Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
VA Staat Vatikanstadt, Estado de la Ciudad del Vaticano, État de la Cité du Vatican, Stato della Cittŕ del Vaticano, State of the Vatican City
Abkürzung, Abreviatura, Abréviation, Abbreviazione, Abbreviation

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ablemedia
Latin Phrases and Abbreviations
Translation of modern Latin abbreviations

(E?)(L?) http://www.ablemedia.com/ctcweb/consortium/moremottoes2.html


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etc
etc. (W3)

Lat. "etc" (dt., span., frz. "etc." (1579 abrégé sous la forme "etc."), ital., engl. "etc.") = lat. "et cetera" = "and the rest" = "und der Rest", "und die übrigen (Sachen)".

(E?)(L?) http://www.cnrtl.fr/etymologie/etc


(E?)(L?) http://www.kith.org/logos/words/upper2/EEtc.html

On most computers running the UNIX operating system, there's a directory named /etc. Some people pronounce that directory name as "etcetera"; others simply say /'Et si/. Some may even spell it out as /'i 'ti 'si/.
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Speaking of things Roman, and of "etc.", there are a few Latin abbreviations which have become so common in English as to hardly be noticed as Latin. Outside of the computer context, "etc." is short for "et cetera", meaning "and so on" though more and more people say "ek cetera" these days. I always used to mix up "i.e." and "e.g.", until a friend told me what they stood for: "id est" ("that is") and "exempli gratia" ("by the grace of example", or loosely "for example", though my friend originally taught it to me as "exemplar gratis", and translated it as "free example" as in, "hey, free example!"), respectively.
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(E?)(L?) http://www.takeourword.com/Issue052.html

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Actually, "ask" pronounced as "aks" goes way back and occurred via a process called metathesis, where the "k" and "s" were switched. A different process occurs in the "et cetera" to "eck cetera" shift, except in your case where you applied metathesis to the abbreviated form etc.
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(E1)(L1) http://www.takeourword.com/TOW144/page3.html

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the "et" in "et cetera" actually means "and" in Latin! The "cetera" portion means "the rest", being the neuter plural of "ceterus" "the other". So "et cetera" means, literally, "and the rest", so to say and "etc." is to say "and and the rest".
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=etc.
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "etc." taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2013-02

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newadvent
Ecclesiastical Abbreviations
Latein-UK

Latin to English abbreviation translation from the Catholic Encyclopedia. (E?)(L?) http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01022a.htm

The words most commonly abbreviated at all times are proper names, titles (official or customary), of persons or corporations, and words of frequent occurrence. A good list of those used in Roman Republican and early Imperial times may be seen in Egbert's Latin Inscriptions (New York, 1896), 417-459. The Jewish scribes and Talmudic scholars also had frequent recourse to abbreviations.

Between the seventh and ninth centuries the ancient Roman system of abbreviations gave way to a more difficult one that gradually grew up in the monastic houses and in the chanceries of the new Teutonic kingdoms. Merovingian, Lombard, and Anglo-Saxon scripts offer each their own abbreviations, not to speak of the unique scotica manus or libri scottice scripti (Irish hand, or books written in the medieval Irish hand). Eventually such productive centres of technical manuscripts as the Papal Chancery, the theological schools of Paris and Oxford, and the civil-law school of Bologna set the standards of abbreviations for all Europe.

The medieval manuscripts abound in abbreviations, owing in part to the abandonment of the uncial, or quasi-uncial, and the almost universal use of the cursive, hand. The medieval writer inherited a few from Christian antiquity; others he invented or adapted, in order to save time and parchment. They are found especially in manuscripts of scholastic theology and canon law, annals and chronicles, the Roman law, and in administrative documents, civil and privileges, bulls, rescripts). They multiplied with time, and were never so numerous as on the eve of the discovery of printing; many of the early printed books offer this peculiarity, together with other characteristics of the manuscript page. The development of printing brought about the abandonment of many abbreviations, while it suggested and introduced new ones a process also favoured by the growth of ecclesiastical legislation, the creation of new offices, etc. There was less medieval abbreviation in the text of books much used on public occasions, e.g. missals, antiphonaries, bibles; in one way or another the needs of students seem to have been the chief cause of the majority of medieval abbreviations. The means of abbreviation were usually full points or dots (mostly in Roman antiquity), the semicolon (eventually conventionalized), lines (horizontal, perpendicular, oblong, wavy curves, and commas). Vowel-sounds were frequently written not after, but over, the consonants. Certain letters, like p and q, that occur with extreme frequency, e.g. in prepositions and terminations, became the source of many peculiar abbreviations; similarly, frequently recurring words like et (and), est (is).

Habit and convenience are today the principal motives for using abbreviations. Most of those in actual use fall under one or other of the following heads:

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN APOSTOLIC RESCRIPTS
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Absoluo. | Alr. | Aplica. | Appatis. | Archiepus. | Aucte. | Canice. | Card. | Cens. | Circumpeone. | Coione. | Confeone. | Consciae. | Constbus | Discreoni. | Dispensao. | Dnus | Ecclae. | Ecclis. | Effum. | Epus. | Excoe. | Exit. | Fr. | Frum. | Gnalis | Humil. | Humoi. | Igr. | Infraptum. | Intropta. | Irregulte. | Lia. | Litma. | Lre. | Lte. | Magro. | Mir. | Miraone. | Mrimonium. | Nultus. | Ordinaoni. | Ordio. | Pbr. | Penia. | Peniaria. | Pntium. | Poe. | Pontus. | PP. | Pr. | Pror. | Ptur. | Ptus. | Qd. | Qmlbt. | Qtnus. | Relione. | Rlari. | Roma. | Salri. | Snia. | Sntae., Stae. | Spealer. Specialiter ("Specially") | Spualibus Spiritualibus ("In spiritual matters") | Supplioni. Supplicationibus ("Supplication" | Thia, Theolia. Theologia ("Theology") | Tli. Tituli ("Titles") | Tm. | Tn. | Venebli | Vrae.

ABBREVIATIONS IN GENERAL USE, CHIEFLY ECCLESIASTICAL

A.B. | Ab. | Abp. | Abs. | A.C. | AC | ACN | A.D. | a.d. | Adm. Rev. | Adv. | Alb. | al. | A.M. | A.M. | A.M.D.G. | An. | Ann. | Ana, Ant. | Apost. | Ap. Sed. | Ap. Sed. Leg. | Archiep. | Archid. | Archiprb. | A.R.S. | A.U. | Authen. | Aux. | | B. BB. | B.C. | B.C.L. | B.D. | B.F. | Ben. | Benevol. | Bon. Mem. | B.P. | Bro. | B. Se. | B.U.J. | B.T. | B.V. | B.V. | B.V.M. | Cam. | Cam. Ap. | Can. | Canc. | Cap. | Cap. de seq. | Capel. | Caus. | CC. VV., CC.VV. | Cen. Eccl. | Cla. | Cl., Clico. | Clun. | C.M. | Cod. | Cog. Leg. | Cog. Spir. | Coll. Cone. | Comm. Prec. | Comm. Seq. | Compl. | Con. | Cone. | Conf. | Conf. Doct. | Conf. Pont. | Cons. | Consecr. | Const. Ap. | Cr. | D. | d. | D.C.L. | D.D. | D.D. | D.D. | Dec. | Def. | D.G. | D.N. | D.N.J.C. | DN, DNS, DNUS | Doct. | Dom. | D.O.M. | Doxol. | D.R. | DS | D.Se. | D.V. | Dupl. | Dupl. Maj. | Dupl. I. Cl. | Dupl. II. Cl. | Eccl. | E., Eccl. | El. | Emus | EPS, EP., Episc. | Et. | Evang. | Ex. | Exe. | Fel. Mem. | Fel. Rec. | Fer. | Fr., F. | Fund. | Gen. | Gl. | Gr. | Grad. | Grat. | hebd. | Hom. | hor. | IC | Id. | Igr. | I.H.S. | Ind. | Ind. | Inq. | i.p.i. | Is. | J.C. | J.C.D. | J.D. | J.M.J. | Jo., Joann. | J.U.D. | Jud. | J.U.L. | Jur. | Kal. | Laic. | Laud. | L.C.D. | l.c.; loc. cit. | Lect. | Legit. | L.H.D. | Lib., Lo. | Lic. | Litt. | LL.B. | LL.D. | LL.M. | Loc. | Lov. | Lovan. | L.S. | Lud. | M. | M.A. | Mag. | Mand. | Mand. Ap. | Mart., M., MM. | Mat. | Matr. | Mgr. | Miss. | Miss. Apost., M.A. | M.R. | m.t.v. | Nativ. D.N.J.C. | N. D. | Nigr. | No. | Nob. | Noct. | Non. | Nostr. | Not. | N.S. | N.S. | N.T. | Ntri. | Nup. | Ob. | Oct. | Omn. | Op. Cit. | Or. | Ord. | Or. Orat. | O.S. | O.T. | Oxon. | P. | Pa. | Pact. | Pasch. | Patr. | Pent. | Ph.B. | Ph.D. | Phil. | Ph.M. | P.K. | Poenit. | Poenit. Ap. | Pont. | Pont. | Pont. Max. | Poss. | PP. | P.P. | PP. AA. | P.P.P. | P.R. | Praef. | Presbit. | Prof. | Prop. Fid. | Propr. | Prov. | Ps. | Pub., Publ. | Purg. Can. | Quadrag. | Quinquag. | R. | R. | Rescr. | R.D. | Req. | Resp. | R.I.P. | Rit. | Rom. | R. P. | RR. | Rt. Rev. | Rub. | Rubr. | S., Sacr. | Sab., Sabb. | Saec. | Sal. | Salmant. | S.C. | S.C.C. | S.C.EE.RR. | S.C.I. | S.C.P.F. | SCS | s.d. | S.D. | Semid. | Septuag | Sexag. | Sig. | Simpl. | Sine Com. | s.l. | s.l.n.d. | S.M. | Soc. | S. Off. | S.P. | S.P., S. Petr. | S.P. | S.P.A. | Sr. | S.R.C. | S.R.E. | SS. | SS.D.N. | S., SS. | S.T.B. | S.T.D. | S.T.L. | Suffr. | S.V. | Syn. | Temp. | Test. | Theol. | Tit. | Ult. | Usq. | Ux. | V., Ven., VV. | V., Vest. | Vac. | Val. | Vat. | Vba. | Vers. | Vesp. | V.F., Vic. For. | V.G. | Vid. | Vid., Videl. | Vig. | Viol. | Virg. | Virid. | V.M. | V. Rev. | V.T. | XC., XCS.

ABBREVIATIONS IN CATACOMB INSCRIPTIONS

A.D. | A.Q.I.C. | B., BMT. | B.M. | B.F. | B.I.C. | B.M.F. | B.Q. | C. | C.F. | Cl. V. | C.O. | C.O.B.Q. | COI. | CS., COS. | COSS. | C.P. | D. | D.D. | DEP. | D.I.P. | D.M. | D.M.S. | D.N. | DD. NN. | E.V. | EX. TM. | E VIV. DISC. | F. | F.C. | F.F. | FF. | FS. | H. | H.L.S. | H.M.F.F. | H.S. | ID. | IDNE. | I.L.H. | INB. | IND. | INP | I.X. | K. | K.B.M. | L. | L.M. | L.S. | M. | MM. | M.P. | MRT. | N. | NN. | O. | OB. IN XTO. | OMS. | OP. | P. | P.C. | P.C., P. CONS. | P.I. | P.M. | PP. | PR.K. | PRB. | PR.N. | P.T.C.S. | PZ. | Q., Qui. | Q.B.AN. | Q.I.P. | Q.V. | R. | Reg. | S. | SC. M. | SD. | SSA. | S.I.D. | S.P. | SS. | S.V. | T., TT. | TM. | V. | VB. | V.C. | VV. CC. | V.H. | V. X. | X., XPC., XS.

ABBREVIATIONS OF TITLES OF THE PRINCIPAL RELIGIOUS ORDERS AND CONGREGATIONS OF PRIESTS

A.A. | A.B.A. | C.J.M. | C.M. | C.M. | C.P. | C.PP.S. | C.R. | C.R.C.S. | C.R.I.C. | C.R.L. | C.R.M. | C.R.M.D. | C.R.M.I. | C.R.P. | C.R.S.P. | C.R.S.P. | C.R.T. | C.S.B. | C.S.C. | C.S.P. | C.S.Sp. | C.S.V. | C.SS.CC. | C. SS. R. | Inst. Char. | M.C. | M.S. | M.S.C. | M.S.C. | O.C. | O. Camald. | O. Cart. | O. Cist. | O.C.C. | O.C.D. | O.C.R. | O.F.M. | O.M. | O. Merced. | O.M.C. | O.M. Cap., O.F.M. Cap., O.M.C. | O.M.I. | O.P., Ord Fratr. Praed. | Ord. Praem. | O.S.A. | O.S.B. | O.S.C. | O.S.F.C. | O.S.F.S. | O.S.H. | O.S.M. | O.SS.C. | O. Trinit. | P.O. | P.S.M. | P.S.S. | S.C. | S.D.S. | S.D.V. | S.J. | S.M. | S.P.M. | S.S.S.

NN (W3)

"NN" steht nicht nur für lat. "nomen nescio" = "den Namen weiß ich nicht", "nomen nominandum" = "der zu nennende Name", "non numerato" = "ohne Numerierung" sondern auch für "Normalnull".

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