word origins of curse words? Stumble as to their proper usage? Lack elegant substitutes for dirty sex talk? Here at last are the dirty words you need - words and more words: slang words, rich and colourful; euphemisms, flowery, arcane, and remote; quaint sexual terms rescued from English past. All are suggestive of the romanticism, cynicism, violence, and humour with which the actors, the parts, and the act itself have been viewed through the centuries. Travelling where few etymologists have gone before, Lawrence Paros now makes it possible to master the sexual lexicons. Combining a study of street-talk, with a survey of history, poetry, drama, and the great works of Western literature, "Bawdy Language" delves both into the word origins of curse words and phrases and the wide variety of synonyms for them. Here at last is the book that will show you how to talk dirty, yet command respect. No longer must your prurient thoughts remain inelegantly expressed. Add erudition and class to your gutter talk by mastering the argot. Remember, obscenity by itself is the last refuge of the vulgarian and the crutch of the inarticulate.


    (E?)(L?) http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/books/135882_bawdyparos.html
    ... lettered ones and beyond. It is, quite possibly, the most accessible, colorful etymology book currently in publication. And chances are ...

    (E?)(L?) http://www.bawdylanguage.com/

    Bawdy Language includes:


    Polyglott Sprachführer
    Amerikanisches Englisch

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/3493611897/etymologpor09-20
    Broschiert: 96 Seiten
    Verlag: Langenscheidt Fachv., M.


    Klappentext
    Ihre Kunden wollen sich im Urlaub unterhalten. Mit den Polyglott-Sprachführern ist die Verständigung auf Reisen einfach leicht. Im Herbst erscheinen weitere sieben neue Titel. Alle Sprachführer sind vierfarbig und enthalten ca. 25 Fotos. Sie überzeugen durch ihre übersichtliche Gestaltung und sind deshalb auch besonders benutzerfreundlich.


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    Soukhanov, Anne H.
    Word Watch
    The Stories Behind the Words of Our Lives

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0805035648/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0805035648/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0805035648/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0805035648/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0805035648/etymologpor09-20
    Gebundene Ausgabe
    Verlag: Henry Holt & Co (Juni 1995)
    Sprache: Englisch


    From Booklist
    Anne Soukhanov, lexicographer and executive editor of The American Heritage Dictionary (3rd ed.), has based this book about new words invading the vernacular on her monthly column "Word Watch" in the Atlantic Monthly. The book's meticulously organized 13 chapters are filled with food talk, sports speak, warrior words, businessese, and advertising lingo. Each chapter begins with a list of words and phrases that are then sprinkled in a fast-paced overview; later, the terms are defined individually with quoted passages demonstrating their initial use. Thus the reader can learn of softgel, address hygiene (approved by the U.S. Postal Service), grassy knollism, Paula Jones disease, and trawler in context and by definition and often who coined them. For example, populuxe was the idea of Thomas Hine, critic at the Philadelphia Inquirer, who combined popular, popularity, luxury, and a fancy final e to portray the feel of the mid-1950s to mid-1960s when chrome, far-reaching tail fins, and split-level houses typified the lifestyle of postwar posterity. The way the words, anecdotes, and definitions are laid out, this book was built for browsing.
    Jennifer Henderson


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    Wallraff, Barbara
    Word Court
    Wherein Verbal Virtue is Rewarded, Crimes Against the Language Are Punished, and Poetic Justice is Done

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156011182/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156011182/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156011182/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156011182/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156011182/etymologpor09-20
    von Barbara Wallraff, Francine Prose (Einleitung)
    Sprache: Englisch
    Taschenbuch - 384 Seiten - Harvest/HBJ Book
    Erscheinungsdatum: August 2001
    Auflage: Reprint
    ISBN: 0156011182


    Do you find the errors on a menu before the waiter has a chance to recite the specials? Is "Your call will be answered in the order in which it was received" as grating to you as fingernails on a blackboard? Would you cringe if an advertisement for your child's school promised a "low teacher-to-student ratio"? If so, Barbara Wallraff's Word Court is a book without which you cannot live. For seasoned wordsmiths, books about language can entertain; on occasion they may also enlighten. But rare is the book such as this that can teach an old pro so many new tricks, and in such a delightful manner. If you are a reader of Wallraff's "Word Court" column for The Atlantic Monthly, you will have seen much of what is included here before. If not, caveat reader: though there is an index, this book is arranged in such a way that one may well find oneself reading the proverbial "one more page" long into the night.


    Wallraff, Barbara
    Word Fugitives: In Pursuit of Wanted Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060832738/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060832738/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060832738/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060832738/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0060832738/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Gebundene Ausgabe - 192 Seiten - HarperCollins Publishers
    Erscheinungsdatum: März 2006
    ISBN: 0060832738


    Synopsis
    Based on the popular column in Atlantic Monthly, a humorous celebration of the English language looks at a series of recreational word coinages - none of which have been officially accepted into the language - ranging from "swervousness," the fear of running over squirrels, to "skivvy-dipping," going through the dirty clothes hamper to find something.


    West, Paul
    The Secret Lives of Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0151004668/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0151004668/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0151004668/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0151004668/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0151004668/etymologpor09-20
    von Paul West, Jane Isay (Herausgeber)
    Sprache: Englisch
    Gebundene Ausgabe - 304 Seiten - Thomson Learning
    Auflage: 1st
    ISBN: 0151004668


    Paul West delights in the vicissitudes of language, and his enthusiasm is exquisitely catching. West particularly loves a good etymology (and who, deep down, doesn't?) and he's dedicated this most recent of his 30-odd books to 500 or so of his favourite words and phrases, and the stories that go with them.


    West, Paul
    The Secret Lives of Words

    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156014092/etymologporta-20
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.de/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156014092/etymologety0f-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.fr/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156014092/etymologetymo-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156014092/etymologety0d-21
    (E?)(L?) http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0156014092/etymologpor09-20
    Sprache: Englisch
    Taschenbuch - 304 Seiten - Harvest/HBJ Book
    Erscheinungsdatum: Juli 2001
    Auflage: Reprint


    Paul West delights in the vicissitudes of language, and his enthusiasm is exquisitely catching. West particularly loves a good etymology (and who, deep down, doesn't?) and he's dedicated this most recent of his 30-odd books to 500 or so of his favourite words and phrases, and the stories that go with them.


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