Etymologie, Etimología, Étymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Palindrom, Palíndromo, Palindrome, Palindromo, Palindrome

A

B

Belphegor's Prime (W3)

Geprägt wurde die Bezeichnung "Belphegor's Prime" - für eine spezielle Primzahl - von Clifford A. Pickover. "Belphegor" verweist auf einen der Sieben Prinzen der Hölle. Diese Bezeichnung soll damit auf ein paar "mysteriöse" Zahlenspielereien mit "666" und "13" verweisen. Zudem kann die Primzahl als Palindrom in beide Richtungen identisch gelesen werden.

Der sehr umtriebige, 1957 geborene, wissenschaftliche Autor hat diese Benennung sicherlich mit einem zwinkernden Auge vorgenommen.

(E?)(L?) http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/pickover/pc/1000000000000066600000000000001.html

Gaze in awe at Belphegor's Prime: 1000000000000066600000000000001 is a palindromic prime number, with 666 hiding among the zeros.


(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belphegor%27s_prime

"Belphegor's prime" is the palindromic prime number 1000000000000066600000000000001, a number which reads the same both backwards and forwards and is only divisible by itself and one.

The name "Belphegor" refers to one of the Seven Princes of Hell, who was charged with helping people make ingenious inventions and discoveries. "Belphegor's prime" is a name coined by book author Clifford A. Pickover.

The number itself contains superstitious elements that have given it its name: the number 666 at the heart of Belphegor's Prime is widely associated as being the Number of the Beast, used in symbolism to represent one of the creatures in the Apocalypse or, more commonly, the Devil. This number is surrounded on either side by thirteen zeroes, with thirteen itself long regarded superstitiously as an unlucky number. Also, it in total has 31 digits, which is thirteen backwards.

In the short scale, this number would be named "One nonillion, sixty-six quadrillion, six hundred trillion and one". In the long scale, this number's name would be "One quintillion, sixty-six billiard, six hundred billion and one".
...


(E?)(L?) https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belphegor_(D%C3%A4mon)

"Belphegor" ist die in der Septuaginta und dann in der Vulgata (Beelphegor VUL) überlieferte Namensform der moabitischen Gottheit "Baal Peor" „Herr des Peor“) oder auch "Baal Pegor". Als Dämon fand "Belphegor" Eingang in die christliche Mythologie und von dort in die Literatur der Renaissance und die neuzeitliche Populärkultur.
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(E?)(L?) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford_A._Pickover

Clifford Alan Pickover (born 15 August 1957) is an American author, editor, and columnist in the fields of science, mathematics, science fiction, innovation, and creativity and is employed at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, New York. He is Editor-in-Chief of the IBM Journal of Research and Development, has been granted more than 200 U.S. patents, is an elected Fellow for the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, and is author of more than 50 books, translated into dozens of languages.
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(E1)(L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Belphegor's Prime
Abfrage im Google-Corpus mit 15Mio. eingescannter Bücher von 1500 bis heute.

Engl. "Belphegor's Prime" taucht in der Literatur nicht signifikant auf.

Erstellt: 2015-08

C

cox
Once Upon a Palindrome

(E?)(L?) http://members.cox.net/jjschnebel/palin.html
A story and a word game in one. You come up with a palindrome that logically finishes each section.

D

dailywritingtips.com
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/making-the-most-of-palindromes/

February 2011, 25: Making the Most of Palindromes


(E?)(L?) http://www.dailywritingtips.com/fun-with-words-palindromes/

February 2008, 13: Fun With Words: Palindromes


Erstellt: 2015-08

derf.net
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://www.derf.net/palindromes/old.palindrome.html

Neil/Fred's Gigantic List of Palindromes

Editor's Note, December 1996

Well, when I started this page, there weren't, as far as I know (or knew), any other palindrome lists on the web. Now I haven't really updated this list in almost a year, although I've received a few hundred email messages with additions and praise. And now there are several other palindrome sites, so I've decided to stop maintaining my list. So don't mail me any additions. Thanks.
...


Erstellt: 2015-08

dictionary.com
palindromic date
palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://blog.dictionary.com/category/language/

11/11/11: Why is today so rare and unusual?
November 11, 2011 ?by: Dictionary.com blog ?in: hidden meaning, Language
11/11/11 is a much-anticipated day. Obviously, it contains all of the same digits (like 1/1/1, 2/2/2 and so on…), and it is a palindromic date. (That means the numbers are the same backwards and forwards). 11 is a very odd number and has been subject to much interpretation over the ages. According to Yahoo! News, medieval [...]
Read more »

Bob, radar. Backwards & forwards they’re palindromes. What may be the longest single palindromic word?
August 5, 2010 ?by: Dictionary.com blog ?in: Language
Poor Dan is in a droop. Sit on a potato pan, Otis. What do these sentences have in common? They’re both palindromes. A palindrome is a word, number, sentence, or verse that reads the same backward or forward. It derives from the Greek palin dromo, which means “running back again.” In most palindromes, spacing, punctuation, [...]
Read more »


Erstellt: 2015-08

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F

G

getwords.com
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://getwords.com/results/palindromes

Palindromes


Erstellt: 2015-08

H

h2g2.com
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A278985

Created Mar 16, 2000 | Updated Jan 28, 2002

A "palindrome" is a nifty little word or sentence which can be read the same way both forwards and backwards. The following is a classic example of a palindrome concerning Theodore Roosevelt referring to how the United States borrowed a strategic piece of Central America for nearly a century:

A man, a plan, a canal, Panama
...


(E?)(L?) http://h2g2.com/edited_entry/A592643

...
"Palindromes" are spelled the same, backwards or forwards, such as "mom", "race car", or "deified". Entire phrases can be palindromes. Punctuation does not prevent a sentence or phrase from being considered a palindrome, eg, "Dogma: I am God." counts as a palindrome. Here are some more examples:
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Erstellt: 2015-08

I

inkyfool.com
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/search/label/Palindromes

Showing posts with label Palindromes.

Saturday, 22 May 2010
Policy Wonks Know It Backwards
Posted by M.H. Forsyth
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Monday, 12 April 2010
Llareggub Yobs
Posted by M.H. Forsyth
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Friday, 6 November 2009
What the Dickens?
Posted by M.H. Forsyth
...


Erstellt: 2015-08

inkyfool.com
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://blog.inkyfool.com/search/label/Palindromes

Showing posts with label Palindromes. Show all posts

Saturday, 22 May 2010 - Policy Wonks Know It Backwards - Posted by M.H. Forsyth

The left-winger said all the other candidates were "policy wonks" and "men in their 40s who played football together". - Diane Abbott in The Mirror

This takes us to what might prove the biggest problem of all: that four ex-wonks with limited life experience - The Guardian

There is, as everybody knows, a figure of speech that if you know something well, you know it backwards. Therefore, if you know something backwards, you wonk it. Hence a policy wonk.

It is the same formation as yob, Llareggub and mooreeffoc, all of which I have blogged upon before. The first words ever said by one human to another were palindromic:

Madam, I'm Adam.

P.S. This is one of those occasions where the OED has clearly got it wrong. They conflate two different uses of the word and then suggest that over-brainy people at Harvard wouldn't spend their time making up semordnilaps.

Monday, 12 April 2010 - Llareggub Yobs - Posted by M.H. Forsyth

I was told the other day that a yob was a backwards boy. I didn't believe it. So many etymologies are much too neat and fanciful, especially the ones that involve acronyms and the movement of letters (shit does not mean Store High In Transit). But having pooh-poohed the idea I returned to my burrow and checked a dictionary only to discover that it really is backslang.

Backslang was a code used by Victorian costermongers and Edwardian thieves. There appears to have been quite a wide (and potentially limitless) vocabulary. I'm not sure how far you can credit The Box of Delights* (1935) with linguistic accuracy, but in it two would-be kidnappers use the phrase "Kool slop" which is explained thuslyly:

We would point out that the mystic words uttered by the reprobates are common thieves' slang: 'Kool slop' is what is called back slang: the words Look Police turned backwards. It is a familiar warning in the underworld.

This seems credible because the thing about backslang is that you have to be able to spell. To know that yob is boy backwards means that you know that Y can function as a consonant or a vowel - knowledge that would be denied to your typical urchin before the educational reforms of the 1880s.

[Londoners: there's a lovely point that when the tube was built it was assumed that most of the passengers would be illiterate so they wouldn't know when the train had arrived at their stop. That's why each station has a different pretty pattern of tiles. It is for the use of the illiterate. The same goes for pub signs, but I'm wandering.]

Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas is the only good radio-play ever written, and is set in the Welsh town of Llareggub, which is deliciously convincing as all Welsh place names are invented by throwing consonants into a blender, or by very lazy Countdown contestants.

However, the reversible nature of Llareggub was considered so obvious by the printers that early editions changed it to Llaregyb, just to be on the safeside.

The Reverend Eli Jenkins, inky in his cool front parlour or poem-room, tells only the truth in his Lifework--the Population, Main Industry, Shipping, History, Topography, Flora and Fauna of the town he worships in--the White Book of Llarregub.

Which shows that I am not the only inky fellow in the land.

It is the glamour of grammar, let a human into the secrets of the written word and he will start playing with anagrams, acronyms, palindromes and semordnilaps; inventing, rearranging, tangling and encrypting.

There is an almost holy feel to it, which is perhaps why so many people spend so much time trying to decode the Bible. Of course, this is hard for English speakers (unless you believe the King James Version to be divinely inspired), but in Hebrew you can have hours of fun counting the alephs and deducing the mind of God. As Coleman says in Antic Hay when asked who the devil he is:

'I am that I am,' said Coleman. 'But I have with me [...] a physiologue, a pedagogue and a priapagogue; for I leave out of account mere artists and journalists whose titles do not end with the magic syllable. And finally,' indicating himself, 'plain Dog, which being interpreted kabbalistically backwards, signifies God. 'All at your service.'

"I am that I am", is another of God's titles and a picture of NATASHA I is used to similar effect in Nick Cave's And the Ass Saw the Angel while Red Rum, who won the Grand National whilst I was being born, had his name rudely hijacked by Stephen King. I have blogged before on the wonderful word mooreeffoc, any schoolchild knows which cheese is made backwards and anybody who will pay a pound for a bottle of Evian water is just that.

Yet I'm sure I'm forgetting one of the great examples of what are apparently called semordnilaps (palindromes backwards). And it's not even T.S. Eliot's morbid insistence on his middle initial.

T. Eliot, top bard, notes putrid tang emanating, is sad. I'd assign it a name: gnat dirt upset on drab pot-toilet. - Auden (allegedly)

Dylan Thomas' map of Llareggub

No prizes for guessing what book I re-read a couple of weeks ago.

P.S. There's a good article on backslang here.

Friday, 6 November 2009 - What the Dickens? - Posted by M.H. Forsyth

The only reason T.S. Eliot insisted on his middle initial was that he was morbidly aware of what his name would have spelled backwards without it. Auden (whose H was idiopathic) wrote a palindrome on the subject:

T. Eliot, top bard, notes putrid tang emanating, is sad. I'd assign it a name: gnat dirt upset on drab pot-toilet.

S was a real name, though, it stood (appropriately) for Stearns, a name by which he briefly tried to be known as a student: i.e. T. Stearns Eliot. This is, incidentally, the reason that it's the Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. The debilitating fear of the cloacal also produced, through inversion, the completely superfluous reference to the Turdus aonalaschkae pallasii, in the author's notes on The Waste Land.

Meanwhile the phrase What the Dickens has nothing whatsoever to do with Charles Dickens (unless Shakespeare was blessed with the gift of prognostication). It pops up in The Merry Wives of Windsor and is derived (like almost every other renaissance expletive) from Devil.

Just a little follow-up to my post on the grammar of Dickens and Eliot.

The original Dickens


Erstellt: 2015-08

J

K

L

linguistlist.org - ADS
Palindrome, palindromic

(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2013-September/thread.html

September 2013


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-July/thread.html

July 2010


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-October/thread.html

October 2007


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-January/thread.html

January 2007


(E?)(L?) http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2001-January/thread.html

January 2001


Erstellt: 2015-08

logology

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/logology.wav
The science or study of words.
From Greek "logos" = "word" + "-logy", from Middle English "-logie", from Latin "-logia", from Greek "logos" = "word".

In 1965, Dmitri Borgmann resurrected an old word, logology, and gave it a new meaning of recreational letter play. How appropriate that the word denoting the study of words viewed as letter patterns should itself be of such recreational interest. Logology encompasses two five-letter anchored palindromes - logol and golog - and repeats the cluster log.

Logology is a beautifully balanced word:


M

mathsisfun.com
Palindromic Numbers

(E?)(L?) http://www.mathsisfun.com/definitions/letter-p.html

Palindrome | Palindromic Numbers


Erstellt: 2015-08

N

norvig.com
World's Longest Palindrome Sentence? 17,826 words

(E?)(L?) http://www.norvig.com/palindrome.html


Erstellt: 2015-08

numbergossip.com
palindromic prime

(E?)(L1) http://numbergossip.com/list

palindrome | palindromic prime


Erstellt: 2015-08

O

oeis.org
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://oeis.org/search?q=palindrome%7Cpalindromic

The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences!

Search: "palindrome" | "palindromic"


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Ch

characteristic functions (100): A136522 A002113 A029742 palindrome


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Cor

A002113 (palindromes)


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Nu

numbers whose cube is a palindrome: A002760


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Pac




(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Pri

primes, dihedral palindromic: A048662


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Pri




(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Sq

squares, palindromic: see palindromic squares


(E?)(L1) http://oeis.org/wiki/Index_to_OEIS:_Section_Tra

trees, H*-palindromic, A051174


Erstellt: 2015-08

P

Palindrome (W3)

Das engl. "Palindrome" geht zurück auf griech. "pálin" = "zurück" und griech. "dramein" = "laufen", weil es vorwärts und rückwärts gelesen das gleich Wort ergibt.

(E?)(L1) http://jeff560.tripod.com/words5.html
A Collection of Word Oddities and Trivia - Eine Sammlung aufälliger Worte, gesammelt von Jeff Miller
Page 5 - Palindromes

(E1)(L1) http://www.marthabarnette.com/learn.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.palindromes.org/


(E1)(L1) http://dictionary.reference.com/wordoftheday/archive/
palindrome: a word or phrase that reads the same backward as forward.

(E?)(L?) http://www.verbatimmag.com/
XI 3 Lederer, Richard Palindromes: The Art of Reverse English

(E?)(L?) http://www.wikipedia.org/wiki/palindrome


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/palindrome.wav


(E?)(L?) http://www.yourdictionary.com/


(E1)(L1) http://www.yourdictionary.com/cgi-bin/wotdarch.cgi


pickover
Palindromic Primes
Palindromic binary Year 2015

(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/pickover/status/612415196334702592

Shiver in ecstasy. 2015 (11111011111) is a palindromic binary year.


(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/pickover/status/576787214220156928

What did the palindrome & math lover say when she was offered cake?

Answer: "I prefer pi."


(E?)(L?) https://twitter.com/pickover/status/546305614260207616

This list of palindromic primes was created by G. L. Honaker Jr. in 1999


Erstellt: 2015-08

Q

R

S

T

U

Uni Tennessee
palindromic primes

(E?)(L?) http://primes.utm.edu/glossary/xpage/Palindrome.html

A "palindrome" (from the Greek "palindromos" "running back again") is a word, verse, sentence, or integer that reads the same forward or backward. For example, "Able was I ere I saw Elba" or "333313333". Here is a little longer one by Peter Hilton (a code-breaker on the British team that cracked the German Enigma): "Doc, note. I dissent. A fast never prevents a fatness. I diet on cod".
...


(E?)(L?) http://primes.utm.edu/glossary/xpage/PalindromicPrime.html

A "palindromic prime" is simply a prime which is a palindrome. Obviously this depends on the base in which the number is written (for example, Mersenne primes are palindromic base 2). When no radix is indicated, we assume the radix is 10.
...


Erstellt: 2015-08

V

vvork.com
Palindromic Coined Words

(E?)(L?) http://www.vvork.com/?page_id=8343


(E?)(L?) http://www.vvork.com/?tag=palindrome

»Sentence No. 2 Which Consists of 1007 Palindromic Coined Words«, 2003, by Hideki Nakazawa.


Erstellt: 2015-08

W

waywordradio.org
Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://www.waywordradio.org/?s=palindrom

Search results for "palindrom"

Word Unit Palindrome
Posted June 6, 2014 .
Here’s a word unit palindrome to drop at a party: Escher drawing hands drew hands drawing Escher. This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Palindromist Press SymmyS Awards
Posted May 9, 2014 .
A palindrome is a word or phrase that reads the same both backwards and forwards, like the title of the book Go Hang a Salami! I’m a Lasagna Hog! The SymmyS Awards, bestowed by The Palindromist Magazine are the Oscars of the palindrome world. Recent winners included one called “Espresso Rescue”: Had a tonic? Cuppa [...]
read more »

Cold Feet at the Altar Palindrome
Posted May 9, 2014 .
Word-unit palindromes are palindromes where all the words read the same back and forth, like this SymmyS winner, titled “Cold Feet at the Altar”: Say I do? What do I do? What do I say?! This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Pills Palindrome
Posted May 9, 2014 .
Another winning palindrome from the SymmyS: You swallow pills for anxious days and nights. And days, anxious for pills, swallow you. This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Welded Palindromes Quiz
Posted May 14, 2011 .
Our Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a game called Welded Palindromes, with two-word phrases spelled the same forwards and backwards. What do you call your first appearance on TV? A tube debut. What kind of beer does a king drink? Why, a regal lager, of course. This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Happy Palindrome Day
Posted January 11, 2010 .
Happy Palindrome Day--or, if you prefer, "011110 Day"--from your friends at "A Way with Words"! Lots to report from Language Land: First, there are a number of recent full-length episodes you may not have heard. ---Words of the decade, emotions caused by speaking certain languages, "Main Line brat," throw someone under the bus, mind your [...]
read more »

Yiddish Palindrome
Posted September 26, 2009 .
A Philadelphia listener has a Yiddish twist on an old palindrome: “Unable I was ere I saw Elba, nu?” This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Upstairs Basement
Posted June 6, 2014 .
upstairs-basement
Giving your baby an unusual moniker may seem like a great idea at the time. But what if you have second thoughts? One mother of a newborn had such bad namer’s remorse, she poured out her heart to strangers online. Speaking of mothers and daughters: Laura Ingalls Wilder didn’t write the Little House on the [...]
read more »

Hang a Salami
Posted May 9, 2014 .
hang-a-salami
What’s so special about the phrase Sit on a pan, Otis? It’s an example of a palindrome — a word or phrase that’s spelled the same backwards as it is forwards. This year’s contest known as the Oscars of the palindrome world inspires some clever, even poetic, surprises. Plus, tips for raising a child to [...]
read more »

Boss vs. Therapist Joke
Posted May 9, 2014 .
What’s the difference between your boss and your therapist? Aili Jokela’s word-unit palindrome has the answer. This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Word Reversals Game
Posted August 18, 2012 .
Our Quiz Guy John Chaneski revives a classic game of word reversals called Get Back. What palindromic advice would you give to someone who ought to stay away from baked goods? How about snub buns? If, on the other hand, you’ve highlighted the pastries, then you’ve stressed desserts. This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Secret Gibberish
Posted August 18, 2012 .
pecan-pie.1000x330
What do pigs have to do with piggyback rides? We get a lesson from a listener in the fine art of speaking gibberish. What’s the correct way to pronounce pecan? The French have the Academie Française, but what authority do we have for the English language? Also, what you should do when someone yells, “Hold [...]
read more »

Who You Callin’ a Jabroni?
Posted December 31, 2011 .
who-you-callin-a-jabroni
Yo! Who you callin’ a jabroni? And what exactly is a jabroni, anyway? Also, what do vintage school buses and hack writers have in common? Grant and Martha trace the origins of famous quotes, and a listener offers a clever new way to say “not my problem.” All that, plus winklehawks, motherwit, oxymorons, word mash-ups, [...]
read more »

Scrambled Scrabble and Hot Dogs
Posted May 20, 2011 .
Hi! Last week, we discussed “jabronies,” “winklehawks,” “motherwit,” “purfling,” and a handy new way to say “not my problem.” We also pondered why people call their biceps “guns,” and tackled a quiz about palindromes. Listen here: http://www.waywordradio.org/jabroni/ Several of you sent us your “family rules” for Scrabble, those idiosyncratic tweaks that make the game more [...]
read more »

West Word, Ho!
Posted September 26, 2009 .
west-word-ho
It’s a brand-new season of A Way with Words! Grant has big news, too: He’s used up his last Metrocard, packed up his belongings, and moved to the Left Coast. He reports on some features of California language there that are already catching his ear. Also in this episode, what’s the real meaning of decimate? [...]
read more »

I, For One, Welcome Our New Robot Overlords
Posted July 18, 2009 .
robot-overlords
Sure, there’s Grandma and Grampa, but there’s also Gammy, Bumpy, Dadoo, Gre-Gre, Kiki, Kerkel, Monga, Nee-Nee, Pots, Rah-Rah and Woo-Woo. Martha and Grant talk about the endlessly inventive names grandchildren call their grandparents. They also discuss Seinfeldisms, couch potatoes, and where in the world your car can and will be stopped by robots. Really!
read more »

Wordrows Quiz
Posted March 21, 2009 .
Quiz Guy Greg Pliska has a puzzle called “Wordrows,” a.k.a. “Welded Palindromes.” They’re two-word palindromes, in other words. For example, what two-word palindrome means “beige bug”? This is part of a complete episode.
read more »

Does it Hurt When Someone “Aks” You a Question?
Posted October 13, 2008 .
It's time again for a newsletter from A Way with Words, public radio's program about words, language, and how we use them. This past weekend we plundered the Australian National Dictionary, which is now available in full online, by sharing some Australianisms with the rest of the anglophone world. We also talked about the correct [...]
read more »

cheese curtain
Posted January 11, 2007 .
cheese curtain n.— «Wisconsin—Behind the Cheese Curtain.» —“Re: Longest Known Palindrome” by Joseph Betz Usenet: talk.bizarre Oct. 12, 1994. (source: Double-Tongued Dictionary)
read more »

(E1)(L1) http://www.waywordradio.org/tag-index/

palindromic


Erstellt: 2015-08

wordsmith.org
palindrome

(E1)(L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives.html


(E?)(L?) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/palindrome.html

palindrome


Erstellt: 2015-08

wordways.com
Palindromes and internal Palindromes

(E?)(L?) http://www.wordways.com/articles/web/ASURVEYOFAMERICANINDIANLOGOLOGY.pdf

...
PALINDROMES AND INTERNAL PALINDROMES
...


Erstellt: 2015-08

worldofnumbers.com
WORLD!OF NUMBERS
Mathematical Palindroms
Palindromic numbers

(E?)(L1) http://www.worldofnumbers.com/

In this well-filled website you'll find a variety of facts and figures about topics from the World!Of Numbers . Don't look for a logical order. It is an amalgamation of randomly gathered numbers, curios, puzzles, palindromes, primes, gems, your much valued contributions and more general information. For old time's sake my material, split up in manageable chuncks, is presented on a silver plate (of course I'm refering here to the background color!) just as the various menu's you are familiar with and which are always at your disposal further on. Enjoy!

Introducing Palindromes | Some Thematic Websources | Various palindromic number records | Palindromic Triangulars • The most beautiful Palindromic Triangular • Exhaustive List of Palindromic Triangulars • Subsets of Palindromic Triangulars • Details Part A from [1] to [49] • Details Part B from [50] to [99] • Details Part C from [100] to [149] | Palindromic Tetrahedrals • Details of Palindromic Tetrahedrals | Palindromic Squares • Exhaustive List of Palindromic Squares upto length 31 • List of Palindromic Squares from Length 32 • Subsets of Palindromic Squares • Details of Palindromic Squares • Extraordinary (Palindromic) Squares and Powers | Palindromic Cubes • Details of Palindromic Cubes Circular Primes | Palindromic Primes • Palprime page 1 • Palprime page 2 • Palprime page 3 • Palprime page 4 • Palprime page 5 • Assignment 2 • Assignment 3 • Palprimes where the sum over all digits is a minimum • Multiple Palprimes "Four in a row" • Smoothly Undulating Palindromic Primes - SUPP's • SUPP's - Sorted By Length • Palindromic Wing Primes - PWP's • PWP's - Sorted By Length • Plateau and Depression Primes - PDP's • PDP's - Sorted By Length > • Factorizations of 133...331 > • Factorizations of 311...113 • Palindromic Merlon Primes - PMP's • PMP's - Sorted By Length Home Primes : Repeated Factorisation of Concatenated Primefactors | Palindromic Pronic Numbers of Form n(n+1) | Palindromic Quasi Pronic Numbers of Form n(n+2) | Palindromic Quasi_Pronics n(n+X) : The Sequel | More Palindromic Products of Integer Sequences | Palindromic Products of Integers & their Reversals | Palindromic Pythagorean Triples | The Most Recent Nine Digits Page | The Fifth Nine Digits Page | The Fourth Nine Digits Page | The Third Nine Digits | Page The Second Nine Digits Page • John Abreu's Palindromic Puzzle | The First Nine Digits Page | Palindromic Products of Two Ninedigital Numbers | Palindromic Products of Two Pandigital Numbers | Palindromic Sums of Squared Consecutives • Powers of Consecutives Summing to Palindromes | Palindromic Sums of Cubed Consecutives | Palindromic Sums of Powers of Primes | Palindromic Quasi_Under_Squares of Form n+(n+1)^2 | Various Palindromic Sequences | Palindromic Pentagonals • Details of Palindromic Pentagonals | Palindromic Hexagonals • Details of Palindromic Hexagonals | Palindromic Heptagonals • Details of Palindromic Heptagonals | Palindromic Octagonals • Details of Palindromic Octagonals | Palindromic Nonagonals • Details of Palindromic Nonagonals | Palindromic Incremented Squares of Form n^2+1 | Palindromic Quasi_Over_Squares of Form n^2+(n+1) • Details of Palindromic Quasi_Over_Squares | Palindromic Quasi_Over_Squares of the form n^2+(n+x): The Sequel | Palindromic Numbers other than Base 10 | Palindromic Subsets of Concatenated Sequences | Multiple Precision JavaScript Calculator | Repunits Prime Factors | Prime Factors of the Normal Smarandache Concatenated Numbers | Prime Factors of the Reversed Smarandache Concatenated Numbers | List of the 4260 Left-Truncatable Primes | Squares containing at most three distinct digits | Finding Tridigital Squares using Quadratic Residues - Joe Crump | Numbers whose digits occur with same frequency + Classific. P2 • Classification P3 • Classification P4 • Classification P5 | Sets of three composites in SOPF pro- & retrogression | Sum of the first n 'type of numbers' is palindromic | Facts and figures about the palindromic year 2002 | Facts and figures about 2002 continued... | Some (not so recent) pictures | Varia : Iso Latin I Character Set Display | Varia : Color Names Display | Fill_In Form for Comments and Suggestions | What is new ? | Archives Whatsnew 2002 | Archives Whatsnew 2001 | Archives Whatsnew 2000 | The Prime Brier Brothers Project | List of palindromic products of two pandiagonals Border PRP's around 'Powers of ten' • Border PRP's from 0 to 4999 • Border PRP's from 5000 to 9999 • Border PRP's from 10000 to 14999 • Border PRP's from 15000 to 19999 • Border PRP's from 20000 to 34999 • Border PRP's from 35000 to 99999 Search for the first PRP megaprime of the form 10^999999 + y Output data of 10^999999 + y ( y < 500000 ) Doublechecking PRP candidates


(E?)(L?) http://www.worldofnumbers.com/intro.htm

Links to Webpages dealing with Palindromes


Erstellt: 2015-08

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youtube.com - Dan
A Palindromic Sketch from Dan & naD

(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwWI1aHpzy0
"If you played it backwards, it would be identical."


Following many requests, Dan and Dan are proud to present: "Dan Eating Cake - The Album" - 12 tracks of Dan eating various cakes, ranging from ginger, lemon drizzle, and right through to battenburg, all recorded in stunning sterephonic sound. Now available from iTunes! Fans of Susan Boyle might enjoy it too.


Erstellt: 2015-08

youtube.com - Tran
Palindromic Text about Translators

(E?)(L?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGYL5sUwr2Q

Translators Are a Waste of Space

Veröffentlicht am 01.09.2013

Reversible text. Written and performed by Erik Skuggevik for The Norwegian Association of Literary Translators.

Produced by Iver Grimstad


Erstellt: 2015-08

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