Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Wortart, Clase de Palabra, Catégorie grammaticale, Parte del Discorso, Part of Speech
Interjektion, Interjección, Interjection, Interiezione, Interjection

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dailywritingtips.com
100 Mostly Small But Expressive Interjections
By Mark Nichol

(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/100-mostly-small-but-expressive-interjections/

They often seem disreputable, like sullen idlers loitering in a public thoroughfare, but they actually do a lot of hard work and are usually persnickety about the tasks to which they are put. They are interjections — one class of them, anyway: those lacking etymological origins but packed with meaning.

But how do you know how to distinguish similar ones — or spell them, for that matter? Here’s an incomplete inventory of interjections (not including variations of actual words such as yeah for yes or onomatopoeic echoes of externally produced sounds like boom):


(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/3-problems-of-nonparallel-interjections-2/

3 Problems of Nonparallel Interjections
By Mark Nichol
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Erstellt: 2014-12

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Geronimo (W3)

Geronimo (* 1823 / 1829 (?); † 17. Februar 1909) war der Kriegshäuptling einer Gruppe der Bedonkohe-Inde (Apachen).

"Geronimo" ist die mexikanische Form seines richtigen Namens "Gokhlayeh" ("Einer, der gähnt"). Dieser Name wurde von seinem Vater gewählt, da er als kleines Kind immer sehr müde war und oft gähnte.

Der Chiricahua Apachenführer "Geronimo" starb am 17. Februar im Jahr 1909 (geb. 1829). Der Krieger führte die Verteidigung seines Volkes gegen die US-Behörden an. Nach seiner Gefangennahme lebte er noch 20 Jahre ohne jedoch seine Heimat Arizona wieder zu sehen. Auch wenn er zu den Verlierern der amerikanischen Geschichte zählt, bleibt sein Name doch als Interjektion in Erinnerung. Im Jahr 1940, bereitete die US Armee ein Gefecht der Fallschirmspringer vor (paratrooper school of the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina). Am Abend vor dem Massenabsprung schauten einige der Fallschirmspringer den Film "Geronimo". Alle waren angespannt und einer der Teilnehmer, namens Aubrey Eberhart, kündigte an, beim Absprung am nächsten Tag "Geronimo!" zu schreien, um seine gute Verfassung unter Beweis zu stellen. Eventuell nahm er damit Bezug auf eine Filmszene in der Geronimo mit einem gewagten Sprung die Flucht vor der US Cavalry gelang. Aus irgendeinem Grund fand dieser Schrei Verbreitung unter den Fallschirmjägern. "Geronimo!" verließ jedoch dieses Umfeld und wurde allgemein als Schlachtruf benutzt. Und schließlich wurde "Geronimo!" zu einem Ausruf um "Tapferkeit" zu signalisieren.

Der Name "Geronimo" ist die italienische Variante von "Hieronymus". Dieser griechische Name setzt sich zusammen aus griech. "hierós" = dt. "heilig", "geheiligt", "den Göttern geweiht" und griech. "ónoma" = dt. "Name", "Ruf" (griech. "hierós" findet man auch in dt. "Hieroglyphe", engl. "hieroglyphic" = dt. "Heilige Schrift"). Weitere Varianten des Namens sind frz. "Gérôme", "Jérôme", engl. "Jerome", ndl. "Jern", span. "Jerónimo".

Der Apache-Name von "Geronimo" war "Gokhlayeh","Goyaale", "Goyahkla", "Goyathlay", wofür man sowohl die Bedeutung "der Gähnende" als "der Kluge" findet.

30.09 Hieronymus (Jerôme, Geronimo)

Eugene Alden ("Gene") Hackman, Filmschauspieler (30.01.1930 (San Bernardino (Bundesstaat California)), Filme:

(E?)(L?) http://americanhistory.about.com/od/geronimo/

Geronimo, Apache Leader

Read about the important events in Geronimo's life.
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(E?)(L?) http://americanhistory.about.com/od/nativeamericans/a/geronimo.htm

Geronimo and Fort Pickens

An Unwilling Tourist Attraction
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(E?)(L?) http://italian.about.com/library/name/blname_geronimo.htm

Italian Baby Names: "Geronimo"

English translation/equivalent: "Jerome"

Origin: Derived from the Greek "Hieronymos" and is composed from "hieros" "sacred" and "onoma" "name", and therefore means "sacred name".
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(E?)(L?) http://militaryhistory.about.com/od/army/p/geronimo.htm

Indian Wars: Geronimo
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(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2012/05/08

05/08/2012 Geronimo


(E?)(L?) http://www.alphadictionary.com/articles/eponyms/eponym_list_g.html

Geronimo! An interjection of exultation uttered on the brink of a dangerous or courageous action. "Gerónimo" is the Spanish form "Jerome" given by European settlers to the Chiricahua Apache leader, "Goyathlay" (1829-1909) "the one who yawns", a Native American who resisted forced removal of his people to reservations.


(E?)(L?) http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/fort-sill

Lawton, Oklahoma
Fort Sill
Final resting place of Geronimo, Quanah Parker, and the first atomic gun ever fired
Lost Tribes, Intriguing Environs, Catacombs, Crypts, & Cemeteries
27 Jun 2013
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Geronimo was brought to Fort Sill with the other Apache POWs in 1894 and, aside from travels with Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show, the warrior remained a prisoner of war until his death in 1909 from pneumonia. You can find his grave in the Apache cemetery under a pyramid of stones topped by an eagle, although the story that his skull was stolen by the Yale Skull & Bones Society has yet to be proven or disproven.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.babynamewizard.com/baby-name/boy/geronimo

Geronimo


(E?)(L?) http://www.crystalinks.com/nativeamer.html

Six Regional Groups - Geronimo and Cochise


(E?)(L?) http://www.crystalinks.com/apache.html

Apache Nation

"Apache" is the collective name for several culturally related tribes of Native Americans, aboriginal inhabitants of North America, who speak a Southern Athabaskan language. The modern term excludes the related Navajo people. The origin of the name "Apache" is uncertain. It may derive from the Yavapai word "epache", meaning "people". The origin has also been claimed to be the Zuni word "apachu", meaning "enemy" (but this may have been the Zuni name for the Navajo people) or an unspecified Quechan word meaning "fighting-men".
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Most of the tribes were subdued by 1868, except for the Chiricahua, who continued their attacks until 1872, when their chief, Cochise, signed a treaty with the U.S. government and moved with his band to an Apache reservation in Arizona. The last band of Apache raiders, led by the Chief "Geronimo", was hunted down in 1886 and was confined in Florida, Alabama, and finally Oklahoma Territory.

Geronimo was born in what is now the state of New Mexico and according to the maps of the time was part of Mexico, but which his family considered Bedonkohe Apache land. Geronimo himself was a Chiricahua Apache. He grew up to be a respected medicine man and an accomplished warrior who fought frequently with Mexican troops. Mexican bandits massacred some of his relatives in 1858, and as a result he hated all Mexicans for the rest of his life.

His Mexican adversaries gave him the nickname of "Geronimo", the Spanish version of the name "Jerome".

Geronimo fought against ever increasing numbers of both Mexican and United States troops and became famous for his daring exploits and numerous escapes from capture. His forces became the last major force of independent Indian warriors who refused to acknowledge the United States Government in the American West. This came to an end on September 4, 1886, when Geronimo surrendered to United States Army General Nelson A. Miles at Skeleton Canyon, Arizona.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.deutschlandfunk.de/tiger-in-menschengestalt.871.de.html?dram:article_id=127446

Deutschlandfunk / Kalenderblatt - 04.09.2011
Tiger in Menschengestalt
Der letzte Kriegshäuptling der Apachen Geronimo gab vor 125 Jahren den Kampf gegen die Weißen auf
Von Jürgen Bräunlein
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(E?)(L?) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Geronimo

"Geronimo", cry made in jumping, apparently from the story of the Apache leader Geronimo making a daring leap to escape U.S. cavalry pursuers at Medicine Bluffs, Oklahoma (and supposedly shouting his name in defiance as he did). Adopted as battle cry by 82nd Airborne U.S. paratroopers in World War II, who perhaps had seen it in the 1939 Paramount Studios movie "Geronimo". The name is the Italian and Spanish form of "Jerome", from Greek "Hieronomos", literally "sacred name".


(E?)(L?) http://www.gens.info/italia/it/nomi?nom_action=b&nom_nome=GERONIMO#.VKBJzH6es

GERONIMO
Forma variata di "Girolamo", con uguale significato.
Vedi: "GIROLAMO"


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/b

Barrett, S. M. (Stephen Melvil), 1865-1948: Geronimo's Story of His Life (English) (as Editor)

CONTENTS


(E?)(L1) http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/g

Geronimo, 1829-1909 (Goyakla), Geronimo's Story of His Life (English) (as Author)


(E?)(L?) http://www.howstuffworks.com/historical-figures/10-famous-native-americans5.htm

10 Famous Native Americans: Geronimo


(E?)(L?) http://www.mentalfloss.com/difference/

Crazy Horse vs. Sitting Bull vs. Geronimo


(E?)(L?) http://www.kynsey.com/colecciones/aerograph/indias_heads/geronimoEN.htm

Colection: Aerograph - Serie: Indias Heads - Model: Geronimo - Limited Edition: 2 Pieces


(E?)(L?) http://www.kunigunde.ch/HMH.htm#gnHieronymus

Hieronymus


(E?)(L?) http://www.landrucimetieres.fr/spip/spip.php?article2177

Le combat d’un descendant de Geronimo contre Yale


(E?)(L?) http://www.linternaute.com/biographie/geronimo/

Geronimo

Né à Nodoyohn Canyon (Etats-Unis) le 16/06/1829 ; Mort à Fort Sill (Etats-Unis) le 17/02/1909

"Go Khla Yeh" (nom signifiant "celui qui bâille" en amérindien), plus connu sous le nom de "Geronimo", est un Amérindien apache, célèbre pour avoir défendu les droits de son peuple.
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(E2)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Geronimo

Geronimo


(E?)(L?) http://www.universalis.fr/encyclopedie/geronimo/

GERONIMO (1829-1909)


(E1)(L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-ger1.htm

Geronimo

I have to put a linguistic health warning on this one, because the story is anecdotal, though widely told. But it was mentioned for the first time so soon after it was said to have been created that it seems highly plausible. According to the story, it isn’t St Jerome but the Native American chief who is being invoked.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/geronimo

Geronimo


(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Geronimo
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Geronimo" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1630 / 1730 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

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Holy Mackerel (W3)

Engl. "holy" kommt - wie entsprechend dt. "heilig" - in einigen Ausdrücken vor. So findet man etwa: Alle diese Interjektionen sollen Überraschung, Verblüffung oder Verwirrung zum Ausdruck bringen. Wann engl. "holy" zum ersten Mal in diesem Sinne verwendet wurde, wird sich nicht mehr nachweisen lassen.

Was engl. "Holy mackerel" (1899) betrifft geht man davon aus, dass er schon vor engl. "holy smoke" aufkam. Beide sollen jedoch US-amerikanischen Ursprungs sein. Als möglichen Bezug, kann man an "Holy Mary", "Holy Mary Mother of God", oder "Holy Michael" denken. Sowohl bei "holy mackerel" als auch bei "holy smoke" handelt es sich um verkappte Schwurformeln, um sprachliche Verhüllungen (Euphemismen) mit denen das Schwören durch den Ausdruck von Ärgernis oder Überraschung ersetzt wird.

Es gibt jedoch auch eine andere Theorie. Danach geht der Ausdruck engl. "holy mackerel" (als Verbiegung von "Holy Michael" oder "Holy Mary") eine Anspielung auf "Mackerel-snapper" (dt. "Makrelen-Schnapper") war. Dies ist eine Bezeichnung, mit der einst Katholiken benannt wurden - in Anspielung auf das Essen von Fisch statt Fleich an Freitagen. Das zeitliche Auftreten in schriftlicher Form im 19. Jh., als die Anti-Römisch-Katholische Stimmung in den USA Hochkonjunktur hatte, könnte diese These bestätigen.

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2004-August/subject.html




(E?)(L?) http://mentalfloss.com/article/29657/why-do-people-say-holy-mackerel
Hier findet man zwei weitere Theorien zur Entstehung des Ausdrucks "Holy Mackerel":


Why Do People Say "Holy Mackerel"?
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“Mackerel,” it says, meant two things back in the 14th century: the fish, of course, but also "pimp." Why? There are two possible reasons:

1. The Dutch word “makelaar” means “broker” or “peddler,” which was eventually adopted as a slang term for an entrepreneur of the flesh.

2. There’s apparently a popular belief (I had never heard of it, but it wouldn’t be out of line to suggest that my knowledge of fish is lacking) that male mackerels guide female herring to their mates every spring. It’s not true, but the belief may have given shape to the reason mackerel is also used as the term for pimp.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW180/page2.html#mackerel

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Holy mackerel, which dates in writing from 1899, is thought by H.L. Mencken to be a minced oath formed from Holy Mary, However, Eric Partridge, borrowing from Robert Claiborne, says that holy mackerel is euphemistic for holy Michael, perhaps perpetuated as a jab against "mackerel snappers", Catholics in the U.S. who ate fish on Fridays. Partridge characterizes the phrase as "a mild oath". Whoever is correct about its derivation, there is little doubt that the phrase originated in the U.S.
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Holy Mackerel
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Holy Mackerel" taucht in der Literatur um das Jahr 1890 auf.

Erstellt: 2014-12

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Oh (W3)

Die Interjektion engl. "Oh" gibt einer Aussage eine emotionale Beigabe von Leid oder Widerwille, aber auch von Überraschung oder Bewunderunge - je nach Kontext und Betonung.

(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/the-indispensable-interjection-%e2%80%9coh%e2%80%9d/

The Indispensable Interjection "Oh"
By Mark Nichol
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Whether this all-purpose exclamation is followed by a comma or not depends on its purpose. "Oh, my" and the like are expressions of any one of a variety of emotions or comprehensions, including pain or repulsion, or surprise or wonder. "Oh" is also a placeholder that signals dismissiveness ("Oh, don’t mind me") or indicates an approximation ("He was, oh, about this tall"). "Say" is employed in a similar usage ("What if I were to offer you, say, twice as much?").
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Erstellt: 2014-12

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voanews.com
Interjections

(E?)(L?) http://learningenglish.voanews.com/media/video/talk2us-interjections/2610669.html

January 24, 2015

TALK2US: Interjections

Caty Weaver and Ashley Thompson are joined by a special guest, Anna Mateo, as they sing "The Interjection Song"
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Erstellt: 2015-01

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